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Thunder Bay’s arts & culture alternative

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Collecting Pieces of our Past​

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Comic Culture p 9

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Sleepy G Farm Blacksmith p 13

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Lantern Festival p 26

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walleye the

Thunder Bay’s arts & culture alternative

Editor-in-chief Darren McChristie Editor Rebekah Skochinski Associate Editor Amy Jones Senior Editor Tiffany Jarva Copy Editors Amy Jones, Nancy Saunders Marketing & Sales Manager Logan Wright: ​sales@thewalleye.ca Photographers Chris Merkley, Darren McChristie, Bill Gross, Storm Carroll, Shannon Lepere, Dave Koski, Tara George, Amy Vervoort, Tyler Sklazeski Art Directors Steve Coghill, R.G.D., Dave Koski, R.G.D.: production@thewalleye.ca Business Manager Doug McChristie Ad Designer Jessica Gagnon​ The Walleye is a free monthly publication distributed on racks throughout Thunder Bay and region. Reproduction of any article, photograph or artwork without written permission is strictly forbidden. Views expressed herein are those of the author exclusively. Copyright © 2012 by Superior Outdoors Inc. All Rights Reserved. Editorial and Advertising: Submissions must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Superior Outdoors cannot be held responsible for unsolicited material. Superior Outdoors Inc. Suite 242, 1100 Memorial Avenue, Thunder Bay, Ontario P7B 4A3 Telephone (807) 624-1215 ; Fax (807) 623-5122 E-mail: info@superioroutdoors.ca Printed in Canada Superior Outdoors Inc donates 1% of all sales to 1% for the Planet

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www.TheWalleye.ca

The Good Old Days

M

y grandparents immigrated from Italy and the Ukraine to Canada for a better life and ultimately found it. But it wasn’t easy. They had to learn a new language, find work, and provide for their young families. Growing up, it was the best example I could have asked for, and it gave me some great stories of people who tilled the land, worked on ships and in mines, and sang opera. And they’re all true! I know that not everything about the days gone by were rosy—my Nonno (who just turned 93!) was a corporal in the war—but I’m still nostalgic about collecting the details. We’re all collectors of something. And it often starts as children. Maybe it’s a bucket of Lego, or stuffed animals lined up on the bed. I have always liked books and I had quite a large collection of Archie comics for a while, but mostly I just liked the idea of keeping everything. I wanted to keep the toy ironing board even though I never used it. I wanted to keep every marked homework assignment, and I really wanted to keep that too-small I Love Montreal T-shirt that my mom gave to my dad to use as a rag. I have since learned to grow a little less attached to things (it’s just not practical to keep everything). But nostalgia is a powerful thing. It makes people hang onto everything from hockey cards to bouncy balls. Here at The Walleye we were motivated to explore the art of collecting, and we’re honoured to share the stories of the people we found and the details of their collections with you. Thinking about collecting also got us thinking about old world trades and the professions dedicated to creating and restoring the things that connect us to the past. But that’s not all we’ve got. To woo your taste buds, Rachel Globensky goes retro with Mad Men-esque cocktail party recipes, and Michelle McChristie dives into the world of local chocolatier the Chocolate Cow. Gord Ellis shares his favourite holiday music classics, and Amy Jones talks to Margaret Phillips, owner of Northern Woman’s Bookstore, the last feminist bookstore in Canada. This time of year in general can be a bit nostalgic—digging out your favourite box of Christmas ornaments, or just finding that toque that your mom knit you. We hear a lot about how there is just too much stuff these days, but if everything we owned was well-made and had special meaning attached to it, maybe, just maybe, we would be satisfied with less.

On the Cover

For now we offer you an issue of The Walleye to read, printed on paper, just like the good old days. (Except thankfully, you don’t have to read it by candlelight!) ~RS

Photo by Darren McChristie

The Walleye

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Chris Merkley

Contents

FEATURES

6 CoverStory: The Making of an Avid Collector ■ 8 Collecting Bottles, Collecting History ■ 9 Comic Culture ■ 9 Hockey Town ■ 11 Locomotion ■ 11 Emmerson Street Press ■ 12 Raffaele’s Tailoring ■ 13 Sleepy G Farm and Blacksmith ■ 14 F&M Cabinets ■ 13 Watch Service ■ 16 Bernie’s Upholstery

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CITYSCENE

ARCHITECTURE

Service ■ 32 Laughter: The Best Medicine ■ 33 The Last of the Feminist Bookstores ■ 34 Local Books

HEALTH

Cinema Society ■ 23 Magnus Theatre Presents Completely Hollywood ■ 24 Cambrian Players’ Lend Me A Tenor

MUSIC

■ 47 The Christmas Bird Count ■ 48 Unwrap Wrapping ■ 49 Lars on Homes Heating

THE ARTS

Dowbak, Danny Johnson at The Foundry ■ 38 Wigginstock ■ 40 International Blues Challenge ■ 41 Flamenco Caravan ■ 41 James Sommerville and TBSO

FOOD

■ 17 What’s Old is New (Again)! ■ 18 The Chocolate Cow ■ 19 Cocktail Culture ■ 20 The Blue Door Bistro FILM&THEATRE

■ 22 Docs on Bay ■ 23 The Port Arthur Amateur

■ 26 Vintage Pixie Studio ■ 28 Marianne Brown ■ 29 Lantern Festival

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■ 44 CN Station ■ 30 Fashionably Responsible ■ 31 Hospice Northwest Memorial

■ 35 Big Love for Big Sugar ■ 35 Music4Food ■ 36 Favourite Christmas Music ■ 37 Kim Churchill ■ 37 Robin Ranger, Damon

35 Open Noon to 6 PM everyday & until 8 pm Thursdays from November 1st to December 24th. Located at 411 Markland Street which is one block south of the Oliver Rd/High St intersection & runs between High St & Winnipeg Ave. Look for the big yellow sign out front on the boulevard, you can’t miss it! Call 345-4341, like us on Facebook or visit us at www.beehappycandles.com. Celebrating our 10th year! Clip this coupon & save 10 % on regularly priced products.

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■ 46 The Art of Playing ■ 46 Healthy People, Healthy Cities

LIVING GREEN

with Wood ■ 49 Jamestown Pellet Stoves

■ 21 Drink of the Month ■ 42 Off the Wall Reviews ■ 50 December EVENTS ■ 52 The Wall ■ 53 The Eye ■ 54 ZYGOTE bop

38 CHANGES

consignment boutique Make a “change” today New and gently used clothing, footwear, jewelery, purses and accessories. Youth, ladies and men’s wear. We offer private shopping events. Call for details. (807) 285-0791 113 S. May St.


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December Dreams CLE Coliseum December 1–2

Shop local this Christmas while supporting the Lakehead Rotary Club and its commitment to local charities at December Dreams. Now in its fourth year, this premiere craft show showcases over sixty artists and artisans from Thunder Bay and around the region, including One-of-aKind Quilts, the Ahnisnabae Art Gallery, Beebe Custom Tools, Paro Presents, Sparks Pottery, Hamata Creations, Beadle Designs, and demonstrations by heritage artisans from Fort William Historical Park. December Dreams also features fine festive treats to enjoy at the fair or take home to share with your family. Admission is $2 at the door, with all proceeds going toward the Lakehead Rotary Club. decemberdreams.com

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Thunder Bay Community Auditorium December 21–22

For many, the holidays just wouldn’t be the same without The Nutcracker, the timeless story of young Clara and her Nutcracker Prince who comes to life after midnight on Christmas Eve and takes her on a magical journey through an exotic, enchanted dream world. This version, created by choreographer Allen Fields, is set in Manhattan in the early 1900s, and will be brought to life on the TBCA’s stage by the dancers of the Minnesota Ballet and 70 local dancers from Studio One Dance Studio.tbca.com

Sheepdogs Roxy’s/Tonic December 10

A hard-working rock band from small-town Saskatchewan, the Sheepdogs rocketed to worldwide fame in 2011 when they won a competition to appear on the cover of Rolling Stone magazine—the first unsigned act in history to do so. Since then, the Sheepdogs haven’t slowed down, spending the last year on the road with acts such as the Kings of Leon and John Fogerty, and hitting the studio with the Black Key’s Patrick Carney to produce their new self-titled album. The last time the Sheepdogs were in Thunder Bay, their show was one of the most talked-about of the year—if you missed them then, this is the perfect opportunity to see what all the buzz is about. thesheepdogs.com

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The Manhattan Nutcracker

5 The Road to Memphis Starts in TBay Fundraiser

Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 5 December 14

After winning the Thunder Bay International Blues Competition at the Apollo earlier this year, Tracy K & Blue Thunder will be making their way to Memphis, Tennessee in January to represent Northwestern Ontario in competition against other blues musicians from around the world for cash, prizes, and industry recognition. For a suggested donation of only $10, this fundraiser—which features dancing, draws, and of course, live music—will not only help send the band on their way, but will give you one last chance to say you saw them when. tracyk.ca

New Year’s Eve Family Frolic

Fort William Historical Park December 31

New Year’s Eve at FWHP is a long-standing Thunder Bay tradition, regardless of the weather. Bring your skates, sleds, and toboggans to play on their skating rink and sliding hill, or borrow a pair of snowshoes from the park. There will also be main stage entertainment, heritage games, and a bonfire to warm up those toes. For those who prefer to stay inside, there will be a variety of indoor activities, including children’s entertainment and crafts. The evening caps off with an exciting fireworks display at 10 pm—giving parents just enough time to bundle the little ones off to bed before settling in to celebrate the new year. fwhp.ca

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CoverStory

We like progress as much as anyone else. But we also have huge respect for history and the lessons that the past can teach us. It’s the unofficial job of collectors to preserve that past for us, and we’re excited to share their collections with you.

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CoverStory

“I

t’s not that I’m really a collector, it’s just that I don’t throw things away,” says Paul Mickleburgh, who is not a pack rat, but rather, an avid collector. Over the years, Mickleburgh has collected numerous items, including baseball cards, stamps, buttons, insulators, bottle caps, magazines, and bouncy balls. Mickleburgh was raised in a family of collectors. His parents’ formative years were during the Great Depression and he refers to his father as one of the “original recyclers” because he kept things so as to avoid being wasteful. One of his earliest memories is looking at his brother’s baseball cards depicting what are now the sport’s most legendary players. In grade school, he collected sports cards, Batman cards and marbles. Mickleburgh explains that “collecting was part of kid culture—kids traded cards and played marble games at recess.” Reflecting on his school days, Mickleburgh recalls the status that came with owning a rare card or a complete set, but says that his current reason for collecting, or rather keeping his collections, has more to do with sentimentalism and nostalgia. “I don’t want to throw things away that bring back memories...someone else might enjoy

Darren McChristie

them,” says Mickleburgh, adding “there’s always the hope they might be worth something, someday.” Spreading his button collection over a large table makes a colourful patchwork of shapes, sizes and messages, and Mickleburgh shares the story behind some of his favourites. From the depths of the bin, he pulls out a button from the Spanish Civil War that pays tribute to Canadians who fought as part of an international brigade in an effort to defeat the rebel Nationalists. The conflict had significant meaning to Mickleburgh’s parents—some of their friends had joined the brigade, and some never returned. When asked how he decides what to collect, Mickleburgh says that it has never been a conscious decision. “Sometimes it just doesn’t feel right to through some things away,” he says. These days Mickleburgh is busy sharing his love for collecting with his grandsons—he’s already passed on the bouncy ball collection.

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CoverStory

Collecting Bottles, Collecting History Tara George

By Pat Forrest

T

here are some who collect for the thrill of the hunt, while others are in it for the money. But for Thunder Bay’s Wayne Pettit, collecting bottles is a way to uncover our region’s history. “As strange as it may sound, if you think about it, objects such as soda pop and milk bottles can connect the collector to the past,” he says. Ample evidence of the strength of this connection can be found in Pettit’s two books: 2003’s Milk Bottles and Dairies of Thunder Bay and Area 19062003, co-written with fellow local bottle collector Dave Maclean, and The History of Soda Pop Manufacturers in Northwestern Ontario and the Bottles They Used, published in 2011. While the book on milk bottles is out of print, both are available at the local libraries.

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The more recent book is also available for purchase from the Thunder Bay Museum. Packed with stories and facts about the region’s past, the books also offer a rarity guide, information on other related collectibles, and lots of great photography, making them a good read for collectors and history buffs alike. Focusing almost completely on local bottles, Pettit has amassed a collection of some 500, along with a variety of memorabilia. Of all the pieces, the Kakabeka Beverages advertising clock that was in his father’s garage at one time is his favourite. The past president of the Thunder Bay Museum Historical Society and a former constable with the Thunder Bay Police Force, Pettit says that his interest in collecting has been life-long. “I started as a

child, collecting stamps and coins and it evolved from there,” he says. He is also a longtime member of the Sleeping Giant Bottle Club, a group of like-minded collectors who meet once a month. His advice to collectors is to zero in on what they are interested in, buy the best they can afford, and not to view the collection as something they are going to make a profit on. And how does he draw the line between collector and hoarder? “Do it for the love of collecting but don’t let your collection take over your life.” The Sleeping Giant Bottle Club meets on the second Wednesday of the month at Confederation College at 7 pm from September to May. People interested in collecting are welcome to come to the meetings.


CoverStory

CoverStory

B

ry Kotyk really likes the colour green. After all, it is the colour of the objects of his lifelong obsession, the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. “I was six when I bought my first comic book,” he says. “It involved an intergalactic wrestling match on a coliseum planet between the Turtles, their allies and enemies, and a swarm of alien bugs. It was bigger and weirder than anything I’d seen before and I fell in love with the medium instantly and have never looked back.” This led to the discovery of the original Mirage Studios comics (which are in black and white and much grittier), and to the world of independent comics.

Comic Culture Ahead of the Curve

In addition to having nearly every issue of the original TMNT run, he also has a sketch from their co-creator, Peter Laird, as well as the original toys, games and other random merchandise. Kotyk attends comic conventions and signings to expand his collection, though he remains true to the TMNT.

Although he collects, he doesn’t really consider himself a collector—at least not a purist, which would mean his comics should be sealed in plastic. Not Kotyk. His are in Rubbermaid bins and loose on shelves. “I’ve always cared about the stories and that is where their value is for me. I don’t worry about their condition. I think they are much more inviting to re-read and enjoy (this way).” Kotyk accepts the fact that he’s a bit of a geek. But, as he points out, everyone is a geek about something. “People invest a lot of time into their interests and passions. I never understood why comic culture seemed to have more of a social stigma about it, but it seems that everyone is into Batman and the Avengers now, so maybe the geeks were just ahead of the curve.” Kotyk has turned his childhood dream into a reality and has his own webcomic Welcome to Hereafter (welcometohereafter.com) that he has been working on for the past two years.

Chris Merkley

By Rebekah Skochinski

We thank you for your support this year 807-345-0501 901 Memorial Avenue www.homehardware.ca 9

The Walleye

The Walleye

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CoverStory

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Hockey Town

Collecting Memorabilia in Thunder Bay Story and Photos By Amy Jones

E

lving Josephson has a stick he wants to show me. It’s from the Thunder Bay Twins, a Senior A team formed from the merger of the Port Arthur Bearcats and the Fort William Beavers. At first the stick doesn’t seem particularly extraordinary, but when I look closer, I see them—the markings. “It’s autographed by the entire 1977-1978 team,” he says. “In pen, because that’s how they did it then.” Looking around Josephson’s basement, it becomes obvious he is a huge local hockey fan. There are buttons, bobbleheads, pucks, cards, sticks. A pair of gloves autographed by Ryan Johnson, a Team Canada jersey autographed by Marc Staal. Among the treasures he has on display is a puck autographed by Neil Purdon, who played for the Thunder Cats in the late 90s. “I actually got hit with that puck, and I got him to autograph it after,” Josephson says with a laugh. Josephson began collecting baseball cards in the early 90s before switching to hockey. He finds cards online, and bought from Collector’s Headquarters before it closed this past summer. Often, he says, he gets things through word of mouth. “People approach you and say they’ve got something. That’s how I got the stick.” He credits Diane Imrie and Kate Dwyer at the Northwestern Ontario Sports Hall of Fame for helping him when he first started collecting local memorabilia, and over the years he has donated pieces to their collection, and lent them others for various events. “Either you’re a collector or you’re not,” he says. “You talk to some people who don’t collect and they look at you like you’re a little bit off. I guess I just always have been a collector.” But for Josephson, it’s clear that it goes further than that— stemming from a deep love of both hockey and his city. “The history of hockey in Thunder Bay, in Fort William and Port Arthur, it’s just phenomenal,” he says. “In 1951, the first year they started mass-producing hockey cards, there was only 105 cards. And something like 13 of them were guys from Northwestern Ontario.” He places the stick carefully back in the corner. “It’s amazing,” he says, shaking his head. “Just amazing.”

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The Walleye

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CoverStory

Emmerson Street Press Between the Covers By Bonnie Schiedel

I

n the age of e-readers and mass market paperbacks, starting a publishing house that creates hand-bound, labour-intensive books is a bold move. “I fell into the book-making side of publishing. As I was starting the company, I wondered what we could do to set us apart,” says Vincent Ponka, founder of Emmerson Street Press. “Our books are beautiful, they’re not boring, and they are different from anything else in the country.”

Locomotion

A Store Filled with Memories Story and Photos By Amy Vervoort

He loves the energy he feels from antiques, an appreciation shared by many. His passion for collecting developed at a very young age, when he would visit the dump with his father. It was here where he discovered a fascination for things discarded—learning to recognise not just monetary value in found objects, but character and purpose. Collecting grew with him, and by the time he was 23 he had turned his hobby into a career. His hip east-end Toronto store was a portal to another era, uniting old treasures with new homes. For many years, Locomotion set the retro stage for major motion films set in and around Toronto, with a collection of unique rental items and a reputation for quality. After 17 years in Toronto, Caria brought his store home to Thunder Bay, and for the past 13 years Locomotion has brought retro to the Ruttan Block on Court Street. He has seen a lot of changes over the years in the waterfront district, but

never a more vibrant time than now. Locomotion’s style is well suited to Thunder Bay, where locals love global design and repurposed materials. The high standard of Art Deco design is what catches Caria’s eye, who goes out hunting during the summer, and has pickers who know his style who buy for him year round. Caria has kept busy over his thirty years of searching for and selling collectibles by a diverse clientele who return in search of one of a kind items, vintage jewellery, furniture, unusual gifts, and local memorabilia. The store is filled with all sorts of memories—even if they’re not yours you feel as if you know them well: kitchen appliances your mom used, jazz age microphones and telephones with rotary dials, lamps and fixtures that once faded out of fashion bright to light again. It’s early 20th century design popular in the decorative arts, with geometric shapes and curves in every corner of the store, glimpses of later decades everywhere. Everything feels so familiar.

Emmerson Street Press published four books in its first year, and two were long-listed for ReLit Awards, a literary prize that recognizes independent presses. Ponka is about to release a book of short stories by Atikokan author John Pringle, as well as a poetry collection by Toronto author Stan Rogal. Visit emmersonstreetpress.com for more information.

Locomotion is located at 18 South Court Street in Thunder Bay and online at golocomotion.com and on Facebook.

Amy Vervoort​

A

nthony Caria’s broadly eclectic style is unique, and his 20th century antique store, Locomotion, is a treasure house of wonderful things. His collection is personal but widely appealing, and is something he acknowledges humbly as what has made his business successful.

The books are printed locally at Print Pros Plus, on high-quality textured paper that Ponka says he fell in love with (when he discovered that the American papermaking company used carbon neutral practices, it sealed the deal). Then Ponka goes to work in his basement studio—yes, located on Emmerson. He uses a guillotine outfitted with a powerful blade to trim up to 400 pages at a time. Then he affixes the inner cover using a process called invisible binding, meaning that the staple used can’t be seen or felt. He measures the cover to fit, scores and folds it, and glues it to the book spine with rubber cement. The book goes into a press to dry, and then is trimmed a final time to produce clean edges. The work is done in stages, but he estimates each book takes 10 to 15 minutes in total to complete. A typical print run is 300 copies. “A book is beautiful when it feels lovely in your hands and the design is pleasing to read,” he says. “I like the dichotomy of publishing modern, avant-garde literature using a process that’s a bit of a throwback.”

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CoverStory

Raffaele’s Tailoring In Good Hands

Chris Merkley

By Rebekah Skochinski

C

lothing says a lot about us, whether we’re aware of it or not. What we wear is influenced by our region, by economics, and dictated by history and convention. Innovation has affected the craftsmanship of tailors: what was once done all by hand is now aided by sewing machines. What cannot be replaced, however, is an eye for fashion and fit. Raffaele Tassone has been paying close attention to clothing, making it his life occupation since being trained in Italy and moving to Thunder Bay in the 70s. He says what is required to be tailor is someone who has attention to detail, patience, and vision. “You need to be able to visualize the finished product, because often you have to take something apart and put it back together again,” he says. Nine years ago Tassone opened his own shop on Simpson Street, where they do everything

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from rebuilding, repairing, and “tackling anything to do with sewing.” As for the industry, he thinks the wheel is turning, and that people are getting tired of the trend toward inexpensive garments that fall apart or lose their shape, and are looking for a return to quality-made clothing. Tassone is passionate about his work and believes in the importance of what he does. “When your clothes fit you, you feel better, and you perform better, no matter what you are doing,” he says. If you go into the shop more than once, Tassone will greet you by name, and he stands by the motto that is posted on the wall that reads, “It is easier to do a job right than to explain why you didn’t.” Which gives you faith that the more things change, the more they remain the same. Raffaele’s Tailoring, 638 Simpson Street, 476-0669


CoverStory

Sleepy G Farm Blacksmith Heat and Bang

Story and Photos By Rebekah Skochinski

B

lacksmithing is noisy, smelly, and dirty—and totally exciting. Brendan Grant of Sleepy G Farm came to the trade purely by necessity. As a mixed farmer in Pass Lake, he needed to built a yoke for his oxen. “You just can’t buy these things at Canadian Tire,” he says, both of the wooden beam he built and the rings and pins. The basic setup requirements for blacksmithing are a forge, a blower, an anvil, and a hammer, but there are a myriad of other specialty tools and when Grant needs one he makes it himself. The same goes for the apron he wears—it’s the tanned hide of a deer he shot on his property, the entry and exit bullet holes visible on either side of his hips. He also makes other household items, such as hooks, handles, hinges, and toilet paper rolls. “The big difference between traditional blacksmithing and now is that it’s not actually the same kind of metal,” Grant

explains. “Wrought iron is the traditional metal, more like a fibre, really malleable at lower heat, easy to bend, super low carbon, not strong. And it doesn’t rust.” Today, however, wrought iron is all but unavailable so the closest thing is mild steel. “It’s not quite as soft and it cools quickly, so it requires a lot of reheating and must be heated to a higher temperature in order to be able to shape it,” he says. Blacksmith shops are supposed to be like a dungeon—dark, so that the blacksmith can see the colours of the metal change (there is a colour scale from blood red to straw). But Grant keeps the doors open for air flow, working quickly to stamp, twist, and punch the metal, then dousing it in oil pitch, which prevents rusting and gives the finished product that characteristic black colour. Grant says the process “is really just a lot of heat and bang. Pretty simple, really, and kind of fun.” Sleepy G Farm, Pass Lake, ON, 977-1631

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CoverStory

Northern Ontario’s Premier Entertainment Park

Chris Merkley

F&M Cabinets Hands On

By Rebekah Skochinski

Y

ou have to get used to being covered in dust if you’re a cabinetmaker. And you have to be good with your hands. Both of these things hold true for the owners of F&M Cabinets, Frank Armiento and brothers Gabe and Lorenzo Ferrazzo. It’s a small operation that has changed its name and ownership since opening in the late 1950s, but there has been one connection that remains to this day: Gabe and Lorenzo’s late father, Gino, who taught them everything he knew. “I sort of got into the business ass backwards. I was working at Andrew Coffey selling clothes when an opening came up at the shop,” says Gabe. That was forty years ago. Gino trained both his sons and Armiento as installers and cabinetmakers. Gabe is the cutting specialist, Lorenzo is the finishing specialist and assembles cabinets, and Armiento is mainly involved in installation work.

Gabe says the industry has changed dramatically because of technology (the biggest innovation being a router instead of a block plane), but they continue to work within their niche. “Some materials, like doors for example, are nearly impossible for us to make anymore and be competitive. So we source that, as does everyone else. What you will find here are custom designers and fabricators who build the boxes and apply the finishing details.” They do a lot of kitchen cabinetry, but the majority of their work is for people who just don’t want to go the cookie cutter route. For example, they recently completed work on a judges dias for the courthouse, and are currently putting the finishing touches on an LU Thunderwolves skybox for the Fort William Gardens. It’s all hands-on at F&M, and while they have a few machines, it’s still fairly low-tech. And that seems to work just fine in a world where we keep pushing the high-tech envelope. Some things still need that human touch. F&M Cabinets, 615 Norah Crescent, 623-2147

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/fortwilliamhistoricalpark @FWHPTweets

School and Public Programs Overnight Programs FALL 2012 For Details Call Private Parties 807.473.2344 Rentals Paid for by the Government of Ontario


CoverStory

Watch Service

Keeping Watch Over Time Story and Photos By Tara George

I

magine being tasked with time—keeping time, inspecting time, and fixing the apparatus that provide us with time. Watchmaking is the trade that Risto Koivukoski has devoted himself to, and his enthusiasm for all things time-related suggests that his career has been successful in every regard. Koivukoski and his wife Reija own Watch Service, a family business that has been operating in Thunder Bay for over 40 years. The couple purchased the business in 1986 from Reija’s father, who was originally a watchmaker in Finland. In the early days of Watch Service, the watchmaker not only maintained and

repaired watches and clocks, but he also served as an authorized Watch Inspector for the Canadian Pacific Railway Company. Watch Inspectors were responsible for inspecting the pocket watches of railroad employees to ensure accurate time was kept so that trains stayed on schedule. Advancements in time keeping saw the demise of Watch Inspectors in the early 1980s; however, the craft of horology has not been completely lost in this electronic age. It’s true that much of the Koivukoskis’s business today consists of battery and circuit changes, but the traditional skills of a watchmaker are still in demand. Many people possess heirloom pieces that

carry monetary and/or sentimental value, and these require maintenance. In addition, Koivukoski explains that high-end watch manufacturers are trending back towards mechanical watches. The future of watchmaking in Thunder Bay hangs in the balance, however—Watch Service is the last of its kind. Qualified watchmakers are sparse in Canada, especially with the pending threat of our last watchmaking school (in Trois-Rivières) closing. Can this meticulous craft stand the test of time in Thunder Bay? Only time will tell. Watch Service, 59 N Court Street, 345-1964

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CoverStory

Chris Merkley

807-345-4686 182 South Algoma St. Thunder Bay, ON P7B 3B9 www.fireweedcrafts.ca

Bernie’s Upholstery

December Hours:

Upholding Tradition By Rebekah Skochinski

I

t’s a modern notion that upholstery involves just furniture. The history of the trade is rooted in the working class, says Brigitta D’Angelo, co-owner of Bernie’s Upholstery. Her father, Bernard Bogensberger, learned the trade from her grandfather in Austria, where there was a guild that promoted standards of workmanship. They ensured that members learned everything from building to re-stuffing to preparing a cost analysis. Back then, the majority of work was in making tractor seats and mattresses, and they used horse hair and sheep’s wool for stuffing. Bernie’s has been around since the mid 80s. D’Angelo and her brother Werner took it over from their father when he retired. Werner was fortunate to learn the trade from him but as D’Angelo says, “it’s a dying art”—one that, as of seven years ago, no longer carries a viable certification in Canada. And with many people retiring, it puts the future of this trade in jeopardy. Another problem is finding people who are up to the challenge of

apprenticing. “You need to be good with your hands, yes, but you also need to take pride in your work,” says D’Angelo. “It involves matching up lines, putting the seams correctly. No piece is the same.” It seems like things are still done the old fashioned way at Bernie’s. I watch as Werner works in the shop, removing tacks on a piece of furniture in an outdated shade of green. They take every piece down to the frame, correct the joinery, replace spring clips, and take a good look at the piece to rebuild it before putting it back together. It seems popular to refurbish antiques and sentimental items but without people getting the experience, it’s hard to predict the future of upholstery. For now, D’Angelo and her brother keep busy, often with repeat business—they are seeing people who came in twenty years ago returning. We can only hope that in twenty years from now, they will be able to say the same thing. Bernie’s Upholstery, 389 Oliver Road, 345-5546

Monday to Friday 10am to 8pm Saturday 10am to 5:30pm Sunday 12pm to 4pm

AUTHORIZED BRADFORD EXCHANGE DEALER No shipping and handling charges if purchased and picked up at

Victoria’s Cupboard 115 N. May St. Thunder Bay, ON (807) 622-7821

Order soon for the best selection!

You always remember your first time.

OPENING THIS DECEMBER Prince Arthur’s Landing, Marina Park 807-62-BIGHT www.bightrestaurant.ca

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Food

What’s Old is New (Again)! By Jeannie Dubois, Certified Sommelier

A

s with everything else in the wide world, trends in cocktail are cyclical and every now and then history repeats itself by bringing golden oldies back into the spotlight. Currently trending are prohibition-era concoctions that feature the great American spirit bourbon, mixed with fresh new ingredients from inhouse syrups to traditional European aperitifs.

shape of Marie Antoinette’s breast (Ooh la la!).

Bourbon: the rich, warm, Kentucky-born whiskey, which by law has to be distilled from at least 51% corn, giving it an inherent sweetness, and aged for a minimum of two years in charred American oak barrels, adding a natural amber caramelization to the spirit. All the attention being lavished on bourbon has brought about a revival in its production, and there are a plethora of finely crafted, small production styles of this spirit available on the market. But perhaps my favourite part of this 1930s nostalgia is the service of these spirited bourbon drinks, which are poured up quite frequently in a champagne coupe—a saucy glass that was purportedly designed after the

Mix 4 1/4 cups of 100-proof bourbon, 2 1/2 cups Campari, 1 2/3 cups red vermouth and 1 pound of 100% natural hardwood lump charcoal (no chemicals or accelerants please; broken into 1” pieces) in a large jar. Cover and let stand in a cool, dark place for 10 days. Strain through a coffee filter into another large jar or pitcher; repeat until mixture is sediment free. Return to jar. Cover.

To try this trend at home at your next swinging soirée, go all out and serve the show-stopping Lincoln County in coupes from Marvel Bar, the super-hot speakeasy-style bar in Minneapolis. The charcoal adds just a mellow smokiness to the cocktail but surprisingly doesn’t affect the rich red robe of the drink.

When serving, fill a large glass with ice cubes and add 1/4 of the strained cocktail mixture. Stir until outside of glass is very cold. Strain into a coupe glass. Cheers!

Tuesdays: Cocktail and Martini Nights PREMIUM COCKTAILS AND MARTINIS $5.25 COCKTAILS $4.50 SHOTS $4.00

Wednesdays: Draught Night ALL DRAUGHT BEER $4.50

242 RED RIVER ROAD 807-285-3188 MONDAYS & TUESDAYS 4 PM - 2 AM WEDNESDAYS 11 AM - 2 AM THURSDAYS TO SATURDAYS 4 PM - 2 AM

Thursdays: Bottles

ALL BOTTLES IN OUR FRIDGE $4.50 SHOTS $4.00

Fridays: Heineken & Corona

BOTTLES OF HEINEKEN AND CORONA $4.50

Saturdays: Dinner Special

BOTTLE OF WINE AND MEAL PAIRING

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Food

The Chocolate Cow

Delectable, Local and Handmade By Michelle McChristie

N

estled in the Slate River Valley is a chocolate lover’s dream come true. The Chocolate Cow is a home-based company owned and operated by Doug and Jane Stanton—a dynamic and efficient duo. At the time of my visit, the Stantons are in the midst of a chocolate-making marathon in preparation for the holiday season, and their store is well stocked with an impressive assortment of lollies, s’more bars, fudge, candy cane bark, chocolate-dipped marshmallows, sponge toffee, and licorice. The Stantons are entrepreneurs who originally came to Thunder Bay in 2002 to start Stanton Cruise Lines, which offered tours of the harbour on an 80-passenger boat. Two years later, they purchased a business called Take the Cake—a yearround cake business that also provided a commercial kitchen for preparing food for dinner cruises. “Cakes were not my passion,” says Jane. “I was more excited about making chocolate.” In 2007, the Stantons moved their business to their country home and decided to focus on chocolate. Since then, the Chocolate Cow has grown from producing 1,000 to over 8,000 pounds of chocolate a year. A few key pieces of equipment have helped the Stantons keep up with the ever-growing demand for their confections: a cooker/mixer, which is used primarily to make caramel and fudge; a tempering melter, which is used to melt and temper

chocolate; and a chocolate cooling cabinet, which provides a climate-controlled environment to cool and set chocolates. While Jane works on a batch of chocolate lollies, Doug gives me a short-course in chocolate-making, and puts theory into practice by making a small batch of Joes— a scrumptious combination of caramel, roasted chick peas, and milk chocolate. Joes are the Stanton’s signature product and the chick peas, which will soon be locally-produced, provide a tasty nut-free crunch. In speaking with the Stantons and sampling their products, it becomes clear they are perfectionists. They use various types of chocolate to create their product line—for example, confectioner’s chocolate is used for lollies, while milk and dark chocolate is used to make truffles, and single-source chocolate is used to make chocolate bars. They do extensive research on their suppliers to ensure the chocolate is high-quality and all ingredients are completely nut-free. Although the Stantons have made efficient use of what used to be a two-car garage, their business has outgrown its space. In the future they plan to move to a larger location that includes a storefront, where Doug hopes “customers can have the chocolate factory experience.” Their retirement plans go handin-hand with the growth of their business—a sign they have both found a passion they enjoy sharing, not only with their customers, but also each other.

Darren McChristie

The Chocolate Cow is located at 261 McCluskey Drive. They also sell their confections at the Country Market and various retail locations in Thunder Bay. Visit stantonschocolatecow.com for more information.

Holiday Hours from November 8, to December 22 807-622-9627 132 Cumming Street Thunder Bay, ON

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1. The foundation of the Joe is a one-inch square of soft caramel; Doug presses a handful of roasted chick peas into the caramel.

2. Doug drizzles a “bottom coat” of tempered milk chocolate over the caramel/chick pea combination, spreads the chocolate, and then places the Joes in the cooling cabinet.

Begin a new family tradition with our Christmas Tree Excursions!

Tues – Sat 11am-5pm visit our blog for more info vintagepixiestudio.blogspot.com www.vintagepixiestudio.com

3. Doug removes the Joes from the cooling cabinet, drizzles in tempered milk chocolate, and then spreads the chocolate with a fork.

www.borealjourneys.com


Food

Cocktail Culture

By Rachel Globensky, Chef/ Owner of Grinning Belly

33 Cumberland Street South

344-4636 www.paintedturtleart.com

I

Basil Deviled Eggs Makes 24 eggy bites 12 hard-boiled eggs 1 ½ cup roughly chopped fresh basil leaves ¾ cup mayonnaise Salt and pepper, to taste

n keeping with the bygone-era vibe of this issue, I searched online and through my cookbooks for menus and recipes popular in different decades in the Western world, hoping to be inspired. I was met by various versions of everything-less cakes made from wartime rations, Technicolor pictures of June Cleaver-esque housewives sculpting perfect meringue points in their Seven-Minute Frosting, and atomic colour palettes made possible by 60s and 70s-era convenience foods. I found so many possibilities for boiled raisins, tuna noodle and green bean casseroles, that I immediately became restless and uninspired. Kaput. But then, I turned on the new-to-me obsession that is Mad Men. I know I’m a few seasons behind, but I’m catching up! The boardroomto-bedroom dramascape where Don, Peggy, and their sophisticated posse exist is pure magic. When did drinking an expensive scotch in the morning fall out of favour with business society? I love the retro fashions, the questionable parenting (anyone see the drycleaner bag episode?), the nod to tumultuous current events, and especially the glamour of Madison Avenue in the 60s—the AMC show makes it effortless. By the 1960s in America, war rations were a distant memory, and many of the sparkling new convenience foods of the 1950s had lost their lustre. Cocktail parties with emphasis on single malts, with some classy hors d’oeurves thrown in, were as important to an executive’s upward mobility as his actual performance on the job. Here are a couple of elegant appetizers, modernized a little, that would make Betty (Draper) Francis proud.

Peel hard-boiled eggs and cut them lengthwise. Carefully remove yolks and place in a bowl. Set whites aside and mash yolks with a fork. Add basil and mayo to the bowl of a food processor—blend about 2 minutes, or until relatively smooth. Season with salt and pepper. Fill reserved egg white halves with filling, using a spoon (or a piping bag if you’re feeling fancy). Place on your finest dimpled plate and serve!

Caramelized Onion Dip Makes 2 cups – you’ll never want the dried onion soup version again! 2 Tablespoons butter 2 cups finely diced onion 2 teaspoons finely chopped sage leaves ¼ cup white wine ½ cup mayonnaise 1 cup sour cream Seasoning salt and pepper, to taste Potato, pita, or bagel chips, for serving

Melt the butter in a heavy-bottomed saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onions and sage. Stirring often with a wooden spoon, cook until onions are a deep golden colour. Pour in wine, scraping all of the brown bits from the pan bottom. Cook until the wine has reduced and pan is almost dry. Let cool. Mix with mayo, sour cream and seasonings. Chill overnight for best taste, and serve with chips.

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Food

The Blue Door Bistro

Story and Photos By Susan Hagens

T

hunder Bay mourns the loss of the Good News Café, which has been a regular staple in the lunch scene for many years. But with the retirement of one dream comes the reality of another. Hollie and Craig Napper, owners of the new Blue Door Bistro, wanted to create a little nook where they could take food away from being generic and back to a time when there was pride in creating a good dish. With a family to raise and the expertise of having a marriage of one chef and one baker, both with many years of experience, they decided to return home. Hollie Napper has travelled extensively, and has taken this influence and transferred it into the décor of the restaurant. On the walls you will find Hollie’s pictures she has taken from her travels. The menu consists of an all-day breakfast, but their busy time is lunch. The High Tea for Two found on their menu includes shaved deli meat, cheeses, and breads. Thunder Bay’s own Five Star Bakery provides them with their fresh bread, and the onion and dill baguette used for the grilled garlic lime chicken sandwich is the perfect pairing for a tasty lunch. Something that the public has been raving about on

Northern Lights Gallery Linda L. Brown ~ SILVERSMITH

Marianne Brown ~ GOLDSMITH

CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 2012 12 NOON TO 7PM & SATURDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2012 10 AM TO 3PM New Work, Warm Welcomes and Refreshments

Lorna Anderson ~ FALLEN FORGE

Alex Chri stian ~ SILVER JEWELLERY

Patri ck Doyle ~ PAINTINGS

P: 345-5446

20

316 Bay Street Thunder Bay, ON www.northernlightsgallery.ca

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their Facebook page is the double-smoked pepper candied bacon, which they make on site. This is used in a variety of their lunch items, and is definitely on my list of things to try the next time I visit. The Blue Door Bistro is located on 116 Syndicate Avenue South, and is open Monday to Friday from 8:00 am–3:30 pm.


Food

Drink of the Month

Candy Cane Tea - Steeper’s The Tea People By Rebekah Skochinski relaxation. Not to mention your dentist will be happy you chose your candy cane in a cup rather than in a wrapper. Think of it as a little holiday bonus. Candy Cane not your cup of tea? Steeper’s has over 120 blends to choose from and brings in many other goodies to enjoy especially at this time of year. You can find them at 122 May Street North.

Chris Merkley

With the busy season squeezing in around us, it would seem that rather than fight it, we should just embrace it. Especially its tastier offerings, like Candy Cane Tea. This premium loose leaf black tea originates from Sri Lanka and is flavoured with the minty fresh sweetness of, you guessed it, candy canes. It’s extremely fragrant with a smooth finish, and goes down really nicely with a freshly baked scone. There are many purported health benefits to drinking black tea, but who needs to know anything more than how good it feels to stop and savour a mug of this warming elixir? It’s instant

The City of Thunder Bay’s bike lanes are closed from Nov. 15 to April 30. Please remember:

Bike Lanes are now

Closed

• • • •

Bike lanes not maintained during winter months Cyclists may still ride in bike lanes Motorists should not drive in bike lanes Parking restrictions now lifted in some locations (check posted signs) • Bike lanes re-open May 1, 2013

For more information, please visit: thunderbay.ca/activetransportation

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FilmTheatre

Docs on Bay

The Finest Films for the People By Betty Carpick

“It is our duty as responsible citizens to find out the provenance and quality of what we buy and it is our right to be suitably informed.” - When You Shop, Use Your Head, a publication by Slow Food’s 4 Cities4Dev project co-funded by the European Union. Swedish filmmaker Fredrik Gerrten’s film Bananas! is about Nicaraguan banana workers’ allegations that the Dole Food Company’s use of a banned pesticides made them infertile. In 2009, the film was selected for the Los Angeles Film Festival. Almost immediately, the highly anticipated documentary was removed from competition. Dole was suing the filmmakers. Big Boys Gone Bananas! is what results when filmmakers document what happens as it is happening. The film’s 90 minutes are far more complex than the titles of these two Gerrten films might lead you to believe. This is a thoughtful documentary about documentary practice. For the November 8 Docs on Bay screening, Canadian film producer and director Bart Simpson was in town. Simpson’s works include both Bananas

films, The Corporation, A Place Called Chiapas and Juicy Danger Meets Burning Man. He is also the founder of the Independent Film Legal Defense Fund. Docs on Bay also screened SCI Lunchroom by Thunder Bay’s Kelly Saxberg. An informal question and answer period followed the screenings. Bananas! is available on Netflix; Big Boys Gone Bananas! isn’t. It’s not every day that Bart Simpson comes to town. The Bay Street Film Festival’s presentations are opportunities to watch films, meet filmmakers and have conversations. Seven bucks or pay what you can. Docs on Bay has monthly screenings at 314 Bay St. Upcoming films include The Carbon Rush by director Amy Miller on December 6 at 8 pm. Watch for John Walker’s A Drummer’s Dream in January and Sarah Polley’s Stories We Tell in February. Visit baystreetfilmfestival.ca for more information.

Gifts for Friends & Family And for the Planet!

Local Foods Gift Baskets Just $45 for a delectable selection of specialties both savoury and sweet made right here in Thunder Bay. Order early for pickup starting in December.

Come check out where Santa does his Christmas shopping

Eco-Friendly Gift Wrap Service Watch for us at your favourite retailers in December offering amazing wrapping ideas with all-natural, re-used or re-purposed materials. It’s the UnWrap Christmas campaign, a project funded by the City of Thunder Bay. Watch our website or Facebook for details! Christmas Open House: Tues. Dec 11 noon – 7 pm

More than a store... A lifestyle.

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244 Pearl St, Thunder Bay, ON P: 807-684-9555

Visit us on-line or at the office for details on upcoming events. Proceeds from all of the gift ideas here will support community Sign up for our on-line E-news so you’ll be the first to know! environmental programs in the Lake Superior Basin.

ecosuperior.org | 807 624 2140


FilmTheatre

The Port Arthur Amateur Cinema Society

Breaking Film Ground in the 1920s and 30s By Tiffany Jarva

F

ounded in 1929, the Port Arthur Amateur Cinema Society—the first amateur cinema society in Canada—made three back-to-back feature-length films in less than two years. Interesting to note, Dorothea Mitchell was involved in writing and producing all three of the films, making her Canada’s first independent female filmmaker. Local producer and filmmaker Ron Harpelle (Under the Red Star, Northern Grown) explains the importance of these early film years shaping today’s filmmaking climate. “The Port Arthur Amateur Cinema Society’s decision, back in the late 1920s, to make films in our region that reflect our community and its values lives with us today in Thunder Bay, where there exists a thriving independent film culture and a number of filmmakers who are doing it their way,” he says.

A Race for Ties May 1929 A Race for Ties was Canada’s first full-length amateur movie and premiered at the Lyceum Theatre in Port Arthur. The script was loosely based on Mitchell’s own experience as a sawmill operator dealing with a crooked lumber deal. (Also very cool to note, Dorothea Mitchell, aka Lady Lumberjack, was the first single woman in Ontario to be granted a homestead.)

SleepInn Beauty July 1929

The Fatal Flower May 1930

Not as long as A Race for Ties, SleepInn Beauty is a comedy about a beauty contest, based on a story adapted by Dorothea Mitchell. It was filmed in two days at Mitchell’s camp on Surprise Lake, north of Port Arthur.

The third script penned by Dorothea Mitchell was The Fatal Flower—a romantic bank heist film set in Northwestern Ontario.

Intrigued by local film history? Check out local author Michel Beaulieu’s new book Celloid Dreams, Early Film at the Lakehead, available at bookstores across the region. Also, check out ladylumberjack.ca to find out more about the Port Arthur Amateur Cinema Society, and details about filmmaker Dorothea Mitchell’s remarkable life.

Rehearsal photo, from l to r: Jerry Getty, Ari Weinberg, Chris Cound.

The Silver Screen Takes the Stage Magnus Theatre Presents Completely Hollywood (Abridged) By Kyle Poluyko

M

agnus Theatre’s third offering of the 2012–2013 season, Completely Hollywood (Abridged), promises to be a wild and witty journey through our shared celluloid history. The three-man cast, featuring Chris Cound, Jerry Getty, and Ari Weinberg, takes audiences on a breakneck tour of Tinseltown rules and redundancies, while sending up over 180 iconic Hollywood motion pictures in just under two hours. “It’s a play that draws people who might not typically come to the theatre,” says Getty. “Movies are a dominant cultural force, and this show has great appeal.” Completely Hollywood (Abridged) is “off-the-wall entertainment anchored by three great actors,” shares director Mario Crudo. “It’s so silly and it is so fun.” It is unlikely audiences will see 3-D wizardry or sweeping crane shots of Thor wielding his almighty hammer—more likely, the actors will be armed with extensive props such as flashlights and water bottles and engaging in what Cound describes as over the top physical comedy. Magnus is sure to employ deliciously low-tech methods similar to those enjoyed in last season’s delightful The 39 Steps to replicate expensive Hollywood special effects. Completely Hollywood (Abridged) opens at Magnus Theatre November 23 and runs through December 8. Call 345-5552 or book online at magnus.on.ca. The Walleye

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2012-12_ad_print_Layout 1 11/15/2012 1:53 PM Page 1

FilmTheatre

Cambrian Players’ Lend Me A Tenor Big Buzz for Big Laughs By Amy Jones

W

hen we arrived at quarter to eight for the Wednesday night show of Cambrian Players’ Lend Me A Tenor, most of the seats in the Paramount Theatre were already full—a good sign indeed for a play entering its second week of production. Certainly Lend Me A Tenor has been getting some great buzz around the city, and for good reason. With a script that favours big, physical comedy, and director Lawrence Badanai’s high-energy, fast-paced directing style, it’s the kind of show that keeps audiences talking long after the curtain rises (or, in this case, after the cast has completed a hilarious re-enactment of the entire play in thirty seconds as part of their curtain call). The show’s set design is perfectly rendered Art Deco, and the gorgeous prohibition-era costumes lend an air of authenticity to the 1930s dialogue, but the real function of the mise en scène is to

provide another layer of comedy—dresses come off and get put back on, doors close and open, phones ring and are answered by the wrong people, notes are left and attributed to the wrong author. Though all the constant entrances and exits and costume changes and mistaken identities in this screwball farce can be dizzying for the audience, they are likely even more so for the actors, who handle them with aplomb. Standout performances include Rory Ryan as Tito, Felicia Seyfert as Maria, and Tracey Tebbenham in her acting debut as Diana, as well as a few short but show-stealing appearances by Colin Stewart as The Bellhop. If you missed Lend Me A Tenor, make sure to keep an eye out for the next Cambrian Players production, so you can see for yourself what everyone is talking about. For information on upcoming shows, visit cambrianplayers.ca.

After the holidays,

between December 26 and January 10, bring your tree to one of the many Christmas tree collection sites. Look for the Christmas Tree Drop-Off Site sign.

2012 – 2013 Christmas Tree Collection Locations NORTH LOCATIONS Brent Park (Balsam At Margaret) County Park Tennis Courts

(County Blvd)

Grandview Arena (Madeline St) in between Grandview Arena & Westminster United Church–not in the arena parking lot John Jumbo Recreation Centre

(Toivo St)

Strathcona Golf Course

SOUTH LOCATIONS Delaney Arena (Legion Track Dr) Kinsmen Northwood Centre

(609 N. James St)

Lakehead Labour Centre

(Fort William Rd)

Westfort Playing Field

(Off Neebing Ave)

West Thunder Community Centre

The chipped trees are added to the compost pile at the City’s landfill site. In the spring, when the compost is mature, it is provided to residents free of charge to enrich flower gardens and lawns across Thunder Bay.

(Edward St)

Remove all ornaments and remove plastic tree wrap before dropping your tree off at the collection site. Do not put trees out for curbside garbage collection.

www.thunderbay.ca

FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 625-2195

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GMC TERRAIN ECOTEC engine achieving 46 MPG Built in Canada with pride Consumers Digest Pick by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety OnStar® Automatic Crash Response Starting from $170* 2.99% Finance example based on stock#21124. Total price 27603 @ 2.99% over 84 months bi-weekly = 170.00 Total interest 3033.84. Total obligation over the term 30728.04. HST and license extra. OAC.

882 Copper Crescent, phone (807) 343-2277 • Toll Free 1-800-465-3899 • www.dominionmotors.com

Calling all Kids! Send us your ideas and win free stuff by recycling. Entries must be received by Dec. 19, 2012.

NamE

PhoNE NumbEr

Save on a

One Month Membership

Only $49

Makes a great stocking stuffer!

Tell us how you and your family will make the holiday season a little ‘greener’ by reducing waste at your house. There is so much waste at this time of year. how can we reduce our impact on our environment? Mail or eMail your entry to:

gamescomplex.com

(807) 684-3311

City of Thunder bay, roads Division Waste Diversion and recycling Po box 800, Thunder bay, oN P7C 5K4 attention: Jason Sherband Email: jsherband@thunderbay.ca, Fax: 625-3588

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theArts Food

Lantern Festival Spark in the Park

Zoe Gordon

By Rebekah Skochinski

T

he Baggage Building Arts Centre continues to bring new and exciting offerings to the community, and the celebration of the winter solstice on December 21 is no exception. Artist and organizer Zoe Gordon says they are drawing on ways that light and fire have played a role in winter solstice festivities around the world. Lantern festivals in particular are growing increasingly popular across Canada. “We felt that in Thunder Bay with our long, isolated winters, we’re in the perfect location to have a festival to honour the light in the dark. We also wanted to include lantern building as a way to introduce a creative element to the evening.” People are invited to come and make a lantern to carry in the parade, but there will also be a skating party, storytelling, and live music with the Kam Valley Fiddlers and the Knackers. Gordon came up with the name of the festival, adding “I wanted to sparkle up the park a little bit.” The Lantern Festival runs from 5 pm–10 pm at Prince Arthur’s Landing, and is free and open to everyone regardless of creative ability and belief. You can also take one of the lantern building workshops being offered at The Baggage Building Arts Centre leading up to the festival (contact 684-2063).

One BOX OF TISSUe CAn Be MADe FROM 2 ReCYCLeD MILK CARTOnS Recycling saves valuable natural resources, energy, time, and money

One CAn MAKe A DIFFeRenCe. www.thunderbay.ca/recycle

InFRASTRUCTURe & OPeRATIOnS 625-2195

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Where Thunder Bay’s Active People Come to Shop. 311 Victoria Ave. E. Thunder Bay, ON | 807-623-9393

Fresh Air_Walleye_DEc.indd 1

RECYCLING JUST ONE NEWSPAPER CAN PRODUCE ONE NEW CEREAL BOX Recycling saves valuable natural resources, energy, time, and money

12-11-16 12:36 PM

Buy one pair of Birkenstocks and get the second at 25% off.

ONE CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE. www.thunderbay.ca/recycle

• INFRASTRUCTURE & OPERATIONS 625-2195

Free gift

Offter valid for December 1st - December 31st

with any jewellery purchase of $75 or more

179 S. Algoma St. (Bay & Algoma Shopping District) 622-2330 www.globalexperience.ca The Walleye

27


theArts

Marianne Brown

Ancient Art Form, Modern Aesthetic By Bonnie Schiedel

Survive the Holiday! The SAVE committee wants to remind you to stay safe over this holiday season. Be sure you: - Beware of thin ice. - Don’t drink & ride. - Slow down.

Marianne Brown

TBDHU.COM

M

arianne Brown’s jewelry is beautiful: sinuous curves of gold and silver; incredibly delicate floral designs; baroque pearls; slender silk cords. So it’s a little disconcerting to discover that creating it involves tough tools. “Most jewelry is cast, which means the liquid metal is poured into a mold,” explains Brown, a goldsmith. “Instead, I cut all the pieces by hand. There is lots of hammering, lots of filing. It’s definitely physically demanding.” Brown, whose career spans 30 years, is particularly proud of the floral imprinting technique she developed and refined. The process is labour-intensive: first, she takes a plate of pure silver and saws it into pieces by hand, and files it into a pleasingly organic shape. Then she heats and cools each piece, selects a dried flower or leaf she has previously gathered and preserved, and places it on the metal. Each metal piece is then fed through steel rollers, which press an imprint of the leaves or petals— which include wild geranium leaves, cherry blossoms, meadow rue and hydrangea—onto the metal. Finally, each piece is placed on a dish-shaped “dapping block,” covered with thin leather, and struck with wooden tools to create a gentle curve before being finished as a ring, pendant, bracelet, or earring.

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Not surprisingly, the flora pieces are among her favourites and are extra-popular with customers as well. Other items include bangles that look like ribbons, pearls knotted onto silk cords, and sleek hoop earrings. “I love that the pieces are made the same way ancient pieces were made, but that they have a modern aesthetic,” she says. “Each piece is soft yet strong.” To learn more about Brown’s jewelry, visit mariannebrown.ca.


theArts

Bloomers & the Brownhouse Chocolates 807-624-9005

330 S. Archibald St.

• Fair trade flowers • Nut free, sugar free, gluten free, & vegan chocolates • Vegan Leather handbags

Thunder Bay, ON, Canada

• Local Art work (stained glass, framed pictures, candles, cards) • Canadian made hand creams And SO much more!

We offer a large selection of unique giftware items perfect for that someone special on your Christmas list. Come check us out today at 330 S. Archibald Street, located directly across from Mckellar Place. Free street parking.

Tara George

December hours: Monday – Friday: 9:30am – 6:00pm Saturday: 10:00am – 5:00pm Closed Sundays EXCEPT open Sunday December 23rd 10:00am – 5:00pm

Vintage Pixie Studio Discovering Your Inner Child By Bobbi Henderson

Larry Hogard

Certified Home Inspector Energy Advisor

ASSOCIATE MEMBER

807.620.3886 larry@superiorinspections.ca www.superiorinspections.ca

- Pablo Picasso ASSOCIATE MEMBER

Residential Home Inspections • Energy Assessments • Home Energy Savings Serving Thunder Bay & Northwestern Ontario since 2008

MUSTANG SALLY VINTAGE VINTAGE CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES

An item of vintage clothing is

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Every child is an artist. The problem is how to remain an artist once we grow up.

Now available at: Ruby Moon 10 S. Court St. Thunder Bay, ON

“I

think I have Peter Pan syndrome, where you just never want to grow up,” laughs Leslie Bailey, artist and owner of Vintage Pixie Studios, who has been a full-time artist for more than twenty years, and has experimented with a plethora of art mediums. Best known for her multi-award winning collectable one-of-a-kind art dolls, which are featured in numerous doll maker magazines, Bailey’s hallmark is her fine attention to detail, in everything from hand sculpting the most delightful and quirky mythical characters, to designing elaborate costumes and themed settings. Each creation seems to be an invitation to take life a little easier, and perhaps laugh and dream just a little more. Bailey also has a flare for seeing beauty in all things vintage, something which is expressed in much of her work. A large majority of her figurine’s characteristics are well-aged. “There is more room to

explore in creating an older being” says Bailey. “More character to be found than just pretty and perfect.” Intrigued? Bailey eagerly shares her wealth of talent, offering workshops throughout the year with no experience required. “I get just as much or more out of the workshops as the participants,” she admits. “I find it truly inspiring.” Workshops cover a wide range of artistic and creative projects, from garden and home decor to designing and sculpting your very own fantasy creature. So sprinkle on some pixie dust and fly over to Vintage Pixie Studios. Whatever your creation, you may find your inner child wanting to run home to show mom and dad! Vintage Pixie Studio is located at 132 Cummings Street and online at vintagepixiestudio.com. Bailey will be offering more workshops in the new year.

The Walleye

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CityScene

Fashionably Responsible By Justyna Kondakow

I

t is commonly known that fashion requires the sense of sight and touch. So it was much to the surprise of my olfactory senses that it was actually the scent of past lives luring me towards downtown Fort William for a fashion operation. It was the sweet aroma of retro at the Clothing Assistance Mission on May Street North that had my nose hairs tingling. To my sartorial delight, I discovered racks of old gems weeping to be worn. Like many experienced shoppers, the sequence of my shopping routine goes like this: squint, rub hands together in slow motion, then race through racks of threads with bingo champion precision. By now, the kind CAM volunteers know to leave me to my own devices, to prevent their ears being chatted off about how “this 100% silk green blouse uncannily resembles the anatomy of a flying squirrel.” And unfortunately for the other patrons, the changing room becomes clogged with clothing and the sound of clicking from my cell phone, as I post my glorious finds onto Twitter. Part of why I am so fond of CAM is that their intentions are of the purest. They provide clothing at very reasonable prices for individuals in crisis. During the holidays, keeping costs at a minimum is important, but it is also a time to give back to the community. CAM covers both those bases by not only giving Thunder Bay an inexpensive place to shop, but also giving them a place to donate their used clothing, and possibly even their time. Knowing this, my senses are forever aroused by their selection of mostly used and retro clothing on a slim budget. Some people’s idea of paradise consists of half-naked cherubs hovering grapes over their mouth on a bed of plush pillows. My paradise is similar, but my cherubs hover affordable clothing options from my most beloved stores, CAM included.

Head-to-toe ■ CAM Distribution Centre: Leather biker jacket, green silk squirrel blouse, flood pants, pleather purse ■ Changes Consignment: earrings, silk leopard blouse, red leather gloves ■ Internet: Suede wedge booties ■ Fabricland: Shoe tassels

If you want to be a responsible citizen of our community this season, contribute your time gift shopping or volunteering at, or donating to the Clothing Assistance Mission, so the ones in need can have a paradise of their own.

Shannon Lepere

Follow Justyna’s fashion adventures at LaModeOperandi.com

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CityScene

Hospice Northwest Memorial Service A Light in the Darkness

By Susan Wade

C

Chris Merkley

andles have long been part of the holiday tradition, whether flickering on the mantle or decorating the tree. They also hold powerful symbolism, offering light and hope in the darkest times. Candlelight is at the heart of a memorial service presented by Hospice Northwest on December 6 at Trinity United Church, starting at 7 pm. Open to everyone in the community, the non-denominational service features readings and music. It’s one way Hospice Northwest is reaching out to offer support at this time of year. “People need to have their grief acknowledged, their losses validated,” says Joan Williams, executive director. “This service offers a special space to express feelings of sadness and loss amidst the busyness of the holidays.” Patricia Luomala found comfort when she attended last year’s service just months after her husband Matti died. “It’s knowing other people have the same feelings I have,” she said. “It’s

important to realize you’re not alone.” In a gesture of community support, AIDS Thunder Bay and The Compassionate Friends are partnering with Hospice to present the memorial, expanding the collaboration already established with Trinity United and St. Paul’s Anglican Church. Lakehead University’s Gender Issues Center will also take part, remembering the lives lost during the December 6 massacre at École Polytechnique. In a moving tribute, participants will light keepsake candles in quiet reflection. Hospice will also be selling their Wings of Remembrance Ornaments, another way to commemorate a loss. Whether candlelight or decorations, Joan Williams sees these symbols as a way to offer hope during the holidays. “They are tangible signs of how our loved ones remain part of our lives even in their absence. They also offer hope that one day the pain will lessen and lives can be re-built.” For more information, visit hospicenorthwest.ca.

Christmas Trees – Green Up The Holidays ’Tis the season to deck the halls!

This year, express your holiday cheer and be kind to the environment too. Here are some of the pros and cons of fresh versus artificial Christmas trees. fresh-cuT chrisTmAs Trees

ArTificiAl chrisTmAs Trees

Pros: • Let’s face it - the FRAGRANCE! • Purchasing local trees supports local tree farmers • Natural trees can be recycled in the Christmas Tree Chipping Program • Did you know you can harvest one tree for free on Crown Land (contact the MNR for info)

Pros: • Can be reused season after season • Come in a variety of colours and styles • Don’t need watering like fresh-cut trees

cons: • A real tree only lasts one season • Natural trees need water as they are flammable if allowed to dry out

cons: • No natural fragrance • Can be pricier than fresh-cut trees • A fresh-cut tree has a lower carbon footprint, especially if grown locally – but an artificial tree can be a responsible option if you use it for many years before it hits the landfill.

Don’t forget to check the City of Thunder Bay’s Christmas Recycling webpage at www.thunderbay.ca/christmas for fresh tree chipping locations and tips on reducing waste over the holiday.

QUESTIONS? CALL INfrASTrUCTUrE & OpErATIONS AT 625-2195 The Walleye

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CityScene

The Framing Post & Gallery

Darren McChristie

Create a framed memorabilia piece for that special someone for Christmas

232 Camelot St Thunder Bay, ON

Telephone: 345-0452 • www.framingpost.ca • frapost@tbaytel.net

Laughter

The Best Medicine By Michelle McChristie

O

n December 22, Anishnawbe Mushkiki is hosting their first-ever First Nations comedy night at the Paramount Theatre. The event, called Laughter: The Best Medicine, will feature four of the area’s funniest and most promising First Nations stand-up comedians—Todd Genno, Dave Wesey, AJ Mandamin (also known as the First Nation Sensation), Ron Kanutski, and special guest Patrick Cheechoo. Kanutski will be hosting the show and will be giving away his very fashionable limited edition t-shirts. A mainstay of the local comedy scene, Kanutski is a past winner the Thunder Bay Comic Idol competition, and headlined the event in April 2012. On what is almost the shortest day of the year, everyone can use a good laugh and these comedians are guaranteed to deliver. As some, if not most, of the content will not be suitable for children, we advise that you hire a babysitter and leave them at home. The event is a fundraiser for Anishnawbe Mushkiki, an Aboriginal community health centre that offers a variety of services, such as health promotion, support for new parents, and traditional teachings and healing. Advance tickets are $15 and available at the Paramount Theatre or Anishnawbe Mushkiki, or $20 at the door. The show starts at 7 pm. For more information on the local stand-up comedy scene, visit superiorcomedy.com.

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The Last of the Feminist Bookstores

Thunder Bay’s Northern Woman’s Bookstore Story and Photos By Amy Jones

When the Toronto Women’s Bookstore closes its doors on November 30, Northern Woman’s Bookstore becomes the last surviving feminist bookstore in Canada. We talk to owner Margaret Phillips and volunteer Dana Walsh about how they make it work.

O

n November 5, Northern Woman’s Bookstore was awarded a Mayor’s Community Safety & Crime Prevention Business Award for its role as a “safe space” in the community for women who are susceptible to crime and violence. The recognition was long in the making. For nearly 30 years, Margaret Phillips and her team of volunteers have worked tirelessly to promote women’s issues, advocate for women’s rights, and support marginalized women in the region.

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Evolving from what Phillips describes as “a shoebox” on Bay Street to a spacious, inviting storefront on South Court Street, Northern Woman’s is more than just a bookstore, it is a vibrant community space, regularly hosting a wide range of cultural events. For Dana Walsh, who has been working at the bookstore for a year, the community aspect played a big role in her choice to volunteer. “If I wasn’t involved, I wouldn’t be as engaged in the feminist community,” she says. “I meet so many interesting people, and that enriches

everything about living in Thunder Bay.” Over the years, Phillips has seen a lot of changes—one of the exciting ones being the growth of Aboriginal literature. “When we started, there were two books: Half-Breed and The Search for April Raintree. Now there’s hundreds.” But she acknowledges that it is a difficult time for bookstores. “We are all enormously upset about the closing of the Toronto Women’s Bookstore,” she says. “People like the idea of an independent bookstore, but that doesn’t always translate into support for them. Readers have to remember that independents have to be constantly nourished.” When asked the secret to their survival, Phillips doesn’t hesitate. “Volunteers,” she says. “If it weren’t for the volunteer staff, we would have closed years ago.” But Walsh has a different perspective. “I think it’s Margaret,” she says, smiling. Visit northernwomansbookstore.ca for more information. The Walleye

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CityScene

Local Books

A Christmas Gift Guide

By Amy Jones

Books are possibly the perfect Christmas gift: they’re easy to wrap, fit nicely in a stocking, and there’s something out there for almost everyone. Here’s a round-up of some local favourites.

Home Made In support of A Kitchen for the Community

A Picasso in the North Country James R. Stevens

A charity project in support of Our Kids Count, Home Made is a 100-page cookbook showcasing recipes from some of our finest local chefs and restaurants, and featuring artwork by Heather Cranston. Money raised will go towards building a community kitchen.

This controversial biography of Norval Morrisseau was a 40-year project for the author, and features stunning representations of neverbefore-seen artwork by the troubled Ahnisnabae painter.

Campfire Stories from Northwestern Ontario Shannon L. Robertson

The R. F. Welch (Veltri) Company Joe Potestio

Ghosts, supernatural spirits, and mythical beings populate this collection of original stories from the region, perfect for sharing with family and friends around a fire at any time of year.

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A must-read for anyone interested in the history of Italians in Thunder Bay, this book recounts the origin and development of a railway construction firm started by the Veltri brothers, who opened the door for thousands of Italian immigrants after the Second World War.

A Paddler’s Guide to the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area Zack Kruzins with Darrell Makin For the outdoor adventure enthusiast on your list, this handy guide provides maps, routes, detailed launch site and camp site locations, as well as interesting facts on the history, culture, ecology, and geography of the Lake Superior National Marine Conservation Area.

Stone Stairs and Steeple Bells: The Short, Shocking Life of Leonard Roche Bill MacDonald The latest book from prolific Thunder Bay author Bill MacDonald, this tale follows the adventures of the talented and troubled Leonard Roche, a scholar, traveller, and teacher with a taste for adventure (and young women).


Shannon Lepere

Ron Desmoulins

Music

The CBC’s Jolene Banning shelves some of the hundreds of CDs that will be available for the station’s Dec. 7th Music4Food event to help out the Regional Food Distribution Association.

Big Love for Big Sugar By Jamie Varga

B

ig Sugar. The name itself speaks of overindulgence, and the band did not disappoint at their November 11 show at Crocks. To see the original band members together after a decade-long hiatus was awesome, to say the least—right down to Big Ben (bassist for Grady) behind the sound controls. Gordie Johnson led the act with the new addition of chest-length hair, and his longtime friend and bandmate, Kelly “Mr. Chill” Hoppe, was there on harmonica, saxophone, back-up vocals, and whatever else needed an added touch. An obvious favourite among the crowd was Garry Lowe with his locked-in bass and dreadlocks that would fill a dance floor. In addition to their veteran roster, Big Sugar welcomed guest Willy Williams for the taste of reggae that gives Big Sugar their unique flavour in the world of hard rockin’ blues. And almost stealing the show were openers The Balconies, one of the best three piece acts I have ever seen. Speaking with Johnson before the show, I was impressed, as always, by his unbiased nature. When asked about the venue, he says that he loves to play “at a venue 10 times the size of Crocks as much as one half the size.” Despite playing here pretty much every year since 1993, he says that he doesn’t hold any particular nostalgia for the city—he saves that sort of emotional attachment for the people he meets and places he goes while on the road. ln Thunder Bay, the

former Calabria restaurant on Bay Street and his new home for tour food in the city, Donato’s Bakery, are what strike a chord with him. After meeting members of Big Sugar and The Balconies, I can say that all involved are people who truly love to play music for music’s sake—a trait that should be a universal amongst Canadian rockers. Humble and thankful for the gift of being able to entertain, these bands deserve every accolade they receive. This was certainly a feeling shared by the huge number of fans who filled Crocks for the show, hopefully reminding Big Sugar and The Balconies why Thunder Bay is a place that bands love to play.

Music4Food

CBC Thunder Bay Offers CDs in Exchange for Food for the RFDA By Natasha Davidson

A

jar of peanut butter for a David Usher CD. Or maybe a box of pasta for the Eagles’ Greatest Hits. It’s the kind of trade you can make at CBC Thunder Bay’s Music4Food event on December 7th. Last year’s successful exchange raised almost a tonne of food with a value of $4,000 for the Regional Food District Association, prompting the CBC to hold it again. “We still have a huge number of CDs ready for the taking,” says CBC program manager Susan Rogers. “All our music is now available digitally through a virtual music service, so we no longer have the need to store CDs.” This year, the public is invited to come to the CBC station at 213 Miles Street East between 8 am and 6 pm with up to 15 food items. After 3 pm, you can return with more food for more music. Volker Kromm, RFDA executive director, says he’s “ecstatic that we could have a repeat performance” of Music4Food with the local CBC. Our shared vision will make a difference to the 13,000 people seeking help every month in the Northwest.” Kromm says the RFDA is looking for foods that are nutritious, easy to prepare, and provide protein: canned stews, vegetables, fruits, and soups, along with cereal, pasta, and peanut butter. Rogers advises music enthusiasts to come with an open mind. While CBC staff is trying to bring some order to the CD collection, Rogers warned it’s eclectic and far from alphabetized. “Think of it as a treasure hunt with a twist,” she says. “You might come in search of music by Keith Secola or Keith Urban and walk away instead with CDs by the Barenaked Ladies or 10,000 Maniacs.”

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Music

Favourite Christmas Music Burning to the Sky By Gord Ellis

To some, Christmas music is a sign of the holidays, and a reminder of good times past and to come. For others, holiday music is as welcome as a full dental extraction. From November 1 until December 25, the good tidings flow out of every clothing store, elevator and office building in North America. There is truly nowhere to hide. Christmas music has been embraced by nearly every musical artist, regardless of their religious beliefs. The truth is, Christmas music is big business, and has inspired some of the most brilliant—and bizarre—tunes ever put to tape. Here, in no particular order, are a few of my favourite Christmas hits.

Elvis Presley’s “Blue Christmas”

Aretha Franklin’s “Joy To the World”

Keith Richards’ “Run Rudolph Run”

Presley knew how to turn corn and schmaltz into something memorable, even soulful. “Blue Christmas,” from the Elvis’ Christmas album is a prime example of this. Originally recorded by Ernest Tubb, Presley nails this otherwise pale, bluesbased song and makes it his own. There are very few people who cannot sing you the first few bars of “Blue Christmas.” It has the typical white-bread, Nashville backing of the time, with a bit of a Hawaiiansounding doo wop thrown in for good measure. Yet it works. It is now a classic, and one most of us still like to hear. Check out the clip recorded during his 1968 comeback special. Incredible and sexy.

Aretha Franklin could sing the back of a macaroni package and bring people to tears. It’s her gift. But the way Lady Soul wraps her vocals around an upbeat, gospel-tinged “Joy to the World” is spine-tingling. She just kills it. Oddly enough, her version of this holiday classic is not on her Christmas album, but it’s worth seeking out on YouTube. Killer stuff—as is any holiday song she wraps those velvet pipes around.

Originally written by Johnny Marks and Marvin Brodie, and popularized by Chuck Berry, “Run Rudolph Run” is the one and only Christmas song ever done by a Rolling Stone. This solo Keith Richards version, from 1979, is lo-fi, raunchy, and rough. In other words, how you want a Christmas Song by Keith Richards to sound. Keef is having a ball, cranking out bed spring telecaster licks as he implores Rudolph to get Santa moving. Classic stuff and worth seeking out.

Happy Christmas to you all.

Bing Crosby and David Bowie’s “Little Drummer Boy/ Peace On Earth” One of the most unlikely—even bizarre—artistic couplings of all time is also one of the most triumphant. David Bowie’s appearance with Bing Crosby on a 1977 Christmas TV special is a show stopper. If you watch the video, and get past the slightly cringe-worthy (but endearing) opening chatter between the two, you get to the song. Who would have believed Bing Crosby and the Thin White Duke would blend vocally like this? And hit so many emotional targets? The legend is that Bowie barely even knew who Bing Crosby was, and they rehearsed just an hour or so before recording. I never fail to get choked up when I see or hear this. Often copied, never duplicated.

Bob Dylan’s “It Must Be Santa” Where to start with this hilarious and completely maniacal take on an otherwise lightweight novelty song? From Dylan’s completely unexpected—and polarizing—holiday album Christmas in the Heart, “It Must Be Santa” sounds like it was recorded after a late night drunk at the local carnival grounds. The loud, polkastyle squeeze box, double-time drumming, shouted background vocals, and Dylan’s death-gargle vocals have to be heard to be believed. You can practically hear Dylan smiling. Sure, he ripped the arrangement from Texas polka band Brave Combo, but still, this is Bob Dylan. Take that, you super-serious Dylanologists. The video, with Dylan in top hat and wig, takes it all to another level. A mustwatch this holiday season—preferably after a few glasses of high-test eggnog.

We rush through life consuming and not living… …is it making us happy?

The Crisis in Consumerism

sh a nnonle pe r e .com

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Paramount Theatre, 24 South Court St. December 19th, 7:30pm Free Admission


Paul Jokelainen

Tyler Sklazeski

Music

Kim Churchill Owning the Stage By Margaret Evans

M

any words have been used to describe Kim Churchill and his explosive music, but the ones I have liked the best, after trying to explain his music to others, is “psychedelic folk.” He is a one-man band with implausible talent who has the ability to entrance every age group. I have had the opportunity to watch children totally transfixed by him, as older adults watch him with awe. His energy, his nimble fingers, his mastery of rhythm, and his lyrics are all the work of a young man beyond his years. The fingernails on his right hand are kept long, his left hand is heavily calloused, and everything is duct taped, from his harmonica to his thumb—all a tribute to the ferocity of his playing. His kick drum feeds the music with a primal beat that adds to his ethereal soundscape. Seasoned performers come stage-side to marvel at his energy and clear passion. Kim Churchill owns the stage.

For Churchill, music is a something of an adventure—without a band, he can travel wherever he wants, which is how he came to be on the stage for the first time in Red Rock. He was just making his way across this massive country of ours, looking to play so he could continue on with the gas he needed to get to the next town, and he ended up at the top for CD sales that year. The young Australian sees a lot of similarities between Canadian and Australian audiences, and he loves to come back to the gathering of the many he has touched with his heartfelt persona. His humble demeanour makes him an instant friend to so many. His tour is in promotion of his latest CD, Detail of Distance. Do yourself a favour and don’t second guess yourself—come out to the show and see what possibilities lie ahead in the world of music for you. Kim Churchill plays Crocks on December 9. Visit kimchurchill.com for details.

Robin Ranger, Damon Dowbak, Danny Johnson at The Foundry A Night Etched in Time By Peter Jabs

D

owntown. The magic of the night, the scent of foxes on the run. The chase. The lost and found, the stranger’s glance. The human drama on the human stage. There was an extra buzz in the air that night—the tide was turning, love was winning. The struggle had drained us to the core, but at long last the balance had been tipped. The long day was done, and the man with the big white hat on the big white horse was finally riding off into the sunset. Add to all this the lifting, soaring, concentrated essence of some honest musicians’ souls, and it was time to party at the Foundry! Opener Robin Ranger’s cool jazz gradually worked to mellow the packed house. Accompanied by Kyle Shushack on guitar, Ian McLeod on drums, TBSO’s Martin Blanchet on standup bass, and the excellent Richard Tribe on keyboards, this group was sheer pleasure to hear. The unflappable staff at the Foundry should be commended for keeping their high standard of service during the very busy show. Later, Ranger took to the bass as Damon Dowbak played his mandolin and guitar, with legend Danny Johnson riffing on keys. Even the tuning was in the zone as some of Thunder Bay’s master musicians performed at the top level of their craft, enjoying themselves, each other, and the happy audience while jamming late into the evening. It doesn’t get any better than this. That night is etched in time for those who were there.

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Darren McChristie

Music

Auditor General, on stage as part of Wigginstock

Wigginstock

TBShows Founder Hosts Music Festival By Peter Jabs

The evening began with Keenan Wark, who provided an earful of tender heart out on a string. Wark was followed by Mary Walker and Mike Butt, with their pretty harmonies bringing to mind eaglets descending on wings of love sent below to reaffirm that the sun will shine through after the great travails ahead. Watch for this

talented woman—she is an amazing vocalist. Next, sharp-dressed young men Don’t You (,) Mean People replayed their mathematically precise compositions, one of which requires the lead guitarist to play on only one tone throughout. The crowd started hopping so it must have been the right one. It’s the same old song: play the tunes that make them swoon. Finally, the oxymoronically named Married Singlemen delivered the knockout punch with their hard-as-granite muscular rock to send us home reeling. In a good way.

Tyler Sklazeski

T

he second evening of the four-day music festival Wigginstock—put on by Jimmy Wiggins of TBShows— continued the showcase of local acts at Black Pirates Pub, where the bartender was friendly and the music was groovin’.

Rival, on stage as part of Wigginstock

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“Sun dazzling winter blue sky....Layers of resonance...Rich interpretation" (M. Sobota, Remote Control 1987)

Y y niversar 25th an now available red CD

Re-maste

ou know it’s perfect when… “hhmmm, maybe I should keep this for myself.”

Keg gift cards are available at the Thunder Bay Keg or visit kegsteakhouse.com to instantly email an E-card or send a traditional plastic gift card.

735 Hewitson Street (807) 623-1960

At select outlets and from www.kimerickson.ca In support of Kim's upcoming CD project, 'The Raven's Wing'

The Walleye

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Music

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Tel: (807) 343-8799 conference.services@lakeheadu.ca

Monty and the Mule​

International Blues Challenge By Ken Wright

P

erched atop every blues musician’s bucket list is the chance to play at one of the genre’s most iconic locations, Beale Street in Memphis, Tennessee. That dream will soon become a reality for Tracy K & Blue Thunder, who will be travelling, all expenses paid, to compete in the 29th annual International Blues Challenge (IBC), which runs from January 29 to February 2, 2013. Hosted annually by the Blues Foundation, the IBC is

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the world’s largest gathering of blues musicians, where more than 200 acts match skills in a quest to find the top blues band and solo/duo act. Hard work and talent paid dividends for award-winning singer, songwriter, and harmonica player Tracy K and her band mates, Aaron Jardine (guitar), Stu Green (drums), and Arden Bruyere (bass), who emerged from two preliminary bouts in the spring to best five other local acts in the championship round of the Thunder Bay IBC Competition at the Apollo Bar this past October

19 and 20. Scoring was done by a large, appreciative audience and a panel of five official judges. The Thunder Bay Blues Society would like to thank all of the great local blues musicians who participated in the competition as well as everyone who came out to show their support. Good luck to Tracy K & Blue Thunder in Memphis! For more information on the IBC, visit blues.org.


Music

Flamenco Caravan Soaring to Great Heights By Meghan Jewell

James Sommerville and TBSO

An Impressive Combination By Meghan Jewell

T

Margaret Evans

he Thunder Bay Symphony Orchestra and guest conductor James Sommerville were at the top of their game during Four Masters, the first concert of the Masterworks Series, which took place at the Community Auditorium on November 8.

F

lamenco Caravan celebrated the release of their newest CD, Liberation, with a performance at the Thunder Bay Community Auditorium on November 17. With a healthy-sized crowd in attendance, the concert was lively, vibrant, and, after a 5-year hiatus from performing together, I could also hear the refreshed energy they had while they played. With a full band and powerful instruments, there were times when the sound balance was a bit off, but overall their music was energetic, and their skills were more than impressive. Susanna DiGiuseppe’s vocals were smooth and seemed to be highly trained, adding to the Latin-inspired feeling to all their songs. There were times when she startled the audience

with her incredible piano skills on top of her powerful voice. I wished I could have clearly heard all the lyrics from where I was sitting. Esteban Figueroa’s cool, laid back nature on stage took the audience away from the chilly setting of Thunder Bay while he played his hot flamenco guitar licks. And the percussion players, led by Jim Differ, especially wowed me, performing effortless solos and keeping the audience moving to the music. From jazz to rock to Latin-inspired sounds, Liberation is a must-buy. There is no doubt it will not only impress their current fans, but also gain then some new ones. For more information visit flamencocaravan.ca.

The concert started off with “Siegfried Idyll” by Richard Wagner. Maestro Sommerville conveyed to the audience that this piece was never meant for the public’s ear. It was written for Wagner’s wife as a Christmas/Birthday present. It started off with a gentle waking with playful, yet romantic tones. Wagner created this piece to evoke certain memories for his wife and the symphony took the audience there as well. The second piece the symphony performed was “Pulcinella Suite” by Igor Stravinsky. This was one of my favourite pieces performed that night. It was interesting to me because Stravinsky normally did not write music with such a baroque feel, and the elements of modernism throughout were a pleasant surprise. It was wonderful to hear the strings perform as if they were percussion instruments by hitting their bows against the strings with a ricochet. The highlight of the night was by far the Mozart. The symphony performed the Horn Concerto No. 3. Maestro Sommerville showed his multi-tasking skills by performing his horn solo while also conducting the piece at the same time. He delivered brilliantly, transitioning from performing to conducting. The orchestra was perfectly responsive to his movements, but I could see he was also using facial expressions to convey what he wanted them to do. Bravo, Thunder Bay Symphony Orchestra and guest conductor James Sommerville. This was a concert that I will not forget. The Walleye

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Off theWall

REVIEWS

Books

Music

Video

Christmas Eve at Silver Islet: A Winter Pilgrimage

Bill MacDonald (2004) The author of many local history works, Bill MacDonald takes the reader on a journey perfectly suited to the Christmas season in Christmas Eve at Silver Islet: A Winter Pilgrimage. While Thunder Bay is steeped in history, few locations provide the concentrated history of Silver

The North

Stars

Montreal-based electroindie group Stars give a nod to the north in their sixth studio album, the title track “The North” telling a story of isolation and struggle, with the melody pushed along with their signature heavy synthesizer sound. But this song, along with a few more politically inspired cuts, aren’t where they are at their musical best. Instead, the standout tracks are ones like “Hold On When You Get Love and Let Go When You Give It,” which singer/songwriter Torquil Campbell says defines the entire philosophy behind the group, and where singer/guitarist Amy Millan’s voice resonates with an exquisite pureness not unlike Kate Bush. There is some experimentation with rhythm in tracks such as “Through the Mines,” and a slightly edgier guitar sound with the addition of Chris McCarron. But devoted Stars fans looking for their fix will definitely be satisfied, especially with “Progress,” “The Loose Ends Will Make Knots,” and the 80sinfluenced “The Theory of Relativity.” Living in the north has its challenges, and Stars have found a way to explore the bittersweetness of it with a solid musical offering that only gets better with each listen. - Rebekah Skochinski

Babel (Deluxe Edition)

Mumford & Sons

In 2011, the U.K.’s Mumford & Sons breathed new life into the contemporary folk-rock scene when they performed live at the 2011 Grammy Awards. Their second album, Babel, produced by Markus Dravs of Arcade Fire, continues with the signature sound created on their first album Sigh No More—polished, powerful, collaborative songs featuring Marcus Mumford’s emotional, raw, earnest vocals, and a cast of musicians playing a flurry of string instruments (mandolin, guitars, banjo), keyboards, and accordion. The popular single “I Will Wait” has a catchy melody that is hard to resist. The only downside is that many of the songs are eerily similar to the first album. Many of the songs on Babel seem to have religious undertones, including the title track “Babel,” “Lover of the Light,” “Broken Crown,” and “Not With Haste”—a not-so-surprising religious nod given that Marcus Mumford’s parents are evangelical Vineyard Church leaders in the U.K. Note that it’s well worth it to pay a few extra dollars for the Deluxe Edition of Babel, which includes two bonus tracks, and a beautiful cover of Simon and Garfunkel’s “The Boxer” featuring Paul Simon and Jerry Douglas playing the Dobro guitar. - Tiffany Jarva

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Islet. Reading this book will make you feel as if you are along for the walk down the Avenue and hearing the author recount stories of the people, places and homes that created the Silver Islet community. Along with a phantom fox and ghosts (real or otherwise), this

book will inspire you to take your own stroll down memory lane this season. Take a moment from all the Christmas rush and look around at the houses, land, and stories underneath all those twinkling lights. -Jesse Roberts

The Poet’s Dead

Rah Rah

With their new release still hot off the press, Rah Rah is making waves across North America. And rightfully so, because The Poet’s Dead, which is the band’s third full-length album, is fantastic. Starting from the first track, Rah Rah delivers a blend of infectious melodies, energetic rhythms and thoughtful lyrics, many of which pay homage to their prairie home, Regina. In fact, it’s hard to find any shortcomings in this ten-track CD that sees band members taking turns on lead vocals and swapping instruments just as they do during live performances. What is most striking about this album is that each song sounds unique— a rare occurrence for any band, let alone one that has been around for only about four years. Standout tracks include “The Poet’s Dead,” “Prairie Girl,” and “Art and a Wife”—each has good hooks that will have you tapping your toes, if not singing along. -Michelle McChristie


Herb and Dorothy

Directed by Megumi Sasaki Megumi Sasaki did not set out to make an art documentary until she became acquainted with Herb and Dorothy Vogel—two art collectors living in a one-bedroom apartment in Manhattan. In their modest home, they amassed a collection of over 4,000 pieces of art, each one fuelling their passion for collecting. What is most amazing about this story is their approach to art—they are not snobs and never mention the word “investment.” Simply put, Herb and Dorothy are passionate about art and beauty and are not concerned with the stature of the artist or the price tag. Sasaki says this is what drew her into their story because they “don’t try to explain their art” and “they really look at each piece,” perhaps seeing things most of us cannot or do not take the time to see. This year marks the couple’s 50th wedding anniversary, and Sasaki has produced a follow up to the award-winning documentary that tells the story of their historical gift project: 50 Works for 50 States. -Michelle McChristie

The Greatest Lake

Conor Mihell

Those of us who are lucky enough to live on the north shore of Lake Superior know that it is both beautiful and intimidating. So it does not come as a surprise that there are many stories to be told on this, the greatest of all lakes. In The Greatest Lake, Conor Mihell weaves together 16 such stories that invoke intrigue and appreciation for the lake. Although it is his first book, Mihell is a seasoned journalist who has written for publications such as The Globe and Mail, Cottage Life, Canoe & Kayak, and Superior Outdoors. Each story offers a unique perspective on the lake and its residents—meet Stan Chladek, a PhD chemist and world-class whitewater slalom paddler known for late-season kayak-surfing trips during the “gales of November,” and Keith McCuaig, third generation “beachcomber,” turned charter operator based in Marathon. If you spend a lot of time on Lake Superior, some of the personalities and places will be familiar, which makes the book even better. The Greatest Lake will appeal to anyone with an interest in Lake Superior, environmental issues or outdoor adventure— Mihell’s passion for the lake is evident and contagious.

Desire’s Despair

Mise en Scene

Desire’s Despair is the first full-length album from Winnipeg indie pop-rock duo Mise en Scene, featuring Stefanie Blondal Johnson and Jodi Dunlop. With a sound that is straight from My Bloody Valentine and lyrics reminiscent of Mazzy Star, they blend an early 90s style into a pleasant album you will find yourself playing three times over before you realize it. Standout tracks include “Endless Summer,” which falls somewhere in between indie and pop, and “Hey Velvet,” with a guitar riff that is reminiscent of the Clash’s “London Calling.” With Twinkies, Ho Hos, and Ding Dongs now a thing of the past, nostalgic sweetness will be a thing of the future. Start out your appreciation of it with this duo’s album of effervescent, dreamy, guitar-folk music. - Patrick Thompson

-Michelle McChristie

Death & Taxes

The Stanfields

From the Water

Colin Linden

Halifax-based Celtic punk rock group The Stanfields released a stellar album this past September called Death & Taxes. The quintet delivers ten tracks that speak to different issues, including the struggles of the working class, the cost of war, and the “invisible hand” that controls the systems of our society—all the while rocking out.

The last time I heard Colin Linden was as part of Blackie and the Rodeo Kings at the Winnipeg Folk Festival. This album drives much closer to American roots than that group’s intense electric blues. The licks in “Between the Darkness and the Light of Day” have a classic sense of that tradition, a feeling that’s doubled as the organ kicks in.

Guitar feedback and distortion are joined by a determined drum cadence and the gruff voice of lead singer, Jon Landry, starting off the album with “Jack of All Trades,” an exploration of the issues of the working class: “A normal day for them is a miracle for me.” “The Boston States” is a personal favourite, igniting the album with evident Celtic flavour, and telling the story of an 18th century young man shipped off to war. The concluding track, “Dunvegan’s Drums,” holds the listener’s interest until the end of the album with great modal progressions, and a mandolin feature.

Which isn’t to say that this isn’t a blues album— ”Smoke ‘em All” digs deep there. It’s not hard to understand, listening to this album, why Linden contributed to some of the instrumental tracks on O Brother, Where Art Thou?

Death & Taxes caters well to its audience, providing a variety of stories and themes, and an undeniable Celtic feel.

Bonus, as far as I’m concerned, is that this is a live album, recorded in Nashville, so it’s also an opportunity to hear what the musician is made of (not that Colin Linden, who’s been performing over thirty years, has anything to prove). In this case, it shows a musician who can deliver great material that’s drenched in tradition and yet still entirely fresh. - DMK

- Uko Abara

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Architecture Food

CN Station

Dave Koski​

By Lee-Ann Chevrette

T

he Canadian Northern Railway (CN) Station is one of the oldest and most architecturally beautiful buildings in Thunder Bay. Built in 1905–1906, it represents an important part of the city’s development as a transportation hub; it is largely due to the success of rail transportation that Port Arthur was able to become a thriving port city in the early 20th century. The CN station is also an important symbol of the history of immigration into the area, as many immigrants arrived at the Lakehead by rail, or passed through the station on their way westward. The building was designed by Ralph Benjamin Pratt, chief architect for the CNR, who designed many stations and shops for the transcontinental line. It is a prime example of Railway Gothic, a uniquely Canadian style developed by the railway companies at the beginning of the 20th century. The original structure was symmetrical in plan, and creates the impression of solidity by the combined use of brick and stone. It features three main sections: the outer two sections, which are three-storey square towers, and a 1-1/2 storey, gabled middle section. A complementary section was added in 1950, which expanded the main and second floors of the building on the south end. The medieval detailing of the corner turrets or bartizans (in the Scottish baronial style) and

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crenelations are further enhanced by the triangular stone reliefs in the gables, which feature the CNR initials, a wheat sheaf, and the date. These are accentuated by various types of traditional window designs, including both round and vertical oriented sash-style windows with muntins, some of which are round headed. Below the windows on the second and third floors, at the sill level, runs a string course, supported by stone corbels. A frame canopy over the first storey is supported on frame brackets that rest on stone corbels. Additional notable architectural features include tyndall limestone used in the foundation, extremely high pitched roofs, multiple dormer windows, loophole windows and dormer windows, crenelated turrets, exposed brick interior walls near the north and south ends of the original structure, and arrow slit/oylet windows in corner turrets. The CN Station was designated as a heritage building in 1979, for both its architectural and historical significance. Lee-Ann Chevrette is the Heritage Researcher for the Heritage Advisory Committee, which advises City Council on the conservation of heritage buildings, sites and resources, and their integration into development. For more information on the city’s heritage resources, visit thunderbay.ca/living/culture_and_heritage.


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Health

The Art of Playing By Paul Hemsworth, Strength & Wellness Coach

Playfulness is something that we think of for kids, but in fact it is something that adults should really get back in touch with. The exploration of nature and the movements that play allows for are not only health benefits for the physical body, but also the brain. Play taps into your inner child in a way that brings

joy to your mind, blood to your muscles, and non-stop laughter. I often get parents bringing their 9, 10, and 11-year-olds to my gym to get them “in-shape.” My response is simple: “Your daughter does not need structured exercise. Your daughter needs to go outside and be a kid.” Technology is an amazing tool that allows us to accomplish many things we thought were once impossible. But, with it can come attachment and reliance—especially when we don’t teach moderation and the importance of being outside. So, bundle up, grab your kids and your hockey stick, and find out how much more the outdoors can teach than an iPhone. For more information, contact Paul at 777-1717 or paul.hemsworth83@gmail.com, or visit hemsworthstrength.com.

Darren McChristie

A

ccording to a recent article in The Globe and Mail, less than 7% of children and 15% of adults meet the minimum requirement for exercise a day. Remember when you were a kid and your parents told to go play outside? It didn’t seem like much of a chore to explore your natural environment, and in fact many of us had to be called in to eat and sleep. Sometimes it seems like you have to remind kids to go outside to get some “exercise,” rather than it being an effortless and enjoyable experience.

Healthy People, Healthy Cities By Hanna Janiec, Public Health Nurse

D

o you remember when you walked back and forth to school and only rural kids took the bus? Today, only 1 in 10 children get to school on their own steam. Do you remember when you played outside after school until you heard the call that it was time to come in? Back then, everyone knew their neighbours and looked out for one another. There was a sense of connectedness and community. These days, kids and adults alike spend hours behind closed doors in front of a TV, computer, or gadget screen. Do you remember when you could get anywhere you wanted by either walking, taking the bus, or even a streetcar? (Yup! We had streetcars in Thunder Bay!) Almost everything we needed was close by. In those days, streets belonged to people, not just to cars.

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Yes, times have changed, but in some ways we’re going back to the way things were. Today, cities all over the world are rethinking how they are built, and are being transformed into healthier and more people-friendly communities. City planners are updating their design principles to reflect the way older neighbourhoods were laid out, with street space designated for people who want to walk or bike. They are also allowing for mixed uses of land by blending residential areas with office and retail spaces. All this is happening in our community right now. Our city and local groups are working together to make Thunder Bay a more livable, sustainable, prosperous, and socially engaging place to live. It’s exciting to see changes already taking place. I know my children and grandchildren will enjoy them for years to come.


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The Christmas Bird Count A Gift Exchange with Mother Nature By Julian Holenstein

D

oes the thought of fighting through hordes of Christmas shoppers leave you in a cold sweat? Ever feel like there must be more to Christmas? Then why not gift back to Mother Nature and get outside with the Christmas Bird Count? Try this local conservation activity and stay grounded with the outdoors for the holiday season.

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Started at the turn of the century by members of the Audubon Society, the bird count has become one of North America’s longest running conservation initiatives to assess the health of bird populations. It is an event where both novice and expert birders, families, and volunteers all help to identify and count our feathered friends. The brave will often face bone-chilling temperatures at dawn and join a team to cover a specific location of our city for a full day, while others simply volunteer to monitor their backyard feeders and to complete a count from the warm comfort of their home.

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This year, the bird count takes place between December 14, 2012 and January 5, 2013. The bird count itself is in its 113th year, and the City of Thunder Bay has participated almost every year since 1939. The Thunder Bay Field Naturalists host team counts for Thunder Bay are on Boxing Day—a great opportunity to walk-off that Christmas dinner. Thunder Bay is typically divided into 14 specific geographic units (neighbourhoods) and field teams record their search hours, bird species, and total number of birds. The record for Thunder Bay occurred back in 1994, when a total of 53 species and 16,668 individual birds were counted. All of the count circle data is entered into a central database vital to biologists and other conservations looking at bird populations across North America. To make a donation or to get involved with this great family activity, contact your local count coordinator through the Thunder Bay Field Naturalists at tbfn.net/christmas-bird-count. The Walleye

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LIVINGGREEN

Unwrap Wrapping By Jessica Backen

Q A

I’ve recently learned that most store-bought Christmas wrap is not recyclable. How can I wrap my gifts in a way that maintains my commitment to eco-friendly living without making me look like Scrooge? Gift wrap comprises a significant amount of all the holiday waste that winds up in the landfill. The downside to sparkly, coloured, and metallic store-bought wrapping paper is that it’s not recyclable due to heavily saturated inks and glitter that are difficult and expensive to remove. Admittedly, a significant part of the holiday fun is the anticipation surrounding an elaborately-wrapped gift and opening the package to discover what’s inside. But you can guarantee to be on Santa’s nice list this year by giving gifts that spread good tidings and cheer without taking a toll on the environment. Make “reusable” the theme of your gift exchange. Printed cloth bags, reusable boxes and bows, and stockings are great alternatives to paper. You could even try your hand at furoshiki folding for awkwardly-shaped parcels, which is similar to origami but uses fabric instead of paper! Another way to go wrap-free is to give a gift within a gift. Consider filling an oven mitt with cooking supplies, a mason jar with candies and pastries, or a watering can with gardening tools. The best part is that the wrap becomes part of the gift, which the recipient can enjoy after he or she has delved into the contents.

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Other options include cleaning and reusing material such as potato chip bags, newspaper, tin foil, old calendars, and outdated magazines—or set aside sheet music and maps to wrap gifts for music and travel enthusiasts. Kraft paper creates a sense of old-world whimsy, and throwing on simple embellishments, like natural greenery, buttons, pine cones, cinnamon sticks, shells, or dried fruit will add a festive touch. Or go the extra mile and make your own wrap by drawing, stamping, or painting all kinds of recycled paper, like old phone book pages or cereal boxes turned inside out. And when you’re ready to wrap, go tapeless! Odds and ends like shoelaces, yarn, twine, raffia grass, or fabric ribbon can be used to hold your wrap in place. Nothing says season’s greetings quite like custom-made packaging designed specifically with your recipients in mind. If you want to go the eco-friendly wrapping route but you still don’t know where to begin, watch for EcoSuperior’s UnWrap Christmas booth at local retailers this December. Our experienced staff and volunteers will help you give a beautifully-wrapped gift that’s easy on the pocketbook and the planet. By Jessica Backen, Program Coordinator


LIVINGGREEN

Jamestown Pellet Stoves Homegrown Heat By Larry Hogard

D

id you know that one of North America’s leading pellet stove manufacturing companies is located right here in Thunder Bay? Originally founded in the late 1970s in Salt Lake City, Utah, Jamestown Pellet Stoves moved its operations to Ontario in 2000, where a group of Canadian farmers, contractors and businesspeople focused on improving the stoves’ efficiency and manufacturing process. The company has many employees and distribution points across across North America, including a manufacturing facility in Albert Lea, Minnesota, though Thunder Bay is home to the head office.

Lars on Homes

Heating with Wood Story and Photos by Larry Hogard

Heating your home with wood requires a lot of work, dedication, and planning, but the reward is the ritual of lighting the fire and the ambiance created from its warmth and glow.

There are a few key tips about building fires that I learned over the years. The first is you need dry, seasoned wood. Wet wood doesn’t produce much heat, it doesn’t burn completely, and it isn’t safe because creosote will collect in your flue and chimney; this is one of the causes of chimney fires. Creosote also comes from burning wood that has a lot of “pitch,” or sap, in it, such as spruce, pine, and fir. Birch wood is very nice to burn because it’s dense and it burns very hot for a long time. This leads me to my second tip: birch bark is the best fire starter. Even when birch bark is wet it will still catch fire. Every year I order a large load of birch and not only do I end up with a nice supply of firewood, but I also get a year’s worth of fire starter. How long a fire gives off heat depends on the species and size of wood you use, and

With the rising costs of home heating, a pellet stove is a great way to take the chill out of the air without putting a freeze on your wallet. Check out their website at jamestownpelletstoves.com.

the size of the burning chamber you have in your wood heater. Hardwood burns longer than softwood because of its density, and the more wood you can safely place in the burning chamber, the longer your burning time. Any type of wood burning unit can be very dangerous if not installed properly. Combustible clearances have to be maintained to ensure there is no threat of causing fire damage to your home. Whether you install a wood burner yourself, or hire a professional, I recommend getting a WETT inspection (Wood Energy Technology Transfer) from a certified inspector for safety and insurance purposes. Heating with wood has been around forever, and whether you use it for cooking, to heat a room or your whole house during the winter season, or you only light up your fireplace during special occasions, the crackling of a fire and the radiant heat you get from it offers more to the senses than any other fuel source ever can. Larry Hogard is a Certified Home Inspector and Energy Advisor with Superior Inspections Inc. He can be contacted at larry@superiorinspections.ca.

Darren McChristie

H

eating with wood is something that has always been a big part of my life. As a young kid, I used to help my Finnish grandmother light the sauna and cookstove at camp, and on weekend fishing trips my dad taught me how to light campfires. After I built my home, I exclusively heated it with wood for the first few winters.

The company produces many models of pellet stoves and pellet stove inserts/hearth mounts to help warm your home comfortably and affordably. As a heating alternative, wood pellets are renewable, sustainable, have low emissions, and are very economical when compared to other fuels producing equal amounts of heat.

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DecemberEventsGuide December 1, 10 am

December 2, 1–4 pm

Santa Shuffle

Rustic Bird Feeders Workshop

Current River Community Centre The Santa Shuffle 5K and 1K fun walk/run helps The Salvation Army to assist families and individuals in need during the Christmas season. There will be post-event refreshments, awards, and prizes, and all participants will receive a unique Santa Shuffle finisher’s medal.  santashuffle.com

Thunder Bay Art Gallery Come out and enjoy an afternoon creating bird feeders made from cedar, antique tin ceiling, roof tiles, willow benders, and other natural additions. Coffee, tea, and light refreshment provided. Cost is $30 for Art Gallery members, $35 for non-members. Presented by Willow Springs.  theag.ca

December 1, 7 pm

December 2, 2–4 pm

Parade of Lights

Christmas Tea

Beginning at Manitoulin Transport Yard on Main St. to Intercity The Parade of Lights has turned into a magical evening, a seasonal favorite among young and old alike. Thousands line the streets for an opportunity to be part of the excitement and see the procession of over 50 decorated trucks.  paradeoflights.ca December 1, 8 pm

A Child’s Christmas in Wales

Scandinavian Home Society This Christmas Tea features fancy sandwiches, dainties, a bake table, and a silent auction. Tickets are $5, and available at the Scandinavian Home Society. All proceeds go towards the building fund.  scandihs.com December 2, 4 pm

Advent Concert Fundraiser for Flood Relief

St. Paul’s United Church Consortium Aurora Borealis’s Christmas special, with a reading of Dylan Thomas’s nostalgic and idyllic memory of childhood past, mingled with carols and seasonal music ancient and modern from the British Isles for voices, trumpet and organ.  consortiumauroraborealis.org

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church The Thunder Bay Community Choir directed by Mary McGhee is holding its Advent concert, featuring the Hand Bell Choir as well as other guest musicians. A free will offering will be collected at the door and the proceeds going to the Thunder Bay Disaster Relief Fund. * office@saintapc.ca

December 1

December 2, 8 pm

Fort William Male Choir 2012 Prelude To Christmas

Thunder Bay Community Auditorium Join the Fort William Male Choir for this traditional early taste of Christmas on the first weekend of December, now in its 84th year. Tickets are just $30 each, and a portion of this year’s proceeds will once again be donated to the Prostate Cancer Canada Network Thunder Bay.  fwmc.ca December 1–2

December Dreams Arts & Crafts Show

CLE December Dreams is a premiere arts and craft show, brought to you by the Lakehead Rotary Club of Thunder Bay Ontario. All proceeds from the door go to the Lakehead Rotary Club to benefit local charities.  decemberdreams.com December 1–2, noon–5 pm

Pet Photos with Santa

The Pet Shack Bring your pets to The Pet Shack for the annual Pet Photos with Santa fundraiser, with photographer Greg Malo. Each 5x7 print is only $10 and all proceeds will be donated to George Jeffrey Children’s Center and Local Dog Rescue. ) 344-8575

The Huron Carole

Thunder Bay Community Auditorium Tom Jackson’s Huron Carole returns this year with guests Sarah Slean and Susan Aglukark to raise funds and awareness for Canada’s hungry. The concert is filled with Christmas music and stories that embrace messages of peace, harmony and optimism.  tbca.com December 4, 1:30–3 pm

Lantern Making Workshop

Baggage Building Arts Centre For only $2, learn how to make your own lantern for the Spark in the Park Lantern Festival. This week’s workshop will feature pop-art lanterns. ) 684-2063 December 6, 7 pm

Hospice Northwest Candlelight Memorial Service

Trinity United Church This non-denominational service will provide an opportunity for those who are grieving the loss of a loved one to light a candle and spend a few moments honouring the memory of those who have died. Everyone is welcome to attend.  hospicenorthwest.ca

EVENTS GUIDE KEY GENERAL FOOD ART SPORTS MUSIC

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December 6, 8 pm

Docs on Bay Screening of The Carbon Rush

314 Bay St The Carbon Rush takes us around the world to meet the people most impacted by carbon credit offsetting projects.  baystreetfilmfestivalblog. wordpress.com December 7, 8 am–6 pm

Music4Food

CBC Building An annual food drive in which CDs from the CBC music library are exchanged for non-perishable food items to be donated to the RFDA. ) 625-5000 December 7–9, 13–16, 8 pm

A Christmas Carol

Fort William Historical Park Join Rogue Productions for this annual family favourite, featuring Ebenezer Scrooge, a miserly, cynical man who re-discovers his humanity and the true meaning of Christmas. Tickets are $15 for adults and $10 for students and seniors.  fwhp.ca

December 8, 7:30 pm

December 21, 5–10 pm

Gerry Dee: Life After Teaching

Lantern Festival

Thunder Bay Community Auditorium This former Canadian Comedy Award winner for Best Comic in Canada and star of CBC’s new sitcom Mr. D is a comedian you do not want to miss. Touching upon marriage, fatherhood and his years as a teacher, Gerry Dee will certainly provide you with a night of laughter you will never forget.  tbca.com December 9, 11 am–5 pm

Christmas on the Waterfront

Baggage Building Arts Centre An arts showcase and sale featuring local and regional artists and artisans. ) 684-2063 December 11, 1:30–3 pm

Lantern Making Workshop

Baggage Building Arts Centre For only $2, learn how to make your own lantern for the Spark in the Park Lantern Festival. This week’s workshop will teach you how to make stained glass lanterns using jars and tissue paper. ) 684-2063

Until December 8

December 13–14, 7 pm

Magnus Theatre The greatest Hollywood blockbuster never made reduces 187 of the greatest movies ever made into an under two-hour evening of uproarious entertainment.  magnus.on.ca

St. Patrick High School A holiday play from the grade 12 drama class at St. Patrick’s High school. Tickets are $5, with all proceeds going to the Disaster Relief Fund. ) 623-5218

December 8, 1:30 pm–4 pm

December 14

Completely Hollywood (Abridged)

St. Nicholas Celebration (Sinterklaas Celebration)

West Arthur Community Centre Presented by the Dutch Canadian Society of Canada, this event for children and parents includes colouring, face painting, Dutch treats, storytelling, and a visit from St. Nicholas. Parents are asked to bring a small gift for St. Nicholas to present to each child. ) 473-9518 December 8, 5:30–9 pm

Are We Alone/UFOs Dinner Event

Thunder Bay Observatory This interactive show and discussion will focus on the possible, evidence, and history of efforts and research to determine if there is life outside our planet. Cost is $15 per person or $25 for two people, including dinner of beef on a bun. Tickets sold in advance only, on first come first serve basis. * astrorandy@tbaytel.net

Tis the Seasons, Charlie Brown

The Road to Memphis Starts in TBay Fundraiser

Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 5 Help send Tracy K & Blue Thunder to Memphis, Tennessee to compete in the International Blues Competition.  tracyk.ca December 16, 10 am–4 pm

Christmas Market

Victoria Inn Shop local this Christmas from local artisans, crafters, and small business. Door prizes, vendor prizes. $3 admission, kids under 12 free. ) 577-8481 December 16

Christmas Brunch

Founders’ Museum and Pioneer Village This year’s Christmas Brunch is catered by Grinning Belly, and will feature the Village Blacksmith on site along with a special visit from Santa.  founders.ca December 18, 1:30–3 pm

Lantern Making Workshop

Baggage Building Arts Centre For only $2, learn how to make your own lantern for the Spark in the Park Lantern Festival. This week’s workshop will feature glowing globe lanterns. ) 684-2063

Prince Arthur’s Landing A celebration of the winter solstice, featuring a skating party, storytelling, and live music with the Kam Valley Fiddlers and the Knackers, as well as the opportunity to make your own lantern for the parade. ) 684-2063 December 21–22

The Manhattan Nutcracker

Thunder Bay Community Auditorium This very popular holiday tradition comes to life on our stage thank to a world-class performance by the dancers of the Minnesota Ballet and 70 local dancers from Studio One. This truly international Holiday production is not one to be missed!  tbca.com December 22, 7 pm

Aboriginal Comedy Night

Paramount Theatre Hosted by Anishnawbe Mushkiki, and featuring comedians Todd Genno, Dave Wesley, Ron Kanutski, and AJ Mandamin. Tickets are $15 in advance or $20 at the door, and are available at the Paramount or Anishnawbe Mushkiki. ) 343-4843 Until December 30

The Unbuilt Campus: Visions of a Potential Lakehead University

Thunder Bay Art Gallery This exhibition focuses on the visions that have inspired the campus of Lakehead University. Curated by Gary Genosko.  theag.ca December 31, 6–10 pm

New Year’s Eve Family Frolic

Fort William Historical Park FWHP’s New Year’s Eve family event, featuring outdoor and indoor activities and entertainment, including a fireworks display.  fwhp.ca


Music Events December 1

Bluegrass Guild

December 7

HoHoHo! Drag Show feat Portia, Paloma Marquez, Fantasia LaPremiere, DJ Jaqi Iraqi, more

The Study Free ∙ 12 pm ∙ All Ages

Black Pirates Pub $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+

Janie Chadwick

Battle of the Bay: MC & Producer Battles

Beaux Daddy’s Free ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages

Bless the Fall, A Skylit Drive, At The Skylines, Skip the Foreplay Crocks $15 ∙ 6:30 pm ∙ All Ages

Fort William Male Choir presents A Prelude to Christmas Thunder Bay Community Auditorium $35 ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages

Flipper Flanagan’s Flat Footed Four The Foundry $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+

Traffic Light Party feat DJ Steiner, Palehock, Electrocity, Streaky Beats Crocks $5 ∙ 10:30 pm ∙ 19+ December 2

Thunder Bay Community Choir presents Choral Music for Advent

St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church $ By Donation ∙ 4 pm ∙ All Ages

The Huron Carole

Crocks $5 ∙ 9 pm ∙ 19+

Tracy K

Beaux Daddy’s Free ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages

Plan B

The Foundry $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+ December 8

Bluegrass Guild

The Study $TBA ∙ 12 pm ∙ All Ages

Treble with The Married Singlemen The Foundry $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+ December 9

Kim Churchill and Baybette Howard with Jean-Paul De Roover and Emily Kohne Crocks $15 ∙ 7:30 pm ∙ 19+ December 10

The Sheepdogs and Yukon Blonde Tonic Night Club $25 ADV ∙ 8 pm ∙ 19+

Thunder Bay Community Auditorium $40 – 60 ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages

Snak The Ripper

December 4

Mood Indigo

Machines and Skynet with Fragments, The Vilification Black Pirates Pub $10 ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages December 5

Open Mic Night

The Study $TBA ∙ 7 pm ∙ All Ages

Lakehead Choral Group presents The Spirit of Christmas St. Anges Church $12 – 15 ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages

Theory of a Deadman and Big Wreck Thunder Bay Community Auditorium $40 ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages

TBSO presents Bach to the Future Hilldale Lutheran Church $20 – 35 ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages

Crocks $8 ∙ 9 pm ∙ 19+

The Greenbank Trio with Erin Junkala The Foundry $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+

Wry Cherry

Beaux Daddy’s Free ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages

Start the day with Lisa Laco for breaking news, weather, daily events and compelling stories.

December 21

Weekdays starting at 6am

The Communication with Android 16 and more Black Pirates Pub $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+

Uhussie

The Foundry $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+ December 26

Advina and Maraday Park with Don’t You(,) Mean People? and Point North Black Pirates Pub $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+ December 27

Wax Philosophic Waxmas Throwdown Crocks $7 ∙ 9 pm ∙ 19+ December 28

The Zep Show The Foundry $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+

cbc.ca/superiormorning

December 29

Tin Pan Alley

The Foundry $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+

CBC Radio Canada, English Communications 250 Front Street West P.O. Box 500, Station ì Aî  Toronto, ON M5W 1E6 Print Production 416-205-3781

December 31

NYE PARTY featuring DJ Dustbuster The Foundry Free ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+

Beaux Daddy’s Free ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages December 14

Memphis Fundraiser feat Tracy K & Blue Thunder Branch 5 Legion $ By Donation ∙ 8 pm ∙ 19+

Paper Scratcher The Foundry $5 ∙ 10 pm ∙ 19+

Erin Junkala

Beaux Daddy’s Free ∙ 8 pm ∙ All Ages December 15

Saturday Night Praise Concert

360 Black Bay Road $ By Donation ∙ 7 pm ∙ All Ages

TBSO presents Holiday Pops 2 Thunder Bay Community Auditorium $16 – 41 ∙ 7 pm ∙ All Ages

Brought to you by: The Walleye

51


theWall

Curating Buttons Story and Photos By Marlene Wandel

S

tuff. It’s everywhere. Most of us have too much of it, except for those admirable few who strive to whittle down their possessions. The rest of us surf the ebb and flow of accumulating and divesting; we are forever curating our collections of things. Our collections can speak volumes about us. The bookshelf in the living room is as much about the books I love as it is a statement of what I am willing to have people know about me. We keep the things we need and love, and, ideally, are willing to let go of the rest. I would not call myself a collector, but looking around my house, a pattern emerges. Wool felt hats, cookbooks, buttons. Numerous small jars of buttons, sorted by colour. In my years of finding and giving away treasures, and a long and mutual relationship with both the Salvation Army Thrift Shop and yard sales, I have never contemplated giving away the button collection. The buttons pre-date

my tenure as a homeowner, parent, adult. The button collection as an entity is static, yet the buttons themselves keep changing—except for that jar of vintage glass buttons that anchors the collection as somehow meaningful. These buttons, like all good collections, are curated. I had a button collection back when I took pride in fitting everything I owned into a 1984 VW Rabbit, without the benefit of a shoehorn. I took the buttons on roadtrips when other, more practical items like flashlights didn’t make the cut. The buttons were posed for scenic photos like reluctant, immobile children, posed with bacon at the Thunder Bay Restaurant, on a roadside inukshuk on Hwy 11, next to a dead porcupine in Saskatchewan, in a field of glorious yellow skunk cabbage in the Kootenays, and finally, within reach of the pummeling waves of the Pacific Ocean. These buttons were my travelling companions, and some jars stayed behind,

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The Walleye

as travellers are wont to do. The buttons have survived the transition from VW to apartment to rambling old house. Next time we move, I predict a massive downsizing of stuff, but I’ll probably keep the buttons. These days, the button collection doesn’t travel as far. I took a few of them on an outing to Waverley Park for a photo shoot. It wasn’t the same as dashing up a hill on the side of the road in Lebret to match the red buttons with the red trim of an ancient church in the long, dry grass. These buttons have a different life, getting sewn onto shirts, or stuffies made from old sweaters, or sewn onto some material stretched across an embroidery hoop just so I have an excuse to go to Craft Night. Sometimes they get re-sorted in an effort to redefine the boundaries in the continuum from pink to purple. While clutter comes and goes, as yard sale season and tastes and hobbies wax and wane, the buttons remain.

send to:

The Walleye Magazine 242-1100 Memorial Ave Thunder Bay, ON P7B 4A3 sign me up!

name:_______________________ address:_______________________ city:______postal code:________ phone number:_______________________ e-mail address:_______________________

*please make payment payable to Superior Outdoors Inc


Dave Koski

TheEYE - Movember - Team “Human Schnauzers”

The Walleye

53


Come join us on the ice! Skating Programs • Learn To Skate Programs for Children • Semi-Private Lessons

• Skating Development • Stroke improvement • Power Skating Skills

Visit our website www.thunderbay.ca For program information call 625-3168

GIFT PACKS

featuring our signature

PROSPECTOR STEAK SPICE

available December 1st until

CHRISTMAS

RECREATION & CULTURE DIVISION

To RegiSTeR FoR WinTeR PRogRamS CaLL 625-8463

54

The Walleye

Prospector Steak House 27 Cumberland Street South Thunder Bay, ON P7B 2T3 (807) 345-5833


The Walleye

55


NNOG L H OO GM Y E• SBARVI INNGG SH O• MB ER I RNEGL H I AOBMI LE I TL O Y V• E B•RBI N R IGN H G OHMO NH O• MBER IPNOGS SHI O B RO IMNEG AHDOVME EN TLUORVEE •• BBR BM I LEI TSYA •V IBNRGI SN G• H •P IBNREI SNSG •H O P OHS O S IMBEI L TI TR YU S• T B •R I BNRGI NHGO MHEO M AD B RMIEN G E V ETNE O• M BE R HI NA GP P H I NOEMSES A• BDRRI ENAGM H •O MB ER I TNRGU SHTO •M EB RHI N AG P PH I NO L I THYO M• EB R HG O SM E• BH IBNI G H IANPGP I H NO E SMSE • A B D R IRNE GA MH O• MBER SI NA G VIN NE R• •B RBI RNIGN GH OHMOEM EH AJPOPYI N •E SBSR I• N BGR IHNOGM EH OPMOES SSIABVI LI W EE RS T• OBRRI IENS G• BHROIMN EG JHOOYM•E BPROI N HP O M S SGI^BHIOL M I TEY P• OBSRS II NB $ BONUS GR I HE O M• E B SR AI NF∞ EG T YH O• MBER IVNAG S M•E BSRTIONRGI EHS O •M EB R SI N AHONDA FG E THYODOLLARS ON 2012 CIVIC & CR-V MODELS VGA THI OO M N E • QBURAI N E I NV G A L HU O E M•E BT RR IUNSGT •H OB M L IGT YH •O M BR R IEN GT RH I TEY R •E L B HI NNGO L H OO G YM E• BRREI LNIGA BHI OL M I ARBI N I LGI T YH O • MB ER I NAG DHROEM RIN N • GB R H I NOGM EH OPMOES SPIOB SI LS I TB YI L I •T Y B •R IBNRGI N H G OHMOEM ES ASVAI VNI G HOME LOVE • BRING HOME JOY • BRING HOME PO OME SAFETY • BRING HOME VALUE • BRING HOME IN SAFETY H O M E B R I N G H OBRING MHOME E VALUE H A P P I N E S S • BBRING R IHOME NG TRU LEASE A PURCHASE A R E L I A B I L I T Y N G H O M E • BERCR-V I YN E HA O DM V EEAPR %N TQUURA $ BHROI M % $ LX G @ CIVIC DX @H O M EAPRS A 2012 N O L O G2012 Y • B R I N G F T • N G . FROM . FROM MGE HS O A TMI ES FVAACLTUI EO N• •B RB IRNI N A SP TP I •N EB SRSI N• GB R G GH H OO MM E ET H RU H ION TOP SAFETY PICK WITH THE VERSATILITY M EG PHOOW EE R A• DBRREI2012A NOFIIHS GCLASS-LEADING H OB M ENCARGO JGOSPACE° Y O• MBER ISNAGT REAR B IBLRI TI N Y GCANADA’S • HB O R I N M M • R I H FAVOURITE CAR 14 YEARS IN A ROW E•N TB U RM I NEG SHAOV M E SI N •G B HR O I NMGE HI N OM E VSAAT RR I NE G• HB O I NE G SS T O• RBI R NO N YNOR O• VBART II N OG N H • OB M R IEN GP O HW OM E •Q B U RA ILNI TGY H• OPLBUM REI NSGT OH EE JI O E R S $ $ Y • B R I N G H O M E R E L I A B I L I T Y • B R I N G H O EG AH O DM R M E V AGET L U E • B R I N G H O M E I N N O V A T I O N • B5 RH 0 IMN 0 UPG NB G RHI N O MTO E HSOAMV EI N TGRS U•S BT R •I NBGR HI NO GM EH LOOMVEE • DTOBLOLENARDRAC SI N G H O HNOLO IN CUSTOMER CASH INCENTIVES ON OTHER SELECT 2012 MODELS HN OG M EH OP M O SE S I AB DI LVIET NY T•U B DO V EMNE T UAR ED •R EB AR RR E I N• G BHROI M N EG A H N EHS OS M•E BHRAI N M GE S •T EB IPNI G P PG I NHEOSMS E • TBRRUI SNTG • H BORMI EN GS AHVOI N www.goremotors.com •R B• R IBNRGI N HG O M E A D R E M• B • RBI R GH OHMO EM EP OHSASPI PB II N H O M E J O Y361AMEMORIAL N IGN BAY L AVE. THUNDER HO •G345-0902 BHR OI N GE 486-2144 H O FMEET YS A• VBI N (807) •M 1(800) GI NHGO M E MS ET OHRAI PE PS I •N EB SRSI N SA R IGNSG • HB I NOGM EH OQMUEA LJI O I NGGH O HM OM •E R B R •I NBGR H T YY •• B BR RI N E ET RPUOSST S •I BBI RL NH OO L OMGE Y S •T OBRRIIENSG• B H RO IMNEG RHEOLMI AE BPI LO ISTSYI B• I LB IRTIYN •G BHROI N M NM G E HLOOMV EE •V AB NR •I EBS R I• N B G RHI N OG M EH SOAMVEI NSGASF E• TBYR I•N GB RHI O M GE HQOUMAEL IPTOYS •S IBBRI LI N •G BHROI N I TGY H• OBMREI NTGR UHSOTM •E BARDI VNEGN H

BRING YOURS HOME BEFORE IT’S GONE!

1000

∞EXCEPT

CIVIC HYBRID: $500 HONDA DOLLARS

MODEL FB2E2CEX

97 199

BI-WEEKLY FINANCE FOR 84 MONTHS . $0 DOWN PAYMENT/OAC. $16,520 SELLING PRICE INCLUDES FREIGHT, PDI, LEVIES AND OMVIC FEE. EXCLUDES LICENSE AND HST. †

uu

5000

LX MODEL SHOWN WITH OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT - MODEL RM3H3CE

PER MONTH FOR 36

MONTHSΩ

288 0 99

WITH $4,678 DOWN PAYMENT/OAC AND $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT.

°WITH 2ND-ROW SEATS UP ◊

§

ˆ$1,000 Honda Dollars offer applies only to retail customer purchase or lease agreements for new 2012 Honda Civic Coupe and Sedan models (except Civic Hybrid models) // 2012 Honda CR-V models concluded between November 1 and November 30, 2012 at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. $1,000 Honda Dollars must be applied towards the purchase or lease of an eligible vehicle, Honda accessories, extended warranty and are deducted after taxes. †Receive 1.99% purchase financing on any new 2012 Honda Civic DX Sedan (Model FB2E2CEX) for a maximum of 84 months available through Honda Financial Services Inc., on approved credit. Bi-weekly Finance example: based on a 2012 Honda Civic DX Sedan (Model FB2E2CEX) equals 182 bi-weekly payments of $97 over an 84 month term at 1.99% APR, complete selling price of $16,520 [includes $1,495 freight and PDI, EHF tires ($29), EHF filters ($1), A/C tax ($100 except Honda Civic DX), and OMVIC fee ($5). Excludes taxes, license, insurance, and registration]. Cost of borrowing is $1,190.42 for a total finance obligation of $17,710.42. Down payment or equivalent trade-in on purchase financing offers may be required based on approved credit from Honda Financial Services Inc. Ω Limited time lease offers on a new 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD (Model RM3H3CE) // 2013 Honda Accord LX (Model CR2E3DE) available through Honda Financial Services Inc., on approved credit. Representative lease example: based on a 2012 Honda CR-V LX 2WD (Model RM3H3CE) // 2013 Honda Accord LX (Model CR2E3DE) on a 36 // 36 month term at 0.99% // 2.99% lease APR, the monthly payment is $288.00 // 257.99 [includes $1,640 freight and PDI, EHF tires ($29), EHF filters ($1), A/C tax ($100), and OMVIC fee ($5)] with $4,678 // $3,929 down payment or equivalent trade-in, $0 security deposit and first monthly payment due at lease inception. Total lease obligation is $15,046.00 // $13,216.64. 72,000 // 72,000-kilometre allowance; charge of $0.12/km for excess kilometres. During the initial model launch period, dealer inventories of 2013 Accord models may be low. Dealer order may be required and delivery delays up to two months may be expected. u$5,000 customer cash incentive is valid on any new 2012 Honda Pilot // 2012 Honda Ridgeline // 2012 Honda Crosstour models when registered and delivered between November 1 and November 30, 2012. Cash incentive is available for all Honda retail customers except customers who lease or finance through Honda Financial Services Inc. at a subvented rate of interest offered by Honda as part of a low rate interest program. All advertised lease and finance rates are special rates. Cash incentive will be deducted from the negotiated price before taxes. §$500 Honda Dollars offer applies only to retail customer purchase or lease agreements for all new 2012 Honda models (except 2012 Honda Civic Coupe and Sedan // 2012 Honda CR-V) concluded between November 1 and November 30, 2012 at participating Ontario Honda Dealers. $500 Honda Dollars are deducted after taxes. For all offers: license, insurance, PPSA, and other taxes (including HST) are extra. Taxes payable on full amount of purchase price. Offers only valid for Ontario residents at Ontario Honda Dealers. Dealer may sell/lease for less. Dealer order/trade may be necessary. Vehicles and accessories are for illustration purposes only. Offers subject to change without notice. See your Ontario Honda Dealer or visit HondaOntario.com for full details. ◊Cargo space calculated on volume behind second-row seats with rear-seats up for two-row vehicles in segment and third-row seats with rear seats up for three-row vehicles in segment. Compact Segment classification based on Association of International Automobile Manufacturers of Canada (AIAMC). All measurements sourced from data published by each manufacturer. ‡Does not replace the driver’s responsibility to exercise due care while driving. ∆Text message and e-mail functions are only compatible with certain devices. uuBased on Association of International Automobile Manufacturers of Canada (AIAMC) data reflecting sales between 1997 and December 2011.

December 2012  

The February 2013 issue featuring TBay Chefs, Family Dining and much more!

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