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TWR - Feb/Mar 2013 - Issue 16:The Waiting Room - Summer 2012 - Issue 13

OVER SIXTIES ROMANCE

inside

TIPSTO HELPYOU SLEEP

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THE GATHERING 2013

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F R to ta EE ke h om e

February/March 2013 D Issue 16

FITNESSGOALS PERSONAL GOALS FOR HEALTH P.08

CONTRACEPTION FITINGYOUR LIFESTYLE P.12

THEOSCARS GLITZY AS EVER P.16 WWW.WAITINGROOM.IE

Transform yourselfin2013 PLUS EASTER COLOURING PUZZLES COMPETITIONS NOTEBOOK


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E E e m o R h Fto take

)UHH WR WDNH KRPH The Room Ireland’s dedicated waiting T he Waiting Wa a aiting Ro om Magazine Magazine is Ir eland’s only dedic ated w aiting rroom oom magazine and d is delivered With circulation over 83,000, deliverred to to GP surgeries, surg geries, hospitals hospitaals and private private clinics. clinics. W ith h a cir culation of o ver 83,00 00, magazin ne is FREE for for your your patients patients t to to take take home. home. this unique magazine


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inside February/March 2013

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Features

10 Getting fit

This year achieve your potential

12 Contraception options Advice on contraception

10 Top 10 tips

Dr Eva Orsmond

16 The Popcorn Recession Hollywood or bust

22 Dream on

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How to get the best from your night’s sleep

Regulars

04 Notebook Bits and Bobs

Competitions 28 Crossword

Win 2 nights B&B and one Evening Meal at the CityNorth Hotel, a member of Select Hotels

Dec 2012 / Jan 2013 Winners The winner of last issue’s crossword is Theresa Doran, Co Wicklow, the winner of the wordsearch is Alison Treacy, Co Meath, and the winner of the cross reference is Sandra Mullins, Co Cork YOUR FREE COPY

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notebook HEALTH

IT’S LOLLIPOP DAY 2013

Monday 21st January – The Oesophageal Cancer Fund (OCF) needs your help this February! With just one month to go until the 12th annual Lollipop Day, the OCF is calling for more volunteers throughout the country on Friday 22nd and Saturday 23rd February 2013 to help raise vital funds for oesophageal cancer. Lollipop Day involves thousands of people selling lollipops (€2) nationwide, in an effort to raise vital funds for oesophageal cancer. So if you have a few hours to spare on the 22nd or 23rd February, pop down on your own or with friends, have some fun and help the OCF! “We are very fortunate to have an ever increasing number of dedicated volunteers, all

WIN

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED THROUGHOUT THE COUNTY FOR LOLLIPOP DAY. THE OESOPHAGEAL CANCER FUND NEEDS YOUR HELP ON FRIDAY 22 AND SATURDAY 23 FEBRUARY 2013 – WHY NOT SIGN UP?

of whom make Lollipop Day a success every year,” said Noelle Ryan, chairperson of the OCF. “But we still need more volunteers so if anyone or any group is interested in helping out, please contact us on www.lollipopday.ie or on Lollipop Day’s Facebook/Twitter page.”

For more information on Lollipop Day, to volunteer or to make a donation, go to www.lollipopday.ie or to volunteer call 01-2897457. Join the Lollipop Day Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/lollipopday Twitter: @LollipopDayIE Hashtag: #LollipopDay



 

   

RISk fACToRS foR oeSophAgeAl CANCeR: Barrett’s oesophagus (long-term regurgitation of acid) Long history of chronic heartburn Age, people between the ages of 40 – 45 years old need to be particularly vigilant More common in men Smoking Heavy alcohol use Obesity, increased incidence in obese patients

About the oesophageal Cancer fund The Oesophageal Cancer Fund (OCF) is a registered charity set up in 2002 by friends of Lucilla Hyland to raise awareness of and money for research into oesophageal cancer. Awareness for the OCF and Lollipop Day has grown year on year and to date over €1.6 million euro has been raised by the OCF. Lollipop Day volunteers sell lollipops (€2) throughout Ireland to raise funds for Lollipop Day.

VeraTemp

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Non-Contact Thermometer

VeraTemp is a non contact thermometer which uses infrared technology to record temperature. The background display uses traffic light colours to indicate if the child has a normal, slightly elevated or high temperature. It is always ready to use, there are no additional parts needed for ongoing use and uses standard AAA bateries. It can also be used for confirming room, bath water, food and bottle temperatures. Due to its non contact technology, VeraTempcanbeusedfromanewbornbabyallthewayuptoadulthood.Allinallit'samusthaveforallthefamily.

TO WIN A VERATEMP THERMOMETER JUST ANSWER THE FOLLOWING QUESTION

WHAT COLOUR SCREEN WOULD INDICATE A NORMAL READING?

a. green b. orange c. red

Answer: _________________________Name:_________________________ Address: _________________________City:______________________Email:________________________

Please return entries to The Waiting Room,The Studio, Maple Avenue, Stillorgan, Co Dublin by 22nd March 2013 4

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TWR - Feb/Mar 2013 - Issue 16:The Waiting Room - Summer 2012 - Issue 13

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notebook HEALTH

THE WAITING ROOM MAGAZINE is produced and printed in Ireland ACTING EDITOR Danielle Barron PRODUCTION/DESIGN Colm Geoghegan colm@waitingroom.ie ADVERTISING Ingrid Lyons ingrid@imn.ie CONTRIBUTORS Niamh Flynn, Danielle Barron PUBLISHER Danstone Ltd.

CONTACT US The Waiting Room Magazine The Studio, Maple Avenue, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin 01 2960000 | info@waitingroom.ie

Discover more at www.waitingroom.ie

for news, updates, offers and competitions, join us on facebook.com/TheWaitingRoomMagazine

FREE SUBSCRIPTIONS 1,700 clinics already get Ireland’s fRee magazine for patients. Published bi-monthly, The Waiting Room Magazine is free to medical clinics and free for their patients to take home. Get your FREE delivery of The Waiting Room Magazine to your clinic... simply email your practice address and contact number to subscribe@waitingroom.ie or call 01 2960000.

AUDIT BUREAU OF CIRCULATIONS

Total Average Net Circulation 83,002 (JUL-DEC 2010) THE WAITING ROOM MAGAZINE founded by Maurice O’Scanaill

The Waiting Room Magazine will not be responsible for, nor will it return, unsolicited manuscripts. The views expressed in the magazine are those of the authors and not necessarily those of The Waiting Room Magazine. The entire contents of the magazine are the copyright of The Waiting Room Magazine and may not be reproduced in any form without the prior written consent of the publishers.

2013 Hearing Awareness Week

Keep an ear out for Hearing Awareness Week, an awareness campaign around hearing loss run by Hidden Hearing in association with the Irish Deaf Society and Age Action, which will be up and running shortly. The campaign is encouraging people to take action on their hearing loss. Research has shown an alarming lack of action on hearing loss with 70% leaving it more than a year to seek treatment for their hearing loss and 28% leaving it more than five years to seek treatment. The 32 county campaign sees the launch of two mobile hearing clinics from Dublin and Belfast which will tour the country throughout 2013, visiting over 400 destinations nationwide and providing over 10,000 free hearing screenings and advice and information on hearing loss. Research conducted in advance of the campaign has shown that 88% of respondents said that Irish people don’t take good care of their hearing health. Sixty-five per

cent of respondents said that they have experienced ringing in their ears after an event, concert or disco while just 16% said that they had never brought ear plugs to a social event, concert or festival. This year’s campaign will feature events organised by Hidden Hearing, The Irish Deaf Society and Age Action, free hearing tests in all Hidden Hearing branches, tips and advice on protecting your hearing, the launch of a new App which will monitor noise levels for consumers, and a Deaf/Hearing Awareness Campaign with schools. Keep an ear out for activity in your local area. The message from Hidden Hearing is that hearing loss is not something to ignore, do something about it during Hearing Awareness Week. For more information or to book a free hearing test contact Hidden Hearing on 1800 66 77 11 or visit www.hearingawarenessweek.ie

HEALTH

Check your medication

The Irish Government is about to pass legislation that will put pressure on doctors to prescribe generic forms of medication rather than the branded originals. A generic medication is one that has the same ingredients as a branded medication but is made by a different company, usually at a cheaper price. However, many patients groups, such as those for osteoporosis and epilepsy, have expressed concern that generic medications may have harmful effects for patients with these conditions. There is also a concern that for those with longterm illnesses, any changes in medication appearance could cause them to potentially reduce or even stop taking their medication. Also, studies have shown that when tablets

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change in colour or size, patients who switch from brand-name to generic or between generic versions may become confused and fail to take their medication as prescribed. A recent study in the US suggested that patients may consider a bioequivalent pill with a different appearance ineffective. This phenomenon is termed the “nocebo effect”. The researchers suggest that their findings may help explain why some have argued that generic drugs are not as effective as their brand-name equivalents; since patients may be less likely to be persistent when using generics, they may appear to be less effective. So next time you receive your prescription, check with your GP whether you’ll recognise your medication!

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www.myorthoclinic.com …is Ireland’s first website for patients with injuries to their bones and joints. This initiative specialises in providing medical and practical information for all patients outside of the hospital environment. The website allows patients to freely access reliable information without having to contact their local fracture clinic. Clinical follow up is essential in ensuring adequate healing after a musculoskeletal injury. However patients often forget to ask or have problems retaining the information that they receive before leaving the hospital. This can be due to many factors: limited contact with doctors, time constraints, post-operative challenges and fatigue. A better knowledge of one’s injury leads to better compliance with their healing programme. This website

recognises this issue and aims to bridge the information gap between the hospital setting and follow up care. Patients, family members and carers involved in the recovery process can all benefit from using the website. Essential information on cast management, crutches, slings, pain relief and exercise programmes are all easily available. The website has a “frequently asked questions section” answering all necessary queries from hygiene issues to social entitlements. Healthcare professionals can be assured their patients will receive accurate and beneficial information from this source. www.myorthoclinic.com was launched in October 2011, and has witnessed a very encouraging response. Piloted in the North East HSE region,

the website attracted 900 individual users over an initial six month period. Furthermore, the website was highlighted for its potential at the Irish Orthopaedic Association’s annual meeting, held in Fermanagh in June 2012. Supported by orthopaedic professionals, this website is available to any patient seeking information and is promoted through 16 fracture clinics nationally. Derek Cawley is the creator of www.myorthoclinic.com and he is training as a specialist registrar in Trauma and Orthopaedic Surgery in the Republic of Ireland. The data available at www.myorthoclinic.com is a collaboration by orthopaedic specialist registrars which continues to be updated and enhanced on a regular basis.

HEALTH

Sick Teddy Bears Get Full Treatment at NUI Galway

Cameron Deely (6) from Carrabane National School in Athenry, Co. Galway gets a pawscription for her teddy at the at the 8th Annual NUI Galway Teddy Bear Hospital. Organised by the Sláinte Society, the NUI Galway branch of the International Federation of Medical Students Associations, and up to 200 YOUR FREE COPY

medical and science students, the Teddy Bear Hospital creates an environment to help children, ranging in age from 3-8, feel more comfortable around doctors and hospitals. The event saw over 1,500 sick teddy bears admitted to the hospital, accompanied by their minders, 1,500 primary school children. FEBRUARY / MARCH 2013 | THE WAITING ROOM

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HEALTH FITNESS GOALS

Setting fitness goals

Niamh Flynn advises on how to meet your personal goals for health and fitness

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ou’ve set the New Years fitness resolutions, January has come and gone and, if your plans for a thinner waist, a faster running pace and transformed eating patterns have fallen by the wayside you are not alone. A New Years resolution, by definition, is a commitment made on one specific day of the year. A goal, on the other hand, is a desire to achieve something. Our New Years commitments are often abandoned soon after they are made but goals, even fitness goals, stand a far better chance of fulfilment if given due diligent attention. There is, surprisingly perhaps, a vast amount of material available on goal setting in the sporting realm. Professional athletes will be familiar with the power of goal setting. There is no reason why recreational athletes cannot make use of the same tools in order to achieve their aspirations too. The focus of goal setting and feedback

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research within the realm of sport has changed in recent years. Traditional goal setting in athletic research focused on goal specificity, the temporal nature of the goals and goal direction and some attention was also given to the distinction between performance and outcome goals. In the area of sport psychology today, one of the first things a sport psychologist will address with an athlete is their goals. Goal setting, on the surface is a deceptively simple exercise. It is nonetheless a very powerful ergogenic (something which improves sports performance). The follow through with a coach, manager or sport psychologist is equally important. Fine motor skills such as passing, catching and kicking will improve as a direct result of proper goal setting. Throw feedback into the equation and there is an even greater increase in performance. Clearly, the way the goals are set and the delivery of the feedback are

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important. One school of thought suggests setting shortterm, long-term and process goals. So, if your goal is to run the 10k mini marathon in Dublin on the June Bank Holiday Weekend, the longterm goal is evident. Depending on your starting point, be it a complete lack of fitness or a reasonable level where you can walk four miles comfortably at a fast pace, this will determine your short term goals for each month. You could of course aim to jog the four kilometres by month two and increase that distance by one kilometre every month. Alternatively or in addition, you could ask a gym instructor to do a fitness assessment and establish your resting heart rate and the most effective heart rate training zones for you to work within so that you make the most of the time you have when training. There are of course almost as many ways to formulate goals as there are individuals. Establishing process goals, for example, YOUR FREE COPY


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FITNESS GOALS HEALTH deciding when you are going to make time for the training is also important. Once you have all this in place, find a training partner or team mate who will motivate you and support you will increase the likelihood of your adherence to the exercise. Not everyone is motivated by the same goals. Athletes, professional or recreational, will be incentivised predominantly in one of three different ways. Some will focus on mastering new skills. Others will be more concerned with gaining others’ approval and there is a third orientation where the emphasis is on avoiding negative feedback and avoiding a drop in one’s own skills, standard and ability. The technical jargon is ego orientation

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versus performance orientation. Task mastery orientation is the term used to describe athletes who fall into the category of those who gain their sense of proficiency and success from high effort and achievement of mastery of a task. Whatever your fitness plans were for 2013 on January first this year all is not lost if they are now but a distant memory. If the end result still appeals to you, today is as good a day as any to set a resolution. Commit to a goal that you would like to achieve a few months from now and find a willing training partner – today. Failing that, make a decision to book a specific time to meet a fitness instructor, sport psychologist or a friend who will encourage

you to sit down once a month to assess and reevaluate your fitness or sporting goals. Be aware of whether you are more concerned with mastering a certain skill set, winning a medal or hearing positive feedback from people around you and set your goals accordingly and realistically. I wish you the very best of success in your journey to fitness.

Niamh Flynn, MBA MMEDSCI BA CI DHP, is a sport psychologist based in The Galway Clinic. Her book for migraine sufferers, ‘ProMigraine’ is on sale from www.promigraine.com

Whatever your fitness plans were for 2013 on January first this year all is not lost if they are now but a distant memory. If the end result still appeals to you, today is as good a day as any to set a resolution

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Dr Eva’s Top Tips

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HEALTH TOP TIPS

Operation Transformation’s Dr Eva Orsmond gives her top 10 tips for weight loss to The Waiting Room

1. Face the numbers Use an online calculator to find out your Body Mass index. A healthy BMI falls between 18.6 and 24.9. Use this to work out what your healthy weight should be. Measuring your waist is also a quick way to see what you should be – a woman’s waist should be less than 80cm and a man’s less than 94cm. Look at yourself in the mirror and be critical!

8. Sleep well Make sure you get enough rest. Seven to eight hours of unbroken sleep is preferable, and once in a while lie in, and have an extra-good rest.

9. Keep motivated Treat yourself and reward your weight loss success. Rewards don’t need to be food. They could be cultural, buying some new gadget or clothing, doing a trip somewhere, or just having a relaxing few hours.

2. Find a reason Write down why you want to lose weight. It will help as a reminder during minor lapses. A medical reason (eg high cholesterol, diabetes, high blood pressure) should be motivating enough.

10. Rely on support Losing weight is so much easier when you do it with someone else. You can motivate each-other and be there to support when things get tough. Your “buddy” does not necessarily need to be losing weight, their goal might be to get fit or learn a new skill, but all the better if the goals are similar.

3. Have a target I suggest 10% weight loss in 12 weeks as the first step – the ultimate weight goal might take months to achieve, so can be daunting, so take it a step at a time. You could lose 10% weight in 6 weeks using a very low calorie diet, but this should be done under professional supervision.

4. Plan ahead Plan your eating and exercise routine for the week ahead. Make sure you have all the ingredients to cook your meals, missing some vital ingredients could just be the frustration pinnacle that ruins the plan. My book “The Last Diet” is full of great tasty recipes and advice to help you.

5. Have a health check Your GP might want to screen your for high cholesterol, diabetes or an underactive thyroid. If you are diabetic, you may need more professional guidance as your medication will need to be reduced. 10

6. Clear the cupboards If your kitchen doesn’t contain unhealthy foods, you are less likely to succumb to temptation. A de-cluttered kitchen is also easier to cook in. Get some decent utensils, pots, a wok etc to make cooking so much easier.

7. Get moving Explore new areas of exercise. I recently tried belly dancing and pole dancing, and loved them both! Find something that you like so that it motivates you. Team sports are great at motivation but might not suite everyone.

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TOP TIPS HEALTH

Chicken Stir-Fry with Ginger and Coconut Milk

Serves 1

5ml/ 1 tsp olive oil 150g chicken breast cut in strips 100g/ 1 courgette sliced 100g cabbage cut in thin strips 50g/ ½ leek cut in small half circles 75g/ 1 small green pepper cut in strips 1 celery stick sliced 1/8 tsp red curry paste 1.5cm size of ginger grated 15ml/ 1 tbsp soy sauce 100ml light coconut milk 2 cloves garlic crushed ¼ vegetable stock cube ¼ tsp turmeric Fresh coriander to garnish How to prepare:

1. Cut leek in small half circles. Slice courgette and celery. Shred cabbage and cut pepper in strips. 2. Cut chicken in small strips. 3. Heat oil in non stick pan or wok and start by gently browning the chicken. 4. Add in all the vegetables, and stir frequently. Then add ginger, garlic, curry paste and soy sauce. 5. Melt vegetable stock cube in 100ml boiling water. 6. Pour in vegetable stock when ingredients start sticking to the wok and reduce heat. Cover and leave to simmer until vegetables and chicken are cooked. 7. Add coconut milk and turmeric. Cover and simmer for further 2-3 minutes, stirring occasionally. 8. Serve with fresh coriander sprinkled over the top. FEBRUARY / MARCH 2013 | THE WAITING ROOM

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Choosing the right contraception for you HEALTH CONTRACEPTION CHOICES

Choosing a contraception that fits your lifestyle, age, relationship status, and budget is important when it comes to your sexual health

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Contraceptive options have never been greater for women and men with more than a dozen options available – there is something to suit most people. When contraception is used correctly and consistently it is very effective in preventing crisis pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections – most methods available are 99 per cent effective. The most common form of contraception used by people are condoms and the contraceptive pill. Other methods, such as contraceptive patches, rings and implants have become more popular in recent years. They offer more effective protection as you do not have to remember to take them every day. More young women are choosing these methods. They are medium term (once a week – up to three years) and are easily reversible. Older women are increasingly likely to choose longer acting methods of contraception such as the coil/IUD. We know from research that although the up-front costs of long acting methods are more expensive, use of these methods by women in the long

term are more cost effective than other methods, such as condoms and the pill. However, medium or long term methods of contraception do not provide protection from sexually transmitted infections. Sometimes things don’t go as planned so if your contraceptive method failed, or has not been used, emergency contraception can be used to avoid a crisis pregnancy. There are different emergency contraception choices for different situations; depending on how long it has been since you had unprotected sex and when you had your last period. Emergency contraception is more effective the sooner you take it after having unprotected sex. Ask a pharmacist for a private consultation or talk to a GP or Family Planning Clinic about the best option for you. Remember, if you have had unprotected sex you may be at risk of getting a sexually transmitted infection (STI). Condoms are the only method of contraception that protect against most STIs. STIs are infections that

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are passed on from an infected partner(s) during unprotected sex. They are caused by specific bacteria and viruses. There are many different STIs – some are more common than others e.g. Chlamydia. Most can be cured with medication. It is good sexual health practice to get an STI check regularly. A GP, Family Planning Clinic, STI clinic or GUM clinic can carry out STI screening. Visit thinkcontraception.ie for a list of STI clinics in Ireland. If you would like to know more about the contraceptive options available to you, talk to a doctor or Family Planning Clinic. During your consultation with the doctor he/she will take you through all options to help you find the best contraceptive method for you.

www.thinkcontraception.ie

provides information on contraception choices, sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and reproductive health in a clear and user-friendly manner YOUR FREE COPY


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CONTRACEPTION CHOICES FEATURE

There are a number of leaflets that can help you make your decision. To order a copy of any of the leaflets outlined below visit healthpromotion.ie. Think

Contraception

leaflet provides information on fertility, various types of contraception, including emergency contraception and how to put on a condom correctly and STI screening.

Your Guide to Emergency Contraception leaflet provides

Contraception 35-55 leaflet outlines contraceptive methods for those in the older age group, information on fertility, menstrual cycle changes and perimenopause.

information on the different forms of emergency contraception available.

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The Gathering:

FEATURE THE GATHERING

Welcome home in 2013

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H

ere we are in 2013. For those of you who don’t know it is the “Year of the Snake”. This is quite ironic when one considers it is also the year of “The Gathering”, the Irish Government’s muchcriticised attempt to bring the diaspora back to the home country for what will surely be an almighty St Patrick’s Day parade! The Gathering is a Government-backed, year-long festival in which Irish expats and indeed anyone with an interest in Ireland are encouraged to visit the country during 2013. Instead of holding new events the Gathering will sponsor hundreds of preexisting festivals and events throughout the year. From an initial core budget of €5 million, the Government hopes to attract an extra 325,000 visitors and generate €200 million in tourism revenue. In turn, the Irish people are expected to extend a huge “Cead mile Failte” to family and friends abroad, as well as anyone tempted to come and explore their Irish heritage this year. According to the organisers, some 70 million people worldwide claim Irish ancestry – are there enough spare bedrooms and couches to hold them all is the question! Joking aside, The Gathering may not just be a futile exercise in attempting to increase tourism revenue. The US Navy vs Notre Dame football game held in the Aviva Stadium last year was a major boost for the tourism industry. Some 40,000 Americans descended on the capital for the event, and many travelled further afield during their visit to the home country. It was estimated that this influx of visitors may have provided a boost of up to €100 million to the Irish economy. Who hasn’t travelled to the US and immediately been asked once our brogue is heard “Do you know the Duffys from Killaloe?” Having established that we possibly don’t know absolutely everybody on the Emerald Isle, we then scarper before they can extract our home address and an invitation to visit. That said, many of us have some dear relatives and friends who made the move abroad years ago, not only since the rise in emigration catalysed by the ongoing recession. So is this as good an excuse as any to party like it’s 2006 and call everyone home for a knees-up? Normally charming Irish actor Gabriel Byrne may have lost himself a few fans when he suggested that the initiative was “a scam” and said that all the Government were trying to do was “shake down” our long lost relatives for a “few quid”. Tourism Minister Leo Varadkar was quickly on the case suggesting that Mr Byrne was only attractive to “women of a certain age”. The spat received so much attention, tourism chiefs reckon it may have actually given the event a serious boost. Petty squabbles aside, many people are using the year long event as an incentive to organise their own events and family reunions. See thegatheringireland.com for tips on how to create your own gathering! YOUR FREE COPY

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THE GATHERING FEATURE

“According to the organisers, some 70 million people worldwide claim Irish ancestry – are there enough spare bedrooms and couches to hold them all is the question!”

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HISTORY THE ACADEMY AWARDS

THE POPCORN RECESSION

The Oscars are as glitzy as ever, no matter what state the economy is in 16

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ceremony continued to be held on an annual basis. Some 84 years later, we once again find ourselves in the midst of a global economic fallout, and Hollywood appears to be recessionproof, with ticket sales increasing year on year. Indeed, the film industry has observed an increase in box office and attendance in six of the eight last recessions, showing that escapism is key for those struggling financially. That may finally be changing however. Last year saw the lowest ticket sales since 1995 at cinemas, and a recent survey saw six out of 10 adults admitting they never or rarely go to the movies. Of course, it is well known that the Oscars does not reward big ticket sales – this year’s nominees are far from blockbuster movies. Nevertheless, the 85th Academy Awards, due to be held on February 24th, will no doubt, as always, attract the attention of the world.

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THE ACADEMY AWARDS HISTORY

Photograph credit: Rick Salyer

The 1st ever Academy Awards ceremony was held in the Blossom Room of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel on May 16, 1929

he year 1929 is synonymous with “Black Tuesday” – this was the year that the stock market crashed and marked the start of the Great Depression. That year, however, was also the first time the Academy Awards, affectionately known as the Oscars, were held in Hollywood. The first ever Academy Awards ceremony was held in the Blossom Room of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel on May 16 1929. There was little suspense when the awards were presented that night: the recipients had already been announced three months earlier. The first presentation was the only one that didn’t have a media audience; by the second year, enthusiasm for the Awards had grown so much that a Los Angeles radio station produced a live one-hour broadcast of the event. The ceremony has been broadcast ever since – last year’s broadcast reached a worldwide television audience of hundreds of millions. Yet instead of the fledgling movie business suffering like every other sector during the harsh years of the Depression, it went in much the opposite way. Hollywood responded to the sentiment among the ordinary American people, and produced movies that were either “socially conscious” or tempered escapism. In turn, the public continued to flock to the movie theatres during these years of unprecedented hardship – between 60 million and 80 million Americans went to the cinema at least once a week or more. It is thought that Hollywood played a vital psychological role in maintaining national morale during that time and the Oscar

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Only three times in its more than 80-year history has the Academy Awards failed to take place as scheduled. The first was in 1938, when massive flooding in Los Angeles delayed the ceremony by a week. In 1968 the Awards ceremony was postponed from April 8 to April 10 out of respect for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., who had been assassinated a few days earlier, and whose funeral was held on April 9. In 1981 the Awards were once again postponed, this time for 24 hours because of the assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan.

This year, nine out of the 20 acting nominees are previous winners, including all five up for supporting actor: Daniel Day-Lewis, Denzel Washington, Alan Arkin, Robert De Niro, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Tommy Lee Jones, Christoph Waltz, Sally Field and Helen Hunt.

Les Miserables is the first musical to make the bestpicture cut since 2002's Chicago won the category. Only nine other musicals in Oscar history have taken home the big prize of the evening: The Broadway Melody (1929), The Great Ziegfeld (1936), Going My Way (1944), An American in Paris (1951), Gigi (1958), West Side Story (1961), My Fair Lady (1964), The Sound of Music (1965) and Oliver! (1968).

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ADVERTORIAL DRINK AWARE

Alcohol

A GUIDE FOR PARENTS

Young People and Alcohol, can parents have an Influence? by Mark Morgan and Thérèse Hegarty THE

PURPOSE OF THIS ARTICLE IS TO HELP PARENTS TO DISCUSS DRINKING WITH THEIR CHILDREN. Although it is mainly aimed

at the parents of teenagers it may also be useful for parents of younger children and, generally, for all adults concerned with the development of children. This article has been prepared by professionals who have expertise in the area of young people and alcohol but it does not set out to tell parents what they must or must not do. Instead it tries to provide useful information, which may help parents to openly discuss the issues with their children.  Parents have an important influence on their children’s behaviour. Many parents may be surprised by this – but it is true!  A key guiding idea is that alcohol consumption requires maturity and responsibility. For this reason postponing a first drink to an agreed age has a lot of merit. The exact age will need to be negotiated between children and parents and we take the view that the age of drinking by many young people is too young.  Better information can help parents to make the right decision. It is important to note that the latest research suggests delaying teenage drinking for as long as possible is the best option. A young person’s brain will continue to develop into their early twenties so the potential for damage and poor decision making will be reduced if they start drinking at a later age.  In Ireland, drinking patterns differ from, for example, wine producing countries – where children are introduced to alcohol in the home. We also differ in where alcohol is drunk, what we drink and in many of our attitudes. INFLUENCES Many factors influence the drinking patterns of young people.

FAMILY Families are of major importance in children’s drinking. Your example is important. We are not saying that all parents who abstain from alcohol will have children who are abstinent or temperate. Nor are we suggesting that the children of heavy drinkers will necessarily have drinking problems. What is clear however is that parents

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who drink moderately have children whose use of alcohol is quite different to the children of those whose drinking is problematic. How you react to their drinking is also important. The research shows that a moderate and balanced approach to underage drinking is most likely to bring about positive outcomes. In other words if parents take an indifferent attitude it does not produce positive results and a very strict and authoritarian attitude can also cause problems. Many recovering alcoholics remember their childhood as one where love was not communicated and where they felt they were not valued. The research indicates that children who feel loved and valued are less likely to abuse alcohol. We often worry that alcohol problems ‘run in families’ and will be inherited by the children. This is not necessarily true – alcohol problems develop over several years – and we should focus on those conditions in the individuals’ lives which give rise to problem drinking.

FRIENDS Parents identify peers as the most important influence on their children’s decision to start to drink. This is understandable – young people who drink regularly are likely to have friends who drink, while those who do not are likely to have friends who do not drink. Whether to drink (or not) is one of the most central decisions during adolescence and influences the selection of friends. Many of us worry about ‘peer pressure’, which is often considered to come from all the peer group in the locality and school. The reality however is that it is the peer group of those selected friends, especially best friends, which matters most.

SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY You may know about the Social, Personal and Health Education (SPHE) programme, which is now running in most schools in the country. This focuses on the health, personal development, decision making and self esteem of young people and it also deals with the use of alcohol. However we cannot leave it all to the schools and, as parents, we can influence our children’s attitude to school and to participation. ‘She will be taught about alcohol at school soon enough – maybe I should

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leave alcohol education to the experts. Besides, I don’t want to put ideas in her head before she’s even a teenager.’ When a young person drinks too much it is usually part of a broad set of behaviours. Here are some suggestions that can help prevent these behaviours: • Encourage commitment at school – either to study or sport or other activities; • Find out about your school's policies on alcohol. Partnership between parents and schools is likely to bring about a better outcome than any effort made by either on their own; • Encourage children to read or to take up a hobby that does not involve drink. Moving from Primary to Secondary school is a stressful time – new subjects, new teachers, possibly new classmates and making new friends. If the transition isn’t smooth young people are more likely to become involved in underage drinking. Our children may want to appear ‘grown up’ at this time but in fact they are very vulnerable and we need to be alert to any changes and be available for a chat. Teachers have insights into our children which we may not have. Many are parents themselves and they all play a significant role in our children’s formation. Do talk to them if you have concerns about alcohol abuse.

HOW YOU CAN HELP Alcohol abuse is not confined to any particular sector in society. You can be sure that your teenager (or preteen) will be offered alcohol. You cannot be sure that your children will not make silly mistakes with alcohol. Young people who come through all this with responsible drinking habits often share many of the following characteristics: Healthy self esteem. They know their own strengths and weaknesses and have the confidence to know they are liked and to like themselves. Because of this they are unlikely to harm or abuse themselves. Parents can encourage selfesteem by being supportive of their children’s efforts from an early age and being willing and interested listeners to their ups and downs. They can make decisions. There are many influences on young people, often with conflicting messages. These young people can make up their minds without worrying too much what YOUR FREE COPY


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DRINK AWARE ADVERTORIAL others think. Parents walk a fine line here. Too much control and children have no opportunity to think for themselves – too little and they may feel that decisions are not important. What young people need is encouragement to think on their feet, follow their own advice and resist following the herd at times. They understand that some rules are necessary. Through learning to live with clear and reasonable rules young people develop personal responsibility. Parents can help by having a few clear rules at home and by explaining the values behind the rules. A rule about telling those at home where you are going and what time you will be home is a great protection. They appreciate the value of money. They realise that they must manage on a limited amount of money. Parents can limit their children's pocket money or control the amount available from parttime jobs – by, for example, requiring a contribution to collective household expenses from income earned outside the home. They are busy with interesting lives. Some are involved in school, others in sport, dancing, music or youth clubs. They do not have much time to be bored. Boredom is one of the greatest causes of alcohol abuse. Try to spot their talents early and give them every encouragement to develop them. Their families drink in moderation, if they choose to drink, or are open about their problems. They have seen their adult relatives drink in a moderate way, and have seen them choose not to drink on occasion (e.g. when driving). Alternatively, if there are problem drinkers in the family, these issues have been openly and frankly discussed with them. Children of alcoholic parents can use lessons from frank and compassionate discussion of the issue to help protect themselves and their friends. Children are not taken in by appearances – they are more influenced by what we do than by what we say. Teenagers in particular are rarely fooled at home and honesty is certainly the best policy.

PARENTS’ WORRIES “How do I explain the dangers of drink?” Most adults in Ireland take a drink when relaxing and socialising and it is helpful to acknowledge the enjoyable aspect of this. It is also helpful to discuss with young people the harmful aspects such as losing control, taking risks and wasting money. A good time to bring up these discussions is when watching TV when the issue arises. We can talk to our teenagers, listen to their views and convey information and guidance in a distanced way that is not too threatening for them. This has proven more useful than scare tactics or punishment, which can turn young people off. “I worry about the friends they are with.” The ‘best friends’ have a lot of influence in the development of a pattern of drinking. Parents are wise to be aware of the pattern of drinking among young people in the area. It is also helpful to get to know the ‘best friends’ and make them welcome at home. Often parents criticise friends when they fear their influence. This can lead to a young person feeling torn between YOUR FREE COPY

parents and friends and this is not helpful in maintaining good communication. It is better for parents to convey their worries about the safety of the young people than to run down the friends themselves. “Will they end up in a fight?” We also need to discuss the increasing trend towards rowdy and violent behaviour, often under the influence of alcohol, and to clearly state that violence at all levels is unacceptable. Parents can help teenagers to think about places that are dangerous and how levels of alcohol consumption can leave them vulnerable to involvement in fights. Young people need the older generation to be clearly concerned with their safety. “I’m so worried I can’t sleep.” Parents often worry when their teenagers begin to drink. Often that fear is not so much about the drink itself as the consequences of drinking. At its worst the fear can be about drink related violence or poor decision making around sexual activity. “Are they having sex?” We all worry about pressure on our children as they enter puberty and the confusion and anxiety that can follow. The age of sexual activity has fallen and peer pressure along with media pressure can make decision making difficult. Sometimes young people drink in response to this pressure and alcohol consumption can lead to inappropriate decisions. Parents can make it clear to their sons and daughters that sexual activity is always their choice and it is always OK to say "NO". Once again TV and films can provide us with opportunities to discuss this with our young people. “I just don’t know how to begin. I know she drinks sometimes when she’s out with her friends. She’s usually quite a sensible girl, but I just hope she doesn’t take any stupid risks. Should I have drink in the house?” Most households do have drink at home and will often offer a drink to visitors. Drink however needs to be kept in a place where younger children cannot access it by accident. It is unfair to teenagers, especially if parents are away for a night, to leave them in a situation where they have access to a large supply of drink at home especially during the years when they are likely to experiment.

USEFUL CONTACTS Your school’s Parents Council Your school’s Home Liaison Officer Your Health Board's Health Promotion Officer Your local Residents Association VISIT DRINKAWARE.IE for information on alcohol and drinking, from fascinating facts to practical tips. DOWNLOAD FREE GUIDES including the 'Student Survival Guide' the 'Festival Survival Guide', 'Alcohol Sport & You' and the 'Christmas Survival Guide'. OTHER USEFUL PUBLICATIONS: ‘Straight Talk - A guide for parents on teenage drinking’ published by the HSE

drinkaware.ie was developed by MEAS (Mature Enjoyment of Alcohol in Society Limited) MEAS is a drinks industry initiative against alcohol misuse MEAS,Merrion House, 1/3 Lower Fitzwilliam Street, Dublin 2. Tel: 01 611 4811 Email: info@meas.ie www.meas.ie

Young People & Alcohol Quiz

ARE THESE STATEMENTS TRUE OR FALSE? 1 The average age of beginning to drink is 14-15 years FALSE Since the early 80's the average age of beginning to drink has reduced from 15 years to 13 years. The whole 'timetable' of drinking (starting with an occasional drink and following with more regular drinking) is now earlier than a generation ago, but has levelled off, with recent (2011) evidence showing it has increased somewhat. 2 The number of young people who have never tried alcohol has decreased over the years. TRUE There has been a dramatic change here. Thirty years ago about 1 in 4 those leaving post-primary school had not tried alcohol even once.Today the number reaching 18 without having tried alcohol is very small. Some teenagers start to drink because they wrongly think all teenagers are drinking. Recent research shows that the number of teenagers under 15 experimenting with alcohol has dropped and that half of 15 year olds are not regular drinkers. Delaying drinking reduces the risks of harmful drinking in later life. 3 Under 18's know that they will not be able to buy alcohol, even if they want to FALSE Young people aged from 16 upwards say that they can get access to alcohol if they want to. (We are not suggesting that alcohol is always easily obtained – what is crucial is that young people see it as easy to obtain). 4 There is more drinking in cities than anywhere else FALSE People from all backgrounds begin to drink at roughly the same age. 5 All young people do not start drinking in the same setting TRUE There are three broad locations for the 'first drink'. Own home or home of a friend (sometimes when parents are away), pubs/off- licences (sometimes bought by a 'friend' who is overage), and parks/beaches/ waste-ground. 6 The changes in Irish Society are part of the picture that influence the drinking of young people TRUE Childhood is shorter in modern Ireland than it was even 20 years ago. Young people are independent minded at an earlier age, are sexually active, and make decisions about their lives earlier. 7 The best time to talk to your children about alcohol is when they enter the early teens FALSE Children often ask about alcohol and drinking when they are very young. When this happens a positive response is better than ducking the issue. Many parents do not see the need to raise the subject until their children reach their teens when they apparently start drinking alcohol. Ideally you should speak to your child before he or she is likely to start experimenting with alcohol.

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FEATURE ROMANCE

DOES ROMANCE DIE WHEN YOU’RE OVER THE HILL?

As the build-up to Valentine’s Day begins, for one NUI Galway researcher it’s an opportunity to ask the over sixties to tell her about love 20

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ate Burke, a doctoral student at NUI Galway, wants to examine the importance of romantic relationships for people over the age of 60. She has created a questionnaire and ideally needs around 200 people to participate. Apart from being over 60, participants should also either be in a romantic relationship or have been in a relationship within the last 10 years. “We are hoping to identify the most important elements of successful romantic relationships, and how these factors influence one another”, explains Kate, who is a Trainee Clinical Psychologist and carrying out her research under the supervision of Dr Michael Hogan, Lecturer in Psychology at NUI Galway. Successful romantic relationships are recognised as being beneficial for psychological wellbeing and physical health. Communication, intimacy, sex and love have been found to be important in relationship satisfaction, however this research is usually completed with younger couples. “Older adults are largely neglected when it comes to this kind of research”, says Kate, “with the focus being on younger people and newlyweds. However, I think older people have

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ROMANCE FEATURE a lot of experience and can offer a different perspective that younger people can’t.” In order to create the survey, Kate has already carried out some in-depth research with a group of younger people, and older people. Using what’s known as collective intelligence methodology, Kate was able to establish some stark differences between the focus groups. “So far, in testing this research area, we think that older people see honesty as being the fundamental driver of all other elements of successful romantic relationships. Honesty is an interesting concept as it involves self-disclosure and risks putting an individual in a vulnerable position, and yet the ability to disclose honestly can facilitate a deeper level of intimacy in the relationship. The older adult group were able to draw on their experience and recognise honesty as critical to the long-term success of romantic relationships.” For younger adults, communication and trust significantly enhance all elements of relationship success. Older adults also acknowledged the importance of communication and both younger and older adults identified intimacy as an important component of relationship success. Meryl Streep and Tommy Lee Jones in Hope Springs. Image: Columbia Pictures

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However, there were also differences in the elements of relationship success identified by younger and older adults. Specifically, older adults argued for the importance of religion, companionship, and respect, whereas younger adults argued for the importance of attraction, compatibility and love. “The survey will hopefully build on our previous findings and provide some statistical information about this interesting topic, allowing us to learn more about what’s important in loving relationships for older people. The survey itself is a series of tick box questions, and hopefully should only take people half an hour to fill out. It would be great if people could share their experience with us.” Those who wish to participate in the online study should log onto https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/MBNJ9CL Participants can also complete the survey in paper format by contacting Kate on 0879451299 or kateburke85@gmail.com. All participants’ data will be kept confidential with no identifying information attached to the questionnaires.

“We are hoping to identify the most important elements of successful romantic relationships, and how these factors influence one another”

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HEALTH SLEEPING TIPS

Dreamy sleepy nighty snoozey snooze zzzzzzzzz

WHY AREN’T YOU SLEEPING? TIPS ON HOW TO SUMMON THE SANDMAN, AND ADVICE ON WHAT TO CHOW DOWN BEFORE YOU BED DOWN, WITH A LIST OF FOODS THAT WILL HELP YOU ON YOUR WAY TO DREAMLAND

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odern life is hectic, and most of us long for that time when we can crawl under the duvet and switch off the light. Yet sometimes, as tired as we are, sleep just won’t come! Former UK Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher famously survived on just four hours sleep each night, supplemented by naps in the backseat of her car between crisis meetings. Yet most of us need between seven and eight hours to feel normal the following day, and if sleep is broken, we aren’t able to function properly. Primary insomnia is defined as a “complaint of difficulty initiating or maintaining sleep or non-restorative sleep for at least a month”, and there are lots of

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reasons why someone may have trouble sleeping. Sleep experts say that the first steps are to look at underlying personal or lifestyle issues, possible mood disorders or anxiety, and other medical problems or sleep disorders such as restless legs or obstructive sleep apnoea. Second steps then include establishing a sleep diary, limiting time in bed to seven to eight hours, with no napping allowed; limiting caffeine; reducing alcohol; and exercising. A concept that many people haven’t heard of is that of “sleep hygiene”. This is nothing to do with washing your bed sheets, strangely enough, but rather it

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involves trying to stick defined sleeping times and addressing poor sleep habits. That means no daytime naps, sticking to a defined bedtime each night, and avoiding alcohol and caffeine before bed. Yet some sleeping problems cannot be helped. For example, pregnancy is a time when many women notice their sleeping patterns interrupted. Indeed, women experience different sleeping habits during each trimester of pregnancy. During the first trimester 13-80 per cent of women experience sleep difficulties, with longer sleep times but lower sleep efficiency. This is caused by the increase in steroid hormones at this time. In the second trimester there is a “grace

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SLEEPING TIPS HEALTH

period”, where sleep time falls, but deep sleep increases, while in the third trimester 66-97 per cent of women experience problems, with more napping and lying in but also issues such as restless legs experienced. Studies have shown that women who experience poor sleep patterns in late pregnancy are more likely to experience longer labours and have a Caesarean section. Also, it has been shown that long sleepers during pregnancy may have difficulties tolerating post-partum sleep deprivation, which may result in depression. Sleep disordered breathing Obstructive sleep apnoea occurs when there are repeated episodes of complete or partial blockage of the upper airway during sleep. During a sleep apnoea episode, the diaphragm and chest muscles work harder to open the obstructed airway and pull air into the lungs. Breathing usually resumes with a loud gasp, snort, or body jerk. These episodes can interfere with sound sleep. The prevalence of sleep apnoea is around two per cent in women but there is a lower prevalence in pre-menopausal women. Obesity is a major contributing factor and

recent studies have shown that children who are in the obese range can have disordered sleep due to breathing difficulties. Pre-menopausal women are less severe than men at the same weight but post-menopausal women are equal – suggesting an important hormonal role. Restless legs syndrome The prevalence of restless legs syndrome is between six and 15 per cent and is more common in women. Background medical problems that may cause the development of this distressing condition include pregnancy, anaemia, renal insufficiency and diabetes. Environment The environment in which you sleep is hugely important and can have a marked impact on the quantity and quality of your sleep. • Use comfortable bedding. Uncomfortable bedding can prevent good sleep. Evaluate whether or not this is a source of your problem, and make appropriate changes. • Find a comfortable temperature setting

for sleeping and keep the room well ventilated. If your bedroom is too cold or too hot, it can keep you awake. A cool (not cold) bedroom is often the most conducive to sleep. • Block out all distracting noise, and eliminate as much light as possible. Ever heard of the digital sunset? Televisions, radios and computers on standby…those little lights can actually stop you nodding off. • Reserve the bed for sleep. Don't use the bed as an office, workroom or recreation room. Let your body “know” that the bed is associated with sleeping.

Eat your way to a full night’s kip... Beans

Milk and night milk

Milk has always contained natural melatonin. Recently though, a new source was found: special milk crystals produced from milk obtained by milking cows at night. These crystals, called "Nachtmilchkristalle", contain up to one hundred times more melatonin than regular milk. "Interestingly, the natural melatonin found in milk is highly bioavailable, allowing the body to process it very well", explains Tony Gnann, from Munich-based company Milchkristalle. In addition, night milk contains a high concentration of tryptophan, an amino acid that speeds up the body's own melatonin synthesis. Tryptophan is responsible for the production of the hormone melatonin. Milchkristalle is stirred into milk and to be drunk approximately one hour before going to bed for best effect.

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Cherries

This tiny red fruit not only tastes splendid, it is also a real giant when it comes to vitamins. Cherries are known to be anti-inflammatory and a natural source of melatonin. A 2001 study published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has shown that the amount of melatonin contained in the Montmorency cherry can be up to 13,5 ng per gram of fruit pulp.

Beans and other vegetables contain high dosages of Vitamin-B, including B6, B12 and folic acids. These assist the body in regulating the sleep cycle and producing serotonin. Serotonin is an important starting substance in the production of melatonin, a hormone, which the human body releases mostly when it is dark.

Salmon

Nuts

Neurologists at the University of San Antonio have found those suffering from sleeping disorders should try eating a hand full of walnuts before bedtime. The study shows walnuts are a good source of melatonin and that the body can easily absorb it. The melatonin blood level rises threefold, when walnuts are consumed.

Salmon contains unsaturated docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a fatty acid in the omega-3 family. This acid can help stimulate melatonin production within the human body. That's good news, since melatonin regulates the human circadian rhythm, or sleep cycle. Other fish, such as the herring, also store large amounts of DHA.

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PROMOTION WEIGHT WATCHERS

LAUREN O’BRIEN

Tall and slim Lauren O’Brien tells us how she lost four stone and has maintained her weight loss for the last two years… Lauren's weight gain happened slowly. “I suppose it crept on bit by bit. Each time my clothes got tight, I'd make excuses to myself for having to buy bigger sizes. I just didn't want to admit the truth which was that I was overweight.” Both Lauren and her friend decided they would join the Weight Watchers meeting in nearby Naas. “I was nervous joining; I knew I was heavy and felt embarrassed; I got a big shock when I saw what I weighed, I really didn't think I was that size.” But her leader, Anna Doody, gave her great encouragement. “From week one she has given me nothing but support and I'll always be grateful to her.” Lauren was always sporty and had been ballroom dancing for more than ten years. “To help speed up my weight loss I started going to the gym and swimming. I tried as much as possible not to convert the Activity ProPoints® values I earned on food. That isn't to say I never used them. If a special occasion came around, it was great to know I had them there to use, but I wanted to dedicate the Activity ProPoints® earned toward my weight loss and not have them as a means of eating more food.” As well as having Anna's support, Lauren is quick to point out how supportive her

family and friends have been from the start. One person in particular has been right behind her and that's her grandmother, Granny Pearl. “Each week I'd phone her after the meeting; when I had lost weight, she'd tell me how great I was doing and when I wasn't, she'd tell me how great I'd do the next week. All along the way, she's been there for me. When she looks back on her old eating habits, how do they compare to the way she eats now? “In the past I just ate whatever and whenever I wanted to. I gave absolutely no thought to what I was eating. Take-aways were part of my week, every week, whether it was pizzas or Chinese - and not just savoury foods either, chocolate bars were a regular part of my diet too.” And now? “I still have my chocolate bars, but now I have the Weight Watchers bars instead. They taste just as delicious and cost me only a fraction of the ProPoints® values a regular bar would cost. In fact my mother, who doesn't need to lose weight at all, prefers the Weight Watchers bars!” The biggest difference Lauren feels is that now she's in control of what she eats, rather than being at the mercy of her own whims. “Sometimes I would spend more ProPoints® than I had

available but, rather than beating myself up about it, I'd remind myself that a gain of one pound was better than gaining a stone, so I'd just get back on track and carry on. When it came to clothes, Lauren used to think in terms of keeping herself hidden. Now that she's dropped four sizes, she loves experimenting with colours and styles. “I used to hesitate and feel very self-conscious, but not anymore. I love the soft, clingy dresses which are in fashion and it's great to be able to wear them. I also think that I wear my clothes better now because I feel so much more confident. I was always aware that my photographs would be on my social network site and that everyone would see me, but I don’t worry anymore about the dreaded tagging on Facebook!” Looking back, Lauren is amazed by the way her life has transformed since reaching goal. “Everything has completely changed for the better; it’s hard to believe I was the weight I was but here I am now. I look at what I’ve achieved and can’t believe I did it, people come up to me and tell me I inspire them and that’s a very surreal but nice feeling! Weight Watchers is a brilliant system, everyone there is so lovely and supportive, and my life now is just brilliant.”

Lauren O’Brien at 13st 11½lbs/88kg

Lauren’s Statistics Name: Lauren O’Brien from: Kildare Start weight: 13st 11½lbs/88kg Now: 9st 11½lbs/62kg lost: 4st/26kg Class: Naas Community Centre leader: Anna Doody

Lauren’s tips for success

Do it for YOU – and do it wholeheartedly. Take a good look at yourself and ask yourself if you're genuinely happy with what you see. If you are, great. And if you aren't, then maybe it's time to do something about it. As long as you deny the reality of your situation, nothing will change.” For people who are already on the road to success, she recommends they, “Take baby 





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steps, week by week. It won't always be pounds every week. Respect the half pound and keep your goal in mind. It would be such a waste to give up after all you've done.” And for people who are maintaining their weight? “Don't forget why you put on your weight in the first place, or you will end up slowly slipping back into the old ways and putting your weight back on.” Check out Lauren’s video on www.weightwatchers.ie 

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FOR C LASS D MEN O ETAILS: NLY AT WO R LO-CA K BY REQUE LL 1 ST WWW .WEIG 850 234 123 H TWA MEN W ELCOM TCHERS.IE MEETI E AT ALL NGS· AT HO 056 77 ME 222 76

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WEIGHT WATCHERS PROMOTION

Apple and Blackberry sponge

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20 MINUTES PREPARATION, 40 MINUTES COOKING. SERVES 6 4 ProPoints per serving, 23 ProPoints values per recipe, Vegetarian

Ingredients 2 large cooking apples (about 500g/1lb 2 oz) 300g (10 ½ oz) blackberries, fresh or defrosted 2 tablespoons golden syrup 3 eggs 75g (2 ¾ oz) caster sugar 75g (2 ¾ oz) self-raising flour, sifted twice

Instructions 1. Preheat the oven to Gas Mark 4/180°C/ fan oven 160°C. Peel, core and dice the apples. 2. Spread the apple and blackberries out over the base of a 20 x 30 cm (8 x 12inch) ovenproof baking dish and drizzle over the syrup. Bake in the oven for 20 minutes until starting to soften. 3. Meanwhile, put the eggs and sugar in a large heatproof bowl and whisk briefly to combine. Place the bowl over a pan of just simmering water, making sure the bowl doesn’t touch the water. Using a hand-held electric whisk, whisk the mixture for 8-10 minutes, or until pale, thick and at least double the volume. 4. Remove the bowl from the heat and gently fold in the flour with a large metal spoon. Pour the mixture over the fruit, spreading it out quickly and evenly. Bake for 20 minutes or until well risen and golden. Serve hot or cold.

Marrakesh Stew 4 PROPOINTS PER SERVING, 17 PROPOINTS VALUES PER RECIPE 20 minutes preparation, 20 minutes cooking Vegetarian, freezing

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Ingredients

Calorie controlled cooking spray 1 onion, chopped 1 tablespoon ras el hanout spice mix (available in large Tescos) 350g (12oz) carrots, peeled and chopped 400g (14 oz) butternut squash, peeled, de-seeded and diced 1 aubergine, diced 400g can chopped tomatoes 300ml (10 fl oz) vegetable stock 1 courgette, cubed 100g (3 ½ oz) ready-to-eat dates, chopped 410g can chick peas in water, drained and rinsed Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Instructions 1. Spray a large, lidded, non stick saucepan with the cooking spray and cook the onion for 5 minutes, covered, until soft. Add the ras el hanout and cook for 1 minute, stirring. 2. Stir in the carrots, butternut squash and aubergine and cook for 5 minutes until starting to brown, stirring occasionally. Add the tomatoes, stock, courgette and dates and simmer uncovered for 20 minutes. 3. Stir in the chick peas and heat through. Check the seasoning and serve immediately in bowls. Cook’s tip: Add a pinch of chilli flakes or powder to spice it up.

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TECHNOLOGY DR GADGET

Jason's Moyee Monster Chair

R O T C O D T E G D A G

Jason Goh designs mostly electronic products for companies like Hewlett-Packard, Panasonic and Siemens. However, like all children he wouldn't eat his greens! So his grandmother decided to utilise the time honoured tradition of scaring him into doing it. She told him that if he didn't finish up his dinner that his chair would turn into a giant monster and would eat him! For some people the result would entail hours/days of therapy. Jason went another route. He created the monster, turning it into a huge, furry chair which he christened Moyee. It's fab and something that both children and grown-ups would both like. Basically it is a massive furry sphere with a hole in the middle. You sit (if that's the right word, perhaps enter might be better), in the mouth which has a carpet dangling onto the floor like a large red tongue. It has a flat weighted base to keep it stable and interior lighting if you feel like reading or whatever. Jason is currently exhibiting at the National Museum of Singapore. Now the bad news. There's no cost on the Moyee as it is only a concept chair and no deal has been done yet to produce and sell them, but we'll keep you posted if we hear anything. In the meantime, I just want to try it, but not enough to go to Singapore.

Rubik’s Cube Bank

This is the so-called Rubik’s Cube Bank, which is made by Tokyo-based toy maker MegaHouse. As you can probably guess, this piggy bank requires brain power to save and get out money. The way it works is that you need to solve the yellow side in order to put money in and the green side in order to make the center tile pop out and get access to your coins. MegaHouse says the piggy bank can be used as a regular Rubik’s Cube as well. But I assume this will get difficult once the cube is filled up with coins, and sized at 100/100/100mm, the bank is pretty large, too. The Rubik’s Cube Bank is already on sale in Japan where it costs $40 US. Contact the Rinkya online store, www.rinkya.com, if you’re interested in getting one but live outside Japan.

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THE WAITING ROOM | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2013

The Lazy Chef's Fishtank

OK. I'm not saying you're lazy but this is worth a look. It's an indoor herb garden and a fish tank which, when combined together in this ingenious concept become a what the manufacturers call a ìclosedloop, ecosystem. This symbiotic approach appeals to the more ecologically conscious among us. The fish waste is recycled to naturally fertilise the plants above. Then, in turn, the plants clean the water for the fish swimming around below. What your pet goldfish makes of swimming around in basil or oregano scented water is anyone's guess but hey, it's a small compromise to make in order to own a fish tank that you NEVER have to clean out or change the water in. All that's needed now is a genetically engineered fish that likes to nibble on oregano plant roots and you could just forget about it. It costs $60 (roughly €44.26) plus shipping from a California-based online company called backtotheroots.com. Do they deliver to Ireland? I don't know. We were unable to find that out before going to press for this issue. Oh and fish are extra! Buy your own.


TWR - Feb/Mar 2013 - Issue 16:The Waiting Room - Summer 2012 - Issue 13

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TWR - Feb/Mar 2013 - Issue 16:The Waiting Room - Summer 2012 - Issue 13

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QUICK QUIZ

TheWaitingRoom

CROSSWORD

Across Question 1 Kiev is the capital of 6 Achieve a which country? desired result. a) France (7) b) Ukraine c) Poland

7 The stem of a plant. (5) 2 Question

What is the birthstone 9 July? Causes reduced for visibility, can a) Opal b) Sapphire obscure objects c) Ruby and memory. (4)

Question 10 Sentences 3 or Which is the only factual mammal capable of declarations. sustained flight? (10) a) Bat

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When completed, the letters in the shaded squares will spell out the winning word: A Planet’s Path

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WIN 2 nights B&B and one Evening Meal at CityNorth Hotel a member of Select Hotels

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No.16

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11 Specialists in c) Pandas oral healthcare. Question 4 (8)

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13 form of the A Sea? a) Neptune classical dance. b) Zeus Tutus required! c) Poseidon (6)

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HOW TO ENTER: Text TWR2 followed by your answer, name and address to 53307 or post your answers along with your phone number to us!

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Question 15 Make yarn5by Which French car NO TIME TO FINISH? NO WORRIES! THIS MAGAZINE IS YOURS TO TAKE HOME! combining shares its name with a 8 Young felines. Down fibres. Spiders Spanish born painter (7) DOWN do it! (4) ACROSS and sculptor? 1 Receiving Congratulations! a) Peugeot through 17 BrightXsara or glossy. The winner of last issues Crossword 1 Receiving something oered or 6something Achieve a desired result. (7)12 Moves b) Citroen Picasso is Theresa Doran from Co. Wicklow offered or water. (5) (5) c) Bugatti agreeing to something. (10) 7agreeing The stem ofto a plant. (5) 14 Ability to guide Terms: 18+. 60c per entry incl VAT. 18 As well or 6 in Question Faculties with which we 9something. Causes reduced(10) visibility, can or2 direct Network charges vary. Competition a addition. (4) closes midnight March 22nd 2013 Brochan is a Scottish Entries made after the close date interact with the world around 2 obscure objects and memory. (4) group. (10) Faculties with word for which type of do not count and you may be charged. 19 A light current breakfast food? SP Phonovation Ltd. PO Box 6, Dun which we us. (6)known as 10 Sentences or 16 Also Laoghaire, Co Dublin. Helpline 0818217100 of air. (6) a) Haggis interact with the parakeets. b) Porridge Enter at www.waitingroom.ie 3 A thought, (7) concept or notion. factual (10) worlddeclarations. around us. 20 They live under or write in to The Waiting Room, c) Cereal The Studio, Maple Avenue, (4) strict or 17 Most (6)Specialists in the rule of a 11 Stillorgan, Co. Dublin firm. (8) Question king. (8) 7 4 A group of people gathered 3 oral A thought, healthcare. (8) Who were the runners 21 Cut or torn concept or 23 Executive up in the 1994 body football together. (8) by 13 A form of classical dance. Fill in the grid so that each row, teeth. (6) world notion. (4) thatcup? runs a column and 3x3 square contain all 5 Cook using dry heat as in an the digits from 1 to 9 a) Italy Tutus required! (6) country. (10) 22 Device or trick 4 A group of b) France c) Ireland 26 A sharp

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What number in Bingo 27 Ladies is sometimes referred undergarments. to as 'Heinz varieties'? (5) a) 57 b) 47 28 A group of c) 37 closely related living things. Question 9 (7)

What is Scooby Doo`s favourite food? a) Scooby Snacks b) Tayto Crisps c) Doggy Drops

Question 10

What movement did Lord Baden Powell found? a) Girl Guides b) Boy Scouts c) Altar Boys Answers: 1b. 2c. 3a. 4c. 5b. 6b. 7a. 8a. 9a. 10b.

Crossword is open to readers aged 18 or over, are resident in the Republic of Ireland, except employees and their families of The Waiting Room Magazine, its printers, or anyone connected with the competition. The magazine is not responsible for entries lost, delayed or damaged in the post. Proof of postage is not accepted as proof of delivery. Any number of entries will be accepted. Winner will be the sender of the first correct entry to be drawn at random after the closing date. Winner will be notified by post, and only their name and the county in which they live may be published in the magazine. All personal information obtained through entry into this competition will be destroyed following its completion. Entry implies acceptance of these rules.

PUZZLES

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THE WAITING ROOM | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2013

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YOUR FREE COPY


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PUZZLES

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Cross reference

Charleroi

Paula won a round the world trip, visiting different Ciampino countries more than once and returning back to Ireland viaDublin a differentAirport airport to the one she originally departed from. Can you find all of the 20 Airports she used? Gatwick

Hamburg Heathrow Beijing JFK Casablanca Heathrow La Guardia Charleroi Lyon Airport Ciampino JFK Orly Dublin Airport Gatwick La Guardia Oslo Schipol Hamburg

Shannon Stansted Tempelhof Valetta Venice Winnipeg

Lyon Airport

Using fresh local healthy produce, award Orly winning Irish food company Just Food specialise Osloin premium handmade organic soups and are available throughout Ireland. Schipol Visit www.JustFood.ie

Win A Stansted Hamper Tempelhof of Just Food Valetta Products! Shannon

CRACK THE CODE AND WIN €50 Each letter of the Alphabet appears as a code. Complete the grid and it will reveal one of the greatest movie messages of all time. Then Text TWR3, followed by your answer, name and address to 53307 or post your answers to The Waiting Room, The Studio,Maple Avenue, Stillorgan, Co Dublin

Venice

post your completed WoRDSeARCh along with your name and address to The Waiting Room, The Studio, Maple Avenue, Stillorgan, Co Dublin. Winnipeg Closing date for entries is March 22nd 2013 YOUR FREE COPY

FEBRUARY / MARCH 2013 | THE WAITING ROOM

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TWR - Feb/Mar 2013 - Issue 16:The Waiting Room - Summer 2012 - Issue 13

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KIDS COLOURING PAGE

EASTER colouring fun for kids

image source: www.thecoloringbarn.com

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THE WAITING ROOM | FEBRUARY / MARCH 2013

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COLOURING PAGE KIDS

image source: www.thecoloringbarn.com

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FEBRUARY / MARCH 2013 | THE WAITING ROOM

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TWR16 February-March 2013