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TR US TE D J O U R NALI S M AT YO U R FI N G E RTI P S

NOVEMBER 23, 2020 VOL. 56, No. 47

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One reason Connecticut is in a stronger fiscal position at the moment than most other states is our $3 billion rainy day fund....”

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­­— Kevin Kelly

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E The new GOP state Senate Leader, Kevin Kelly of Stratford.

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INCOMING REPUBLICAN CT SENATE LEADER KEVIN KELLY DISCUSSES TOP ISSUES

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or years, Republican Len Fasano of North Haven embodied the phrase “loyal opposition” in Hartford. It seemed rare for Democratic Gov. Dannel Malloy or his successor, Ned Lamont, to make a decree without hearing in turn from Fasano, who rose from minority whip in 2003 to Senate Republican president pro tempore in 2017, a post he held until his retirement this year. But if anyone thought Fasano’s successor as GOP Senate Leader, Kevin Kelly of Stratford, would pose a lesser foil to Lamont, they should think again. Long an opponent of a state government-sponsored public health

insurance option, which Comptroller Kevin Lembo and State Senate President Pro-tem Martin Looney (D-New Haven) have indicated will be raised again in the next General Assembly session, Kelly makes no bones about why he thinks that’s a bad idea — and why one-party rule, which state Democrats will continue to enjoy next year, creates “an echo chamber where they only listen to themselves” — in this conversation with Business Journal Bureau Chief Kevin Zimmerman. Congratulations on being selected the next Senate Republican leader. Even though the next session of the General Assembly

doesn’t begin until Jan. 6, what do you see as your party’s legislative priorities going into 2021? “First and foremost is addressing the affordability of Connecticut, which is represented by a whole host of different factors. Health care is unaffordable, taxes are unaffordable. Republicans put forth a plan to make health care more affordable that’s been sitting on the shelf for two years. We would reduce health insurance premiums by 20% and keep high-paying Connecticut insurance industry jobs — all of which would be protected by the Affordable Care Act and therefore » KELLY

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Court rules Louis Cappelli doesn’t have to pay $1M BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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hite Plains developer Louis R. Cappelli does not have to pay a competing landlord $1 million that was assessed against his management company in 2013. The Second Appellate Court on Nov. 12 upheld a ruling by Westchester Supreme Court, finding that Cappelli Enterprises Inc. was not trying to make itself judgment proof when it wrote off more than $8 million in assets in 2011. White Plains Plaza Realty Inc. “failed to prove by clear and convincing evidence that Mr. Cappelli or Cappelli Enterprises

actually intended to hinder, delay or defraud any creditors,” the lower court judge, William J. Giacomo, had ruled in 2017. The dispute goes back to 2004 when New York Sports Club decided to move from One North Broadway, then owned by White Plains Plaza, across the street to Cappelli’s new City Center White Plains. The gym defaulted on its One North Broadway lease, and in 2011 a court awarded White Plains Plaza $900,562. But the New York Sports Club entity that signed the lease did not have the assets to pay the judgment. It was judgment proof. Cappelli Enterprises

had agreed to back New York Sports Club for liabilities from the One North Broadway lease. So White Plains Plaza sued the management company and, in 2013, won a $1,044,745 judgment. Cappelli Enterprises also was judgment proof, according to court records. So White Plains Plaza Realty sued Cappelli personally and Cappelli Enterprises, arguing that his sole ownership and control of the management company and 100some affiliates made them his alter egos. He had stripped assets from the management company, funneled » CAPPELLI

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Susan Rice addresses real world issues with Mount Vernon youngsters BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

I’ve been really lucky,” Susan Rice, a former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations and a former White House National Security adviser said about the presidents she had worked for when members of the Boys & Girls Club of Mount Vernon and others gathered for a virtual event Nov.16. “They have all different styles of leadership but they’re all smart and they all had good intentions. And, they’re all trying to serve the country for the right reasons. Not because they’re trying to get rich for themselves or set up their families or because they want power for themselves personally. They came to do things that they believed would be helpful to the American people,” Rice said about Presidents Bill Clinton, Barack Obama and PresidentElect Joe Biden with whom she worked while he served as vice president. “I never had to deal with somebody who was a bully in the role of the president, or somebody who was dishonest, or somebody whose motives were questionable,” Rice said during the online event without mentioning President Trump by name. “I would not want to serve, quite honestly, under a president whose integrity I doubted or whose mind I thought was not strong enough to do the job and who wasn’t there for the right reasons.” Mel Campos, chief professional officer of the Boys & Girls Club of Mount Vernon explained that some youngsters were watching the event at the club and other guests were viewing at their own locations. He said that the club has been serving Mount Vernon for 108 years and throughout the Covid-19 pandemic has been providing virtual programming and limited in-person activities for the city’s youth. Rice answered questions prepared by students who are members of the club that covered her government service and referenced her recently published memoir “Tough Love: My Story of The Things Worth Fighting For.” The book includes her experiences as a youth that started her on

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Susan Rice the road to becoming a diplomat and White House official. Rice made autographed copies of the book available as a fundraiser for the club. When asked about the major global issues she faced while in government service, Rice mentioned terrorist attacks, the rise of ISIS, aggressive action from Russia and China, the Ebola epidemic in West Africa that threatened to become a global pandemic and brokering peace agreements in various world hotspots. She said that she wrote in her book in 2019 that one of the issues short of nuclear war that gave her concern was the threat of a global pandemic. Rice urged the youngsters to learn about current events and become involved in the local community. “Education is everything. It’s not the only thing but it really is important,” Rice said. “There are so many aspects to it. It’s what you get in your early childhood, it’s what you get in high school, what hopefully many of you will get in college.” Rice herself had a stellar education, attending the National Cathedral School in Washington, D.C., a prep academy, followed by Stanford University. She was a Rhodes Scholar and did advanced FCBJ

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studies at the University of Oxford in England. “From my earliest entry into this business I was often one of the only women and almost always the only woman of color in any given meeting,” Rice said. “I had to draw on a lot of what I learned from my parents. The first thing was to always be as well prepared as I possibly could; do my homework and make sure I’d done it very thoroughly so that when I was in a discussion or meeting or making a presentation I knew what I was going to say and I knew that I could say it persuasively and effectively.” Rice told the youngsters that she learned from an early age that to succeed you needed to learn the skills to communicate effectively and write clearly and be a person who works well in teams. “I faced obstacles. I faced people who wanted to keep me out or keep me down because I was a woman or because I was black, or both, sometimes because I was very young,” Rice said. “Sometimes they would just sort of be dismissive. Sometimes they would be outwardly hostile and condescending. What I had to learn was that I wasn’t there to seek their permission or their approval. I was there to bring my best game every time I stepped

into the room and I had to do that with competence.” Rice urged the youngsters not to be deterred by people who will try to keep them down or be prejudiced against them because of who they are or what they look like or who they love or any number of other factors. “You can’t let other peoples’ definition of you become your own,” Rice said. “Bigotry, prejudice, is most often a function of the bigot’s own insecurity. They don’t feel good about themselves and so in order for them to feel better about themselves they’ve got to make somebody else feel badly. They’ve got to feel better than the other person.” Again, without using the name Trump, Rice directed her attention to the current administration. “We’ve had four years of the leadership of our country that has tried to put people down who look like us; who make us not just feel bad but face real-world obstacles that are more than we would otherwise have to face,” Rice said. “He’s tried to pit Americans against each other based on how they look and who they worship and where they came from and whether they’re immigrants or recent immigrants or long-ago immigrants or never immigrants, came here on slave ships, and that is deeply wrong and we have just said ‘no’ to that. We have said ‘no.’ We’re not going to continue to have leadership in the White House that is sowing hate and sowing division and propagating racism.” Rice told the youngsters she knows President-elect Joe Biden very well and he is a good and decent man. “He’s not going to be able to wave a magic wand and make it perfect. He can’t guarantee that Congress, particularly because we didn’t have enough change in Congress, is going to implement all of the programs and changes that I know he wants to make, but it will be better,” Rice said. “With time and progress and people like you becoming actively engaged and voting and running for office and demanding leadership that reflects your interests and your values it’s going to get better and better over time.”

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Redevelopment of Yonkers housing complex enters new phase BY PETER KATZ pkatz@westfairinc.com

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espite the disruptions to daily life caused by the Covid pandemic, the sixphase $296 million master plan to redevelop the Cottage Place public housing complex in Yonkers has continued to make progress with the recent closing on financing for phase five of the multiyear project. The overall project will create more than 500 new and renovated apartments in a southwest Yonkers neighborhood that’s along Warburton Avenue and somewhat north of Ashburton Avenue and south of Lamartine. More than 240 units have been completed so far. Phase five involves creating a $56 million eight-story complex of 81 apartments known as 178 Warburton at The Ridgeway. The development is by the Municipal Housing Authority for the City of Yonkers (MHACY), which has a property portfolio valued at $750 million, and The Community Builders (TCB), a nonprofit real estate developer that owns or manages more than 13,000 apartments in 14 states. “The whole area of Warburton that it is replacing has been radically changed,” Wilson Kimball, president and CEO of MHACY told the Business Journal. “In almost all of the cases the buildings were demolished.” She said some residents were moved into different apartments at Cottage Place Gardens and then moved back after construction had been completed while others were given Section 8 vouchers and allowed to move to different properties. “The tenants who are living in the new buildings love it there. They love the amenities, they love the way the buildings look, they love the finishes and they love the fact that this is a brand new housing complex,” Kimball said. Cottage Place Gardens, a public housing project that was built in 1945, had 256 apartments. The phase-five 178 Warburton building replaces Cottage Place’s buildings 4, 8 and 12 and a commercial space that had been a gas station. Among those funding phase five are MHACY, TCB, the city of Yonkers, the Westchester County Housing Implementation Fund, Community Capital New York and a number of New York state resources.

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Rendering of 178 Warburton at The Ridgeway. Sue McCann, senior vice president of TCB in charge of development in New York and New Jersey, told the Business Journal that the developer found the location in Yonkers to be especially attractive in view of the proximity to New York City. “Its one of our favorite projects because it’s really transformative,” McCann said. “We saw that there was much potential there and it just needed a little rethinking of the way that neighborhood had historically been laid out. When we originally planned for this site we didn’t know that the properties across the street from us that had been known popularly in Yonkers as ‘The Chicken Coops’ on the west side of Warburton would become available to us so it was opportunistic that we were able to buy those and add them into the development and provide better living opportunities for those folks as well.” McCann said that TCB’s design for the housing is a sharp break from the utilitarianism that makes some public housing projects of the 1940s and ’50s look sparse and grim today. “We are able to produce a real high-quality product that FCBJ

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any middle-class person would be happy to live in,” McCann said. “People are living here because of the affordable rents and they seem quite pleased. Seniors tend not to want to move from where they are currently living and so the seniors who moved into the building that was just for the elderly in our first phase, some of them can’t believe how nice it is.” Apartments at 178 Warburton will include Energy Star appliances, dishwashers and microwaves. There will be a fitness center, rooftop meeting space and lounge and free parking. The building will have green elements, including plumbing fixtures that conserve water and solar panels to generate some of the building’s electricity. There also will be an Early Head Start daycare center operated by the Westchester Community Opportunity Program Inc. The mix of units is set at six studios, 35 one-bedrooms and 40 two-bedrooms. McCann said that in addition to the Yonkers project, TCB is involved with two other projects, one in the Bronx and another in Queens. She also said that the company would like to do a

project in northern Westchester and has met with officials in one of the towns. Elected officials have welcomed the progress made in the Cottage Place Gardens project. Westchester County Executive George Latimer said, “The Covid19 pandemic has already put a tremendous strain on some of our most vulnerable communities and projects like The Ridgeway, which will serve a mix of incomes, show that we are moving in the right direction.” Yonkers’ Mayor Mike Spano said, “This new phase of Cottage Place Garden’s redevelopment points to the positive momentum happening right now in Yonkers as we revitalize our neighborhoods and improve the lives of residents who live here.” Kimball, who previously was the city’s planning commissioner, had this take: “Every home that is made better for a family or an individual or a senior in Yonkers is a huge improvement in the life of that family or that senior or that individual and for the life of the neighborhood and greater community. Our effort now that we’re coming into phase five is really about quality of life, bringing it up

to a better level than it ever was before.” Kimball said that an important lesson to be learned from the ongoing remaking of the Cottage Place area is that municipalities should not be afraid of long-term projects, even those lasting a decade. “One of the positive messages from Cottage Place Gardens is also that you can have a mix of incomes and that mix of incomes makes the housing richer and better for everyone,” Kimball said. “It shouldn’t be all one income of any kind. Mixing incomes is great. I think we’re seeing that in Yonkers and Westchester where affordable housing ordinances are providing a minimum of 10% affordable housing within market-rate projects.” Kimball said she anticipates that MHACY will have additional rehabilitation and new construction projects on its plate. “We’re willing and able to talk to developers across the spectrum, whether they’re doing new buildings or they’re renovating. We’re very interested in expanding our partnership portfolio and also building our own,” Kimball said.


Danbury Hat Tricks await chance to get back on the ice BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

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hen the Covid-19 pandemic took root in this country, the Danbury Hat Tricks hockey team was in pursuit of the Commissioner’s Cup, the crowning achievement of the Federal Prospects Hockey League (FPHL). “Back in March, we were going into our playoffs,” said Herb Sorcher, managing partner of the Hat Tricks. “We were probably a month away from finishing our season — and then, the shutdown happened. We were hopeful to continue it a month later.” One month passed and regular play did not resume. Sorcher glumly admitted that the team “saw the writing on the wall — it was just impossible.” Unlike the National Hockey League, which scraped together the remainder of its 2019-20 season after several months’ delay to hold the Stanley Cup playoffs within a so-called “bubble” of arenas without audiences, the FPHL canceled the remainder of its season. No games have been scheduled yet for the league’s 2020-21 season, and Sorcher is still hoping for an update on a potential resumption of play. “We’re waiting to get some good news from the state government that we can play,” he said. “But like the other professional hockey leagues — the National Hockey League and the American Hockey League — we’re now on hold.” However, the Danbury Arena-based team has not suspended its internal operations. Sorcher said the Hat Tricks were “constantly recruiting and constantly talking to players” — their most recent acquisition, 24-year-old Brett Gravelle, a forward who graduated from Minnesota’s University of St. Thomas this past spring, was signed on Nov. 10. Sorcher said the team’s players have been practicing throughout the pandemic. “The players are from all over the world,” he said. “They’re back in their homes and have been training on their own. We’ve had some guys who have come in here and trained a little bit, but for the most part, we haven’t really had any team activities.” Sorcher is grateful that the team’s fans have stayed loyal, showing their devotion with steady merchandise sales during the pandemic. “We’ve actually done really well with merchandise sales,” he said, claiming that having “one of the best logos” in hockey helps boost fan interest. “The merchandise is something that’s constant.” The Hat Tricks’ FPHL games are not televised — fans can watch them for free on YouTube. But Sorcher is eager to return to the Danbury Arena where attendance at Hat Tricks games ranges from 1,000 to 1,500 and food and beverage sales along with merchandise sales help keep revenues flowing. Sorcher is also eager for a return to the

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Jonny Ruiz, forward on the Danbury Hat Tricks, outskates his competition.

normalcy that enabled the Hat Tricks players to serve double-duty as brand ambassadors in the community. “We try to connect with groups and different organizations and do various fundraisers and promotions that will always lead to keeping the crowd strong,” he said. “For example, we’ll send our players into the school system and do an assembly where we’ll talk to the kids about never giving up and living your dream, and about the road to becoming a professional hockey player. “From there,” he continued, “we’ll connect with the school on doing a fundraiser for a project that they might have. And it’ll lead to getting all those kids who just saw the players and their families attending a game. We get a ton of hockey fans.” The team has built a considerable list of local corporate sponsors, but during the

pandemic Sorcher insisted that the team not ask for special favors from these sponsors, many of whom have also seen disruptions to business during the pandemic. “It’s a different climate,” he said. “What we have been doing is just staying in front of them, talking to them, seeing if there’s anything we can do for them, and then just setting it up for when we do get back that we will have some new ideas.” As for 2021, Sorcher remains optimistic that better days are ahead for the Hat Tricks. “Where do we see ourselves?” he asked. “I think we will be playing hockey and it will be an abbreviated season. And I think it’ll be it’ll be very quick and exciting though for our fans. Even if we start playing in January and February and we only play 40 games, I think our fans are going to come out and they’re going to support us big time.”

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regulated by the Connecticut Insurance Department. “The Democrats’ public option plan would put state government in direct competition with one of our flagship industries, which would be backed by Connecticut taxpayers and will cost Connecticut insurance jobs. Since it would be classified as a government health care payment program, not insurance, it would not be regulated by the Connecticut Insurance Department and would not have the protections of the ACA. So you would end up with something that would be overseen by the whim of the Connecticut legislature and the comptroller’s office. “The Democrats’ plan treats insurance companies in a way where they’re only involved to process claims. Two of the things that Connecticut does best is insurance and defense manufacturing. Why do away with one of things we do really, really well? Why would you want to chase them out of the state?” How do you view Connecticut’s financial standing at this point, given the costs of the pandemic so far and the still-unknown costs yet to come? “In this day and age, we don’t have revenue like we did and we can’t put more stress on the state budget. Recent reports have said Connecticut is dead last in job growth and dead last in personal income growth. Something like (the public option) is a bad proposal at a bad time. “There are 300,000 people in Connecticut without jobs right now — that’s way too many. And since most people get their insurance through their jobs, that just complicates the insurance problem even more. And that’s the Connecticut Democrats’ economy. They’ve had a decade of dominance, but we’re last in job growth and personal income.

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Cappelli—

millions of dollars to affiliates and manipulated financial records, White Plains Plaza Realty alleged, to make Cappelli Enterprises insolvent and judgment proof. Cappelli testified in the 2016 trial that the economy was in crisis in 2010 and he was renegotiating loans with his lenders. He had sold $50 million in personal assets to pay back banks and keep the company alive and he had guaranteed hundreds of millions of dollars in debts. He instructed Richard Dannenbaum, his chief financial officer, to clean up the books to give lenders a clear, more accurate picture of their worth. “All these … hundreds millions of dollars of problems that we had was not driven by a $900,000 lawsuit against Cappelli Enterprises,” he said. “I was personally on the hook on the personal guarantees for over $800 million.” The evidence, Giacomo found, estab-

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“One reason Connecticut is in a stronger fiscal position at the moment than most other states is our $3 billion rainy-day fund — and that exists because Republicans had a tie in the (state) Senate in 2017-18. That was one of the Republican planks in the bipartisan budget. If we hadn’t had that tie, Democrats would not have those planks in their budget today. “But we’re still looking at a $900,000 deficit in the current year and $3 billion the next. Fortunately, we got $1.4 billion in CARES Act funding from Washington. “But it’s the same when you’re doing your family’s budget. If revenue is up, you keep the budget where it is. If revenue declines, you have to start making some choices. We have to adapt and make changes as our circumstances change.”

law attorney, you’ve been understandably outspoken about how Connecticut’s seniors have been treated during the pandemic. How do you see that evolving? “We have to make sure that protection for our seniors, as well as those with comorbidities and complicated medical situations, is there. Even with vaccines on the horizon, we still have to get through this second wave and possibly a third wave. “We need to focus on the dignity and respect of individuals living in nursing homes. That’s their home, that’s where they live. And 90% of them are funded through Medicaid and Medicare. These are poor individuals, predominantly women, whose voices aren’t being heard.”

As ranking Republican of the legislature’s Aging Committee, and as an elder

Presumably that won’t be helped by the governor saying he is considering extending his executive order granting immunity to nursing homes and hospitals from lawsuits, except in cases of “crime, fraud, malice, gross negligence or willful misconduct”? “Where is the accountability going to come from? This is a population that is in many cases critically ill, frail and often suffering diminished capacity. “They need help because they can’t advocate for themselves. They lost their eyes and ears when family visits were curtailed — and I recognize that that was to fight against the spread of the virus — but how do we protect these folks? “You can consider putting cameras into those facilities, but then you have to ask what about giving workers their privacy? It’s okay to put a camera in your mother’s home, but it’s not okay if her home is in a facility? “Now we’re following CDC guidelines for indoor visits, which has gone from 20-minute visits per week to half-hour visits per week. Connecticut is looking to Washington for guidance, when we should be looking to ourselves.

lished that Cappelli Enterprises had not actually conveyed anything to other Cappelli entities. The management company merely made journal entries writing off receivables as uncollectible or bad debt. Nothing was paid, assigned, released, transferred, leased, mortgaged or pledged. “The evidence supports a finding that the journal entries were made in good faith,” Giacomo ruled. “Cappelli Enterprises was attempting to clean its books and accurately reflect its financial condition to its lenders. … The court finds Mr. Cappelli’s testimony credible in this respect.” Appellate Justices Betsy Barros, Mark C. Dillon, Colleen D. Duffy and Sheri S. Roman agreed. The journal entries did not convey anything and White Plains Plaza failed to establish that Cappelli or Cappelli Enterprises had committed a fraud.

Louis R. Cappelli

How do you get your party’s priorities through in the current environment, where you have a Democratic governor and, after this year’s elections, roughly 2/3 of both the state Senate and House controlled by Democrats? “One-party rule often becomes an echo chamber where they only listen to themselves. Our challenge is to find issues that affect everyone, like health care and show the public a better way. “Since 2014, a recurring theme has been how people are concerned about health care. The average household premium is about two grand a month. That’s very expensive and very difficult to meet. And Democrats haven’t brought any relief, so when Washington didn’t fund the ACA, premiums went through the roof. “The Republican plan would bring premiums down by 20% to around $400 to $500 a month. I believe that is something that will resonate with people.”

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“The Mathematica report found, among other things, that social isolation is as dangerous as Covid. It leads to depression, mental health decline, less optimism and weight loss — all of which can contribute to being more vulnerable (to Covid). “We recognize that due to the pandemic we need to keep up with social distancing, using PPE and reducing community spread to bend the curve in order to protect our most vulnerable. But last spring, it became evident that 70% of Covid-related deaths were in nursing homes, and there is no plan right now to make sure that doesn’t happen again. “In addition, a lot of these isolation rules were put into place back in March when we didn’t know much about the virus. Now we’re seven months down the road — have they learned nothing so we can have accountability if we’re not allowing onsite visitors?” You’ve outlined a number of disagreements you have with state Democrats and Gov. Lamont. How would you characterize your relationship with the governor? “I’ve worked with him on various issues over the past couple of years. Since I became leader, we’ve had some conversations. My hope is that the lines of communication will remain open. We don’t always agree — I don’t expect for us to always agree — but as long as discussions can be held in a candid and frank way, we can work together. He is open to dialogue.” I realize this is probably not the ideal time to ask, but still: The 2022 election is growing ever nearer. Do you expect to be a gubernatorial candidate? “(Laughing) It’s way too premature to think about that. I’m still getting my feet under me (as leader). This is my focus right now.”


Juice bar Barvida bringing clean nutrition to Darien BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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t would be hard for most people to turn down a chance at refreshment from a place whose name literally translates as “Life Bar” — and that is just what the owner/ founder of Barvida in Darien is hoping. “I’ve been involved in health and wellness my whole life,” Brennan Branca said at the new juice bar at 879 Post Road, noting that he was born in southern California — the unofficial home of health food — and that his interest carried through into adulthood. He moved with his family to Darien when he was 12. “Playing NCAA Division I soccer at Columbia University — where we co-won the Ivy League championship in 2016 — just helped me get more into it, which was awesome,” he said. “After college I held a number of jobs,” Branca continued. “I was a personal trainer, I interned at a finance company, I got my real estate license and worked at The Corcoran Group in New York City. But being from southern California and now in Darien, I knew there were a lot of differences in what a ‘juice bar’ could mean.” Part of that was determining what it shouldn’t mean, he said.

A worker at the new Barvida shop. “Some juice bars have been around for 20 years now, but they haven’t necessarily evolved over that time. Or they taste fantastic and have lots of cool colors, but not high-quality ingredients. They’re laden with sugar, which represents an unbelievable number of calories. That’s missing the mark, in my opinion.”

Instead, Barvida was created as a 100% organic, 100% plant-based juice bar and café which, Branca said, balances nutrition with a taste experience that doesn’t resemble munching on cardboard. “I’ve kept in contact with a lot of people out in San Diego,” he said. “Since I’ve done sports my whole life, I know a lot of train-

ers, nutritionists, physical therapists and so on. I went through my contacts and got a lot of them onboard to curate our menu.” That menu ranges from juices — the “Dope Detox” features kale, celery, cucumber, cilantro, ginger and lemon; the “Vital Eyes” includes carrot, apple, turmeric, ginger, lemon and cinnamon — to smoothies (such as “The Morning Show,” with banana, chocolate protein powder, cinnamon, dates, almond milk, cacao nibs, coldbrew coffee, espresso beans and sea salt), wellness shots and superfood bowls. Opening a restaurant is always risky, of course — and the timing of Barvida’s opening in the midst of a pandemic did give him some pause, Branca said. “But I saw this as an opportunity, to provide people with healthy, essential options,” he said. “Our menu has items that can actually boost your immune system, and our wellness shots are full of vitamin C. Now more than ever we need to be focused on building up our immune systems, and I think that will play in our favor.” In addition, “There’s nothing compared to owning your own business,” he said. “It’s cool, and a little scary. But I’m going through every process and finding my way around it — I’ve really learned a lot.”

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Potholes persist in the road to a Covid vaccine BY PHIL HALL phall@westfairinc.com

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hen Covid-19 first began to be identified in the U.S. in March, scientists and medical professionals had almost no firsthand knowledge of the virus. Eight months later, successful clinical trials of the first vaccines to mitigate the virus’ spread have been announced. “It’s amazing to me that in such an incredibly short time, we actually have possibly the first effective vaccine against this deadly virus,� observed Gina Kolata, science and medicine reporter at The New York Times during the recent virtual presentation “Covid-19 Vaccination: How and When Will the U.S. Get It? A Discussion of the State of the Coronavirus Vaccination.�

There are concerns about how you’re going to ship it out to everybody because it’s got to be kept at the same temperature as the South Pole on a cold winter day – and that’s not easy. ­­— Gina Kolata

Gina Kolata. Courtesy Fairfield University.

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It was sponsored by Fairfield University’s Regina A. Quick Center for the Arts and Marion Peckham Egan School of Nursing and Health Studies. Kolata, a two-time Pulitzer Prize finalist, acknowledged that while the speed of the vaccine development has been historic, there has also been an unprecedented level of skepticism and agitation over the efficacy of the development. “People always say: ‘Well, why should I take it when I don’t even trust this thing?’â€? she said. “In fact, I remember in the vice presidential debates when that question was asked of Kamala Harris and she said, ‘If Donald Trump said take it, I wouldn’t take it. But if the Food and Drug Administration and its experts said take it, I would take it.’ Which is obviously a political answer.â€? Kolata noted that the public health experts “have to do a real public relations campaignâ€? to convince people on the safety of vaccines. Complicating matters however is the fragmented nature of the vaccine development effort — Kolata highlighted there were “well over 100 vaccines being developedâ€? around the world and quality control efforts vary among countries. Within the U.S., Kolata explained, vaccine makers “have to follow the people in the trial for two months to see whether they have any strange side effects.â€? A few news leaks on these tests highlighted early problems, but these were quickly explained: One person who became ill during a test trial was actually being given a placebo rather than the vaccine, while another person who fell ill was experiencing an early sign of multiple sclerosis that was not caused by the virus. Although vaccine research efforts by the teaming of Pfizer and BioNTech and by Moderna have resulted in announcements that their respective vaccine tests are over 90% effective in clinical trials, Kolata advised that any hope of seeing immediate distribution of vaccines would be Âť COVID VACCINE 9 delayed by federal


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Covid Vaccine—

government protocols. “The FDA has something called scientific advisory boards, and these are outside groups of experts who pore over the data,” she said. “And they can take quite a while to do this. Because it’s on them to say, ‘We are satisfied that this vaccine has been sufficiently studied and tested. If they advise the FDA that this vaccine looks good, then the FDA can approve it or give it emergency approval.” Kolata pointed to another federal agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which has its own committee to determine distribution of the vaccine. She theorized that certain groups could be prioritized over others for initial vaccination efforts. “The first group would be health care workers and first responders, which you might think are doctors and nurses on the frontlines,” she said. “But this also includes many more people who are, for example, aides in nursing homes or even part of the cleaning staff in a nursing home. You end up with millions of people.” Kolata raised the possibility of using the Social Vulnerability Index created by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine as a potential guide for vaccination priority. This index was developed for hurricane relief efforts, with detailed demographics that include income levels and race. But that adds a new problem to the mix. “Race might be the sticking point because you’re not allowed to allocate something like vaccines according to race,” she said. “Layered on top is the fact that a lot of people in these hard-hit areas say, ‘We don’t want to be guinea pigs, we remember that the legacy of Tuskegee and other situations where people who were black or minorities were experimented on — we’re not going to be the guinea pigs for you.’” And even if there were no problems in determining who gets vaccinated first, Kolata noted the process of distributing vaccines is not without challenges. “There are concerns about how you’re going to ship it out to everybody because it’s got to be kept at the same temperature as the South Pole on a cold winter day — and that’s not easy,” she said. “If you’re a hospital you’ve got to keep it ultra-cold before you inject somebody with it. The issues are endless.” Despite the obstacles in the path for a smooth and speedy vaccine distribution, Kolata stressed that she was cautiously positive the process would succeed. “We’ve come an incredibly long way incredibly quickly,” she said. “The questions that remain are impossibly difficult, but it’s also a time of kind of new faith — a new optimism for people who want to be optimistic and hope this can’t go on forever. How are we going to get out of it? We have a number of methods — maybe — and we have some hope that we that something is going to work.”

Catania’s Pizza in Yonkers sues Mohegan Lake competitor over use of name BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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here is room for only one Catania’s, according to a Yonkers pizzeria proprietor. Catania’s Pizzeria Corp., doings business as Catania’s Pizza in Yonkers, claims that Santino’s East Coast Crust Inc. in Mohegan Lake, also doing business as Catania’s Pizza, is using the name illegally. “Catania’s Pizza is a business name of distinctive quality,” the Yonkers restaurant stated in a lawsuit filed Nov. 4 in Westchester Supreme Court, and Santino’s use of the name “continues to cause actual confusion to the general public, causing irreparable harm.” The Yonkers pizzeria traces its history back to 1920 and Arthur Avenue in the

Bronx. In the mid-1970s, Catania’s opened a shop in the Tanglewood Shopping Center on Central Park Avenue, Yonkers. Christian Koch bought the business and the name in 2017. Santino’s was formed this past February, according to state incorporation records. It began operating as Catania’s Pizza in March, according to the lawsuit. It calls itself Catania’s Pizzeria on its website and Catania’s 1925 on a logo. Koch claims that the Mohegan Lake eatery is using the Catania’s name without permission and promotes itself as the second location of the Yonkers shop. The Mohegan Lake manager was not immediately available to tell his side of the story, but an unidentified man who answered the phone said both shops probably bought the business from the same

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Courtesy Catania’s Pizza in Yonkers Facebook page. people and therefore have the same rights. Catania’s of Yonkers is demanding $500,000 in damages and a court order barring Catania’s of Mohegan Lake from using the name or representing itself as affiliated with the Yonkers store. Mount Kisco attorney Philip F. Menna represents Yonkers Catania’s.

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A new wave of pop-up retailers are filling commerce voids

Amy Kahn Russell at her eponymous pop-up store in Ridgefield. Courtesy Noelle Feucht.

Troupe429 pop-up record store. Courtesy Casey Fitzgerald.

Sal Bagliavio of Bailey’s Backyard with the mobile wood stove used for pop-up pizza retailing. Photo by Phil Hall.

The Vicious Circle pop-up gallery in Stamford. Courtesy Bayardo Carrillo.

BY PHIL HALL

anniversary last December with a pop-up music and art gallery in the city’s downtown. “We’re offering artwork to people that they usually don’t see, especially downtown,” said Bayardo Carrillo, a media specialist who produced the event. “We had a full house and it worked out really well.” From a landlord’s perspective, pop-up retailing can be an effective tool to attract attention to neighborhoods that would not benefit from empty storefronts. Phil Kuchma, president of Kuchma Corp., previously arranged for a temporary lease on an arts-focused enterprise within a retail space in his Bijou Square mixed-use development in downtown Bridgeport. “Other than people that are coming to deal with government-related business or the courthouses and attorneys and those that live in a downtown, many people don’t have any reason to visit the downtown

phall@westfairinc.com

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n Oct. 16, designer Amy Kahn Russell opened a pop-up retail store at 9 Bailey Ave. in Ridgefield featuring her jewelry creations. The store, at the former site of Upscale Resale, was Russell’s first foray into retailing and she only planned to keep it open until Oct. 31. “We actually did so well that we decided to keep it open until December 22nd,” Russell said. Several doors down from Russell is Sal Bagliavio’s restaurant Bailey’s Backyard. When the Covid-19 pandemic hit and Gov. Ned Lamont forced Connecticut’s restaurants to temporarily suspend indoor dining, Bagliavio bought a mobile pizza oven and created pop-up pizza stands around Ridgefield and the surrounding towns. “We have someone sponsor us and we

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set up in their driveway,” he said. “They send out an email to their customers, neighbors and friends. And then they put in orders and then we arrange to make the pizzas for them. We just started doing breweries and other venues as well — we’re available to do any event anywhere.” The modern concept of pop-up commerce took root in the mid-1990s and early 2000s as part of the growing popularity in guerrilla-style marketing. Event marketers used storefronts in cities and temporary structures at cultural and sporting events to introduce new products by major brands. These settings would pique consumer curiosity while generating media publicity based on their appeal. Arts-focused nonprofits also took advantage of the pop-up setting to create buzz for their special events. The Vicious Cycle, a Stamford-based independent art exhibit cooperative, celebrated its 25th WCBJ

region,” he said. “So, we have to create our own attractions and entertainment helps to do that.” Kuchma admitted that although his pop-up experience “was interesting to people, it didn’t prove it could be a viable business.” Nonetheless, he added, the space had been vacant for roughly six months with no takers before the pop-up took up a twomonth residency, and he was able to fill the space with a full-time tenant who moved in shortly after the pop-up lease expired. Kuchma also recommended that popup retail leasing can benefit entrepreneurs who are new to running a store. “The ideal situation is to not be put in a position where they have too much pressure on them,” he said. “But they need an opportunity to demonstrate to the market and to a landlord that they can be a traction for business so that they can survive.” » POP-UPS 11 And surviv-


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al has been particularly daunting during the Covid-19 pandemic, with some business owners turning to pop-up as a means of keeping a revenue stream flowing. In Norwalk, the LGBTQ bar Troupe429 has been unable to resume its operations due to the governor’s edicts. In August, after a four-month closure, the business reinvented itself as a pop-up store specializing in vinyl records. Casey Fitzpatrick, co-founder of Troupe429, has been appreciative of the sales from this pop-up solution. He also credited this strategy in helping to keep alive a corner of a business sector that was already facing challenges before the pandemic. “There are less than 700 queer bars left in America,” he said. “They have been closing at an alarming rate for the past decade, and being hit with Covid-19 and a prolonged quarantine has increased the odds of more LGBTQ bars closing before the end of the year. We really must come together as a community to save our safe spaces right now.” Over at Bailey’s Backyard, Bagliavio is among the state’s restaurateurs who have been struggling to find a balance between public health safety mandates and maintaining a profitable business.

“It started in response to Covid,” he said about the introduction of his mobile oven. “We saw a need for mobile service, as far as backyard events and bringing takeout to people instead of making them come get it.” Bagliavio also parks the oven outside of his restaurant for customers who are still not comfortable going inside to dine and are not eager to use the outdoor dining space that he’s set up. He added that the recent rollback from Phase 3 to Phase 2.1 will create more challenges for his business, and he is using the mobile oven to cook a wider variety of meals for those seeking something more than pizza. “We’ve done wings in it, we’ve done salmon and chicken,” he said. “It’s an oven, so we can cook anything.” If there could be a silver lining in this situation, it would be the start of a potential new wave of brick-and-mortar retailing. Jose Mendoza, professor of marketing at Sacred Heart University, theorized that many endeavors created as e-commerce exclusive sales could use pop-up stores as a test platform, noting “these new brands or small businesses want to be connected with consumers in a physical manner” but are not yet ready to commit to long-term leases. “I would say that Covid has been a catalyst for change by demanding retailers to be dynamic and creative,” Mendoza said.

“Retail has been trying to reinvent itself for a long time.” Austin Monteiro, a commercial real estate broker with William Raveis Real Estate, affirmed that pop-up stores will take fuller advantage of prime shopping periods. “I think we may see pop-up stores with online companies opening up for one or two months during the busier times of season, and not a full-year lease,” Monteiro said. “I think it’s a nice way to test your market before launching yourself into a five-, 10-, 20- or 30-year lease.” However, Monteiro admitted this is not a one-size-fits-all approach, pointing out that “a lot of it depends on the market or if you’re in a city or a suburb.” He also commiserated with landlords who were looking for longer-term tenants rather than occupants who would be gone in a month or two. Nonetheless, a temporary tenant could be better than none — especially in shopping malls, which are experiencing their highest vacancy rates in 20 years, according to a recent Moody’s report. Rajasree K. Rajamma, associate professor of marketing at Fairfield University, believed pop-up retailers moving from online to brick-and-mortar could cauterize some of the financial bleeding that malls are now experiencing while restoring vibrancy to the traditional retail sector.

“It’s cheaper to start an online store compared to opening a storefront,” she said. “Pop-up retailing gives them an opportunity to test the market or test the customer or certain geographic areas. With all of the increasing vacancies in the malls, this definitely is going to be a trend in the future.” For Amy Kahn Russell, pop-up retailing substituted for the sample sale stands that she would assemble at Ridgefield arts centers — something she could not accomplish this year due to the pandemic closing those venues. To her happy surprise, Russell has seen strong support from customers eager to support independent businesses. “We were very well received by the local people and even tourists that were coming through our town,” she said. “And our neighbors were very excited to have us here — we’ve got a cute little street and people want to stay local because they aren’t traveling so much. But they also want to support local artists, local vendors and local stores, and they kept encouraging us to stay open until Christmas. So that’s what we decided to do.” For The Vicious Cycle’s Bayardo Carrillo, now is the perfect time for anyone eager to test out the potential of a pop-up presence. “There are quite a few empty spaces, unfortunately,” he said. “But that’s good for us, I suppose.”

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ient Draft – November 23 W.C. F.F. Ad – 11.16.2020

Corporate Immigration Matters Crucial Entering 2021 Companies with large national footprints, and those based locally, are anxiously awaiting guidance from the new federal administration about its immigration policies. For many, access to a foreign workforce is critical, but has become recently limited. It’s also the basis of high stakes federal litigation, led by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, major universities and supported by Apple, Amazon, Google, Facebook, Twitter, Adobe and HP.

Hudson Valley hemp company claims $1.7M facility is defective

Jeffrey Citron, Managing Partner of Davidoff Hutcher Citron (DHC) said, “Many of the high-quality corporations, technology and hospitality clients and CEO-level decision makers we represent have a significant and ongoing need for immigration law advisory and services.” This is why the firm bolstered its immigration law practice, to meet client demand in the Tri-State area and across Florida, where DHC recently opened a new West Palm Beach office. DHC’s immigration law team is supporting high-end resorts that employ workers on H2B visas, and investors from places such as Korea, China, India, and Latin America. Its attorneys direct hundreds of immigrant visa cases annually and processes 300 – 400 non-immigrant visa applications for individuals and companies, with a focus on H1B, L1 and EB-1 through EB-5 visa applications. Mr. Citron continued, “The addition of a more significant immigration law team helps us address a clear demand. We see significant interest and need in these areas of law from resorts, hotels, restaurants, and country clubs for seasonal workers. Immigration law expertise and counsel have become a much-needed tool for offering a full range of legal services for clients.” DHC’s varied clientele includes Fortune 500 companies, entrepreneurs, litigants in business disputes, financial institutions, owners of intellectual property, real estate owners and developers, family law clients, health and hospitality business owners, and well-known fashion industry leaders. During 2020, DHC continued its practice and market expansion, merging in January with Westchester’s premier bankruptcy and reorganization firm Rattet PLLC. The firm now operates office locations in New York City, Albany, White Plains, Washington, DC and West Palm Beach, FL.

New York City Washington D.C. White Plains, NY Albany, NY West Palm Beach, FL 212.557.7200

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BY BILL HELTZEL bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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emp Productions Inc., a Poughkeepsie company licensed to grow and process industrial hemp, claims that a maker of custom modular buildings installed deficient structures. Hemp Productions is demanding nearly $1.7 million from MCC Development Inc. of Asheville, North Carolina, and $1.1 million from the fabricator, Ideal Environmental of Los Banos, California, in a lawsuit filed Nov. 11 in U.S. District Court, MCC Development’s modules. Courtesy MCC Development Inc. White Plains. “We don’t think their claim has merit,” more than $254,000 for its work. Anthony Buffa, MCC’s CEO, said in an interview. Ideal, he said, was responsible for ship“MCC Development and Ideal went to great ping the modules but not for damages incurred lengths and expense to address all of the cusduring shipping, unloading and setting them up. tomer’s concerns.” The hemp company claims that the heating New York state licensed Hemp Productions and ventilation system was not rated for New in 2018, according to the lawsuit, to possess, York weather and the modules had leaks, rust, grow, cultivate and process industrial hemp. misaligned doors, warped floors and dented walls. The company leased property in LaGrange, “The defects … were so substantial,” the comcontracted with MCC to build and install several plaint states, “that the structures could not be modular structures and planned to start proused for their intended purpose and HPI could duction this fall. not begin processing its industrial hemp.” Hemp Productions agreed to buy seven Buffa said it takes time to properly install mod10-by-50-foot structures to be used for extracting ular structures. His crew of three installers was and processing hemp and one bathroom-locker on site for 30 days, “working to resolve all of the room, for $1,674,664. customer’s concerns. Ultimately, they were not preMCC subcontracted with Ideal to fabricate pared to honor their written agreement and pay for the modules. their final implementation. So my crew left.” The first five units that arrived in July, Hemp Productions paid MCC and Ideal nearly according to the complaint, were damaged. $1.4 million, according to the complaint, but withHemp Productions said it agreed to pay Ideal held the $295,195 balance. directly for the remaining modules to get everyIt accuses MCC and Ideal of breach of contract, thing installed for the fall opening. unjust enrichment and fraud. The last structures, the lawsuit states, were “We’re trying to do the right thing by these in worse condition than the first five. people,” Buffa said, and he is disappointed that the MCC began installing the structures but customer sued rather than collaborated on getting did not complete the job, according to Hemp the facility into production. Productions. “Our record stands,” he said, “of 37 years of Poughkeepsie attorney Scott Greer said installing modular buildings around the country Ideal will probably file counterclaims against and for some of the biggest companies on the MCC and Hemp Productions, for failure to pay planet.”


CONTRIBUTING WRITER | By Michael Guberti

Nine ways to reach more people on Google My Business BY MICHAEL GUBERTI

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t’s been reported that “4 in 5 consumers use search engines to find local information.” You can use a platform called Google My Business to reach more people on Google. Google My Business can include your website, office address if you have a physical address, phone number, photos, videos, posts about offers, events, reviews, services, products and other information. If you have researched a restaurant or hotel to read its Google reviews, you have interacted with a Google My Business account. Here are nine ways to reach more people with Google My Business:

1. Create your Google My Business account or claim your existing account

If you do not have a Google My Business account, create one by providing your business information and completing the prompts that Google provides. If you have a Google My Business account, make sure you claim it before someone else tries to.

2. Update your hours if they change during the year

If your business has fewer hours in the summer and more hours in the winter, update your hours on Google My Business. This can prevent your customers from checking your Google My Business account, seeing that you close at 6 p.m., arriving at your office at 5:30 p.m. only to discover that you close at 5 p.m. because the hours were not updated. You can also indicate whether you’ll be open or closed on certain holidays.

3. Publish posts, and upload pictures and videos

Google reports that “businesses with photos receive 42% more requests for driving directions to their location from users on Google and 35% more clicks to their websites than businesses that don’t have photos.” One study determined that “businesses with more than 100 images on Google My Business get 520% more calls, 2,717% more direction requests, and 1,065% more website clicks than the average business.”

4. Check any pending edits

was made by someone besides yourself, or other people were given access to it at one time, check that only people you trust have access to your Google My Business account. I’ve seen cases where people who no longer work with a business still have access to the company’s Google My Business account and other online platforms.

5. Include a business description and list your services and products

8. Monitor your Google My Business insights

Anyone, including your competitors, can suggest an edit to your Google My Business account. Therefore, if someone wants to say that you are closed on Wednesdays and do not offer a particular service, they may be able to submit an edit. Check the pending edits to your Google My Business account.

Write a description of your business. Consider addressing the following questions in the description: • What are the primary benefits of working with your business? • What transformation do your services and products provide? • What services do you provide? • What important values or principles do you stand for? • How long have you been in business? • If applicable, what products do you offer? • What are the benefits of those products? • If applicable, how do you give back to others?

6. Respond to reviews

If someone leaves you a positive review, thank them for their positive feedback. If someone leaves a review that is less than positive, consider responding to them by encouraging them to contact your business to resolve the issue.

7. Check the people who have access to your Google My Business account

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You can identify how many website visits, direction requests and phone calls were generated from your Google My Business account. You can also see the words that people use to find your account.

9. Leverage the Questions and Answers section of your account Publish questions that people ask you about your business. You likely receive multiple questions from customers. Publish and answer your most frequently asked questions (FAQs) in the Questions and Answers section of your Google My Business account. You can also monitor if other people ask questions and respond to them.

Bringing it all together: Your Google My Business account is a representation of your business on the world’s largest search engine. It can showcase your reviews, pictures, videos, service and product information and other items. Leverage this platform to reach more people on Google. Feeling overwhelmed? Schedule your free strategy call and let’s help you win on social media in 2020 and beyond at MichaelGuberti.com/Schedule. WCBJ

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section lifestyle offerings

Beyond Biz

wagmag

UNITING IN LOVE TO HELP HUMANITY

“I love the Book of Ruth, because it shows the power of love that we have for one another, as well as the love that God has for us. And it shows how love redeems us.” Tell me about Unite in Love and what the project is. “Absolutely. After I began hearing about the negative effects of lockdown, when I started asking my students how they were doing, I would get answers like, ‘I’m hungry,’ or ‘I just got some food from my neighbor’ or ‘I managed to find something in the street.’ It was so painful to hear. I gave it some thought and said to myself, I can’t just sit here and do nothing. I have to at least try to help, to put my best foot forward. So, I decided to start a fundraiser to help as many people as I could – to help my students, to help my friends. There is strength in numbers and there is power in love, so when we put them together and say, ‘Unite in Love,’ we can accomplish common good for our society. That is simply living up to our humanity.”

BY JEREMY WAYNE

“HOW ARE YOU FEELING TODAY?” I ASK SHIRLEY CHENG, KICKING OFF THE CONVERSATION WHEN WE SPOKE BY PHONE. “I’M FINE. THANK YOU,” SHE REPLIES, WITHOUT A MOMENT’S HESITATION. “EVERY DAY IS A GIFT FROM GOD.” Shirley Cheng has every reason not to feel fine. Diagnosed with severe juvenile rheumatoid arthritis when she was 11 months old, she lost the ability to walk before she had even learned to take a step and is confined to a wheelchair. In her first years, the Albany-born Cheng was hospitalized so many times between America and China that there was no opportunity for a school education until she turned 11. And though she hardly spoke a word of English when she started elementary school in Poughkeepsie, she spoke fluent English six months later with the help of special education and had mastered other subjects up to grade level. Sadly, though, there were further trials to come. At the age of 17, Cheng lost her sight. Not that this further disability has crushed this remarkable woman’s spirit – far from it. She is a three-time summa cum laude graduate and doctor of divinity from Ames Christian University, a poet, an advocate of parental rights in children’s medical care, an award-winning author and the founder of Ultra-Ability. com, where she proclaims “Jehovah God’s Good News of Salvation through Jesus Christ.” Now based in White Plains, Cheng founded Unite in Love earlier this year as a response to Covid-19 to feed and protect the hungry among her students in the developing world: A little background first, if you will. From earliest childhood, through those traumatic teenage years, and now in adulthood, how have you coped with your disability? “I would say I’ve always had a very positive attitude. I’ve always been happy, never depressed, no matter how many difficult situations I’ve had to face. When

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.com

Shirley Cheng. Photograph by Juliet Cheng.

I was a baby, I laughed through my tears. When I was 4, my mother told me about God, and I immediately accepted the fact, as I saw physical creation all around me. I knew that my creator knew exactly what I was going through, what I needed, and so I put my whole life in his hands.” How have you turned your religion and deep conviction into your life’s work? “I lost my eyesight when I was 17. People would say, ‘Wow, that’s too bad.’ But now I think this was a divine turn of events and I’ll tell you why. I was always interested in the Bible but never really had time to read it, because of my schoolwork and typical teenage things. But after I lost my eyesight, I had a lot more time on my hands. The Commission for the Blind signed me up for talking books from the library, so I asked for a copy (of the Bible.) I learned so much about (God’s) personality, his warmth, his desire and what he wants for us. In 2008, I began my online ministry, because I wanted to share with others the joy and fulfillment I experienced when knowing God on a

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deep level.” Who are your typical followers? Who comes to you wanting instruction? “Over the years, I have been so privileged to meet people from around the world. My students come from the United States, Africa, Asia, Australia – all over. Students of all ages.” How do they hear about you? “From my website. And I post Christian articles on sites like ezinearticles.com. People find me there. Plus, I’m the author of nine books and people find me on Amazon. And I have a Facebook presence. I use screen-reading software – that’s how I communicate with people.” Yes, we have so much to thank technology – well, I suppose you might say God – for. Now, let me ask you this – favorite books of the Bible? “Oh, I like all the books.” I knew you were going to say that! But if pressed, what is your favorite book. one you are drawn to time and again?

How did you get started? “I prayed and hoped for the best and, to my pleasant surprise, my network of friends and associates starting donating. I started out helping 10 families, and then it became 20, distributing funds to cover emergency food supply and also to prevent the eviction of families with young children. Some had gone for days without food before we sent them money. They were literally on a liquid fast. These people are in a very difficult position (in comparison) to us, with no government benefit, no stimulus check, just left alone to fend for themselves.” Where are you mainly supporting people – any particular region? “Most of the students we are helping are from Liberia, Nigeria, Uganda and Kenya. I also have families from India, Pakistan and Nepal.” You have a truly global reach. “All thanks to God. I’m really humbled to be his servant. He gave me my life, he sustains it and he called me to his ministry. Serving him is the least I could do in gratitude.” To learn more about Unite in Love or to donate, visit facebook.com/donate/3628807677210507. For more on Shirley Cheng’s ministry, visit ultra-ability.com This article originally appeared in the Business Journals’ sister publication, WAG magazine.


FOCUS ON

HOSPITALITY — FUN & PRODUCTIVE WESTCHESTER AND FAIRFIELD COUNTY BUSINESS JOURNALS

Aquila’s Nest Vineyards aims to make an oenophilic splash in Newtown BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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hen Neviana Zhgaba and Ardian Llomi decided they’d like to try their hand at owning and operating a winery, they knew precisely what approach they would take. “I love the arts, creating new things, photography,” Zhgaba told the Business Journal. “And I’ve done a lot of graphic design. So we wanted to make this a place where everything ‘fits’ together, from the colors and the presentation to the overall theme, which relies a lot of mythology and history.” The place in question is

Aquila’s Nest Vineyards, 41 acres at 56 Pole Bridge Road in Newtown. Although the Naugatuck couple, who plan to build a home on the property, held their grand opening on Nov. 7, they’d already garnered rave reviews from early visitors, Zhgaba said, racking up 1,300 names on their mailing list, 2,700 Facebook followers and 1,100 Instagram followers. “It all began with our wanting to own a farm,” she said. “We kept looking, and when we found this place we fell in love with it.” The pair spent the five years after buying what had been a farm, perched atop a hill that affords spectacular views of the

surrounding woods, turning it into a winery and event space. The 4,000-square-foot facility shares production space with a 75-seat wine bar and tasting room, which in turn overlooks an outdoor terrace that can seat another 70; it features copies of Greek statuary in keeping with the theme. The contemporary architecture inside primarily uses steel, as well as large glass windows and doors that allow natural light to stream across the stained concrete floor. A barrel-vaulted ceiling oversees a room featuring soft vintage lighting, a “community” baby grand piano (with a “Play

Me” sign), and an array of artwork that features empowering messages from the likes of Maya Angelou, Martin Luther King Jr. and Mother Teresa. The latter’s presence is hardly a coincidence; her portrait includes the quote, “By blood, I am Albanian. By citizenship, an Indian. As to my calling, I belong to the world.” Zhgaba and Llomi are themselves Albanian natives, and reflecting that culture — as well as such themes as globalization, sustainability and women-empowerment — was always going to be a keystone to their presentation, Zhgaba said. She pointed out that “aquila” is Latin for FCBJ

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“eagle,” the bird carried Zeus’ thunderbolts in mythology and that the Albanian flag features a double-headed eagle. That focus on heritage extends to the wines themselves. Currently, Aquila’s Nest Vineyard offers five wines, the Queen of Illyria (Red Blend), Princess of Troy (Merlot), Sibyl (Dry Rose), Zana e Malit (Dry Riesling), and Siren (Muscato), priced in the $26 to $34 range; another three varieties are in the works. Each bottle is adorned with an illustration depicting the image of a constellation, the name of a woman drawn from an ancient Mediterranean » AQUILA’S 17 myth or hisNOVEMBER 23, 2020

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Aquila’s

torical figure, the inscription of a Latin phrase translated into English on the back, and the Mediterranean story that brings those elements together. The text on the back of each bottle is laid out in the shape of a wineglass. Community also plays an important role, Zhgaba said, noting that Aquila’s Nest is booking musical guests and entering relationships with local brewery Reverie and Lucas Local oyster bar for tastings. The winery also offers a “Sip & Savor” menu featuring a variety of nuts, dried fruit and crackers from BD Provisions, as well as gourmet chocolate from Castle Hill Chocolate — all purveyors based in Newtown.

“We’ve received such a warm welcome from everyone here — not just the business community, but also the people themselves,” she said. The winery will be open Thursdays and Fridays from 5 to 8 p.m.; Saturdays from 11a.m. to 8 p.m.; and Sundays from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. “After all,” she laughed, “we have fulltime jobs.” Zhgaba is a senior technical program manager at GE in Norwalk, while Lloma is a senior mechanical design engineer at Sonitek in Milford. Asked if she foresees a time when Aquila’s Nest will become her full-time occupation, Zhgaba smilingly shook her head. “I love my job too much,” she said.

SINGLE TENANT INCOME PROPERTY WITH UPSIDE IN STRONG LOCATION

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We’ve received such a warm welcome from everyone here — not just the business community, but also the people themselves.

FOR SALE | 603-605 Fenimore Road | Mamaroneck Listed by Bryan Lanza | $2,100,000

FOR SALE | 3 Strickland Road | Cos Cob Listed by Kim Galton | $1,300,000

FOR LEASE | 200 Tarrytown Road | White Plains Listed by Rich Aponte & Rick Tannenbaum | $7.35 PSF

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FOR LEASE | 1278 Saw Mill River Road | Yonkers Listed by Thomas Hennessy | $2,950 Per Month

FOR LEASE | 248 New Main Street | Yonkers Listed by Garry Klein | $3,500 Mo. + $500 Mo. H&E

FOR LEASE | 20 Jones Street | New Rochelle Listed by Andy Grossman | Please call for pricing

800 WESTCHESTER AVENUE, RYE BROOK, NEW YORK 10573 914.798.4900 • HOULIHANLAWRENCE.COM/COMMERCIAL

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Good Things CONTEST EXPLORING LESSONS LEARNED FROM PANDEMIC Lifting Up Westchester, a nonprofit agency in White Plains committed to helping individuals achieve self-sufficiency, announced its fourth annual high school student essay contest, open to all Westchester students in grades 7-12. This year’s essay invites students to reflect on how the changes and challenges they experienced may be the same or different from individuals who are homeless and low income. What did they learn about the importance of connection? Where have they seen resilience or adaptability during this crisis? What values are more important or less important to them today than a year ago? Essays must relate back to Lifting Up Westchester’s response to the pandemic and the agency’s core mission. “This year’s essay contest topic could not be more fitting,” said Anahaita Kotval, CEO of Lifting Up Westchester. “We have seen how quickly and drastically millions of lives have changed as a result of the pandemic. This topic offers students an opportunity to reflect meaningfully  on their experiences and chart a path forward that is centered around community and inclusivity.”  Students can enter the contest from now through Jan. 29. Essays must be submitted in PDF format via e-mail to:  luwessaycontest@gmail.com. For more information, visit liftingupwestchester.org.   Lifting Up Westchester is one of the largest social services agencies in Westchester County and has been fulfilling its mission since 1979 through the operation of eight community-based programs. The agency serves 3,500 men, women and children each year providing almost 100,000 meals to the hungry and 20,000 nights of shelter to the homeless. 

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NOVEMBER 23, 2020

NEW COMMUNITY SOLAR SITE IN TARRYTOWN

Michael Murphy, New Projects Development, Murphy Brothers Contracting, Assemblyman David Buchwald, Tarrytown Self-Storage president Paul Ferraro and Peter II Ferraro, Sunrise Solar Solutions Senior Solar Consultant, Lee Streisfeld-Leitner, Westchester County Executive George Latimer, Peter McCartt, Westchester County Director of Westchester Environmentalists; Tarrytown Village Trustees Karen Brown and David T. Kim.

Westchester County officials, including Westchester County Executive George Latimer joined representatives of Sunrise Solar Solutions and Tarrytown Self Storage for a recent ribbon-cutting ceremony at the company’s facility in Tarrytown. Sunrise Solar Solutions, the largest locally owned and operated solar company in Westchester and Rockland counties and the Hudson Valley, launched a solar array that produced 226.1 KW of energy. The solar system, which consists of 595 solar panels, is a rooftop solar array producing 257,000 kilowatt-hours of electricity per year and is expected to provide clean renewable energy to approximately 50 homes and apartments. Those subscribing to the solar system benefit by taking advantage of discounted energy and at the same time reducing the strain on the grid in the imme-

diate area. The fastest-growing trend throughout the region, Community Solar has opened the doors to those who either rent, live in an apartment or can’t switch to solar because their home or business has a roof that cannot accommodate a solar system. Community solar offers access to the sun’s free energy that is harnessed by a local solar facility to then be shared by multiple subscribers on their energy bills. The emergence of “neighborhood” community solar sites and programs throughout Westchester towns and villages has expanded the county’s clean energy movement and significantly increased the number of homes and businesses switching over to solar power. Douglas Hertz, president and CEO of Briarcliff Manor-based Sunrise Solar Solutions, said, “It has been our passion and

our mission since founding Sunrise Solar Solutions 11 years ago, to bring renewable energy and energy efficiency to as many homes and businesses as possible and to play an integral role in fulfilling New York’s Energy Vision. We believe that anyone who wants a clean energy lifestyle, should be able to obtain that goal and it is our goal to make that happen.” Tarrytown Self-Storage President Paul Ferraro had been seeking to green his business and create not only enough energy for the building itself, but enough energy to supply electricity to surrounding homes and apartments. “This project is a win-win on every level,” said Ferraro. “…I feel privileged to be able to make solar available to the many home and business owners in Tarrytown who have been waiting for a way to go solar.”

TV PROFESSIONALS JOIN GREENWICH BROKERAGE Houlihan Lawrence in Rye Brook has announced that Noah Finz and Stacey Delikat – two professionals with extensive experience in the TV broadcast industry – have joined its Greenwich brokerage as agents. As executive director of Finz Creative Programming in Old Greenwich, Finz built Vantage SportsNet for Frontier Communications providing all aspects of the network. He is also a founding partner of P. Garyn Productions, a full-service video production company based in Old Greenwich. He has held positions as sports director for WTNH-TV in New Haven and KEYT-TV in Santa Barbara, California. He is a resident Old Greenwich. Since joining FOX 5 News as a general assignment reporter in 2012, Delikat has covered stories, including Superstorm Sandy, Superbowl XLVII and the New York City mayoral election. As a reporter for WNYWTV, she covered Covid-19’s toll on the tristate area, presidential and local politics and Superstorm Sandy.. Her career in news started on the assignment desk of CNN’s New York bureau right after college. She holds a bachelor’s degree in communication from Cornell University and a master’s degree in broadcasting from the Medill School of Journalism at Northwestern University. She lives in Riverside with her family.

CREATING GINGERBREAD REPLICAS OF HISTORIC SITES Westport Museum for History and Culture hosts “Make the Museum (or other historic building) Gingerbread Contest.” Entrants can create, with gingerbread, museum headquarters Bradley-Wheeler House, another historic Westport building or their own antique home in either the family or individual category. Gingerbread creations will be judged by celebrity judges: Victoria Kann, author of “Pinkalicious;” Stephanie Webster, founder,  CTBITES;  chef Bill Taibe; and Edward Gerber of Historic New England. Bradley-Wheeler House, the museum’s headquarters, at 25 Avery Place, Westport, was purchased in 1981. The house, built in 1795, was remodeled in the Italianate style in the 19th Century and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and the Connecticut Register of Historic Places as well as a Historic Landmark. Enter online at  westporthistory. FCBJ

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Noah Finz

Prior year gingerbread creations.

org/gingerbread-contest from now to Dec. 1. Winners will be announced by Dec. 12 at Westport Museum’s winter

market. Visit westporthistory.org/gingerbread-contest for information about delivery of gingerbread creations.

Stacey Delikat


HGAR FOUNDATION $1,000 DONATION TO CHRISTOPHER’S VOICE

Edward Nusbaum

NUSBAUM FIRM 2021 BEST LAW FIRMS TIER 2 The Law Offices of Edward Nusbaum PC in Westport has been ranked by “U.S. News & World Report” and “Best Lawyers” as a 2021 Best Law Firm in the category of Metropolitan Tier 2 Stamford for family law. This is the 11th consecutive year these rankings have been announced and the 11th year Nusbaum’s firm has earned this recognition. The Stamford metro area includes Bridgeport, Darien, Fairfield, Greenwich, New Canaan, Norwalk, Ridgefield, Southport, Stamford, Weston, Westport and Wilton. To be eligible for a ranking, a firm must first have a lawyer recognized in The Best Lawyers in America©, which recognizes the top 5% of lawyers practicing in the United States.  Achieving a tiered ranking signals a unique combination of quality law practice and breadth of legal expertise.  Nusbaum has been rated Best Lawyers in America for 26 consecutive years. Nusbaum, who was recognized in The Best Lawyers in America for 2021 earlier this year, has been practicing family law in Westport for more than 40 years.  He has been a Martindale-Hubbell AV Preeminent-rated attorney for 26 consecutive years and been named a Connecticut Super Lawyers Top 50 attorney by Thomson Reuters.  Nusbaum recently was featured as Attorney of the Year in the 2020 quarterly magazine Top 100 Lawyers.   Nusbaum is a Fellow and past president of the Connecticut Chapter of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers and is a Fellow of the International Academy of Family Lawyers, the leading organizations of family law practitioners.  He also is a member of the Connecticut Bar Association’s Resolution of Legal Fees Dispute Committee. Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

Sharon L. Zanzano

From left:  Terri Crozier and Antoinette Calderon, HG Realtor Foundation Committee; Chris Greco, founder, Christopher’s Voice; Bonnie Koff, chair, HG Realtor Foundation Fundraising Committee; and Carol Christiansen and Robert Shandley, HG Realtor Foundation Committee.

The Hudson Gateway Realtor® Foundation, the charitable arm of the Hudson Gateway Association of Realtors®, recently presented a check for $1,000 to Christopher’s Voice in New Rochelle, a charitable foundation created by New Rochelle Police Detective and Bronx Realtor® Christopher Greco, and his wife, Tracy. Christopher’s Voice helps prevent wandering of autistic children, provides financial assistance and support to struggling families with autistic children and promotes public awareness, training and safety within the first responder community.    The charity is named for their son,

Christopher, who is now 13 but remains nonverbal. “We are very humbled and appreciative of this very generous donation during a very difficult time,” said Greco, who is also a Realtor® with Richard Greco Real Estate in the Bronx.  “We will be sure to distribute it to those families impacted by autism that need it the most.” The organization supplies free GPS and other search and rescue equipment to families with autistic children.  It also offers recreational activities focused on autistic children and helps families financially by defraying the costs of un-

reimbursed medical equipment, home and childcare.  Christopher’s Voice also financially supports legal advocacy to protect the legal rights of autistic children as well as providing grants to special education classrooms for essential equipment. HGAR is a not-for-profit trade association representing more than 13,000 real estate professionals doing business in Westchester, Putnam, Rockland and Orange counties, as well as the Bronx and Manhattan. It is the second largest Realtor®  Association in New York and one of the largest in the country.  

LMC MEDIA RECEIVES NYS EMPIRE AWARD

HOULIHAN LAWRENCE NAMES NEW YONKERS MANAGER Sharon L. Zanzano has been named the new manager of Houlihan Lawrence’s Yonkers brokerage. Zanzano, who has 19 years of experience in real estate, has spent most of her career as a sales agent in the firm’s Bronxville office, where she received multiple awards for top production. A lifelong Yonkers resident, Zanzano resides in the Bryn Mawr Knolls area of Yonkers. She is a graduate of Iona College where she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree. “I’m honored to be appointed to the Yonkers brokerage managerial position. Having been a part of the Houlihan Lawrence family for most of my nearly two-decade real estate career, along with my knowledge of the Yonkers market, I feel confident in my new leadership role and look forward to the continued success of both the Yonkers Houlihan Lawrence brokerage and the professional sales team affiliated with it,” said Zanzano.

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LMC Media staff with NYS Sen. Shelley Mayer (center) from left: Production Associate Stephen Bisaillon, Assistant Director Dena Schumacher, Executive Director Matt Sullivan, varsity sports producer Rob Mored, office manager/billboard producer Sharon Ladmer-Mosley and programmer Stephen Aluisa.

A community-based media platform, LMC Media, received an Empire Award from New York state Sen. Shelley Mayer Nov. 10 in recognition of its outstanding service to the community during the Coronavirus pandemic. The nonprofit organization, which was founded in 1983, has expanded from a local cable TV sta-

tion to a fully equipped media company that quickly came to the aid of local municipalities. Mayer said, “We should take LMC and make it the new national model of how public access should work.” Mamaroneck town Supervisor Nancy Seligson said, “LMC Media really did step

up during this pandemic. I really appreciate their community and civic spirit that helps us and their tremendous technological abilities. We really feel supported.” Accepting the award, LMC Executive Director Matt Sullivan thanked everyone for “helping us continue to build community through media.” FCBJ

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Good Things NYMC AWARDED GRANT FOR CLINICAL SKILLS AND SIMULATION CENTER New York Medical College (NYMC) is one of four organizations to receive 2020 training grants from The Children’s Dream Foundation (CDF), which works to advance pediatric emergency medicine in New York’s Hudson Valley region. The grant will allow the NYMC Clinical Skills and Simulation Center (CSSC) to purchase a family of Pediatric Emergency Airway Management Task Trainers (teenager, adolescent, infant and difficult airway) to train for pediatric intubation and airway management from Laerdal Medical, a provider of training, educational and therapy products for live-saving and emergency medical care. The equipment will be used to train medical students and first-line responders in their education of pediatric emergency care at a critical time during the Covid-19 pandemic.  “We are very honored to be receiving this grant for a fourth consecutive year,” said Katharine Yamulla,  senior director of competency-based assessment and clinical skills education and  director of the CSSC. “CDF is an outstanding organization and we are very grateful for their ongoing support of our clinical skills training program. Understanding the fundamentals of pediatric airway management through simulation will greatly enhance the pediatric curriculum for NYMC students and will support the continued education of local health care providers for affiliates of NYMC. Moreover, The CSSC’s partnership with local emergency room physicians and pediatric anesthesiologists, provides learners with access to emergency airway experts who are expertly trained to teach the basics of pediatric airway management through simulation.” Since 1992, the Children’s Dream Foundation has provided grants to health care organizations to ensure that the highest pediatric health care, especially emergency services, is available to all children in New York’s Hudson Valley region. Currently, CDF is the only organization in this region specifically working to advance pediatric emergency medicine.

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NOVEMBER 23, 2020

STOP & SHOP’S TURKEY EXPRESS

John J. Manginelli

Feeding Westchester President and CEO Karen C. Erren (center) joins local Vietnam War veterans and the Stop & Shop team for the supermarket chain’s Turkey Express program.

Stop & Shop celebrated Veteran’s Day with a donation of 1,000 Thanksgiving turkeys to Feeding Westchester, Westchester County’s largest nonprofit hunger-relief organization, in an effort to help meet the unprecedented need for holiday assistance. A group of local Vietnam War veterans were on hand at Stop & Shop’s 154 Westchester Ave. location in White Plains to load the Feeding Westchester truck as part of the supermarket chain’s Turkey Express program. According to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, veterans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan are twice as likely to

be food insecure compared with the general population. “We’re here to help those who have helped our country,” said Duke Searles, Vietnam War veteran and volunteer supervisor of VA Hospital Supportive Housing Food Pantry. “I know what it is like to not want to ask for help, but we have an abundance of food for the veterans and their families through the VA pantry, and so many other services available for them to get the help they deserve.” “We are grateful to Stop & Shop for their generous support once again through the Turkey Express program

and honored to have the assistance of Duke and his fellow Vietnam War veterans,” said Feeding Westchester President and CEO Karen C. Erren. “The pandemic has created unprecedented need that isn’t limited to certain zip codes or professions….” Due to the pandemic, Feeding Westchester distributed 123 % more food than from the same time period last year. Stop & Shop’s Turkey Express  program will deliver nearly 22,000 turkeys to hunger relief organizations in New York, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and New Jersey this holiday season.

BANK FOUNDATION MAKES DONATIONS TO LOCAL HOSPITALS

From left: Ellen Komar, chief nursing officer; Kathleen Silard, president and CEO; Jonathan Bailey, chief operating officer; and and Rod Acosta, M.D., chief medical officer; all from Stamford Health Hospital.

First County Bank Foundation donated $5,000 to each of the five local Fairfield County community hospitals in an effort to support the needs of frontline health care workers who were and continue to be at the forefront of the Covid-19 pandemic. The frontline health care workers will also be honored with the foundation’s annual Reyno A. Giallongo Community Legacy Award, which is named after First County Bank’s retired chairman and CEO, who during his tenure exemplified the bank’s culture of giving back to the community. FCBJ

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The following hospitals received the donations: Bridgeport Hospital, Greenwich Hospital, Norwalk Hospital, Stamford Hospital and St. Vincent’s Hospital in Bridgeport. The funding amount of $25,000 is in addition to a $50,000 donation made earlier in the year to select local shelters and food pantries for Covid-19 relief and the nearly $500,000 in grants recently provided to more than 90 local nonprofits through the foundation’s annual CommunityFirst Grant Program.

Established in 2001 in honor of the bank’s 150th anniversary, First County Bank Foundation was created to distribute funds annually to nonprofit organizations that support community and economic development among other quality-of-life programs. communities it serves. Headquartered in Stamford for more than 165 years, First County is an independent mutual community bank with 16 branches in Stamford, Norwalk, Darien, Greenwich, Fairfield, New Canaan and Westport.

KEYBANK NAMES MARKET PRESIDENT John J. Manginelli, Northeast regional executive for KeyBank Real Estate Capital, will assume an expanded role in KeyBank that includes market president for Key’s Hudson Valley/Metro New York market. As market president, Manginelli will drive collaboration and coordination of Key activities and resources in the market, as well as serve as the face and voice of the bank in the community. He will also continue to lead Key’s real estate capital business throughout the Northeast, with main offices in New York City, Boston, Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia. “John has been a strong champion for our clients and the communities we serve and his leadership in this expanded role will be an asset to our teams in this growing market,” said Key’s head of commercial manking Angela Mago. Manginelli joined KeyBank Real Estate Capital in 2001 and has more than 30 years experience delivering commercial real estate financial solutions. He is an experienced real estate sales leader with expertise in market analysis, business planning, extending market penetration and developing new market niches. Prior to joining KeyBank, he spent 12 years at Summit Bank in Cranford, New Jersey, most recently as senior vice president/team leader of commercial real estate. He also held corporate banking and private banking positions at Bankers Trust Company in New York City. Manginelli received a master’s degree in finance from Rutgers University, where he also earned bachelor’s degrees in both industrial engineering and economics. Keycorp’s roots trace back 190 years to Albany, New York. Headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio, Key is one of the nation’s largest bank-based financial services companies, with assets of approximately $170.5 billion at Sept. 30, 2020. For more information, visit  https:// www.key.com/. KeyBank is member FDIC.


HERE COMES THE TURKEY ‘TROT’

NEWYORK-PRESBYTERIAN HOSPITALS TEAM UP WITH FEEDING WESTCHESTER

Juliene Bell-Smith

PEEKSKILL’S NEW IDA BOARD MEMBER Juliene Bell-Smith has been appointed to the Peekskill Industrial Development Agency (PIDA) Board of Directors. An active special-purpose Peekskill governmental agency PIDA offers financial incentives to economic development projects that strengthen the city’s economy through job creation and workforce development. Bell-Smith, a five-year resident of Peekskill sought to become more involved in her community. “I have worked as a job developer in Yonkers for over a decade, helping hundreds of adults obtain gainful employment. I see the Peekskill IDA as a vehicle for supporting the economic structure of this city­— it has and continues to provide opportunities that offer upward economic mobility to its residents.” A job development specialist at SUNY Westchester Community College, BellSmith provides job placement assistance to all vocational students. “We are thrilled to welcome Juliene to the Peekskill IDA Board,” said PIDA Chairperson Deborah Post. “…Juliene’s experience in the field of workforce development is particularly relevant and makes her an ideal fit….” Bell-Smith holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from CUNY Hunter College and a Master of Arts degree in work and labor policy from SUNY Empire State. She is a member of the National Council for Workforce Education and the Coalition on Adult Basic Education.

NewYork-Presbyterian (NYP) is working with  Feeding Westchester  to provide at-risk families in Peekskill and Mount Vernon with healthy food. The two organizations recently launched the Food Farmacy Program, which provides bags of nourishing, healthy food and staples to 120 area families. NewYork-Presbyterian’s Food Farmacy Program is a prevention program that addresses food insecurity to help improve health outcomes.  Individuals with nutritional needs are referred to the program by a health provider for supplemental foods that best promote health, prevent future illness and manage chronic health conditions such as diabetes and high blood pressure.  In addition to receiving the healthy food items, participants will receive ongoing nutrition education and access to resources to assist them in working toward food security. The pilot program runs through the spring, with a goal to become a permanent program for both NYP hospitals.   NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson

Valley Hospital is facilitating the food distribution program with Sun River Health in Peekskill, and NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital is working with the Mount Vernon Neighborhood Health Center. “NewYork-Presbyterian is deeply committed to improving the health and well-being of our patients, our neighbors and all the communities we serve in Westchester County,” said Michael Fosina, president, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital. Stacey Petrower, president, NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital, said, “Food insecurity was a very real issue in Westchester County even before Covid-19 struck. We are focused on helping alleviate this problem and are proud to take part in this effort to keep our community members healthy through the food and nutrition education services provided by the Food Farmacy Program.”    Founded in 1889 by the Helping Hand Association, NewYork-Presbyterian Hudson Valley Hospital, located

Josefa Paganuzzi

in Cortlandt Manor, serves residents of the Hudson Valley and Westchester County. Established in 1909, NewYork-Presbyterian Lawrence Hospital, located in Bronxville, serves residents of Westchester County and the Bronx.

Fullerton Beck Attorneys Named to Super Lawyers and Rising Stars

Katrine Beck

Robert Altchiler

New York-based law firm Fullerton Beck LLP, which has offices in White Plains has announced that six of its attorneys have been named to the 2020 New York Metro Super Lawyers and Rising Stars. Those named to Super Lawyers are Eileen Fullerton, managing partner; Katrine Beck, partner; Edward J. Guardaro Jr., partner; and Robert Altchiler, of counsel. Attorneys named to Rising Star include: Jason Aaron, partner; and Joseph Sauer, senior counsel. “We are honored to have our peers nominate us for this coveted list,” said Fullerton. “While our firm is just in its third year, our experience spans decades….” Super Lawyers, part of Thomson Reuters, is a research-driven, peerinfluenced rating service of lawyers who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement.

Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

The 17th annual 5K run/walk New Canaan Turkey Trot moved to  New Canaan High School with changes like staggered start times and  fewer runners onsite to help improve social distancing during the outdoor event.  All proceeds from the race benefit local  homeless shelter and housing  organization, Open Doors which, provides  resources  to people who are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless, from critical needs like food, clothing, case management, job training and continuing education, and access to health services  to  affordable  housing and emergency shelter. The New Canaan Turkey Trot is organized by a team of New Canaan and Weston students. The event provides much-needed funds for people dealing with homelessness and housing insecurity during the winter months. This year’s race sponsors include  Health Enterprise Partners, Hospital for Special Surgery Stamford, Millennium, Onward Search, Recruitics and Saxe + Bryan Properties. Michele  Conderino, executive director of Open Doors, said,  “We’re thankful for the New Canaan Turkey Trot team, who made this year’s run even more special by finding ways to participate more safely.  It means so much when our community comes together to support  our  neighbors who are struggling  during these particularly difficult times.”

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westfaironline.com wagmag.com Eileen Fullerton

Edward J. Guardaro Jr.

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Fairfield County

NOMINATE TODAY

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: NOVEMBER 6 Visit westfaironline.com/40under40/

VIRTUAL EVENT:

FEBRUARY 25 WestfairOnline

NOMINATE A CANDIDATE (PERHAPS YOURSELF) WHO IS:

• Over 25 and under 40 years of age • A dynamic industry leader who’s part of the county’s business growth • Living or working in Fairfield County and has not previously won this competition

For more information or sponsorship inquiries, contact Barbara Hanlon at bhanlon@westfairinc.com or 914-358-0766. For event information, contact Faime Muriqi at fmuriqi@westfairinc.com. CHAMBER PARTNERS: Darien Chamber of Commerce | The Business Council of Fairfield County | Wilton Chamber of Commerce | Greater Norwalk Chamber of Commerce | Greater Valley Chamber of Commerce | Ridgefield Chamber of Commerce | Westport-Weston Chamber of Commerce | Greater Danbury Chamber of Commerce | Greenwich Chamber of Commerce | Bridgeport Regional Business Council | Stamford Chamber of Commerce

PRESENTED BY:

SILVER SPONSOR:

BRONZE SPONSORS:


Facts & Figures U.S. BANKRUPTCY COURT White Plains & Poughkeepsie Local business cases, November 11 - 17 Bernsohn & Fetner, Upper Nyack vs. Randall Bernsohn, Weston, Connecticut, 20-23707RDD: Adversary proceeding, fraudulent transfer, in Bernsohn & Fetner Chapter 11. Attorney: David H. Hartheimer. Thomas O. Cuccaro, New Paltz, codebtor Vito’s Wholesale Seafood, Central Valley, 20-36151CGM: Chapter 7, $427,306 assets, $486,429 liabilities. Attorney: Gerald N. Jacobowitz. U.S. District Court, White Plains Local business cases, November 11 - 17 Hemp Productions Inc., Poughkeepsie vs. MCC Development Inc., Asheville, North Carolina, et al, 20-9457-NSR: Contract. Attorneys: David L. Cook and Daniel R. Maguire. Stacy Smith, the Bronx vs. The ARC Westchester, Hawthorne, 20-9520-KMK: Race discrimination, attorney Paul Cisternino. Mandeep Singh, Jamaica, Queens vs. Joginder Food Mart Inc., Wappingers Falls, et al, 20-9590-PMH: Fair Labor Standards Act, attorneys Aaron B. Schweitzer and John Troy. CSAIL 2018 – CX12 Route 9 Poughkeepsie Hotel, Plano, Texas vs. South Road Hospitality, Poughkeepsie, et al, 20-9628-VB: Breach of contract, real property. Attorneys: Richard J. Galati Jr., and David M. Posner.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken.

Patricia Cordner, Poughkeepsie vs. Marist College, Poughkeepsie, et al, 20-9629-CS: Civil rights, jobs. Attorney: Howard T. Schragin. Hudson Neurosurgery, Yonkers vs. United Healthcare Services, Minnetonka, Minnessota, et al, 20-9642: Breach of contract. Attorney: Richard A. Hochhauser.

DEEDS Above $1 million 10 Central Ave LLC, Rye. Seller: Carter Roehl, et al, Rye. Property: 10 Central Ave., Rye. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed Nov. 9. 137 School Street LLC, Yonkers. Seller: 4 Herriot Place Corp., Yonkers. Property: 310 New Main St., Yonkers. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed Nov. 9. Aleksander B Realty LLC, Bronx. Seller: Hitachi America Ltd., Tarrytown. Property: 50 Prospect Ave., Greenburgh. Amount: $4 million. Filed Nov. 13. Brite Avenue Development Corp., Scarsdale. Seller: 17 Oxford LLC, Scarsdale. Property: 17 Oxford Road, Scarsdale. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed Nov. 12. CL-S Chappaqua Fee Owner I-A LLC, Southport, Connecticut. Seller: SG Chappaqua B LLC, Westport, Connecticut. Property: 480 Bedford Road, New Castle. Amount: $9.8 million. Filed Nov. 13. Judson Elm Street LLC, Tuckahoe. Seller: Dorothea Tomczyk, White Plains. Property: 44 Edgewood Ave., Mamaroneck. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed Nov. 12.

BELOW $1 MILLION 178 East Boston Post Road LLC, Larchmont. Seller: Madison Property Development Group LLC, Mamaroneck. Property: 178 E. Boston Post Road, Rye. Amount: $460,000. Filed Nov. 12.

ON THE RECORD

500 Central Ave 224 LLC, Scarsdale. Seller: Ramnath Kapoor, et al, Scarsdale. Property: 500 Central Ave., 224, Greenburgh. Amount: $535,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Goldenrod Farm LLC, Sherman, Connecticut. Seller: Todd Farm LLC, New York. Property: 47 Todd Road, Lewisboro. Amount: $810,000. Filed Nov. 9.

71 Pelham LLC, New Rochelle. Seller: Gavin A. David, et al, New Rochelle. Property: 71 Pelham Road, New Rochelle. Amount: $300,000. Filed Nov. 12.

Kadob102 LLC, Yonkers. Seller: Paul D. Feinstein, Yonkers. Property: 102 Sunnyside Drive, Yonkers. Amount: $499,900. Filed Nov. 9.

925 South Street LLC, Mamaroneck. Seller: Robert Ennis, et al, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Property: 925 South St., Peekskill. Amount: $625,000. Filed Nov. 12. 97-44 102nd Street LLC, Larchmont. Seller: Huba Gero Gancsos, et al, Scarsdale. Property: 1 Scarsdale Road, 513, Eastchester. Amount: $675,000. Filed Nov. 12. Anchor Estates LLC, Eastchester. Seller: Herman Hanson, Yonkers. Property: 139 Mountaindale Road, Yonkers. Amount: $370,000. Filed Nov. 13. BC 439 LLC, Monsey. Seller: 439 S 7 Ave LLC, Spring Valley. Property: 439 Seventh Avenue South, Mount Vernon. Amount: $475,000. Filed Nov. 9. Cabeca Group R.E. Investors Corp., Briarcliff Manor. Seller: Susie M. Blanshaw, Elmsford. Property: 223 Endicott Ave., Greenburgh. Amount: $50,000. Filed Nov. 13. Cedar Hill Owner LLC, Ardsley. Seller: William J. O’Shea, et al, Ossining. Property: 119 Cedar Lane, Ossining. Amount: $430,000. Filed Nov. 12. CL-S Chappaqua Fee Owner I-A LLC, Southport, Connecticut. Seller: SG Chappaqua B LLC, Westport, Connecticut. Property: in New Castle. Amount: $100,000. Filed Nov. 13. E and E Estates LLC, Yonkers. Seller: U.S Bank Trust N.A. Property: 346 Glen Hill Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $353,209. Filed Nov. 13. East Third Street Realty Corp., Mount Vernon. Seller: Alvin J. Kahn, New Rochelle. Property: 50 Overlook Circle, New Rochelle. Amount: $810,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Palisades 164 LLC, Scarsdale. Seller: 164 Palisades Street LLC, Dobbs Ferry. Property: 164 Palisade St., Greenburgh. Amount: $697,000. Filed Nov. 9. RAS Closing Services LLC, Glen Ellyn, Illinois. Seller: Kelly Moiseeff, et al, Larchmont. Property: 80 W. Garden Road, Mamaroneck. Amount: $939,000. Filed Nov. 10. RAS Closing Services LLC, Glen Ellyn, Illinois. Seller: Michael Davis, et al, White Plains. Property: 118 Manhattan Ave., Greenburgh. Amount: $440,000. Filed Nov. 12. Rayford Deverne and Sons Inc., Briarcliff Manor. Seller: Michael J. Kear, Montrose. Property: 1564 East Blvd., Peekskill. Amount: $285,000. Filed Nov. 13. Red Oak Lane LLC, Briarcliff Manor. Seller: Susan M. Fitzgerald, et al, Amawalk. Property: 39 Red Oak Lane, New Castle. Amount $140,000. Filed Nov. 9. Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Seller: Christopher T. Bonante, White Plains. Property: 549 Westchester Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $658,748. Filed Nov. 12.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicated a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed. 50 High Holding Corp., et al. Filed by Toorak Capital Partners LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $262,500 affecting property located at 50 S. High St., Mount Vernon 10550. Filed Nov. 10.

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Anselmo, Nicasia, et al. Filed by U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $610,000 affecting property located at 144 Northfield Ave., Dobbs Ferry 10522. Filed Nov. 9. Borrelli, Sam Jr., et al. Filed by PNC Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $220,000 affecting property located at 424 Bellevue Ave., Yonkers 10703. Filed Nov. 11. Broquadio, Joseph, et al. Filed by Islandcap LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $75,000 affecting property located at 12 Fox Terrace, Yonkers 10701. Filed Nov. 12. Massey, Paul, et al. Filed by Hudson Park Capital II LP. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 76 Shore Drive, Larchmont 10538. Filed Nov. 9. Multiple Bless Ziad Family LLC, et al. Filed by 310 Realty Corp. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $425,000 affecting property located at 310 McLean Ave., Yonkers 10705. Filed Nov. 13. Partelow, Dawn Marie, et al. Filed by Bayview Loan Servicing LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $408,000 affecting property located at 483 Bedford Road, Bedford Hills 10507. Filed Nov. 10. Ramos, Hiriam, et al. Filed by Islandcap LLC. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $200,000 affecting property located at 234 Sedgewick Ave., Yonkers 10705. Filed Nov. 12. Sarmiento, Fabio A., et al. Filed by HSBC Bank USA N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $406,000 affecting property located at 220 Dante Ave., Tuckahoe 10707. Filed Nov. 9. Travis, Eric Lamont, et al. Filed by The Bank of New York Mellon. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $310,000 affecting property located at 111 and 113 Leila St., Peekskill 10566. Filed Nov. 12.

MECHANIC’S LIENS 294 Route 100 LLC, as owner. $58,206 as claimed by Layne Christensen Co. Property: in Somers. Filed Nov. 16.

NEW BUSINESSES This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS 1 Of A Kind, 540 N. Terrace Ave., Mount Vernon 10552, c/o Alan Seward. Filed July 14. ABS Development, 84 Grandview Ave., Pleasantville 10570, c/o Eamon Pickard. Filed July 14. B.Greene Industries, 20 Claremont Gardens, Ossining 10562, c/o Anthony Greene. Filed July 14. Bliss 13, 55 Cole St., Yonkers 10710, c/o Theresa Bonsignore. Filed July 14. Fine Quality Auto Body, 5 MacDonald Ave., Armonk 10504, c/o Susan Shamus. Filed July 14. Grant’s Moving Delivery, 327 S. Seventh Ave., Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Christopher Grant. Filed July 14. Healy Hospitality, 84 Pleasant Ave., Pleasantville 10570, c/o Jonathan Healy. Filed July 15. Jay’s Jumpers, 21 E. Broad St., Mount Vernon 10552, c/o Jason Mason. Filed July 14. Jewelers On, 701 Ridge Hill Blvd., Apt. 4A, Yonkers 10710, c/o Ercan Taskin. Filed July 14. K. Arielle, 411 Bronx River Road, No. 50, Yonkers 10704, c/o Shamecka Blakney. Filed July 14. Kardz, 21 E. Broad St., Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Deon Parker. Filed July 14.

Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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Facts & Figures Noelle’s Heating and Cooling, 1330 Halstead Ave., Mamaroneck 10543, c/o Randy Omess. Filed July 15. O’Meara Law Office, 200 E. Post Road, White Plains 10601, c/o Brendan O’Meara. Filed July 14. Orisas Child Botanica, 33 Fisher Court, No. 41T, White Plains 10601, c/o Soulangie Leeper. Filed July 16. Papi Wings-Hot and Spicy, 57 Palisade Ave., Yonkers 10701, c/o Eufrastes Perez Garcia. Filed July 16. Rainbow Jam Jar, 755 Pelhamdale Ave., Pelham 10803, c/o Chiawei Satriano. Filed July 16. Slot Time Media, 540 N. Terrace Ave., Mount Vernon 10552, c/o Alan Seward. Filed July 14. Sunshine and Love, 244 S. Third Ave., Apt. 2, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Nichola Campbell. Filed July 14. Therapy With Tice-Icepic Productions, 90 Union St., Apt. 6H, New Rochelle 10805, c/o Natice I. Jackson. Filed July 16. Vintage Village Apparel, 21 E. Broad St., Mount Vernon 10552, c/o Jason Mason. Filed July 14. Weir Home Bakery, 38 ½ Wolden Road, Apt. D1-2, Ossining 10562, c/o Ashley Dianne Weir. Filed July 15. Woods Electric, 802 Pinesbridge Road, Ossining 10562, c/o Brian D. Woods. Filed July 14.

PATENTS Acoustical noise reduction and distributed airflow in electrical equipment. Patent no. 10,842,051 issued to Scott Lapree, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Analyzing text documents. Patent no. 10,839,298 issued to Robert Farrell, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Cognitive computing for servers and mobile devices. Patent no. 10,839,311 issued to Pradip Bose, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

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Cooling system for an electronics enclosure. Patent no. 10,842,049 issued to William Anderl, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Container filling system and valve for same. Patent no. 10,836,624 issued to John Eaton, et al. Assigned to PepsiCo, Purchase. Determination of an online collaboration status of a user-based upon biometric and user-activity data. Patent no. 10,841,255 issued to Stephane Queva, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Fabricating coolant-cooled heat sinks with internal thermally conductive fins. Patent no. 10,842,043 issued to Hongqing Zhang, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Formation of air-gap spacers for reducing parasitic capacitance. Patent no. 10,840,349 issued to Kangguo Cheng, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Monitoring learning performance using neurofeedback. Patent no. 10,839,712 issued to Kevin Carr, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Oblivious pseudorandom function in a key management system. Patent no. 10,841,080 issued to Jason Resch, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

HUDSON VALLEY BUILDING LOANS Above $1 million 160 Union Holdings LLC, as owner. Lender: CPC Funding SPE 1 LLC. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $7.2 million. Filed Nov. 12. Congregation Tiv Leivov Inc., Monroe, as owner. Lender: Northeast Community Bank, White Plains. Property: 5 Garfield Road, Monroe 10950. Amount: $5 million. Filed Nov. 5. Dutchess Partners LLC, as owner. Lender: Lakeland Bank. Property: in Fishkill. Amount: $1.9 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Below $1 million 327 Monroe LLC, Kiryas Joel, as owner. Lender: LendingHome Funding Corp., San Francisco, California. Property: 60 Wait St., Walden 12586. Amount: $128,400. Filed Nov. 10. 420 Grand LLC, Newburgh, as owner. Lender: Rock East Funding LLC, Plainview. Property: 420 Grand St., Newburgh 12550. Amount: $351,000. Filed Nov. 13.

Populating a new community for a social network. Patent no. 10,839,465 issued to Richard Gorzela, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Croom, Edward L., et al, as owner. Lender: TD Bank N.A. Property: in LaGrange. Amount: $336,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Plastic bottle with a champagne base and production methods thereof. Patent no. 10,836,531 issued to Kamal Mahajan, et al. Assigned to PepsiCo, Purchase.

Get Wild For Water LLC, et al, Gardiner, as owner. Lender: Walden Savings Bank, Montgomery. Property: 2235 Route 44/55, Gardiner. Amount: $350,000. Filed Nov. 12.

System and method for secure proximity-based signatures for parcel delivery. Patent no. 10,839,337 issued to Nader Nassar, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. t

Gushue, John M., et al, Sparrow Bush, as owner. Lender: Mid-Hudson Valley Federal Credit Union, Kingston. Property: 34 W. Peenpack Trail, Sparrow Bush 12780. Amount: $100,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Omri Amit Trust, et al, as owner. Lender: Walden Savings Bank. Property: in Rhinebeck. Amount: $400,000. Filed Nov. 9.

DEEDS Above $1 million 404 WDR LLC, New York City. Seller: One Madison LLC, New York City. Property: in Amenia. Amount: $10.3 million. Filed Nov. 5. APT Real Estate LLC, Amenia. Seller: Silo Ridge Ventures Property A LLC, Scottsdale, Arionaz. Property: in Amenia. Amount: $2.2 million. Filed Nov. 6. Birch Knoll Farm LLC, Armonk. Seller: Robert Cole, et al, Verbank. Property: 273 Old Camby Road, Union Vale. Amount: $1.2 million. Filed Nov. 5. Casa M Investments LLC, Scottsdale, Arizona. Seller: Stoneleaf Lot Ventures 2 LLC, Amenia. Property: Redtail Pass, Amenia. Amount: $1.1 million. Filed Nov. 6. DMS Middle Lane VII LLC, New York City. Seller: Sam Youneszadeh, et al, West Palm Beach, Florida. Property: 411 Pheasant Run, Amenia 12501. Amount: $3.2 million. Filed Nov. 5. Faith Apostolic Ministries Inc., Poughkeepsie. Seller: Hudson Valley Community Center Inc., Poughkeepsie. Property: 110 S. Grand Ave., Poughkeepsie 12603. Amount: $1.4 million. Filed Nov. 12. LGP Capital Neelytown LLC, Central Valley. Seller: Brenda Messenger, et al, Monticello. Property: 230 Neelytown Road, Hamptonburgh. Amount: $2.2 million. Filed Nov. 10. PKCW LLC, Red Hook. Seller: Third Rock Realty LLC, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $1.6 million. Filed Nov. 5. Wolfram Hanchett-Bates Inc., Fort Worth, Texas. Seller: Fraser Conservation LLC, Bronxville. Property: in North East. Amount: $3.7 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Wolfram Hanchett-Bates LLC, Fort Worth, Texas. Seller: Young Life, Colorado Springs, Colorado. Property: in North East and Amenia. Amount: $6.6 million. Filed Nov. 10. Zheng Jian LLC, Middletown. Seller: Local Media Group Inc., Pittsford. Property: 20 Smith Road, Wallkill. Amount: $2.7 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Below $1 million 30 Chevron LLC, Monroe. Seller: Vista Pearl LLC, Monroe. Property: 28 Chevron Road, Monroe 10950. Amount: $900,000. Filed Nov. 10. 366 Highland DMI LLC, Middletown. Seller: Andrea Lindenberg, Avon, Connecticut. Property: Dolsontown Road, Middletown 10940. Amount: $649,000. Filed Nov. 10. 420 Grand LLC, Newburgh. Seller: Bryan Burke, Newburgh. Property: 420 Grand St., Newburgh. Amount: $123,000. Filed Nov. 13. 45 Lincoln Drive LLC, et al, Carmel. Seller: Steven Frattarola, Carmel. Property: 24 Harvard Drive, Carmel 10512. Amount: $155,000. Filed Nov. 9. 64 East Main Street LLC, Wappingers Falls. Seller: Kevin A. Delehanty, Wappingers Falls. Property: 64 E. Main St., Wappingers Falls 12590. Amount: $650,000. Filed Nov. 10. B4 Holdings LLC, Newburgh. Seller: Bruschetti Real Estate LLC, Walden. Property: Rock Cut Road, Newburgh. Amount: $75,000. Filed Nov. 13. Chefalo Contracting LLC, Pleasant Valley. Seller: R.J.A. HLD Inc., Wappingers Falls. Property: in Wappinger. Amount: $295,000. Filed Nov. 6. Clinton Corners Ventures LLC, Rhinebeck. Seller: Jeanne Rodewald, et al, Red Hook. Property: Kansas Road, Clinton. Amount: $95,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Dasmas Landco LLC, New York City. Seller: U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Property: 31 Blossom Lane, Carmel 10512. Amount: $307,500. Filed Nov. 13. DeBellis Construction Corp., Brewster. Seller: Route 6 Partners Inc., Brewster. Property: 22 and 28 Eastview Ave., Brewster 10509. Amount: $250,000. Filed Nov. 12. Diamond Trail Properties LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Pete G. Capell, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Pleasant Valley. Amount: $95,000. Filed Nov. 12. Diamond Trail Properties LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Steeplechase Acres LLC, Pleasant Valley. Property: in Pleasant Valley. Amount: $495,000. Filed Nov. 12. Fargab LLC, Brewster. Seller: Robert Haddad, Carmel. Property: 120 Manor Road, Patterson 12563. Amount: $125,000. Filed Nov. 12. GDS Capital LLC, Pleasant Valley. Seller: William L. Fanelli, et al, Hyde Park. Property: in Pleasant Valley. Amount: $562,500. Filed Nov. 9. Jency and Blacina LLC, Wingdale. Seller: Alondra Realty LLC, Brewster. Property: 2237-2239 Route 22, Patterson 12563. Amount: $400,000. Filed Nov. 12. JPK Enterprises LLC, New York City. Seller: Eastern Oaks Development LLC, Pleasantville. Property: in Clinton. Amount: $76,000. Filed Nov. 10. MTGLQ Investors LP, Greenville, South Carolina. Seller: Tizrah Sheehy, Kingston. Property: 187 Sackett St., Esopus. Amount: $124,672. Filed Nov. 12. National Residential Nominee Services Inc., Eden Prairie, Minnessota. Seller: Sean M. Gately, Hopewell Junction. Property: in East Fishkill. Amount: $400,000. Filed Nov. 5. New Wave Pool and Spa LLC, Newburgh. Seller: Michael Gallo, Newburgh. Property: 18 Pampas Lane, Newburgh. Amount: $55,200. Filed Nov. 10. NI840 LLC, Syosset. Seller: Minisink Land LLC, Nyack. Property: in Minisink. Amount: $95,000. Filed Nov. 9.

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Facts & Figures NML Wilds LLC, Millbrook. Seller: Robert D. Trotta, Millerton. Property: in Northeast. Amount: $385,000. Filed Nov. 5. PHH Mortgage Corp., West Palm Beach, Florida. Seller: Theoni Stamos-Salotto, Hopewell Junction. Property: 29 Carroll Drive, Wappingers Falls 12590. Amount: $270,000. Filed Nov. 9. Poughkeepsie Dev LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Serroukas and Vanikiotis Real Estate Partnership, Poughkeepsie. Property: 535 Haight Ave., Poughkeepsie 12603. Amount: $565,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Winning Properties LLC, Rhinebeck. Seller: Harvey M. Marek, Rhinebeck. Property: in Rhinebeck. Amount: $410,000. Filed Nov. 10. Z and H RT52 LLC, Babylon. Seller: Francesco Cappuccio, Scarsdale. Property: 7300 Route 52 West, Wawarsing. Amount: $265,000. Filed Nov. 6.

JUDGMENTS Across Campaign Inc., Monroe. $46,000 in favor of the Workers’ Compensation Board of the State of New York, Albany. Filed Nov. 12.

Preshburg Realty LLC, Monroe. Seller: Shaun McKenzie, et al, Brooklyn. Property: in Cornwall-on-Hudson. Amount: $95,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Bello and Son Ltd., Goshen. $2,218 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12.

Skyview Equities LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Wilmington Trust Co. Property: 465 Kennicut Hill Road, Mahopac 10541. Amount: $132,500. Filed Nov. 10.

C. Baker’s Auto Repair LLC, Central Valley. $1,796 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12.

Starlite Equities LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: James Yastion, New Paltz. Property: 102 Pine St., Hurley. Amount: $175,900. Filed Nov. 6.

C.A.D.I. Auto Parts Inc., Monroe. $5,438 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12.

Sybil Development Inc., Port Chester. Seller: Karen E. D’Alessandro, Carmel. Property: 72 Harvard Drive, Carmel 10512. Amount: $81,200. Filed Nov. 9.

Capital Trimmers Inc., Monroe. $3,266 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12.

The Oak Tree Development Group LLC, West Nyack. Seller: Thomas E. Babcock, Jr., Hialeah, Florida. Property: 12 Sayer St., Goshen. Amount: $95,000. Filed Nov. 9. Turk Hill Properties LLC, Brewster. Seller: U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Property: 23 Shannon Way, Brewster 10509. Amount: $413,000. Filed Nov. 9. Vinco Realty LLC, Bronx. Seller: The County of Putnam, Carmel. Property: 615 Route 6N, Carmel. Amount: $60,000. Filed Nov. 9. Vista Pearl LLC, Monroe. Seller: Abraham Friedman, Highland Mills. Property: 19 Seven Springs Road, Woodbury. Amount: $900,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Crystal Run Healthcare Physicians, Middletown. $95,196 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Dos Latinos Inc., Goshen. $14,274 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Glebe house LLC, Newburgh. $541 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Jewels Fashion LLC, Middletown. $33,000 in favor of the Workers’ Compensation Board of the State of New York, Albany. Filed Nov. 12.

JMM Deli Corp., Highland Falls. $10,017 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Lou G. Siegel Inc., Monroe. $5,395 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Mid-Valley Towing Inc., Middletown. $5,086 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Muzon Foods Inc., Monroe. $805 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Puppypaw Enterprises Inc., Cornwall-on-Hudson. $34,000 in favor of the Workers’ Compensation Board of the State of New York, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Salon Lucere LLC, Chester. $3,809 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Tara Group Restoration and Maintenance Inc., Goshen. $3,500 in favor of the Workers’ Compensation Board of the State of New York, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Three Mama’s and Mike Inc., Chester. $29,165 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12. Yobo Inc., Newburgh. $5,493 in favor of the New York State Department of Taxation and Finance, Albany. Filed Nov. 12.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicated a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed. 177 Stone House LLC, et al. Filed by Finwise Bank. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an undisclosed amount affecting property located at 177 and 197 Stone School House Road, Crawford and 7 Hudson Pointe, Woodbury. Filed Nov. 12.

Bon, Deny J., et al. Filed by U.S. Bank Trust N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure and undisclosed amount affecting property located at 19 Buhleier Road, Patterson 12563. Filed Nov. 10. Brearley, Gail, as executrix of the estate of Richard Exner, et al. Filed by Wells Fargo USA Holdings Inc. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 607 Ulster Heights Road, Ellenville 12428. Filed Nov. 10. Cannon, Daniel R., et al. Filed by U.S. Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 34 Cromwell Road, Monroe 10950. Filed Nov. 13. Fauci, David C., et al. Filed by Mill City Mortgage Loan Trust 2019-1. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $180,860 affecting property located at 6 Orchard Lane, Highland 12528. Filed Nov. 11. Hallock, Franklin A., et al. Filed by Anthony G. Buono. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $40,000 affecting property located at 610-612 Huckleberry Turnpike, Plattekill. Filed Nov. 11. Hansen, Erik, et al. Filed by Wells Fargo Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $360,000 affecting property located at 24 Milltown Road, Holmes 12531. Filed Nov. 6. O’Hare, Stephen P., et al. Filed by U.S Bank Trust N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure an unspecified amount affecting property located at 15 Pray Lane, LaGrangeville 12540. Filed Nov. 6. Vieira, George, et al. Filed by Deutsche Bank National Trust Co. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $215,000 affecting property located at 58 Lake Drive, Mahopac 10541. Filed Nov. 9. Wolter, James E., et al. Filed by UMB Bank N.A. Action: seeks to foreclose on a mortgage to secure $314,724 affecting property located at 2929 Route 52, Pine Bush 12566. Filed Nov. 12.

MECHANIC’S LIENS 446 Liberty LLC, as owner. $8,132 as claimed by PSH Corp., Newburgh. Property: in Newburgh. Filed Nov. 13. 7 Lizensky Realty LLC, as owner. $1,600 as claimed by W Ojeda and Sons Trans Corp., Linden, New Jersey. Property: 7 Lizensk Blvd., Palm Tree. Filed Nov. 13. Banta LQ LLC, as owner. $178,409 as claimed by Peak Construction Management LLC, Buffalo. Property: 541-551 Route 211 East, Middletown 10941. Filed Nov. 12. GAM Property Corp., as owner. $1,600 as claimed by W Ojeda and Sons Trans Corp., Linden, New Jersey. Property: 3 Police Drive, Goshen. Filed Nov. 13. Iglesia, Steve, et al, as owner. $2,189 as claimed by BRAV Industries LLC, Airmont. Property: 130 Ridge Drive, Mount Hope. Filed Nov. 10.

NEW BUSINESSES This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

PARTNERSHIPS JZK Contractors, 39 Terra Road, Saugerties 12477, c/o Zachary B. Kalatsky and Joshua J. Zaloga. Filed Nov. 9. Ray’s Simpler Times 2, 5973 Route 28, Phoenicia 12464, c/o Ethan W. Bernstein and Shane M. Bernstein. Filed Nov. 12.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS BeautiCrafts, 194 Sara Lane, Newburgh 12550, c/o Crystal Ann Walker-Selby. Filed Nov. 10.

Brudnak Woodworking, 9-B Kavalee Lane, Warwick 10990, c/o Scott Francis Brudnak. Filed Nov. 13. Chase Built, 586 Sandhill Road, Gardiner 12525, c/o Lagrand E. Chase IV. Filed Nov. 6. CHS, 23 Bill Parr Drive, Saugerties 12477, c/o Charles W. Duford. Filed Nov. 6. Farm and Land Services, 106 Purgatory Road, Campbell Hall 10916, c/o Andrew J. Homar. Filed Nov. 12. Garrett Investments, 214 Dingle Ridge Road, Southeast 10509, c/o Suzanne Garrett DeBaun. Filed Nov. 10. Grann Design, 1115 Route 9W, Esopus 12429, c/o Stephanie M. Grann. Filed Nov. 10. Kerri Gaddis, 1979 County Road 3, Olivebridge 12461, c/o Kerri Rebecca Gaddis. Filed Nov. 10. McFly’s Transport, 45 Shufeldt St., Kingston 12401, c/o Martin C. Flynn Jr. Filed Nov. 12. Minnan Boutique, 197 Penaluna Road, Monroe 10950, c/o Minna Aaltosalmi-Harmon. Filed Nov. 13. New York City Bag Shop, 26 Peenpack Trail, Huguenot 12746, c/o Raymond Joseph Semidey. Filed Nov. 9. Palestinian Made Us, 76 Ellen Ave., Mahopac 10541, c/o Qater Annada Deluca. Filed Nov. 9. Rob Fix It All, 229 Shear Hill Road, Mahopac 10541, c/o Robert Michael Pozzi. Filed Nov. 12. Wogan Works, 634 Creekside Road, Kingston 12401, c/o Christina Ludas. Filed Nov. 12.

Bodi, 216 Canal St., Ellenville 12428, c/o Alain Lamontagne. Filed Nov. 10.

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Facts & Figures BUILDING PERMITS Commercial Amazing Pro Builders, Bridgeport, contractor for Beechmont Professional. Replace windows at 3180 Main St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $7,100. Filed Oct. 2. A-Preferred Construction, Bridgeport, contractor for ABCD Inc. Perform interior alterations at 1070 Park Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $90,000. Filed Oct. 2. A-Preferred Construction, Bridgeport, contractor for Career Resources Inc. Perform repairs at 405 Clinton Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed Oct. 1. Burr Roofing Siding Windows, Stratford, contractor for Jesus, Tavares. Replace roof covering at 1655 Barnum Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $39,379. Filed Oct. 8. Cove Tent Co, Stamford, contractor for Indian Harbor Corp. Prepare for a private party at 710 Steamboat Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $2,450. Filed Oct. 2020. Ericsson Inc, Plano, Texas, contractor for Greenwich Hospital Association. Upgrade and replace equipment at 5 Perryridge Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Oct. 2020. JCS Construction Group Inc., Stamford, contractor for West Putnam Owner LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 32 Grahampton, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $75,000. Filed Oct. 2020. Jos Miranda Contracting, Stratford, contractor for BTTC WJ Partners, LLC. Replace roof covering at 955 Main St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $7,500. Filed Oct. 9.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken.

Jos Miranda Contracting, Stratford, contractor for BTTC WJ Partners, LLC. Replace roof covering at 144 Golden Hill St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $16,500. Filed Oct. 9. Oceanview Pool & Patio, South Port, contractor for Jonas Grossman. Construct swimming pool and required safety barrier at 21 Mountain Wood Drive, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $100,000. Filed Oct. 2020. Signature Pools Inc., Norwalk, contractor for Charles E. MacDonnell. Construct swimming pool and required safety barrier at 553 North St., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $70,000. Filed Oct. 2020. Transcend Wireless, Mahwah, New Jersey, contractor for SBA. Install three new antennas and associated equipment at 955 Main St., Unit 961, Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Oct. 6. Wagner Pools, Darien, contractor for Michael Yavonditte. Construct swimming pool and required safety barrier at 23 Wickham Hill Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $95,000. Filed Oct. 2020.

Residential Quality Roofing Services Inc., West Haven, contractor for On the Mark Management LLC. Replace roof covering at 390 Charles St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $197,526. Filed Oct. 14.

ON THE RECORD

Baybrook Remodelers, West Haven, contractor for Joanna, Ortiz. Construct dormer on garage and perform structural repairs to garage and foundation at 551 Courtland Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $29,000. Filed Oct. 13. Best Way, Waterbury, contractor for Nicardo Whyte. Install a roof garage at 319 Summerfield Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $1,000. Filed Oct. 14. Best Way, Waterbury, contractor for Nicardo Whyte. Install a roof house at 319 Summerfield Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $9,000. Filed Oct. 14. Blue Star Construction LLC, Stratford, contractor for Magilla LLC. Convert first floor to residential and add second story for apartment at 2010 Boston Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $110,000. Filed Oct. 1. BM Pro Builders LLC, Trumbull, contractor for BM Pro Builders LLC. Add new family dwelling at 1023 Reservoir Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $145,000. Filed Oct. 10. Building Roofing LLC, Bristol, contractor for Constance Bondswell. Replace roof covering at 465 Indian Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $5,099. Filed Oct. 8. Bulldog Roofing LLC, Bristol, contractor for Luis Viera. Replace roof covering at 221 Moffit St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $6,300. Filed Oct. 8.

AF Contracting LLC, Stamford, contractor for Shin Inai Lee and Ken Eui-Han. Renovate front door and construct new retaining wall at 14A Forest Ave., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $125,000. Filed Oct. 2020.

Constand, Christopher, Bridgeport, contractor for Christopher Constand. Alter kitchen and bathroom at 108 Rowsley St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Oct. 6.

ALX Products & Services LLC, West Hartford contractor for Adaeze, Merah. Replace roof covering at 315 Ridgefield Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $12,000. Filed Oct. 14.

Davenport Contracting Inc., Stamford, contractor for Charles and Elizabeth Swanson. Replace windows and siding at 31 Indian Point Lane, Riverside. Estimated cost: $277,260. Filed Oct. 2020.

Arevalo, Edwin, Bridgeport, contractor for Edwin,Arevalo. Install rear dormer and two window dormers at front and remodel kitchen at 297 Hooker Road, Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed Oct. 13.

Douglas Allen Investments Group LLC, Milford, contractor for Douglas Allen Investments Group LLC. Replace windows, doors, sheetrock, cabinets and siding at 1387-1391 Pembroke St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $35,000. Filed Oct. 2.

fairfield county

Fairfield Roofing, Bridgeport, contractor for Juene Ghyslin. Replace roof at 426-428 Jane St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $11,000. Filed Oct. 2.

Neto, Carmen, Bridgeport, contractor for Carmen, Neto. Rebuild deck at 510 Birmingham St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $4,200. Filed Oct. 2.

Garcia Wood Floors and Painting LLC, Bridgeport, contractor for Yixian, Long. Alter kitchen and bathroom at 406-410 Gregory St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $35,000. Filed Oct. 6.

Noble Construction Management, South Salem, New York, contracto for Phillip Mintz. Remove existing roof and re-roof 80 Round Hill Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $80,000. Filed Oct. 2020.

The Home Depot USA, Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Carol, Marrone. Replace four windows at 105 Woodland Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $2,485. Filed Oct. 8. The Home Depot USA, Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Manuel, Vargas. Replace patio door at 100 Orchard St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $2,252. Filed Oct. 8. Karipides, John, Greenwich, contractor for John Karipides. Finish basement and add half-bathroom at 45 Gold St., Greenwich. Estimated cost: $11,000. Filed Oct. 2020. Knox, Gina, Bridgeport, contractor for Gina Knox. Repair brick porch steps at 93 Sterling Place, Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $700. Filed Oct. 7. Live Oak Contracting, Jacksonville, Florida, contractor for Canfield Partners. Provide foundation only at 306 Canfield Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $1,000,000. Filed Oct. 6. Live Oak Contracting, Jacksonville, Florida, contractor for Canfield Partners. Provide foundation only at 215 Alfred St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $240,000. Filed Oct. 6. Lucien Investors LLC, Bridgeport, contractor for Lucien Investors LLC. Convert a four-family house to a two family house at 66-68 Crescent Place Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Oct. 14. Meadowpoint LLC, Greenwich, contractor for Meadowpoint LLC. Construct new single-family dwelling at 32 Grahampton Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $1,550,000. Filed Oct. 2020.

OM General Construction LLC, Naugatuck, contractor for Daniel, Johnson. Replace roof at 229 Moffit St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $9,000. Filed Oct. 8. Pedro Quintero, Stratford, contractor for Reina, Brito. Build deck at 298 Rosewood Place, Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $4,000. Filed Oct. 13. Phil’s Main Roofing LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Meredith, Vander Handel. Install roof at 425427 Brewster St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $19,462. Filed Oct. 7. Prestige Renovations LLC, Chester, contractor for Robert Desir. Replace front door, three basement windows and bathroom door at 447 Exeter St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $N/A. Filed Oct. 2. Pro Custom Solar / Momentum Solar, East Berlin, contractor for Marina Alamina. Reinforce roof rafters for solar installation at 85 Ocean Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $1,500. Filed Oct. 7. Pro Custom Solar DBA Momentum Solar, East Berlin, contractor for Georgia Marshall. Perform a roof covering replacement and structural reinforcement of rafters at 159 Linwood Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $15,333. Filed Oct. 5. Pro Custom Solar - Momentum Solar, East Berlin, contractor for Lalanne Philippe. Perform a roof replacement at 24 Harvard St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $11,688. Filed Oct. 5.

Santanna, Mario, Bridgeport, contractor for Mario Santanna. Finish basement and add half-bathroom at 155 Island Brook Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $8,000. Filed Oct. 2. SB Builders LLC, Bridgeport, contractor for SB Builders LLC. Add new family dwelling at 15 Emra St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $150,000. Filed Oct. 1. Sound Beach Partners LLC, Stamford, contractor for SBP Lower Cross LLC. Construct new single-family dwelling at 70 Lower Cross Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $3,100,000. Filed Oct. 2020. Southern New England Windows, Smithfield, Rhode Island, contractor for Clare, Powers. Replace window at 465 Lake Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $23,712. Filed Oct. 14. Southern New England Windows, Smithfield, Rhode Island, contractor for Helen, Longo. Replace window at 36 Cleveland Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $25,531. Filed Oct. 5. Southern New England Windows, Smithfield, Rhode Island, contractor for Maikel Pineda. Replace window at 244 Seaside Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $6,167. Filed Oct. 5. Southern New England Windows, Smithfield, Rhode Island, contractor for Yves Jean. Replace windows and patio door at 31 Astoria Ave., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $16,552. Filed Oct. 2. TGC Excavation LLC, Norwalk, contractor for John R. Muchnicki. Perform replacement alterations at 155 Cat Rock Road, Cos Cob. Estimated cost: $20,000. Filed Oct. 2020. Today’s Home Improvements LLC, Stamford, contractor for Louis J. Paglia. Renovate kitchen and hall at 2 Oakwood Lane, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $225,000. Filed Oct. 2020.

Quality Roofing Services Inc., West Haven, contractor for On the Mark Management, LLC. Replace roof covering at 390 Charles St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $197,526. Filed Oct. 14.

Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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Facts & Figures Umar, Mustafa, Bridgeport, contractor for Mustafa Umar. Add new family dwelling at 45 Evans St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $160,000. Filed Oct. 6. Yardy Contractors LLC, New Haven, contractor for Hellen McNeill. Replace roof covering at 89 Beecher St., Bridgeport. Estimated cost: $8,500. Filed Oct. 2. Zarra, Francesco and Gary Zarro, Greenwich, contractor for Francesco and Gary Zarra. Add bathroom and laundry, remove study wall and enlarge kitchen area at 132 Cutler Road, Greenwich. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed Oct. 2020.

COURT CASES Bridgeport Superior Court Allstate Fire and Casualty Co., Northbrook, Illinois. Filed by Cecil Young, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Dana P Lonergan, Trumbull. Action: The plaintiff was allegedly struck by the defendant’s car and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff was insured by the defendant for underinsured motorist coverage benefits. The defendant was notified and has failed to compensate the plaintiff fairly. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6100173-S. Filed Sept. 16. Kencrest Services Inc., et al, Stratford. Filed by Alvaro Gonzalez, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Cooper Sevillano LLC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-206099891-S. Filed Sept. 4.

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Malick, Shujaat, et al, Fairfield. Filed by Abdelnaster Mahmoud, Fairfield. Plaintiff’s attorney: Altschuler & Altschuler, West Haven. Action: The plaintiff was a tenant on the defendants’ premises. When plaintiff was standing on the deck, without warning it collapsed, causing the plaintiff to fall eight to 10 feet and suffer serious injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBTCV-20-6099656-S. Filed Aug. 26. Pereira, Diego Fernandes, Bridgeport. Filed by Sunshine Floor Supplies Inc., Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Parrett Porto Parese & Colwell PC, Hamden. Action: The plaintiff entered into a contract with the defendant who had access to confidential customer lists and data. After ending his employment with the plaintiff, the defendant started working for a direct competitor and contacted plaintiff’s clients. The plaintiff who suffered damages seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6099761-S. Filed Aug. 31. URSTADT Biddle Properties Inc., East Hartford. Filed by Vanessa Frazier, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Skiber Michael E. Law Office, Norwalk. Action: The plaintiff parked her vehicle in the parking lot controlled by the defendant, when she was caused to fall and suffer injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-20-6100175-S. Filed Sept. 16.

Danbury Superior Court Alexander, Timothy L., et al, Danbury. Filed by Cazenovia Creek Funding II LLC, Charlotte, North Carolina. Plaintiff’s attorney: Marcus Law Firm, North Branford. Action: The plaintiff is the owner and holder of the tax lien, which the defendants promised to pay to the plaintiff. The defendants failed to pay the property taxes and as a result the plaintiff suffered monetary damages. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the tax liens, possession of the premises and monetary damages less than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs. Case no. DBD-CV-206037109-S. Filed Sept. 10.

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Kroeger, Richard, et al, Danbury. Filed by Cazenovia Creek Funding II LLC, Charlotte, North Carolina. Plaintiff’s attorney: Marcus Law Firm, North Branford. Action: The plaintiff is the owner and holder of the tax lien, which the defendants promised to pay to the plaintiff. The defendants failed to pay the property taxes and as a result the plaintiff suffered monetary damages. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the tax liens, possession of the premises and monetary damages less than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs. Case no. DBD-CV-206037112-S. Filed Sept. 10. Pierpaoli, Mary Lou, Bethel. Filed by Cazenovia Creek Funding II, LLC, Charlotte, North Carolina. Plaintiff’s attorney: Marcus Law Firm, North Branford. Action: The plaintiff is the owner and holder of the tax lien, which the defendant promised to pay the plaintiff. The defendant failed to pay the property taxes and as a result the plaintiff suffered monetary damages. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the tax liens, possession of the premises and monetary damages less than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs. Case no. DBD-CV-206037115-S. Filed Sept. 10. Sayers, Larion J., et al, Danbury. Filed by Cazenovia Creek Funding II LLC, Charlotte, North Carolina. Plaintiff’s attorney: Marcus Law Firm, North Branford. Action: The plaintiff is the owner and holder of the tax lien, which the defendant promised to pay to the plaintiff. The defendant failed to pay the property taxes and as a result the plaintiff suffered monetary damages. The plaintiff claims foreclosure of the tax liens, possession of the premises and monetary damages less than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs. Case no. DBDCV-20-6037114-S. Filed Sept. 10. The Stop & Shop Supermarket Company LLC, Hartford. Filed by Pamela Gallo, New Milford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff was lawfully a business invitee on the premises controlled and maintained by the defendant, when she was caused to slip due to the slippery conditions of the floor, thereby causing her to suffer injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-20-6036928-S. Filed Aug. 24.

Stamford Superior Court Boucher, Madeleine, Stamford. Filed by Claudio Pagan, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: The Pickel Law Firm LLC, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-206048466-S. Filed Sept. 16. Cipriano, Austin John, Middlebury. Filed by Evelyn Allen, Old Greenwich. Plaintiff’s attorney: Wocl Leydon LLC, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-206048705-S. Filed Oct. 5. Davis, John T., Darien. Filed by Joseph Romaniello, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Frank N. Peluso Law Offices, Greenwich. Action: The plaintiff was struck by the defendant’s car. The collision was allegedly due to the negligence of the defendant. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-20-6048713-S. Filed Oct. 5. Zepeda, Roberto, et al, Norwalk. Filed by Norberto Samper, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Papcsy Janosov Roche, Norwalk. Action: The plaintiff was injured after an altercation on the defendants’ premises by allegedly intoxicated servers or agents.The plaintiff seeks monetary damages in excess of $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other and further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-206048637-S. Filed Sept. 29.

DEEDS Commercial 171 Hamilton LLC, Greenwich. Seller: Anthony P. Sciarrillo, Greenwich. Property: 70 Hamilton Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $675,000. Filed Sept. 28. 6 Carpenters Owners LLC, Greenwich. Seller: James H. Dean, Greenwich. Property: 6 Carpenters Brook Road, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Sept. 29. 76 Schuyler Ave. LLC, Stamford. Seller: Zhendong Li and Zhen Lin, Stamford. Property: 76 Schuyler Ave., Stamford. Amount: $280,000. Filed Sept. 25. Adval’s Warehouse LLC, Westport. Seller: Charles Urbain and Sophie Urbain, Fairfield. Property: 1311 Fairfield Beach Road, Fairfield. Amount: $2,700,000. Filed Sept. 22. Cortes, Adriana and Marc Ambadjes, Floral Park, New York. Seller: Altered Properties LLC, Fairfield. Property: 1500 Melville Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $459,000. Filed Sept. 21. Fallan, Wesley and Carissa Fallan, Riverside. Seller: Laddins Rock Revocable Trust, Old Greenwich. Property: 16 Laddins Rock Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $2,162,500. Filed Sept. 30. Handali, Cecen and Lie Handali, Cos Cob. Seller: US Bank National Association, Rockland, New York. Property: 5 Dartmouth Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $1,200,000. Filed Oct. 1. Handler, Wilson and Kendall Handler, Greenwich. Seller: Winthrop Drive LLC, Greenwich. Property: 14 Winthrop Drive, Riverside. Amount: $4,195,000. Filed Sept. 30. Lopez, Eliseo L., New Rochelle, New York. Seller: 43 South Water Street LLC, Fort Lee, New Jersey. Property: 43 S. Water St., Greenwich. Amount: $0. Filed Sept. 28. Network Development Company LLC, Old Greenwich. Seller: John Carl Novak, New Canaan. Property: Sheephill Road, Riverside. Amount: $750,000. Filed Sept. 30.

Old South Road LLC, Westport. Seller: Michael J. Reynolds and Margareth M. Reynolds, Southport. Property: 171 Old South Road, Southport. Amount: $2,200,000. Filed Sept. 23. Saddlebrook Acquisitions LLC, Fairfield. Seller: Olsen Built Homes LLC, Woodbridge. Property: 745 Hulls Highway, Fairfield. Amount: $575,000. Filed Sept. 24. Wang, Linyue, Stamford. Seller: Summitview Group LLC, Stamford. Property: Unit 5G, Laurelton House Condominium, Stamford. Amount: $215,000. Filed Sept. 25.

Residential 214 Alden Street LLC, Fairfield. Seller: Thomas Edwards Stokes, Fairfield. Property: Lot A, Map 6691, Alden St., Fairfield. Amount: $450,000. Filed Sept. 21. Beagan, Arthur and Connie Beagan, Beacon Falls. Seller: Rose Marie DeLorenzo, Fairfield. Property: 100 Stone Ridge Way, 1G, Fairfield. Amount: $455,000. Filed Sept. 22. Carpenteri, Frank J. and Diane Carpenteri, Old Greenwich. Seller: Joseph Sergi, et al, Monroe. Property: 3 Ridge Place, Greenwich. Amount: $650,000. Filed Sept. 29. Castellano, Michael, Norwalk. Seller: Michael J. Wing, Ontario, Canada. Property: 14 1/2 Fairview Ave., Unit 5, Norwalk. Amount: $259,000. Filed Sept. 24. Chau, Daniel and Thao Nyugen, Norwalk. Seller: Christina Simcic, Norwalk. Property: 40 Nash Place, Unit 3, Norwalk. Amount: $335,000. Filed Sept. 23. Conovitz, Brandon Jasper and Katherine Marie Conovitz, Brooklyn, New York. Seller: Raymond Forehand and Ann Marie Forehand, Southport. Property: 225 Old South Road, Southport. Amount: $3,300,000. Filed Sept. 25. Cryan, Eugene T. and Catherine Teresa Cryan, Trumbull. Seller: Nancy L. Fellows, Fairfield. Property: Unit 204, Woodfield Village, Fairfield. Amount: $429,000. Filed Sept. 22.


Facts & Figures Daniel, Susanna E., New York, New York. Seller: Matthew V. Besgen and Ashling Ahern Besgen, Greenwich. Property: 41 Richland Road, Greenwich. Amount: $865,000. Filed Sept. 28. De Montbel, Antoine Vialet and Vanlalhmangaihi Fanai, Fairfield. Seller: Gary Frohnhoefer and Caryl Frohnhoefer, Fairfield. Property: 185 Stillson Road, Fairfield. Amount: $530,000. Filed Sept. 23. Delaney, Luke J. and Kaitlyn Basso Delaney, Stamford. Seller: Ward Olney Jr. and Pamela C. Olney, Greenwich. Property: 21 Orchard Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1,600,000. Filed Sept. 30. Flowers, Avery Kahl, Norwalk. Seller: Andrew Hamm, Norwalk. Property: 17 Vincent Place, Norwalk. Amount: $985,000. Filed Sept. 25. Gador III, Jacinto S. and Katherine A. Ong, Greenwich. Seller: Richard T. Byrne and Jean P. Byrne, Norwalk. Property: 21 Old Saugatuck Road, Norwalk. Amount: $600,000. Filed Sept. 23. Gallagher, Shannon and Curtis Gallagher, Greenwich. Seller: Robert Warden and Margaret Warden, Greenwich. Property: 14 Tinker Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $3,700,000. Filed Sept. 29. Iannarelli, Carlin and Mona Ali, New York, New York. Seller: Richard Zanetti and Norma Zanetti, Fairfield. Property: 116 Alberta St., Fairfield. Amount: $405,000. Filed Sept. 22. Islam, Safiqul and Habiba Sharmin, Norwalk. Seller: Stephen J. Arenholz, Norwalk. Property: 1 Hillwood Place, Norwalk. Amount: $420,000. Filed Sept. 22. Jiang, Zhiyuan, Stamford. Seller: Chester F. Forman Jr. and Stephen M. Forman, Stamford. Property: 180 Colonial Road, Unit C2, Stamford. Amount: $315,000. Filed Sept. 25. Kavulich, Stephen N. and Alexandra Kavulich, Greenwich. Seller: Lino A. Iosso and Cheryl A. Iozzo, Stamford. Property: 284 Riverside Ave., Riverside. Amount: $3,747,500. Filed Sept. 29.

Kizer, Martina and Robert Kizer, Norwalk. Seller: Diane M. Tortora, Norwalk. Property: 27 Lakewood Drive, Norwalk. Amount: $448,500. Filed Sept. 24. Krieger, Harrison Grant, Norwalk. Seller: James M. Warner, Norwalk. Property: 14 Richmond Hill Road, Norwalk. Amount: $530,000. Filed Sept. 24. Lamonica, Dawn and Matthew Lamonica, Yonkers, New York. Seller: Jeremiah M. Houlihan and Tiffany M. Houlihan, Stamford. Property: 235 Janes Lane, Stamford. Amount: $745,000. Filed Sept. 23.

Nawn Jr., James William, New York, New York. Seller: David W. Agonis and Susan P. Agonis, Fairfield. Property: 64 Lookout Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $895,000. Filed Sept. 23.

Stancil, Anthony and Leslie Stancil, New York, New York. Seller: Jonathan K. Gable and Jennifer D. Gable, Fairfield. Property: 145 Sunny Ridge Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $365,000. Filed Sept. 21.

O’Reilly, Brendan and Nicole O’Reilly, New York, New York. Seller: Mark N. Antar and Ashley E. Antar, Fairfield. Property: 3060 Redding Road, Fairfield. Amount: $723,803, Filed Sept. 24.

Umbro, Jonah and Eva Liu, Stamford. Seller: Diane Smith and Jay T. Chu, Southport. Property: 270 Acorn Lane, Southport. Amount: $1,125,000. Filed Sept. 28.

Pall, Bertalan, Fairfield. Seller: Ronald A. Krug, Fairfield. Property: 342 Warde Terrace, Fairfield. Amount: $408,200. Filed Sept. 24.

Vernacchio, Paul and Christina M. Gode, Milford. Seller: Alexander M. Goodman and Allison R. Farina, Fairfield. Property: 411 Woodridge Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $565,000. Filed Sept. 22.

Ma, Yinyin and Maxine Yang, Riverside. Seller: Barbara Carter, Riverside. Property: 25 Weston Hill Road, Riverside. Amount: $1,337,000. Filed Sept. 30.

Rivera, Abel and Kristina Cartagena, Ridgewood, New York. Seller: Jose R. Raposo, Stamford. Property: 23 Meadowpark Avenue East, Stamford. Amount: $569,000. Filed Sept. 25.

Wieczorek, Emily, Norwalk. Seller: Nathan Steinfeld, Fairfield. Property: 121 Soundview Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $328,000. Filed Sept. 28.

Mallette, Glenn and Veronica F. Tambini Angeles, Stamford. Seller: Joseph V. Tarzia and Vincent Sette, Stamford. Property: 41 Cold Spring Road, Stamford. Amount: $560,000. Filed Sept. 23.

Robinson, Robert and Yunji Kwoun, Stamford. Seller: Vincent Vivenzio and Shanice Vivenzio, Stamford. Property: 118 Grove St., Unit 24, Stamford. Amount: $399,000. Filed Sept. 24.

Wrapp, Bryan and Julie Hlawitschka, Old Greenwich. Seller: Donald H. Steckler and Elizabeth S. Steckler, Greenwich. Property: 22 Old Clubhouse Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Sept. 30.

Mangold, Tina and Davis Mangold, Rowayton. Seller: Grace Sartor, Rowayton. Property: 33 Yarmouth Road, Norwalk. Amount: $2,000,000. Filed Sept. 24.

Salem, Ann M. and Francis A. Salem, Stamford. Seller: Cathy A, Deleo, Stamford. Property: 27 Bartina Lane, Stamford. Amount: $1,372,500. Filed Sept. 23.

Zhao, Shihan and Zun Nan Liang, Flushing, New York. Seller: Nicole B. Valenti and Justin Valenti, Stamford. Property: 189 Seaside Ave., Unit 3, Stamford. Amount: $565,000. Filed Sept. 25.

Manice, Christopher J. and Elizabeth Norene Nanice, New York, New York. Seller: Tamera J. Berczuk, Greenwich. Property: 325 Taconic Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2,800,000. Filed Oct. 1.

Salvatore, Antonio, Norwalk. Seller: Matthew S. Paul, East Palestine, Ohio. Property: 4 E. Rocks Road, Norwalk. Amount: $440,000. Filed Sept. 25.

McGrath, Conor Charles and Pamela Jean Mozart, Fairfield. Seller: Victor R. Devivo and Deborah S. Devivo, Leland, North Carolina. Property: 170 Ronald Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $495,000. Filed Sept. 25.

Sandstrom, Eric and Lisa Sandstrom, Norwalk. Seller: Martha Patricia Fuentes De Iglesias, Norwalk. Property: 230 New Canaan Ave., Unit 5, Norwalk. Amount: $608,000. Filed Sept. 22.

Middleton, Elizabeth R. and John S. Sardo, Stamford. Seller: Trevor Fraser, Stamford. Property: 4 Hornez St., Stamford. Amount: $590,000. Filed Sept. 24.

Schnepf, Ryan and Kaitlin Schnepf, New York, New York. Seller: Alexander T.D. Clarke and Jamie H. Clarke, Old Greenwich. Property: 123 Shore Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $2,360,000. Filed Sept. 29.

Milne, Kyle T. and Rosa Ninni, Greenwich. Seller: Alonzo B. See III, and Beverly White See, Greenwich. Property: 48 Pecksland Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Sept. 28.

Shah, Darshan and Janki Shah, Glastonbury. Seller: John Lane and Jennifer Lane, Corona del Mar, California. Property: 2437 Bedford St., Unit E3, Stamford. Amount: $389,500. Filed Sept. 24.

Moronta, Aida E. and Gabriel Moronta, Stamford. Seller: William C. Druehl and Vicki A. Druehl, Stamford. Property: 39 Kenilworth Drive West, Stamford. Amount: $704,500. Filed Sept. 23.

Smith, Bronwen, New York, New York. Seller: Lawrence D. Kendall and Joan M. Kendall, Greenwich. Property: 33 Meeting House Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Oct. 1.

LIENS Federal Tax Liens Filed 0 Mohawk LLC, 97 Valley Road, Cos Cob. $5,729, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6. 20 Idar Court LLC, 9 Palmer St., Stamford. $7,365, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6. 202 Shore Road LLC, 202 Shore Road, Old Greenwich. $711, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 5. 35 Leonard Avenue LLC, 35 Leonard Ave., Riverside. $3,749, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6.

Doster, Shawna Hamilton, 361 N. Maple Ave., Greenwich. $49, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 5.

Ellenbogen, Richard and Debra Weissman, Greenwich, by Dina Tornheim. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 6 Ledge Road, Old Greenwich. Amount: $2,010,000. Filed Oct. 7.

Feda, Kelly M. and Randall J. Feda, 12 Artic St., Greenwich. $5,301, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6.

Fitchben, Jessica, Stamford, by Erik Kukk. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Inc., 3940 N. Ravenswood, Chicago, Illinois. Property: 680 Hope St., Unit 12, Stamford. Amount: $279,200. Filed Oct. 8.

KD International Group Realty Inc., 150 Pemberwick Road, Greenwich. $6,535, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 5. Kids in Crisis Inc., 1 Salem St., Cos Cob. $351, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 5.

Florio, Matthew John and Amelia Lynn Florio, Fairfield, by unreadable. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 179 Lucille St., Fairfield. Amount: $372,000. Filed Oct. 8.

Kochersperger, Jane Fahringer, 510 E. Putnam Ave., Unit D1, Cos Cob. $2,681, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6.

Fraioli, Donato J., Norwalk, by Julia Jeanne Katz. Lender: CrossCountry Mortgage LLC, 6850 Miller Road, Brecksville, Ohio. Property: 208 Flax Hill Road, Unit 31, Norwalk. Amount: $140,250. Filed Oct. 6.

Sheehey, Michael B., 11 Lafayette Cottage, Unit 6C, Greenwich. $5, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 5. Sheehey, Michael B., 11 Lafayette Cottage, Unit 6C, Greenwich. $136, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6.

Frezza, Nicholas, Stamford, by Michael T. Nedder. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 114 Alton Road, Stamford. Amount: $325,000. Filed Oct. 7.

Town Hall Annex Corp., 249 Milbank Ave., Greenwich. $163, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 5. Walsh, Dionne E., 57 W. Brother Drive, Greenwich. $16,597, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6.

Granitto, Nicholas, Greenwich, by Robert V. Sisca. Lender: Webster Bank NA, 145 Bank St., Waterbury. Property: 34 Cliffdale Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2,200,000. Filed Oct. 9.

Wu, Tong and Kevin Wang, 887 Lake Ave., Greenwich. $22,875, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 6.

MORTGAGES Barracks, Shushawna and Dwayne D. Kellyman, Norwalk, by C.H. Barrington. Lender: Residential Mortgage Solutions Inc., 1515 Martin Blvd., Suite 208, Baltimore, Maryland. Property: 38 Silvermine Ave., Norwalk. Amount: $368,398. Filed Oct. 6. Beach, Stephanie and Ross Peebles-Brown, Fairfield, by Brad M. Aron. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 572 Oldfield Road, Fairfield. Amount: $327,500. Filed Oct. 7.

Chin, Harry, 100 Strickland Road, Unit 2, Cos Cob. $2,234, civil proceeding tax. Filed Nov. 5.

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Green, Douglas H., Stamford, by Douglas Seltzer. Lender: Loandepot.com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 463 Cove Road, Unit 9, Stamford. Amount: $212,000. Filed Oct. 7. Mandujano, Jose, Norwalk, by Jack P. Scherbar. Lender: River City Mortgage LLC, 4555 Lake Forest Drive, Suite 450, Cincinnati, Ohio. Property: 43 Valley View Road, Norwalk. Amount: $319,200. Filed Oct. 6. Marr, Thomas and Joanne Tierney Marr, Greenwich, by Richard J. Magento. Lender: Dime Community Bank, 1 Huntington Quadrangle, Suite 1N06, Melville, New York. Property: 31 Stoney Ridge Lane, Riverside. Amount: $1,000,000. Filed Oct. 8.

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Facts & Figures McEnaney, Kathleen, Stamford, by John Fiore. Lender: Mortgage Markets Cuso LLC, 616 Burnside Ave., East Hartford. Property: 100 Willowbrook Ave., Unit 3, Stamford. Amount: $247,000. Filed Oct. 7. McGovern, Patrick and Alison McGovern, Fairfield, by Pamela Shapi. Lender: US Bank National Association. 4801 Frederica St., Owensboro, Kentucky. Property: 40 Juniper Lane, Southport. Amount: $711,200. Filed Oct. 7. Moskowitz, Laurence and Carole A. Moskowitz, Greenwich, by N/A. Lender: UBS Bank USA, 299 S. Main St., Suite 2275, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 2 Stanwich Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1,385,000. Filed Oct. 8. Nardi, Mathew and Ann Nardi, Stamford, by Beth Willard. Lender: Fairway Independent Mortgage Corp., 4201 Marsh Lane, Carrollton, Texas. Property: 63 Hannahs Road, Stamford. Amount: $510,000. Filed Oct. 8. Novotny, Jacqueline L., Norwalk, by John J. Bove. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 28 E. Rocks Road, Norwalk. Amount: $510,000. Filed Oct. 7. Nunez, Jeffery and Guadalupe Hernandez Fairfield, by John R. Fiore. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 236 Fairfield Woods Road, Fairfield. Amount: $382,500. Filed Oct. 8. Selden, Marc E. and Sarah Selden, Greenwich, by Karen Adelsberg. Lender: Citibank NA, 1000 Technology Drive, O’Fallon, Missouri. Property: 69 Circle Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1,820,000. Filed Oct. 9. Tran, Thien, Norwalk, by Clare Bolduc. Lender: US Bank National Association. 4801 Frederica St., Owensboro, Kentucky. Property: 7 Brookhill Lane, Norwalk. Amount: $457,520. Filed Oct. 6. Ulrich, William and Catherine Ulrich, Fairfield, by Carter Ann Gordon. Lender: First Republic Bank, 111 Pine St., San Francisco, California. Property: 78 Christmas Tree Lane, Southport. Amount: $990,000. Filed Oct. 6.

NEW BUSINESSES Albin ConstruCTion DBA, 470 Glenbrook Road, Apartment 2F, Stamford 06906, c/o Volodymyr Albin. Filed Oct. 7.

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American Sanitize Solutions, 54 Research Drive, Stamford 06906, c/o Timothy Davis. Filed Oct. 8.

Headphone apparatus. Patent no. 10,841,687 issued to Ryan Ott, et al. Assigned to Harman International, Stamford.

Automate My Credit Empire, 1 Bank St., Suite 306, Stamford 06901, c/o Executive Business Consulting LLC. Filed Oct. 7.

Loudspeaker and tower configuration. Patent no. 10,841,701 issued to Jeffery Fay, et al. Assigned to Harman International, Stamford.

Between the Tines LLC, 34 Overbrook Drive, Stamford 06906, c/o Diana Andrews. Filed Oct. 7. Chakos, 78 W. Park Place, Stamford 06901, c/o Yuviny Rosales. Filed Oct. 7. Credit Executive Credit Repair, 1 Bank St., Suite 306, Stamford 06901, c/o Executive Wealth Solutions LLC. Filed Oct. 7. Garcia Brothers LLC, 511 W. Main St., Apartment 3, Stamford 06902, c/o Jennifer Garcia. Filed Oct. 7. Mad Tom Road, 65 Old Logging Road, Stamford 06903, c/o Newfield Advisors LLC. Filed Oct. 8. One World ConstruCTion Corp, 75 Ridgecrest Road, Stamford 06903, c/o Zbigniew Gosiewski. Filed Oct. 8. Prosto ConstruCTion DBA, 32 Scofield Ave., Unit 1, Stamford 06906, c/o Vladimir Kobelev. Filed Oct. 7. RABCO, 592 Newfield Ave., Stamford 06905, c/o Joseph Rabuazzo Jr. Filed Oct. 7. Sol Beauty Salon, 219 West Ave., Stamford 06902, c/o Soledad N. Anarcaya. Filed Oct. 9.

PATENTS wApparatus and method for forming a diffraction grating and printed article, including a diffraction grating. Patent no. 10,838,120 issued to Edward Chapman, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Cleaning web disposed and operable between marker transport belt and marker platen. Patent no. 10,836,189 issued to Rachel Tanchak, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk.

YOUR MORNING COMMUTE, COFFEE, & NEWS.

Method to produce colorless, high-porosity, transparent polymer aerogels. Patent no. 10,836,855 issued to Mahati Chintapalli, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk.

Your daily routine, right at your fingertips.

Methods and systems for enabling object attribute-driven super resolution encoding. Patent no. 10,839,562 issued to David Robinson, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Microphone and method for processing audio signals. Patent no. 10,841,680 issued to Alan Michel, et al. Assigned to Harman International, Stamford. Proximity-based shared configuration of systems and devices. Patent no. 10,841,735 issued to Peter Zehler. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Registration system with translating carriage and omni wheels. Patent no. 10,836,596 issued to Carlos Terrero, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. System and method for providing information through a display of parking devices with the aid of a digital computer. Patent no. 10,839,596 issued to Mark Stefik, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Systems and methods for vehicle audio source input channels. Patent no. 10,841,701 issued to Hongjun Wu, et al. Assigned to Harman International, Stamford. System for forming electrical circuits on nonplanar objects. Patent no. 10,842,026 issued to Chad Smithson, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk. Time-limited debugging of secure communication systems. Patent no. 10,841,343 issued to Peter Zehler, et al. Assigned to Xerox, Norwalk.

Use your camera app to scan code

Dynamic sweet-spot calibration. Patent no. 10,841,723 issued to Pratyush Sahay, et al. Assigned to Harman International, Stamford.

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11/18/20 4:16 PM


LEGAL NOTICES Notice of Formation of DMKS HEYWARD LLC. Principal office Westchester County. Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) designated as agent for service of process. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process served against the LLC to Don O’Regan, 6 Smart Avenue, Yonkers, NY 10704. Articles of Organization of the LLC filed with the SSNY on January 14, 2020. Purpose: Any lawful act(s). #62684 Notice of Formation of Hudson Technology Consulting Group LLC. Articles of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/05/20. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to C/O Hudson Technology Consulting Group LLC, 516 Bellwood Avenue, Sleepy Hollow, New York 10591. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. Latest date upon which LLC is to dissolve: No specific date #62685 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: SIREN GEMS, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/09/20. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 50 Waterside close, Eastchester, New York 10709, principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: any lawful business activity. #62686 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (LLC). Name: NSRS PROPERTIES LLC. Article of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/16/20. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Corporate Creations Network Inc.,15 North Mill Street. Nyack, NY 10960. The limited liability company is to be managed by: ONE OR MORE MEMBERS. The limited liability company shall begin upon filing of these Articles of Organization with the Department of State. #62688 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Mount Hope Plaza LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on October 19, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Mount Hope Plaza LLC, c/o Mount Hope Community Development Corporation, 65 Lake Street, White Plains, New York 10604. #62689

Notice of Formation of READ. WRITE.GROW! LLC. Arts. of Org. with SSNY on 7.24.2020. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: United States Corporation Agents, Inc., 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY, 11228. Purpose: any lawful purpose or activity. #62690 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: REALLY GOOD MUSIC, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/28/20. Office location: Westchester County. LegalZoom has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. LegalZoom shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 45 Lee Ave, Ossining NY 10562, principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: any lawful business activity. #62691 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Andieís Eats LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on October 22, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Andieís Eats LLC, 1055 Saw Mill River Road, Suite 204, Ardsley, New York 10502. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62692 Better Living Production LLC. Filed 8/4/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 258 Sommerville Place, Yonkers, NY 10703 Purpose: All lawful #62693 A J A Construction Co, LLC. Filed 8/18/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 745 Warren Ave, Thornwood, NY 10594 Purpose: All lawful #62694 A & I Restoration LLC. Filed 7/6/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 70 Yonkers Ave, Yonkers, NY 10704 Purpose: All lawful #62695 40 West 6th Street, LLC. Filed 8/18/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 399 Knollwood Road, Suite 318, White Plains, NY 10603 Purpose: All lawful #62696 WU Dental, PLLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/27/2020. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Edmund WU, 971 57th St., Brooklyn, NY 11219. Purposes: Dentistry #62697

Notice of Formation of Ryddym, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/20/20. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 116 Putnam Ave, Freeport, NY 11520. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62699 September2020, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/2020. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to BlumbergExcelsior Corporate Services, Inc., 16 Court St, 14th Fl., Brooklyn, NY 11241. General Purpose #62700 Duevio LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/16/2020. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to BlumbergExcelsior Corporate Services, Inc., 16 Court St., 14th Fl., Brooklyn, NY 11241 . General Purpose #62701 Notice of Formation of Nurture Brands LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/27/20. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Nurture Brands LLC, 2005 Palmer Avenue #1173, Larchmont, New York 10538. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62704 Career Ready Coaching, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/14/2020. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Jeffrey S. Chapski, 723 Seney Ave., Mamaroneck, NY . General Purpose #62705 1302 Waring, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 8/6/2020. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 500 Mamaroneck Ave., Ste. 320, Harrison, NY 10528. General Purpose #62708 Notice of Formation of Madison Family Holdings, LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/20/2020. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the Gary Schwartz, 4 New King Street Ste 120, White Plains, NY 10604. Purpose: Any lawful activity. #62709

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Middlecrest Crossing Senior Apartments Investor LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on November 3, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Middlecrest Crossing Senior Apartments Investor LLC, 44 Warburton Avenue, 1st Floor, Yonkers, New York 10701. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62713 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company (ìLLCî). Name: Green Joulez, LLC. Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (ìSSNYî) on November 3, 2020. N.Y. office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to Green Joulez, LLC, 55 Corell Road, Scarsdale, New York 10583. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62714

753 BPR, LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 12/3/2018. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to Northsight Capital Advisors, LLC, PO Box 756, Rye, NY 10580. General Purpose #62720 Notice of Formation of Bais 1604, LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 11/12/2020. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 107 N Water Street, Peekskill, NY 10566. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62721 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: 914 Records, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 04/13/20. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 86 Chatsworth Ave, Larchmont, New York 10538, principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: any lawful business activity. #62722

LRA Flooring LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/27/2020. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 220 West St., Harrison, NY 10528. General Purpose #62716 Notice of Formation of Eldorado Court LLC, a domestic Limited Liability Company (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) on 07/22/2020. NY Office location: WESTCHESTER County. SSNY is designated as agent upon whom process against the LLC may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the LLC served upon him/her to The LLC, 64 Eldorado Court, White Plains, New York 10603. Purpose: Any lawful act or activity. #62717 Notice of formation EVA Properties Group, LLC; Art of Org files with SSNY on 10/19/2020. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, EVA Properties Group, LLC PO Box 3465 Mt. Vernon, NY 10553. #62718 Notice of Formation of 16 EMERSON STREET LLC. Principal office Westchester County. Secretary of State of NY (SSNY) designated as agent for service of process. SSNY shall mail a copy of any process served against the LLC to 17 South MacQuesten Parkway, Mt. Vernon, NY 10550. Articles of Organization of the LLC filed with the SSNY on October 14, 2020. Purpose: Any lawful act(s). #62719

Notice of Formation of SMYNS, LLC filed with SSNY on May 12, 2020. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to LLC: 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11229. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62723 THE ANNUAL RETURN OF THE BARBARA J. AND LAWRENCE J. GOLDSTEIN DO GOOD FOUNDATION, INC. for the calendar year ended December 31, 2019 is available its principal office located at 1865 Palmer Avenue, Larchmont, NY 10538 for inspection during regular business hours by any citizen who requests it within 180 days hereof. Principal Manager of the foundation is Lawrence J. Goldstein. #62724 Notice of Formation of Ztreet Musician LLC amended to ZstreetMusician LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/9/20. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: Michael Lichtenstein, 420 Lexington Ave, Ste 300, NY, NY 10170, the registered agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. Purpose: any lawful activity. #62725

Notice of Formation of REEX Management, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/29/2020. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Felix Hernandez, 542 Van Cortlandt Park Ave 1F Yonkers, NY 10705. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62727 Notice of Formation of REEX Capital, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/30/2020. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Felix Hernandez, 542 Van Cortlandt Park Ave 1F Yonkers, NY 10705. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62726 Notice of Formation of REEX Realty, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/30/2020. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Felix Hernandez, 542 Van Cortlandt Park Ave 1F Yonkers, NY 10705. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #62728

Sealed bids will be received as set forth in Instructions to Bidders (https://www. dot.ny.gov/bids-and-lettings/construction-contractors/important-info) until 10:30 A.M. on Thursday, December 17, 2020 at the NYSDOT, Contract Management Bureau, 50 Wolf Rd, 1st Floor, Suite 1CM, Albany, NY 12232 and will be publicly opened and read. Maps, Plans and Specifications may be seen at Electronic documents and Amendments which are posted to www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/ opportunities/const-notices. The New York State Department of Transportation, in accordance with the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation and Title 23 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 200, Title IV Program and Related Statutes, as amended, issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all who respond to a written Department solicitation, request for proposal or invitation for bid that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability/handicap and income status in consideration for an award. Please call (518)457-2124 if a reasonable accommodation is needed to participate in the letting. Region 08: New York State Department of Transportation 4 Burnett Blvd., Poughkeepsie, NY, 12603 D264286, PIN 881204, FA Proj Z230-8812-043, Dutchess, Ulster, Westchester Cos., Traffic Signal, Sidewalk, etc. Improvements at 7 Locations in Fishkill, Greenburgh, Hyde Park, Kingston & Scarsdale., Bid Deposit: 5% of Bid (~ $200,000.00), Goals: DBE: 6.00% D264390, PIN 881539, FA Proj Z240-8815-393, Rockland Co., Pavement Resurfacing, Rte 45, Town of Ramapo, Village of Chestnut Ridge, Bid Deposit: 5% of Bid (~ $125,000.00), Goals: DBE: 10.00%

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I FEEL SO POWERLESS. WE HAVE TO WATCH HER EVERY MINUTE. FAMILY AND FRIENDS STOPPED COMING AROUND. HE KEEPS SAYING: “THERE’S NOTHING WRONG WITH ME.” IT’S DESTROYING OUR FAMILY. I FEEL SO GUILTY WE HAVE TO MOVE HER INTO A HOME. IT’S SO HARD TO CARE FOR SOMEONE WHO’S MEAN TO YOU. HE HIDES THINGS ALL THE TIME. I’M GRIEVING THE LOSS OF SOMEONE WHO’S STILL ALIVE. WE DON’T EVEN KNOW WHERE TO START.

LIVING WITH FTD IS HARD. LIVING WITHOUT HELP IS HARDER. THERE’S COMFORT IN FINDING OTHERS WHO UNDERSTAND. WE FINALLY FOUND A DOCTOR WHO GETS IT. I GOT SO MUCH ADVICE FROM OTHER CAREGIVERS. UNDERSTANDING MORE HELPS ME DEAL WITH HER SYMPTOMS. SEEING THAT OTHERS MADE IT THROUGH, I KNEW I COULD TOO. WE HONOR HIM BY ADVOCATING FOR A CURE. NOW I’M BETTER AT ASKING FOR HELP. NO MATTER HOW BAD IT GETS, WE KNOW WE’RE NOT ALONE. It can feel so isolating and confusing from the start: Just getting a diagnosis of FTD takes 3.6 years on average. But no family facing FTD should ever have to face it alone, and with your help, we’re working to make sure that no one does. The Association for Frontotemporal Degeneration (AFTD) is dedicated to a world without FTD, and to providing help and support for those living with this disease today. Choose to bring hope to our families: www.theAFTD.org/learnmore

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The Business Journals - Week of November 23  

The Business Journals - Week of November 23  

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