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AWARD WINNING EDITORIAL

INCLUDING THE HUDSON VALLEY NOVEMBER 22, 2021 VOL. 57, No. 46

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New dine-in movie theater coming to Westchester BY PETER KATZ Pkatz@westfairinc.com

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At one time, drive-in movie theaters were the rage. Now, it's dine-in theaters that are cooking up attention as the motion picture exhibition business is just starting to recover from the devastating hit it took from the Covid-19 pandemic. According to the Motion Picture Association, box office grosses in the U.S. and Canada for 2018 topped $11.8 billion with 1.3 billion tickets sold. In 2019, the sale of 1.24 billion tickets brought in box office receipts of $11.4 billion. In 2020, however, the bottom fell out with the pandemic, with just 240 million admissions resulting in a total box office gross of $2.2 billion. It’s too early for 2021 totals, but as of mid-October the North American box office gross was slightly over $3 billion. While the extent of the recovery so far might raise caution flags for some, for theater operator Brian Schultz the recovery provides an opportunity to continue his company’s program to open new technologically advanced theaters that offer upscale food and beverages. Schultz is the CEO and founder of Dallas-based LOOK Dine-In Cinemas. On Dec. 9, the company will be opening its newest theater in Dobbs Ferry. The eight-

BUILDING A BLOCKBUSTER AT THE VILLAGE: Stamford complex, now 100% occupied, is a game-changer BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN Kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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ention “The Village” to most Connecticutians a year ago and you’d likely drum up images of Greenwich Village or cult TV series The Prisoner. Today, however, The Village can mean only one thing to state residents: the massive 133,000-square-foot facility at 860 Canal St. in Stamford, which in less than a year has become exactly what the man behind it, Brent Montgomery, said it would: an indoor-outdoor work-play environment designed to bring together companies representing

content and media, brands and marketing, social and experiential and finance and investment in one central hub. Not only that, but with the early November lease-signing of MillerKnoll, a recently formed collective of modern design companies, the complex is now 100% occupied. Montgomery, CEO of the Wheelhouse media conglomerate, laughed when asked facetiously by the Business Journal what had taken so long. “It’s been four years in the making, though we only opened last year,” he said. “And I have to say, they went fast.” » THE VILLAGE

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Stamford Health, Columbia U. expand relationship to increase heart surgery capabilities MAK I BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN

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If you think this relationship is uncommon — you’re absolutely right.” So says Dr. Michael Argenziano, chief of adult cardiac surgery at Columbia University, about the years-long, ever-expanding association between the Ivy League school and Stamford Health. In that partnership’s latest chapter, Stamford’s Heart & Vascular Institute is offering treatment and expertise from the Columbia University Irving Medical Center’s staff of heart surgeons; specifically, five of those surgeons will see patients and perform operations at Stamford Hospital. Stamford Health has collaborated for nearly a decade with Columbia’s Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons as a teaching affiliate, explained Dr. Michael Coady, chief of Cardiac Surgery and co-director of the Heart & Vascular Institute. “Columbia was who actually screened me and hired me as chief” in 2010, Coady noted. “They’ve long been involved in the oversight of our programs from a quality standpoint as a teaching affiliate. As the programs grew, there was an oppor-

tunity to partner with Columbia in more inventive ways. “It allows those surgeons to be present here seven days a week,” he continued. “Dr. Argenziano is here on Mondays and the others are scheduled throughout the week.” Argenziano noted that he and the four other Columbia surgeons aren’t “only” cardiac specialists but are leaders in each of their areas. Dr. Isaac George is surgical director of the Heart Valve Center at Columbia and surgical director, Structural Heart Disease at NewYorkPresbyterian; Dr. Yuji Kaku is a specialist in thoracic and cardiac surgery; Dr. Hiroo Takayama, director of the school’s Cardiovascular Institute; and Dr. Koji Takeda, director of its pulmonary thromboendartectomy program. Coady said one advantage for Fairfield County patients is obvious. “These are patients who would otherwise seek surgery in New York City,” he said. “Now they can have an operation closer to their own community, where they reside.” That proximity will also eliminate the need for further trips into New York for follow-up evaluations and procedures, he added. Not only that, Argenziano said, “but over the last couple of years especially, there have been

newer techniques becoming available, including advancements in robotic heart surgery. We consider Stamford Hospital to be one of our closest affiliates — we’re very like-minded — and this is a way for us to help further with oversight and advice. “It really became a natural part of our discussion,” he continued. “The thinking was, ‘Why not deliver some of these same services here at Stamford Hospital?’ As it is, they get some of the best results in the country.” Indeed, in August Stamford was recognized as a High Performing Hospital by "U.S. News & World Report" in four areas: chronic lung disease, heart failure, kidney failure, and stroke care. And in October its Heart & Vascular Institute received a pair of gold achievement awards from the American Heart Association, and another from the American Stroke Association, for its treatment and care of such patients. “Not too many hospitals in the area can function at the level that Stamford is,” Argenziano said. The latest expansion will help Columbia “further disseminate some of the techniques and technologies that would otherwise only be available in certain centers,” he

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added. Argenziano said Columbia too will benefit from the expansion of the partnership. “We can only take care of so many patients” onsite, he said. “Now we’ll be working shoulder-to-shoulder introducing these various techniques and helping all of these surgeons be able to perform these kinds of operations anywhere in the world.” And that hands-on experience will not be limited to surgeons, Argenziano added. “Nurses, radiologists, other technicians — everybody will be gotten on board.” “We’re basically bringing the mountain to Mohammad,” he quipped. The net result, both practitioners agreed, will be more efficient care, quicker recovery times, fewer return trips to the hospital, and ultimately more lives saved. Coady noted that in addition to Columbia, Stamford Health maintains professional relationships with Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) Orthopedics at Stamford Health and the Carl & Dorothy Bennett Cancer Center’s collaborative partnership with Dana-Farber Brigham Cancer Center.

These have been our choices for businesses and nonprofits that are Making an Impact in our communities.

NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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IMPACT 2021

• JANUARY 18: René Hue, Murmuration • JUNE 28: Martin Ginsburg ,Ginsburg Development Cos. • JANUARY 25: Nic King, Proud Puffs • JULY 5: Jake Allyne, Breakthrough Fitness Co. • FEBRUARY 1: Judith M. Watson, Mount Vernon • JULY 19: White Plains DMV Neighborhood Health Center Inc. • JULY 26: Fairfield University Art Museum • FEBRUARY 8: Gary Bilekzikian, Guidecraft • AUGUST 2: Reproductive Medicine Associates of Con• FEBRUARY 15: Jonathan Winn, Thrown Stone Theatre Co. necticut • FEBRUARY 22: Carlo Vona Jr., Paramount Stone Co. • AUGUST 9: Jianying Hu, IBM • MARCH 1: Peter Kempner, Kempner Properties • AUGUST 16: WSHU Public Radio • MARCH 8: Joshua Applestone, Applestone Meat Co. • MARCH 15: Michael Sachse, Dandelion Energy • AUGUST 23: William Raveis, William Raveis Real Estate, • MARCH 22: Donvil Collins, VeeKast Mortgage & Insurance • MARCH 29: George S. Kaufman, Kaufman Astoria Studios • AUGUST 30: Mike Geller, Mike’s Organic Delivery • APRIL 5: Jon Winkel, The Stamford Partnership • SEPTEMBER 6: Carolins M. Osorio, CP Servicios Latinos • APRIL 12: Amiee Turner, Team Woofgang & Co. • SEPTEMBER 13: Adam Musa, Fuelco and FoodSmart • APRIL 19: Ken Londoner, BioSig • SEPTEMBER 20: Joe Carbone, WorkPlace • APRIL 26: Jonathan Gertman, The NRP Group • SEPTEMBER 27: Nicolet Gatewood, Haddad & Partners • MAY 3: State Sen. Billie Miller, Lt. Gov. Susan Bysiewicz, Fran Pastore, Women’s Business Development Council • OCTOBER 4: Rafael Pagan, Pacific House • MAY 10: Peter Hubbell, Apply:you & Leigh Shemitz, Soundwaters • OCTOBER 11: Winston E. Allen, I Pried Open Wall Street in 1962 • MAY 17: Michelle Brier, Blue Path Service Dogs • OCTOBER 18: UConn Stamford, TIP Digital • MAY 24: The Grasso family, Urban Mining CT • OCTOBER 25: Chuck Omphalius, '930 Plan' podcast • MAY 31: Shirley Acevedo, Latino U College Access Inc. • NOVEMBER 1: Jeff Becker, Dwight Senior, Easton Grows LLC • JUNE 7: David Greenstein, TestZone • NOVEMBER 8: Ellie Zimmerman, Interns 4-Good • JUNE 14: Henry Welt, Abigail Lewis, Ossining Innovatives! • NOVEMBER 15: Jessica Paschkes, Refillery • JUNE 21: Christos Athanasiou, Jonus Ademovic, miniMAX If you would like to nominate a business or nonprofit that you feel is also making an impact, please send an email to Erin Real at ereal@westfairinc.com.

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Paraco’s CEO puts business lessons, family experiences in print BY PETER KATZ Pkatz@westfairinc.com

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n 1926, Margaret Mitchell, a journalist for the Atlanta Journal Sunday Magazine, had to leave her job because of an ankle injury that was followed by debilitating arthritis. Her husband suggested that to keep busy she should write a book. Three years later, the manuscript of “Gone With the Wind” was ready for seven more years of editing and massaging before Mitchell was satisfied and Macmillan Publishing was ready to start the presses. With that as context, it is not at all surprising to hear Joe Armentano, CEO of Paraco Gas, which is headquartered in Rye Brook, explain that it took years for him to write and polish his new book, “A Helluva Ride: How a father-son family business overcame crisis to achieve the American Dream.” The book tells the story of how his father Pat, beginning in their garage in Mount Vernon, founded a family business specializing in welding supplies. Through a series of acquisitions and expansions, the business grew into the Paraco of today. The company has more than 425 employees, 28 locations and $150 million in annual revenue. Over the years it has acquired 53 companies and services more than 110,000 residential and business customers. The book also focuses on father-son and other family relationships both at personal and business levels. “I was there as a kid before he started his business so I’ve kind of seen all of the things that bridge a few generations, because we’re now in our third generation with my daughter Christina,” Armentano told the Business Journal. He explained that he had arranged for his father to be interviewed in a series of audio recordings to preserve the family and business history as well as capture personal thoughts and advice. When his father passed away in 2010 at age 80, Armentano realized it was time to organize and transfer the material into written form. “I said I don’t really have the time to get this done, so let me hire a ghostwriter,” Armentano said. “About eight years ago, I gave her about 100 hours of my tapes. I had her come down and interview about 18 people who I thought were important.“ Armentano said that he wasn’t satisfied with what the writer produced but her efforts did organize the raw material. “It wasn’t me, it wasn’t my voice, it didn’t capture the emotions. Over the last seven years, I’ve edited this manuscript probably 50 to 100 times,” Armentano said. “I don’t think one of her words survived. I’m not winning a Pulitzer with this but I became a pretty good writer.” In 1968, Armentano’s father established

the welding supply company Patsems Inc. The products it carried included items such as welding rods, masks and helmets. Armentano recalled that to expand the welding supply business his father had decided to add industrial gases such as oxygen and acetylene. Propane joined the mix since it was used as a source of heat at construction sites and to power forklifts; it became a niche, growing to be about 25% of

the business. “Right around ’79 he goes, ‘Joe, find me a propane company,’" Armentano said. "I knew nothing about propane. I had no idea people used it to heat their homes or for cooking. I thought everybody barbecued with it. At that time we had no clue about the industry, we knew nothing about it and my father’s thought was, ‘Well, I’ll save some money on product and get into another

business.’” In 1979, Patsems bought Paraco Fuel Corp., a Peekskill distributor of fuel oil and propane. The operation adopted the Paraco name and expanded to Long Island, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and into other parts of the Hudson Valley. It soon expanded even further into Rhode Island, Virginia, New Jersey, Maryland, Tennessee, North » PARACO’S CEO

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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SUITE TALK Deena LaMarque Piquion, chief marketing officer at Xerox Holdings Corp. BY PHIL HALL Phall@westfairinc.com

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he newest C-suite occupant at Norwalk's Xerox Holdings Corp. is Deena LaMarque Piquion, who was named chief marketing officer in September. She had been senior vice president and general manager of Xerox’s Latin America Operations since 2019. In this edition of Suite Talk, Piquion speaks about her new job and Xerox’s evolution within the high-tech space.

What do you see as your priorities in this position? In terms of priorities, the first one is probably not very different from any other CMO in our industry and in any industry, which is we have to be very closely aligned to our business stakeholders. Unfortunately, we've been really good at keeping secrets up until now, so it's about amplifying out in the marketplace. There are very cool and disruptive things that Xerox is engaged in right now. And then it's about helping Xerox stand up to its new businesses. Earlier this year, Xerox announced organizational changes to support plans to create three new businesses — Software, Financing and Innovation — aimed at delivering long-term growth. Xerox is also standing up CareAR, which consolidates the CareAR Inc., DocuShare and XMPie businesses under a single holding entity. We have such a diverse set of new businesses, with each of them in different maturity phases with different needs, so I am focused on helping them stand up to be successful. As chief marketing officer, what do you want your stakeholders to think of when they hear the word “Xerox”? I want them to think about a technology powerhouse — an innovative forum for technology. We have over 100 years of innovation experience, but now we are investing in such cool technologies like IoT, cleantech and 3D. We're able to help in advanced manufacturing, When everybody's supply chain is corrupted, it's important to be able to add value in these types of supply chain technologies. You were previously working with Xerox’s operations in Latin America before taking this job. What is the Latin American market like for Xerox? The Latin American market is always complex for any manufacturer. It's a great environment to learn as a business leader

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Deena LaMarque Piquion. Photo courtesy of Xerox. because agility has to be part of how you lead and how you set your business plans. Based on my Latin America experiences, I always look at everything from a global perspective on where we can scale effectively, whether it's in marketing or in business plans. I always have that lens to make sure that we can scale affordably and effectively to secondary or tertiary markets that are not as large as the U.S., Canada or the U.K., which are typically mature markets for any tech company. Coming into this role, I've already dealt with having to balance priority decisions, and I know what that's like from a business and a P&L perspective. Now I can transition to a CMO perspective and understand my business stakeholders even more. You were recently recognized by DiversityFIRST as one of the Top 50 Women in Tech for 2021. What is Xerox doing to encourage more diversity within its ranks? That's one of the things that really drew WCBJ

me to Xerox after a 19-year career at another company. It wasn't an easy decision to leave and join a new company, but I saw that diversity was such an important part of the company's values. We have stated goals and intentions in terms of diversity on our board that we've published publicly. And internally, we have our own metrics that we're tracking. We have the Women's Alliance, we have the Black Women's Leadership Council, and so many different rich and diverse groups for people to take advantage of. That really promotes inclusion and bringing your whole self to work. For a lot of people of a certain age, the first thing they think about when someone says “Xerox” is photocopiers. What is the company's role within today's photocopying sector? It's so funny because it's so outdated — but it's stuck, right? I'm going to use a funny analogy: my family is from Haiti, and in Haiti if you're going to eat cereal you're

going to eat “corn flakes,” regardless of what the brand is. I think that that's how dominant Xerox was in the photocopy business way back when, that it became a verb to photocopy. Xerox was dominant at the time with photocopiers, but we've come so far from that, and we've transformed so much in our brands and all of the services around print. The digital services to automate workflows are still a huge part of our business, but photocopying per se is not the core part of our business. It just speaks to the dominance we had at that time. Where do you see Xerox a year from now? I see our new and diverse businesses as even more mature and even more wellknown in the industry. You will see a lot of the younger generation of technologists — the millennials and Gen Z — recognizing the innovation that comes out of Xerox and wanting to join and be part of that trajectory as well.


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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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The Village—

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Nearly as fast as the available spaces. In addition to Wheelhouse and MillerKnoll, the Village is home to ITV America, Cisco Brewers, investment companies Avesi Partners, TSG Consumer Partners, and Jadian Capital, along with staffing firm Insight Global. There are also branded restaurant The Wheel, a pop-up innovation center called The Pop-Up Shop, a 1,000-foot walkable marina, and a rooftop garden, among other amenities. Montgomery said the entire complex is built on the philosophy that “we want to tell stories — and if we tell a good story, it makes everything easier. That’s what helps build a

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vibrant, entrepreneurial spirit.” He also credits Covid-19 for having a positive effect. “People who were living in San Francisco or New York or Miami have come back to be closer to where they grew up, or to their families,” he said. “The fact that so many people are working remotely now, or are only going to the office two or three days a week, also helps.” Further benefiting The Village’s pull, Montgomery added, is the fact that “we have a mix of companies that have not been in the state of Connecticut before. Now they’re looking to grow their footprint in the state and in the county.” Then there is the perhaps not surpris-

ing government support. Montgomery cited recent visits by Gov. Ned Lamont and Mayor-elect Caroline Simmons as helping to build buzz. “We wanted to create a place to have interesting conversations,” he said. “Someplace that can cater to the businesses, brands, and the people who are here as well as those who are coming to Connecticut.” A concert series and various workshops to help budding entrepreneurs are a part of that ethos, he said, noting that a workshop aimed at children is in the works. “We want to provide some impactful stuff to underrepresented groups,” he said.

Being “right in the middle of Fairfield County” — specifically, in the fast-growing Stamford — has been the boon that he expected, Montgomery said. “We get plenty of people from in and around Stamford, but we’re seeing a lot of people from all over the county and even Westchester too,” he said. Wheelhouse expects to ultimately erect similar near-universally appealing structures around the county, Montgomery added. “The main goal of The Village is to be an incubator for ideas, business, brands and people,” he said. “And I think we’re accomplishing that.”

Lights, camera— screen theater will be the company’s eighth location, with other sites already operating in Texas, Arizona, Florida and California. Schultz says that when he was working as an aide to the late U.S. Sen. Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania he went to a movie at a theater in Bethesda, Maryland, that served food and beverages beyond the normal fare. It was there that he became smitten with the concept of being able to enjoy good quality food and drinks in a professional theater while watching a movie. That experience set the stage for Schultz to launch the Movie Studio Grill chain of theaters in 1993. Movie Studio Grill operated successfully until, once Covid was in full force, it had to file for Chapter 11. The company reorganized and eventually emerged from bankruptcy. Schultz, in the meantime, launched LOOK Dine-In Cinemas. “Making sure that you have a theatrical experience that has service and hospitality attached to it is really the future of where the entire industry is going,” Schultz told the Business Journal. “Like so many other industries, Covid and closures really caused a disruption that allowed us to fast-forward multiple years very quickly.” Schultz said that the company has been able to individualize programming and attract audiences for events such as concerts, operas, documentaries and other categories outside of typical feature film showings. The menu offers a wide range of beverages, including cocktails, wine and beer. Salads, wraps, sushi, St. Louis BBQ ribs, chips, dips, cheeses, pizza and of course popcorn are among the food items offered. Thad Kelly, the company’s executive chef, is charged with crafting the menu and monitoring overall quality and service. “As we look for locations across the country, typically we’re looking for communities that need a great community gathering place," Schultz said. "It’s a place where whatever you want to put on the big screen we can customize to the community.”

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Brian Schultz

LOOK Dine-In Cinema, Dobbs Ferry Schultz said that in previous operations use of theaters by businesses represented about 10% of the total revenue stream. “I think that’s really going to increase to about 20%," he declared. "In Dobbs Ferry in particular there really is a shortage of places you can get together that have the right technology package that can be delivered in a very efficient way. "The rooms lay out perfectly for all kinds of meetings whether you're transmitting or listening, " Schultz continued, WCBJ

"and I think that combines with the idea of less requirement to be in the office. It allows teams to get together where they can have a good meal or snack and have a meeting or conference or continuing education.” The Dobbs Ferry facility at 1 Hamilton St. in Rivertowns Square had been operated by iPic Theaters. It closed in November 2019 when that company restructured. “The previous operator built an absolutely gorgeous facility,” Schultz said.

He added that he’s neither in the motion picture exhibition business nor the restaurant business, but is instead at what he defines as the integration point of the two. He said that during the time the chain's theaters were closed due to Covid, he and his team were able to reflect on their operations and refine ideas such as how to serve high-quality food without distracting from the movie-viewing experience. There will be a 25% discount on food items and nonalcoholic beverages through the end of the year as well as discounts on tickets for certain showings in celebration of the opening. Schultz expressed optimism that the movie studios will have a full slate of theatrical releases from this point forward, providing longer windows for exclusive showings in theaters before movies are released for internet streaming or pay-TV. “It’s really confirmed that to make a movie stand out and get all the ancillary revenues associated with the film, the theatrical release makes that name, makes that value stand out,” Schultz said. He said that while moviegoing needs to become a habit again for many people, “It’s a chance for us to create an experience that is really desirable.” He indicated that LOOK Dine-In has expansion plans and anticipates signing leases for additional locations in the coming months. “Our purpose is to bring communities back together,” Schultz said.


Greenwood Features rising from the ashes of Bethel Cinema BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN Kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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nce, in a prototypically apocalyptic declaration, German filmmaker Werner Herzog remarked: “I would travel down to hell and wrestle a film away from the devil if it was necessary.” Jaimie Lockwood’s efforts at bringing a Bethel movie theater back to life haven’t been quite so deliriously melodramatic — but, she admits, the challenges have sometimes been considerable. “My husband Frank and I never really had plans to own a movie theater before the opportunity presented itself,” Lockwood told the Business Journal. “But we’d always kind of fantasized about opening some type of business here in Bethel.” The opportunity first arose in April 2020 when, during the early days of the Covid-19 pandemic, longtime Bethel Cinema owners Ken Karlan and Pam Karpen announced that they could not survive in the then-devastating economic climate. “We will be heartbroken if the theater is truly closed for good,” they wrote in an email. Ownership of the four-screen theater at 269 Greenwood Ave. passed to landlord Donna Jack, with whom the Lockwoods began working soon after its closing was

announced. “We were not in a position to buy a movie theater at that time,” Lockwood said, “but we kept in touch. I cannot say enough about how wonderful she’s been throughout this process.” She said that “deep cleaning” took on new meaning as they went about restoring and renovating the site, which prior to Karlan and Karpen’s 15-year stewardship had served as a family movie theater, an exhibitor of X-rated flicks (not simultaneously) and as home to the Bright Clouds ministry. “Our backgrounds are in marketing and advertising,” she said of herself and her husband. “And we both have day jobs,” she as director of client services at Activate

Marketing Services and Frank as head brewer and co-founder at Reverie Brewing Co. in Newtown. As a result, “I probably never would have reached out” to Jack, but Frank “was so optimistic about what could be done” that they took the plunge. She said that the work will probably be done in phases; while the current seats “which are pretty uncomfortable” will remain in place for now, plans are to eventually replace them with something more conducive to an eating-and-drinking prospect — something along the lines of what Alamo Drafthouse does, she said, with a revamped concessions area under construction. “We’re keeping four screens, and at least one of them will be dedicated to smaller art-

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house films, like they had before,” Lockwood said. “But we also want to try and pull in more wide-release stuff as well, which is what we anticipate will drive most of our traffic.” The couple is also considering theme nights, “like showing ‘The Big Lebowski’ and offering White Russians.” A line of Reverie brews will also be available, she acknowledged. “Plus we’ll have to come up with something for ‘Lord of the Rings,’ because if Frank has his way, we’ll be showing those in the first moth,” she laughed. Though the cleaning and construction is going more slowly than they’d hoped — Lockwood said the hunt is on for an onsite manager while she and Frank juggle parenthood with their regular jobs — rebranding the facility as Greenwood Features was pretty much a given. In addition to representing its new ownership, the name has a double meaning, she said. “We’d like to do events here as well as show movies, and — along with the different kinds of concessions — it all adds up to new features.” The plan is to open in mid- to late-December, Lockwood said, “in time for the holidays, to capture the holiday spirit. “Whether that happens or not,” she laughed, “is still to be seen.”

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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Paraco’s CEO— Carolina, Florida, Colorado, Missouri and Massachusetts. Joe Armentano was born in Mount Vernon, the oldest of four sons He attended Fordham University, graduating in 1976 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in history. He earned a Master's in Business Administration from Iona College in 1988. Armentano said that a successful family business needs to start with passionate family members. “I’ve seen many family businesses where there have been family members who never should have entered a business because they didn’t have that passion," he said. "Second, there needs to be a commitment to continuing education. Third is a willingness to take risk. "You have to be able and willing to take risk in business, in a family business in particular because you have all your wealth normally tied up in that family business and if you’re going to expand and grow you need to take risk," he added. "Our risk was really through acquisitions, going out and buying companies and assuming that we could make them pay for themselves and work.” Armentano said that Paraco has been through every business cycle imaginable but what’s happening right now is unusual and affects all forms of energy. “This will be a year when energy prices

will be extremely hot,” Armentano said. “I’ve never seen propane prices go up this high this quickly. We’re talking about a 200-plus percent jump in propane prices in a four- or five-month period.” Armentano expressed a belief that energy prices will stay high throughout the winter. “I do think you may see supply shortages in certain energy markets," he said. "For us, we have a very diverse supply strategy to ensure that we have supply for our customers going into this winter. "We’re 100% confident we will have adequate supply but there will be some of our competitors, potentially, and some people in some other areas of energy that may have supply shortages,” Armentano said. “The other issue is not just having the supply but making sure that you have the manpower to deliver. We’re reading about labor shortages right now especially in drivers, truckers. We’re working extremely hard to stay ahead of the curve.” The paperback version of Armentano's book is set for a Dec. 8 release date on Amazon with Armentano offering copies both in paperback and hardcover through his website joearmentano.com. A Dec. 8 book-signing event is planned at a meeting facility in the building where Paraco’s offices are located, 800 Westchester Ave. in Rye Brook.

Joe Armentano's book "A Helluva Ride."

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BY KEVIN ZIMMERMAN

Scarsdale entrepreneurs realizing cereal success with Three Wishes

Kzimmerman@westfairinc.com

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inding a good name for a new product can be challenging for even the most seasoned entrepreneur. But for the husband-and-wife team behind breakfast cereal Three Wishes, it was relatively easy. “I don’t know what we would have done if our name was ‘Smith,’” laughed Margaret Wishingrad, who with her husband Ian co-founded Three Wishes (the third is son Ellis). “We spent two years in product development,” the Scarsdale resident said, “making sure the ingredients and the taste were just right. Then we got into the packaging, the naming and the branding — which wasn’t easy.” Although they both have backgrounds in advertising and creative design, the Wishingrads kept running into trademark issues with every name they came up with. “It seemed like every single word or set of words was already taken,” she said. Strolling through Central Park with their son one day — “We felt like shoemakers without shoes,” she said — they eventually hit upon “Three Wishes,” and to their great surprise found that it was available. “It was like every star aligned,” she said. While the couple has since added a second child, the Three Wishes name will remain in place. The cereal itself is being marketed as a “better-for-you” option, thanks to nutrient density derived from such ingredients as chickpeas, tapioca and pea protein. “When Ellis was still young we kind of rediscovered cereal again,” Margaret Wishingrad recalled, “but then we found there aren’t a lot of great alternative options out there in the market — especially if you want something that’s healthy but still tastes good so it appeals to children.” Working with a food scientist, the Wishingrads developed flavors like cocoa, cinnamon and honey, which Margaret said plays into the nostalgia that today’s wave of new parents have for when they were growing up. “We talked to moms and grandparents about the things that had made them leave the (cereal) category,” she explained. “And that led us to basically flip the idea of what most people think of when they think of cereal. We’re putting out something that’s nutrient-dense and is grain-free, with a lot more protein and a lot less sugar.” The appeal of the cereal’s “O” shape, familiar to millions of consumers of other cereals, speaks for itself, Wishingrad said. Three Wishes launched in 2019 — just in time for Covid-19. But, she said, the pandemic “actually helped us. We both had experience on the agency side, where we learned so many lessons — including the importance of being nimble, being able to

pivot and to come up with creative ways to do things.” The couple had already made inroads at various food-service trade shows with samples for grocery-store buyers. “Then when the pandemic hit, we were able to help customers and potential customers with a completely redesigned website, which we had up in six weeks, which they could order from and keep Three Wishes in stock on their shelves.” Moves like those helped ensure the likes of Whole Foods keeping it on the shelves of

its roughly 500 stores nationwide. “Ian is one of the most incredible networkers I’ve ever met,” she said, “which is important because cereal as a category takes up a lot of space in a grocery store — you can have 40 feet of every color, but it’s dominated by three or four players. “We feel like we’ve already left a significant mark,” Wishingrad added. Indeed, the company has been favorably profiled by Forbes (“Cereal that’s good — and good for you”) and Fortune (“The next wave of cereal is here”).

And as a proud graduate of Syracuse University, Ian also landed the Orange’s renowned shooting guard Buddy Boeheim as the first NCAA athlete to star in a TV commercial campaign. Again, a connection with an old Syracuse classmate led to the relationship. Boeheim — son of fabled Orange coach Jim Boeheim — is donating his fee to charity. “Our goal is to get enough market share to branch out into other areas,” Margaret said. “But right now we’re focused on becoming America’s favorite breakfast cereal.”

PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO EMPLOYEES DURING COVID-19 RECOVERY You need to make sure that they’re healthy and you need to make sure that there’s a sense that you as an employer have their best interests at heart. However, you will find there are circumstances with the potential for employer liability. There are quite a few State, Federal and NYC employment laws you need to be very sensitive to in terms of whether you can compel somebody to come to work…” (Excerpted from the Westchester County Business Journal, Aug. 3.)

WE CAN HELP JEFFREY D. BUSS jbuss@sbjlaw.com 914-476-0600

YONKERS, NY

733 Yonkers Avenue, Suite 200 Yonkers, NY 10704 914.476.0600

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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2405 Crompond Road., Yorktown Heights. Photo via Google Maps.

Private school wants to open in Yorktown Heights BY PETER KATZ Pkatz@westfairinc.com

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private school in Manhattan that was developed to combine elements of Spain’s education system with that of the U.S. would like to open a second location — this one in Yorktown Heights. The Maryel School, located at 28 E. 35th St., is a bilingual English and Spanish co-educational day school for children from the nursery school level to fifth grade. It would like to establish a second location at 2405 Crompond Road in Yorktown Heights in a former school it would be leasing from St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church, which is located on the property. Maryel is seeking special permit approvals from the town of Yorktown to enable it to open. Pastor Dave Dockweiler of the church has written to the town stating his interest

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in leasing the space to Maryel. “Our Montessori School (OMS) was the prior tenant that rented the space we are looking to rent now to the Maryel School of New York,” Dockweiler said. “OMS rented this space from us over 40 years through June 15, 2020. OMS rented additional space not included in Maryel’s proposal. At its peak (1989-1990), OMS used the large room to educate 64 children under the supervision of four teachers. “The proposal from Maryel School reflects usage of our building that is very similar to the way in which it was used by OMS,” Dockweiler said. OMS closed during the Covid-19 pandemic. In announcing the closing, OMS said: “Despite herculean efforts to avoid this outcome, ultimately it was not in our control.” OMS said that all tuition deposits had been refunded. WCBJ

The existing facility is reported to have seven classrooms, a reception area, a combination gymnasium and indoor playroom, bathrooms, school offices and a kitchen. The Maryel School has created a fiveyear strategic plan for its Yorktown Heights operation. During the initial school year, 2022 to 2023, four classrooms would be used for 16 preschool students, eight kindergarten students and eight first-grade students. The strategic plan calls for an additional grade to be added each year until, in the fifth year, the school would be accepting students in pre-K through the fifth grade. It expects total enrollment would be 70 to 80 students in the 2026-27 school year. Maryel projects that it would need to put an addition onto the school building to accommodate the expansion of grades and associated increase in enrollment.

According to prices published by Maryel for its Manhattan location, the tuition is $20,750 for a preschool child attending a half-day, Monday through Friday. A full day, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m, is $29,870. Kindergarten through fifth grade is $34,150 for five days a week, 8:15 a.m. to 3:15 p.m. Maryel was originally founded in Seville, Spain, in 2004. It took the approach that each child has a unique gift and talent, which they express in a special way, and that educators must help students discover and explore those gifts and talents. The school also believes that a bilingual education is important because when children are exposed to two different languages they learn to be more tolerant and respectful of other cultures and traditions. Spanish is used all day in preschool, while English and Spanish are used equally in the other grades.


WBDC webinar takes aim at the value of credit score knowledge BY PHIL HALL Phall@westfairinc.com

$1 MILLION RAISED For Moms & Babies!

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he importance of maintaining a healthy credit score was the subject of the recent Women’s Business Development Council (WBDC) webinar “Financial Foundations: Credit Score Basics.” Samantha Cross, the WBDC business adviser who hosted the webinar, said the one question she is most frequently asked as part of her job involves how to improve one’s credit score. She noted this was not surprising, considering the value that a credit score carries in both a professional and a personal environment. “A credit score matters most when you're looking to borrow money,” she explained. “When you're looking to get money from someone for something — perhaps a home, a business, a car — getting your credit score to be good is something you should be doing long before you need money. Because anything you do to improve your credit score takes time.” Cross defined the credit score as “simply just a numerical representation of your past financial behaviors.” She noted that if someone paid their bills on time and did not carry an excess of debt, then their “credit score should be pretty fine.” But if a person missed a couple of payments or was in a situation where payments were late, the credit score would need improvement. However, she also emphasized that a credit score should not be the financial equivalent of a scarlet letter. “A good credit score does not make you a good person, a bad credit score does not make you a bad person,” she said. “It's just a factual numerical representation of what you've done in the past. And the good news is that if you change your behaviors, you can improve your credit score — and if you maintain good behaviors, you can improve it as well. It's a fluid number and you are not stuck where you are today.” Cross pointed out that credit scores range from 300 to 850, although she laughed that she never saw anyone with scores at either extreme. She explained that scores in the 300 to 500 range were considered poor and borrowers would find it “difficult to get along”, while the 500 to 600 range was “not great, but you'll probably get something — maybe not all you want.” The 600 to 750 range was defined as “a solid B student” by Ross, while anything over 750 was considered excellent credit. Ross said higher credit scores will prove beneficial when seeking loans. “It's more likely that you will get the loan that you're looking for,” she continued, adding that interest rates will also be adjusted based on credit scoring.

Courtesy of Debt.com. “The better your credit score when you get that loan, presumably the less risky that you are and, therefore, the lower the amount of interest rate that you will pay for that loan. Good credit scores give us good outcomes when it comes to loans.” Ross observed that credit scoring can be determined by several companies, most notably FICO and Credit Karma, and she insisted that anyone seeking to keep an eye on their scores can “use any of the credit scores that you can get your hands on, because they're all going to be similar.” Ross cautioned that the upcoming holiday season could create an unpleasant surprise related to credit scoring if consumers take out two or three credit cards to help cover shopping. “Unless you're really organized, you kind of lose track of what you owe and you go from something that might bring 10% of your score in a small way to not being able to manage these cards and maybe not paying on time or racking up a little bit of a debt,” she said. “If you start making errors or missteps, that's where things start to go south far more quickly.” Ross recommended that any perceived credit score errors published by the three major credit reporting agencies — Equifax, Experian and TransUnion — should be challenged if they may create a major impact on one’s credit score. “I definitely encourage people to dispute things that they don't think are accurate,” she said. “Look at all of the accounts — is there an account that's open in your name that you don't know about? I've seen people go through divorces and their spouse is supposed to be managing the account, but they're not and they're getting dragged down by it.” Ross also advised that all three major credit reporting agencies do not need to be contacted about the same problem. “Typically, a dispute that gets cleared from a TransUnion report will flow over to an Experian or an Equifax report over time,” she said. “They are all connected, and disputing with one does not require you to dispute with all of them.”

From left, Rella Fogliano, Joe Simone, Louis Cappelli, Joe Apicella, Event Chair Patricia Valenti, March of Dimes Development Director Annette Trotta-Flynn and News 12 Anchor/Reporter Tara Rosenblum.

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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HUDSON VALLEY Lifetime love of learning begins early at Red Owl Academy BY KATHY ROBERTS

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arents of preschoolers have had to make some major adjustments since New York first shut down in March 2020. Liana Sargsyan-Quinn was among those parents, with an added responsibility: she is an essential worker who provides care for working parents’ toddlers. When Sargsyan-Quinn sought a preschool for her own first-born daughter and could not find a comfortable fit, she decided to start her own early learning center. Red Owl Academy opened its doors in 2017, and she began sharing her love of learning in the kind of environment she wanted for her own child: a safe, clean and nurturing one, where creativity, learning responsibility and building self-esteem encourage children to thrive and succeed. “As a parent, that’s what I want for my children … and I think every parent feels the same way," she said. "Parents of Red Owl Academy’s preschoolers are in constant contact with teachers throughout the day via Brightwheel, keeping them posted on how their child is doing and what they are learning.” When the opportunity to lease a small building from the South Orangetown School District arose, Sargsyan-Quinn met with SOSD officials to negotiate for the space. She eagerly began planning for the Academy’s relocation from Sparkill, but Covid-19 delayed the move by several months. Sargsyan-Quinn was sure that by the time all was said and done, the pandemic would be over and schools and schedules would return to the pre-Covid status quo. As it did with everything else, the pandemic kept the actual process of moving the school from one location to another much longer than she anticipated. “We finally were able to move into the building over one weekend in December 2020,” said the educator, “and as we all know, things did not go back to ‘normal.’” Instead, mandates have continued and change almost weekly, the masking debate continues, PPE costs have quadrupled and finding qualified early-childhood teachers who are certified in both New York and New Jersey has been especially challenging. (The hamlet of Palisades straddles the border of Bergen County.) “We had 22 students graduate this year,” said Sargsyan-Quinn proudly. “As part of the ceremony, each child drew a picture of the flag that represented their heritage. One child had three flags. We had 17 flags, and I was amazed at the cultural mix of our students.” Her graduates also leave with a new language — French — added to their growing

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Liana Sargsyan Quinn, managing director at Red Owl Academy. vocabulary, lending a certain air of savoirfaire to their early childhood experience. European-born Sargsyan-Quinn taught French in Armenia and Belgium; when she came to the U.S. to obtain her master’s degree at Tufts University, she met her future husband. She speaks three languages, and all three of the couple’s children are bi-lingual. Red Owl Academy’s focus is STEMbased, said its founder. “All our projects foster creativity — there are no ‘workshops’ here. Children learn hands-on. They need to see, touch, feel and build to gain understanding. Books play a key part in the learning process. "This month, we spent time learning all about trees — how many different kinds there are, which ones have flowers or berries, what kind of animals make their homes in them and how the trees help the environment," she continued. "In the classroom, they learn to take care of their belongings. We all have shoes we wear outdoors and another pair to wear inside the WCBJ

school. It takes time and patience to teach them which shoe goes on which foot and how to store their shoes in their cubby when they come in from playing." She described children as "sponges — they soak everything up. When they learn to do things for themselves, it’s a great accomplishment that keeps them wanting to learn.” By learning how to care for themselves and for each other, Sargsyan-Quinn said, children are better prepared for kindergarten — and what lies beyond. Serendipity brought Fran Taibi and Sargsyan-Quinn together. After retiring from Good Shepherd Preschool in Pearl River, Taibi missed working with young children. On the other side of town, the preschool owner was looking for an assistant to help her in the academy’s new location. “We had a mutual acquaintance who knew both our situations and we were introduced to each other," Taibi said. "We hit it off right away." Both share the same values when it

comes to education and the benefit of early learning, and the camaraderie between the two educators is apparent. Red Owl Academy currently has 38 children ranging in age from infant to age four enrolled, and is using three of the five classrooms in the school. Plans to expand services are certain, but the timetable is not. “The need is great,” said SargsyanQuinn, “and we have several families on our waiting list. We plan to expand, but that’s going to take time.” She’s also received several requests for before- and after-school care. “It’s a growing need, especially now that parents have been called back to work," she noted. "Some parents need a 12-hour day. That’s something we cannot currently provide and I feel for them wholeheartedly, because no parent wants that long of a day for their young child. "Right now, we are planning to have a before-and-after program in place by the start of the next school year — September 2022," she said.


HUDSON VALLEY

GOOD THINGS

Mantello of Jacobowitz & Gubits recognized as Rising Star

From left to right: Kelly A. Pressler, Esq. (Partner), Michele L. Babcock, Esq. (Managing Partner), Rebecca B. Mantello, Esq. (Senior Counsel), Kara M. Nelson, Esq. (Associate), and Gary M. Schuster, Esq. (Partner), from Jacobowitz and Gubits, LLP.

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allkill resident Rebecca Mantello, Esq., senior counsel at Jacobowitz & Gubits LLP in Walden, was recently named a 2021 Orange County Rising Star by the Junior League of Orange County. The award program recognizes men and women between the ages of 21 and 41 who have demonstrated outstanding leadership skills in their community, from the public, private, nonprofit or volunteer sectors, making a positive impact on the quality of life for Orange

County families and businesses. Mantello specializes in civil and commercial litigation, personal injury and appeals, and is an active member and former President of the Women’s Bar Association of Orange and Sullivan Counties, which awarded her the Outstanding New Lawyer Award in 2012. She volunteers in the social and membership department of the Wallkill Volunteer Ambulance Corp. and is a member of the Police Reform Committee for the Town of Shawangunk.

Palisades Mall hosts fashion show

The Rockland Fashion Week kickoff show drew dozens of guests at the Palisades Mall. Photo by Kathy Roberts.

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ockland Fashion Week had its kickoff event at Hotel Nyack and drew dozens of guests to its runway at the Palisades Mall earlier this month. It’s the second year for what Nyack local designer

Wade Hope says is fast becoming Rockland’s signature fashion event. Wade, president of the Jamaican Civil & Cultural Association of Rockland, put together the show to bring local designers’ talents to the public.

Old house, new lease on life

Farmers markets move indoors

Ricci Tea vendors talk to a customer at the village of Piermont’s weekly outdoor market. Photo by Kathy Roberts.

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hey’re not just about the veggies anymore — farmers markets have attracted many new food vendors, from pierogis and farm-raised meats to

hand-crafted teas. The village of Piermont’s weekly outdoor market moves from Parelli Park to the Piermont Public Library parking lot beginning Sunday, Nov. 28.

This Federal-style home was moved to make way for a new 1 million-square-foot Amazon warehouse. Photo by Kathy Roberts.

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he Arnott-Haber House, built in 1820, was relocated by Amazon to make way for its 1 million-squarefoot fulfillment center on Route 747 in the town of Montgomery. The 180-foot reloca-

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tion took more than two years to complete. Currently under renovation, the town and Amazon are discussing the possibility of donating the historic home to a local nonprofit.

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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Landlord claims ACME contaminated Bronxville property BY BILL HELZEL

previous landlord. ACME has operated the market since November 2015, when it took over the lease from the bankrupted A&P markets. In 2019, ACME installed dry wells for handling stormwater in the parking lot. A 250-gallon underground storage tank was damaged during the work and released heating oil into the soil. The state Department of Environmental Conservation responded, the complaint states, and required the landlord to clean up the mess and also remove a 10,000-gallon tank under the parking lot. The landlord claims that ACME is responsible for damages inside and outside of the building and that it violated the lease by not giving prior notice or receiving approval for the work. ACME agreed to reimburse the landlord for the $125,248 spent on remediating damages from the small tank, according to the complaint, "but has failed to do so." And if not for the leak from the small tank, the landlord argues, it would not have been required to spend $47,237 removing the larger tank. The landlord is represented by Manhattan attorney Jeffrey Klarsfeld.

Bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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Bronxville landlord claims that the village's ACME supermarket owes $172,482 for contaminating soil under its parking lot next to the store. GA Family-Bronxville Holdings accused ACME of negligence and breach of contract, in a complaint filed Nov. 9 in Westchester Supreme Court, stemming from renovations in the parking lot. The landlord says it had to cover the costs of cleaning up contamination from a ruptured underground storage tank and removing another underground tank. ACME failed to do a proper investigation before digging up the parking lot, according to the complaint, or comply with governmental regulations. The media relations department for Albertsons Companies, ACME's parent company in Boise, Idaho, did not respond to an email asking for its side of the story. GA Family, affiliated with Mandrake Capital Partners, Manhattan, bought the property at 12-14 Cedar St. for $8.5 million in 2014, according to Westchester property records, and assumed the lease from the

ACME market, Cedar Street, Bronxville.

Buchanan stucco contractor accused of abandoning projects and diverting funds BY BILL HELZEL Bheltzel@westfairinc.com

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Queens masonry contractor claims that a Westchester subcontractor abandoned two projects and diverted project funds. King Contracting Group NY Inc. is demanding $3.9 million from Hi Rise E.I.F.S. & Stucco, of Buchanan, in two complaints filed recently in Westchester Supreme Court. The lawsuits also name Hi Rise owners Nestor M. Soria, of Buchanan, Juan Fernando Enrique Mejia, of Ossining, and their North Stucco Construction Inc., of Ossining. Hi Rise and North Stucco are one in the same, according to the complaints, using the same employees and equipment, doing the exact same work and operated by the same men. Hi-Rise was a "mere shell," King claims, and payments to Hi-Rise were funneled to North Stucco, which was operated "in a manner as to perpetuate fraud." Defense attorney Kenneth R. Rush, of Hackensack, New Jersey, said he has no comment on the allegations. He has just been retained and is in the process

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of examining the complaints. The complaints have not yet been properly served to his clients. King Contracting, of Long Island City, Queens, specializes in masonry and roofing construction, including exterior insulation finishing systems. Brett Steinberg is the president. King hired Hi Rise in June 2020 to do exterior insulation work on the River Crossing project at the 1st Avenue Tunnel in Manhattan, for $2.83 million, and this past March to work on a Bronx project for $340,000. On Aug. 31, Hi Rise and its owners agreed to work exclusively for King in the masonry and roofing sector, according to the complaints, and pledged not to solicit King's customers, dissuade anyone from doing business with King or disclose any proprietary information for five years. Hi Rise was to receive 50% of the net profits on the two projects, the agreement states. But on Oct. 20, Hi Rise allegedly abandoned the projects and left defective and unfinished work that King then had to repair and complete at its own cost. Hi Rise also diverted funds that were supposed to be used to pay its workers, according to the complaints, and King WCBJ

had to pay them. King also claims that Hi Rise employees assigned to the two projects had been working on a different job in the Bronx and that Soria and Mejia had been diverting funds to North Stucco. The defendants told King's clients that King had misappropriated project funds and owed Hi Rise $783,235, one of the complaints states, when King was actually ahead of its payments to Hi Rise

by $769,000. King is demanding $3.9 million for alleged breaches of contract, defamation, conversion of funds and unjust enrichment. It is asking the court to restrain Soria, Mejia and their companies from competing with King, soliciting King's customers, disparaging the company or using its proprietary information. King is represented by Manhattan attorney Brian L. Gardner.


Foodie Card expands restaurant discount subscription service into Westchester

FOCUS ON

HOSPITALITY — FUN & PRODUCTIVE

BY BRIDGET MCCUSKER bmccusker@westfairinc.com

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ver the past year and a half, restaurant delivery apps have seen a huge boom thanks to the Covid-19 pandemic. It’s one that isn’t stopping yet, either, even as more diners return to in-person and indoor dining. According to a report from Bloomberg Second Measure, meal delivery monthly sales are still more than double what they were in 2019. The downside is that delivery apps can take up to one-third of the revenue made on each order and other services like marketing, which can pose an often significant financial burden on restaurants that are already struggling. Foodie Card, a company from Garden City in Long Island, is hoping to be a resource to restaurants and bring benefits to both businesses and customers — and gives back to the community — through its subscription service and restaurant loyalty program. The membership program launched in Westchester on Nov. 1, after cultivating presences in Long Island, Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, parts of New Jersey and in West Palm Beach, with tens of thousands of members across those areas. According to CEO Jared Katz, the company began its expansion initiative a few months ago and now has over 120 restaurants on board, with plans to double that number over the next couple of months. Foodie Card offers a $29.99 yearly subscription in exchange for a 10% discount for customers every time they dine at a participating restaurant. It also has the added benefit of offering customers a reward point for every dollar saved, which can be redeemed for gift cards to Target, Walmart, Amazon and other retailers. For restaurants, there is no charge aside from absorbing the cost of the 10% discount. In exchange, they are given access to customers from Foodie Card’s directory and receive free exposure and shoutouts on the company’s social media pages. There is also no long-term commitment; restaurants that no longer wish to participate need only give 30 days’ notice to be removed from the program. “The goal is to try to drive traffic into the restaurant and hopefully provide that incentive to our members to make them want to bypass third-party delivery platforms and go

into the restaurant,” Katz said. “Third-party delivery platforms like Doordash and Uber can charge restaurants up to 33%. Our goal is to leverage our program to give customers incentive to go into the restaurant, to get their 10% discount," he expanded. "And the restaurant overall wins because when a customer goes in, they order more drinks, they order appetizers and they're only giving 10% compared to up to 30% that they'd be giving if someone was going to order something to be delivered online.” According to Katz, restaurants are often limited in their ability to market and promote themselves because they are busy providing their products and services. "Our goal was to be that source for independent restaurants, so that they could focus on their core and we could help focus on driving their business," he said. Foodie Card hosts an online ordering and delivery platform for select restaurants as well, but its main purpose is to drive up in-person dining. Additionally, the company donates a portion of the proceeds of every Foodie Card sold to the customer's local food bank. In Westchester, that's Feeding Westchester. In Long Island and New York City, the organi-

zations are Island Harvest and City Harvest, respectively. Each donation covers the cost of meals for a day for one person. "It was a way for us to put something together that supports local restaurants, supports people in need of food and then provides (local) foodies, or consumers, a way to find great restaurants where they can save a buck," Katz said. Katz said that Westchester is just one stop in Foodie Card's expansion plan for the greater metro New York area, with next stops in Fairfield County, the Hudson Valley and New Jersey. The company sees great success in its suburban markets, which Katz attributes to the lifestyle of many suburbanites and the service's popularity among families. “We hope by the end of the month, we'll have thousands of Westchester residents that are partaking in the program and we'll continue to add more restaurants and work different marketing strategies to educate the audience and the community that we exist," he said. "Hopefully it just builds up and then we'll continue to kind of penetrate into Fairfield County. And I know since it's neighboring into Westchester, that will continue to help as well.” After that, Foodie Card's goal is to move FCBJ

into the Northeast over the next year or two, and then to become a national brand over the next five to 10 years, expanding into the major metropolitan areas and their respective suburbs across the country. For now, the company boasts its tens of thousands of subscribers, many of whom have a positive return on their investment in the card and choose to renew it yearly. "An interesting metric is that 80% of our members use our directory to figure out where they want to eat," Katz said. "So it's a very influential platform. For consumers, they'll gravitate towards the restaurant that's on Foodie Card, and on average, our members make their $29.99 a year back in about two and a half months — by four or five meals, they'll kind of get their cost of their membership back.” Among the restaurants in Westchester participating are Fortina, with locations in Armonk, Rye Brook and Yonkers; Moderne Barn in Armonk; Miyabi in Pleasantville; Nonna’s in Yorktown Heights; Pik Nik in Tarrytown; Sundance Kitchen in White Plains; and Sambal in Irvington, along with a host of other restaurants, pizzerias, ice cream shops and even chain eateries like Subway and Taco Bell. WCBJ

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Westport's Round Room Live brings kiddie icons and adult favorites to entertainment venues BY PHIL HALL Phall@westfairinc.com

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t first glance, few people would imagine there could be a connection between Peppa Pig and Nelson Mandela. However, those two highly inf luential icons share a common ground by being among the entertainment events staged by Westport's Round Room Live. Now celebrating its fifth year in business, Round Room Live takes aim at two very different entertainment formats. Part of its business is focused on staging family-friendly theatrical productions featuring the popular characters of children’s television and online programming: Peppa Pig, along with Baby Shark, PJ Masks and Blippi, are the focus of live musical shows that tour North America. The other part of the business

Jonathan Linden (left) and Stephen Shaw with two of their “Baby Shark” performers. Contributed photo.

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offers more adult-focused immersive experiences, including exhibitions inspired by Mandela’s tumultuous life and the “Jurassic World” franchise. Round Room Live is run by Jonathan Linden and Stephen Shaw, both Canadian natives who previously worked with Live Nation before going into business for themselves. “We were more focused on concert touring bands like the Rolling Stones that filled large venues,” Linden recalled. “Between tour cycles, we needed to find activities for everybody to engage in other ticketed activities, so we got into kids and family shows." Linden called the latter "a really interesting part of the business and a bit distinct from the concert-touring business. We thought it was an interesting area for us to jump into it and run our own company.” The Rolling Stones inspired Round Room Live’s first offering with an immersive production called “Exhibitionism” that launched in New York in November 2016. That presentation was curated from more than 500 items of original stage costumes, rare instruments and lyric books, backstage and touring paraphernalia, album art, photography, stage designs, personal diaries and previously unreleased audio and behindthe-scenes footage. For the family-friendly theatrical presentations, Round Room Live’s initial endeavor involved licensing the rights to the “PJ Masks” animated series from Entertainment One in 2017 for a nationwide tour. Linden acknowledged that choosing the right vehicle for a touring show was often tricky. “It's sort of an evolving process,” he said. “When we first got into the business, the major kids networks would have a successful show and that would be a good indicator of what we wanted to take on tour. "But more and more over time," he continued, "between the streaming services and YouTube, there's lots of different ways that children consume entertainment, so we've had to adapt and evolve and keep an eye on where we see the brands that are trending.” Linden added that when they were made aware of the 2016 Pinkfong tune “Baby Shark,” the company “took a bet on a brand that at the time was really just a song — it was very successful, a very catchy song, but it didn't have a broadcast TV show and it didn't have a traditional consumer packaged goods line or following. But we were confident that it was going to pull together the type of following and it was going to have the lasting power that we were hopeful for.”

Theatrical productions aimed at children often have a tendency to be corny and even a little tacky in the presentation, and Shaw admitted that quality control is a major concern for Round Room Live’s shows. “When we started out, we had a high priority in making the integrity of the brand come through within the narrative and the theatrical presentation,” he said, noting that the company works with “everyone from the writers of the animated kids’ series on TV and the marketing, the development and the production teams to ensure brand integrity by integrating the creators of the brand within the live theatrical activation and story. That show is the people's professional IP.” For the immersive exhibitions, Round Room Live co-produced “Mandela: The Official Exhibition” with the Royal House of Mandela (RHoM) and RHoM Investments. The celebration of the South African leader’s inspirational life was staged in London and Berlin before arriving at the Oregon Museum of Science & Industry in October; the company is planning an East Coast presentation in 2022, although a venue has yet to be named. Also happening is a “Jurassic World” event in Dallas featuring large animatronic dinosaurs similar to the creatures in the popular film series. Linden explained that in staging such productions, the company is seeking “historical, culturally significant exhibitions that make a different contribution and have historical value, and they can play in museums and cultural institutions.” Entertainment One acquired Round Room Live in 2019, and Entertainment One itself was later acquired by Hasbro. Shaw noted the company was “fortunate to have a corporate partner that helps us manage our way through the pandemic” when live entertainment was put on hold for more than a year. The company resumed its operations in June with the “Baby Shark” tour and the opening of “Jurassic World.” “We've been optimistic that people are anxious and eager to have live entertainment back and finding the most safe and efficient way to bring it back,” Shaw said, citing the addition of a Tupac Shakur-inspired immersive exhibition being planned for next year. “We're excited that it feels like trends are going in the right direction, with children now being vaccinated," he said. "And we're optimistic that the landscape is changing and 2022 is going to be great for live entertainment.”

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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Good Things GOVERNOR APPOINTS LOCAL CHIEF TO STATE TASK FORCE Luci Labriola-Cuffe, chief of the Fire Training Branch at the Department of Emergency Services (DES) in Westchester County has been appointed by New York state Gov. Kathy Hochul to the New York State Volunteer Firefighter Recruitment and Retention Task Force, which is charged with developing recommendations to help volunteer fire departments increase membership in their ranks. It will examine firefighter training requirements, review the success of programs that provide incentives to volunteers and suggest new ways to assist fire departments that are facing a decline in membership. Labriola-Cuffe has longtime experience in fire service, having been a volunteer firefighter and chief of the Armonk Fire Department. In her role at DES, she oversees training provided to volunteer firefighters and assists with the delivery of training for Westchester’s career firefighters. The task force was created in 2020 through legislation passed by the New York state Legislature. Of Westchester’s 59 fire departments, 41 are all-volunteer, 14 utilize a combination of career and volunteer personnel and four are fully staffed with career firefighters.

CHOW GOES SOLO

Dr. Andrew Abdou

BURKE EARNS EXEMPLARY STATUS ACCREDITATION

Milano Chow Checkered Floor I, 2020 Courtesy of the artist and Chapter NY, New York and Bel Ami, Los Angeles

Milano Chow’s first solo institutional exhibition, Prima Facie, will be presented in two first-floor galleries at the Aldrich Contempory Art Museum in Ridgefield, Connecticut, from Jan. 15 to May 8. She will debut more than a dozen new works on paper spanning two and three dimensions. Chow’s monochromatic collages are rendered in graphite, ink and pho-

to transfer, casting modish women in self-possessed cameos staged in gilded architectural interiors that feel cloistered and deserted. Influenced by Surrealism, fashion photography, shop window design and Hollywood film noir from Chow’s native Los Angeles, her ornamented mise-en-scènes are frozen in time. Pivoting off the wall, the three-dimensional

works, which Chow refers to as “corners” and “rooms” toe the line between drawing and sculpture. Major support for the exhibition is provided by the Pollock-Krasner Foundation, with support among others from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Laurie M. Tisch Illumination Fund and The Poses Family Foundation.

HOSPITALITY JOB SEEKERS AT FAIR

SERVICES FOR THE ELDERLY Field Hall Foundation in Cortlandt Manor has announced $335,000 in new grants that are available for seniors. More than $1 million was awarded in 2021 and now the organization is accepting letters of inquiries for 2022. The 2021 funding will be used to provide services that directly improve the lives of vulnerable, low-income older adults and their caregivers in Dutchess, Putnam and Westchester counties. The grant recipients include Community Action Partnership for Dutchess County Inc., Catholic Charities of Dutchess, Westhab Inc., Legal Services of the Hudson Valley, Community Center of Northern Westchester, Gilda’s Club Westchester, Habitat for Humanity of Dutchess County, Hillside Food Outreach, Maryknoll Sisters, North East Community Center, Meals on Wheels of New Rochelle, Meals on Wheels of Hyde Park, United Hebrew and 13 local organizations to address senior food insecurity during the holiday season. To learn about the foundation’s grantmaking guidelines and criteria, visit fieldhallfoundation.org.

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From left: Natasha Caputo, director, Film and Tourism, Westchester County; OJ Yizar, Westchester-Putnam Career Center manager for White Plains and Mount Vernon; John Ravitz, executive vice president and CEO, The Business Council of Westchester; George Latimer, Westchester County executive; Terry McAneney, general manager, Marriott Westchester; and Thom Kleiner, executive director, Westchester-Putnam Workforce Development Board, at last month’s Westchester County Tourism-Hospitality Job Fair.

Last month’s Westchester County Tourism & Hospitality Job Fair at the Marriott Westchester Tarrytown offered more than 120 job seekers the opportunity to connect with 32 employers and learn about the various career paths available at local hotels, restaurants and entertainment venues. Speaking at the fair, Westchester County Executive George Latimer said, “We were able to connect members of our tourism and hospitality industry to talent from Westchester County and FCBJ

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beyond, which is critical as we welcome visitors back to Westchester for business and leisure. Bridget Gibbons, Westchester County economic development director, said “We are committed to helping the companies in our tourism and hospitality sector stage a strong comeback….” Thom Kleiner, executive Ddrector, Westchester-Putnam Workforce Development Board, said “…This successful job fair suggests that individuals are ready to put themselves forward

and businesses are ready to engage them to augment and improve their workforce.” The job fair was sponsored by Westchester Tourism and Film, in conjunction with the Westchester County Office of Economic Development, Westchester-Putnam Career Center Network, Westchester Hotel Association, the Westchester Marriott and The Business Council of Westchester. Complimentary transportation was provided by Red Oak Transportation.

Burke Rehabilitation Hospital in White Plains recently earned Electrodiagnostic Laboratory Accreditation with Exemplary Status from the American Association of Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AANEM), which demonstrates clinical excellence in electrodiagnostic (EDx) medicine. Dr. Andrew Abdou, the primary faculty physician providing inpatient and outpatient EDx for evaluation of neuromuscular disorders has been appointed the director of the EDx Service. During the past three years, Burke has increased its EDx services with three board-certified electrodiagnostic medicine physicians: Senior Vice President and Chief Medical Officer Dr. MooyeonOh-Park, Dr. Benjamin Seidel and Abdou. These physicians diagnose critical illness neuropathy/ myopathy, polyneuropathy, traumatic nerve injuries, radiculopathies and entrapment neuropathies. “The Electrodiagnostic Laboratory at Burke Rehabilitation Hospital/Montefiore Rehabilitation Medicine serves a unique and valuable role in the evaluation of neuromuscular disorders for our inpatients and outpatients,” noted Abdou. “Electrodiagnostic testing provides information about diseases of the muscles and nerves by recording electrical activity and measuring the speed and degree of electrical activity in these tissues. This testing is highly specialized and not commonly available in physicians’ offices.” Burke maintains the only AANEM-accredited EDx laboratory in Westchester County and is one of only 27 such labs in New York state. Founded in 1915 through an endowment from philanthropist John Masterson Burke, Burke is the only hospital in Westchester County dedicated solely to adult rehabilitation medicine.


CONFERENCE KEYNOTERS TIFFANY MANUEL, PH.D. DrT (as she prefers to be called) the dynamic speaker, best-selling author and President and CEO of TheCaseMade, an organization dedicated to helping leaders powerfully and intentionally make the case for systems change, will be a keynote speaker at The Land Use Law Center of the Elizabeth Haub School of law, Pace University, White Plains, 16th annual Alfred B. DelBello Land Use and Sustainable Development Conference. Scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 7, this year’s conference theme is “Reimagining the Role of Local Governments,” which will focus on the ways local governments are overcoming challenges and finding solutions that target new ways to plan, regulate and design communities. In her role at TheCaseMade, Manuel works with hundreds of passionate social changemakers, innovators and adaptive leaders around the United States who are building better, stronger communities that are diverse, equitable and inclusive. She holds a doctorate and master’s degree in public policy from the University of Massachusetts Boston, a master’s degree in political science from Purdue University and a bachelor’s degree from the University of Chicago. Arthur C. Nelson, Ph.D., also a conference keynoter is professor of urban planning and real estate development at the University of Arizona in Tucson and presidential professor emeritus of city and metropolitan planning at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He was a pioneer in smart-growth planning and research before the term came into fashion. Ranked in the top 10 among more than 1,000 U.S. planning professors, Nelson is also one of the nation’s leading experts in the role of transit in advancing economic development and shaping housing markets in ways that can advance social equity. One of the highlights of the conference includes a dinner honoring Founder’s Award recipient Frank S. McCullough Jr., .partner at McCullough, Goldberger and Staudt, for distinguishing himself as a land use attorney sensitive to and able to unite disparate parties in support of growth and conservation. For more information and to register for the conference, visit http://law.pace. edu/annual-conference-2021. Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

INTERNATIONAL COMPANY JOINS HVEDC

TURNING OVER THE KEYS

Habitat for Humanity of Coastal Fairfield County (CFC) seeks to build community and to improve lives by partnering with low-income families, community volunteers and donors to build decent and affordable homes in stable and welcoming neighborhoods. Throughout its 36-year

history Habitat has maintained a wellearned reputation for success throughout the region. It is a developer with a commitment to “green” construction, a family-service agency, nonprofit financial institution, community advocate and provider of more than 8,000 volunteer opportu-

nities each year. Habitat CFC transforms abandoned properties into homes for tax paying, contributing community members. Since 1985, it has dedicated over 270 homes and has helped more than 1,100 family members in Fairfield County like Vanessa, Ramon and their family.

HIGH FLYING ADVENTURE

Veolia North America, which operates more than 8,500 water and wastewater facilities and systems around the world, using service delivery models that are designed to fit the specific needs of each individual client has joined the Hudson Valley Economic Development Corporation (HVEDC) Board of Directors. "… Water infrastructure is an important necessity to foster economic growth and I look forward to working with Veolia to promote economic development in the region," said Mike Oates, HVEDC president and CEO. Veolia partners with public utilities to improve operations, mitigate risk, improve infrastructure and decrease operational costs. It also develops comprehensive programs to help municipalities and industry efficiently and safely manage utilities, which are challenged by changing regulations, aging infrastructure, limited resources and extreme weather events presenting many obstacles to providing safe, reliable and efficient water and wastewater services. HVEDC is the leading economic development agency for the seven-county region of Westchester, Putnam, Dutchess, Rockland, Orange, Ulster and Sullivan counties. The public-private partnership markets the region as a prime business location to corporate executives, site selection consultants and real estate brokers.

CONNECT WITH westfair communications

Thrillz High Flying Adventure Park and Jumpz Trampoline Sports in Danbury honored the area’s first responders and their families with an evening of excitement and thrilling challenges free of charge. Acknowledging the difficulties and stresses, which the responders face, adventure park own-

ers Rob and Lisa Cannon hosted the event with Responder Wellness Inc. First responders from cities west of Hartford and Mansfield, Connecticut, were invited, including Danbury, Wilton, Waterbury, Norwalk, Brookfield, Easton, Redding – even some members of the New York Fire De-

partment, who reside in Yonkers, New York, attended. “This event is the least we can do for our first responders who worked so diligently throughout the pandemic…,”said Stacey Raymond, psychologist, trauma specialist and founder of Responder Wellness. “ FCBJ

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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Good Things PROVIDING LEADERSHIP TO GIRLS

ONE HUNDRED TO 100 Larchmont Friends of Family (LFOF), a local nonprofit volunteer organization that has been actively and quietly helping families in the Westchester community for more than 20 years, has launched its “100 to $100,000” fundraising campaign seeking 100 families in need to gift $1,000. Due to Covid-19 restrictions, LFOF has replaced its annual holiday gala with the 100 to $100,000 campaign hoping to continue to raise the same amount of funds. Founded in 1997, by several Larchmont residents who had suffered severe illnesses in their own families and received help from neighbors and friends finding such help invaluable,

uplifting and transformative. Since then, LFOF has been actively and confidentially helping local families through difficult times with more than 200 volunteers. “We are neighbors helping neighbors in a meaningful way,” said Tina Sadarangani, president of Larchmont Friends of Family. Donations of $1,000 or more will be recognized on a planting in a local park, which symbolizes the generosity of those helping to grow the LFOF mission. To be one of the families to donate $1,000, visit https://e. givesmart.com/events/on0/ or mail a check to: Larchmont Friends of Family, P.O. Box 746, Larchmont, NY 10538.

COPING WITH SUBSTANCE USE DISORDER

Photo: From left: LM Lion President Phil Oldham, Girl Scout Service Unit Manager Pat Allen, Sedona’s Bill Jablonski, LM Lion and Girl Scout Troop Leader Lina Pasquale.

The Larchmont Mamaroneck (LM) Lions teamed up with Mamaroneck’s Sedona Taphouse “Mondays Dine Out for Charity” in support of The Girl Scouts in their communities. Sedona’s full month of Mondays, held throughout the year, supports charities and service groups (a

percentage of sales is put aside for the program). For the month of October, Sedona raised $1,268 in support of the Girl Scouts. The Lions matched that donation with $1,000, making a combined total donation of $2,268 to the local Girl Scout community.

The Larchmont Mamaroneck Girl Scouts serve more than 400 girls in Larchmont, Mamaroneck and Rye Neck helping them further their programming in STEM, outdoor activities, entrepreneurship and life skills as well as help provide for community-service projects.

CROWDS HAIL EXHIBIT

Lisa Gray and her son, Jordan.

To better understand the emotional toll of the holiday season and how it affects those who are battling a substance use disorder and their loved ones, Simsbury, Connecticut, nonprofit A Promise to Jordan will host an in-person presentation, “Facing the Holidays,” on Thursday, Dec. 9 from 6 to 8 p.m. The presentation will take place at The Barn at Covenant Presbyterian Church, 124 Old Farms Road, Simsbury. All local restrictions with regard to the coronavirus pandemic will be followed. Lisa Gray, founder and executive director of A Promise to Jordan, whose son died of an overdose at the age of 24 noted, “For someone struggling with a drug or alcohol dependency, the holidays can be an especially challenging

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time to abstain and it can be equally stressful for family members as they try to plan the holiday festivities while staying sensitive to the needs of their loved one.” The presentation will be led by Daniel Millstein, LCSW, JD, CEO at Farrell Treatment Center in New Britain, which offers intensive residential and outpatient treatment services to those struggling with a substance use disorder009, and Keith Barile, RSS, drug and alcohol counselor with Behavioral Health Network. Both men are also in long-term recovery from substance use disorders. For more information, visit apromisetojordan.org or email info@ apromisetojordan.org. FCBJ

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From left: HMA Director Robbin Zella, artist Joe Fucigna and HCC CEO Dr. Dwayne Smith.

Black Hose #4_silver_white_purple, 2020, plastic and metal fencing, rubber hose. 72 x 42 x 21”

The long-awaited exhibition “Drip-Drop, Tick-Tock, Here + Now,” opened at the Housatonic Museum of Art (HMA) in Bridgeport, on Oct. 28 with a packed house. Crowds gathered to view the multimedia sculptures and paintings by Weston, Connecticut, artist Joseph Fucigna after a two-year wait thanks to a fire, flood and a pandemic. “It’s finally happened,” said Fucigna. “Drip-drop was the fire and flood, tick-tock was Covid, and here and now is what it is. I’m so happy to be here, how often do you get to

A closing reception for the exhibition will take place Wednesday, Dec. 8 at from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. An art professor at Norwalk Community College and chair of the Studio Arts Program, Fucigna holds a B.F.A. from Alfred University and an M.F.A. from the School of Visual Arts. His work has been exhibited throughout the Northeast and New York. He is a 2018 recipient of an Individual Artist Fellowship from the Connecticut Commission on the Arts.

do a do-over on a show?” Fucigna transforms everyday objects like metal fencing, chicken wire, cable ties and garden hose into elegant, provocative and erotic abstractions. “I want viewers not to be afraid. I want it to be approachable, but I also want them to scratch their heads and say, ‘huh, I think there’s some other stuff I need to find out about this.’ Hopefully they come away with some answers, some discoveries, but some questions too,” said Fucigna.


FAR AWAY FROM HOME

Jessica M. Molano

Nikki A. Hahn

JUDICIAL LAW CLERK JOINS FIRM

WEDC’S NEW CEO Nikki A. Hahn, MPA, a Scarsdale resident, has been named as the next CEO of the Women’s Enterprise Development Center (WEDC), an award-winning organization serving Westchester and the Hudson Valley and helping women achieve economic self-sufficiency and financial stability through business ownership and entrepreneurship. For the past three years, Hahn has served as WEDC’s director of development and strategic initiatives. She will take the reins as CEO on Jan. 1 replacing Anne M. Janiak, who will continue with WEDC as a special advisor on an as-needed basis. She will remain as executive director of the Westchester Municipal Officials Association. Barbara H. Van Bergen, president of the WEDC Board of Directors commented, “… We were especially impressed with her ability (Hahn) to pivot during the past year, during extremely challenging times, enabling us to continue to offer our clients all the services they needed. …We need to dismantle barriers and pave the way for racial equality in the small-business space. To that end, the training opportunities we offer rival those found at many leading educational institutions. But we also provide high-touch business training, networking and access to capital. All of this is critically important to low- to moderate-income women and minority small-business owners as they move forward. In short, we help make their dreams come true.” Before joining WEDC, Hahn served as corporate relations and service events manager for Volunteer New York!, was chair of the Scarsdale School Board Nominating Committee and served as client and partner development director for The Acceleration Project. She earned both a Master’s of Public Administration degree and a Bachelor of Science degree from New York University. Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

Photo courtesy Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael Singley.

Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Airman Julian Fernando, who hails from Yonkers, New York, is directing an F/A-18F Super

Hornet, assigned to the “Black Aces” of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 41, on the flight deck of USS Abraham Lin-

coln (CVN 72). The ship is underway conducting routine operations in U.S. 3rd Fleet.

THE HOLIDAYS AT LMMM

Jessica M. Molano recently joined the Lachtman C0hen P.C. law firm in White Plains as an associate. She will be working in the firm’s litigation group, headed by partner Brian Cohen and the firm’s real estate group headed by partner David Lachtman. Prior to joining the firm, Molano served as a judicial law clerk for the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Middle District of North Carolina. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree in political science from the City University of New York at John Jay College of Criminal Justice, where she graduated with honors. She then earned her Juris Doctorate from The University of Iowa College of Law, where she served as a student writer and editor for the Journal of Transnational Law & Contemporary Problems. Along with other professional memberships she served as treasurer for the Hispanic/ Latino Law Students Association and was a member of the Black Law Students Association.

CONNECT WITH westfair communications The holiday season at the Lockwood-Mathews Mansion Museum, 295 West Ave. in Norwalk, will kick off Wednesday, Dec. 8 at noon with a new exhibition titled "Holiday Enchantment at the Mansion.” Nominated for the second consecutive year as one of the 10 Best Historic Holiday House Tours in the U.S., by “USA Today,” the museum will explore the Lockwoods’ and Mathews’ cherished traditions from the 1850s through the

1890s and feature 21st-century Christmas trees and seasonal displays by renowned interior designer Victoria Vandamm of Vandamm Interiors and floral designer Danna DiElsi of The Silk Touch. The exhibition will be curated by trustees Mimi Findlay and Paul Veeder with the assistance of the LMMM Curatorial Committee and capture the enchantment of the holiday season with glamorous tree displays, an exploration of the history of Christmas

cards, a display of aesthetic movement table décor, vintage toys and glamorous Victorian gowns curated by Stacey Danielson. The museum’s 2021 cultural and educational programs are made possible in part by funding from LMMM’s Founding Patrons, Leadership Patrons and Benefactors. Tickets will range from $8 to $15 and admission is free for children under 8 years old. To purchase tickets, visit lockwoodmathewsmansion.com. FCBJ

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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Good Things WESTFAIR RIDES EXPANDS Three new staff members have been appointed to the operations team of WestFair Rides (WFR) in Mount Kisco according to Catherine Wynkoop, president of the nonprofit, volunteer-based organization that provides rides to medical appointments for older adults and adults with disabilities. The new members, who will provide information and referrals, include Joni Kretzmer, a nonprofit program administrator, appointed to oversee recruitment of new volunteers; Jamila Francis, whose background is in community and public health; and Thomas Odlum, a recent college graduate. Kretzmer’s experience includes nonprofit program administration and direct client support. Prior to joining WestFair Rides, he served as a volunteer program administrator at DOROT Westchester. Francis brings a decade of experience in nutrition and public health counseling. Having worked primarily with women and children’s health programs, she is embracing the opportunity to work with underserved older adults. Previously, she served as WIC Nutritionist at Optimus Health Care in Stamford. She earned her bachelor’s degree at SUNY Oneonta and master’s degree in public health at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy. Odlum started at WestFair Rides in a part-time role, while pursuing his bachelor’s degree at Emory University. He researched and helped to build the information and referral database at WestFair Rides, a hub designed to help the organization’s call-center staff provide referrals to support services to older adults and adults with disabilities in the community. After graduating with a bachelor’s degree he now works in the WestFair Rides Call Center fulfilling ride requests for medical transportation and providing referrals to community members for an array of support services. Since its founding in 2011, WFR’s dedicated network of volunteer drivers has provided nearly 17,000 rides to medical, dental and cancer treatment appointments for individuals who might have otherwise foregone critical medical care.

OZZIE AND HARRIET CHRISTMAS The Larchmont Mamaroneck Lions, LMC Media, the Larchmont Library and The Sandbox Theater have joined together to present the unique story of one of radio and TV’s most popular sit-com series, “An Ozzie & Harriet Christmas.” It’s a holiday event for the entire family at the Larchmont Village Center on Saturday, Dec. 11 from 2 to 3:30 p.m. It’s an opportunity to experience the radio and TV lives of “America’s favorite young couple” … and watch David and Ricky Nelson grow up and Ricky becoming a 1960s’ teen idol. A highlight of the event will be the live recreation of an Ozzie and Harriet Christmas radio episode, presented by the Sandbox Theater Company. It will be followed by a screening of a Christmas episode from the TV series. The radio recreation and the TV episode will include a few surprises for those in attendance to enjoy and an opportunity to win an Ozzie and Harriet prize. The event will be video recorded by LMC Media.

Joni Kretmzer,

PEPSI REACHES OUT TO CHILDREN OF FALLEN PATRIOTS Thomas Odlum

Jamila Francis.

CONNECT WITH westfair communications

westfaironline.com wagmag.com

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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A $10,000 donation to the Children of Fallen Patriots foundation, which provides college scholarships and educational counseling to children who have lost a parent in the line of duty, was presented to the organization by Pepsi Cola at an award ceremony Monday, Nov. 8 in the company’s Hudson Valley’s headquarters at 1 Pepsi Way in Newburgh, New York, after its annual Rolling Remembrance event.

“We are so pleased to make this donation to Children of Fallen Patriots” said Tim Tenney, president and CEO of Pepsi Cola of the Hudson Valley, noting that “this donation would not be possible without the hard work and dedication of our employees.” In operation for more than 75 years, Pepsi Cola of the Hudson Valley distributes and sells Pepsi and other allied products in Orange, Rockland, Sullivan,

Ulster, Duchess and Putnam counties in New York. Rolling Remembrance is an annual cross country relay event, to honor the military heroes who lost their lives while serving the United States. It is conducted in partnership with PepsiCo’s employee resource group, PepsiCo Valor, which supports veteran PepsiCo employees and veterans in communities across the country.


ARTIST AND CHEF

Randall M. Hayes Dr. Ji Chong

AWARDED FOR STROKE CARE EXCELLENCE Four Westchester Medical Center Health Network (WMCHealth) hospitals have been cited by national associations for stroke care excellence. Westchester Medical Center, Good Samaritan Hospital, MidHudson Regional Hospital and HealthAlliance Hospital have each earned the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Get with the Guidelines® Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award for 2021. The award recognizes each hospital for ensuring stroke patients receive excellent care based on the latest evidence-based scientific guidelines. The hospitals were also appointed to the Get with the Guidelines Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll. Additionally, Westchester Medical Center and Good Samaritan Hospital attained Target: Stroke Honor Roll Elite Status from the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. To qualify for this recognition, each hospital met quality measures developed to reduce the time between patient arrival at the hospital and treatment with tissue plasminogen activator or r-tPA, a therapy for for treating ischemic strokes, which are caused by blood clots. Westchester Medical Center is certified by New York state as a Comprehensive Stroke Center, a designation that represents the most advanced stroke treatment available in a given geographic area. Our WMCHealth stroke care teams work in concert for the administration of timely stroke care,” said Ji Chong, M.D., a vascular neurologist and director of stroke at Westchester Medical Center. Under her guidance, the stroke program at Westchester Medical Center now has a stroke specialist caring for each patient 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Information for these features has been submitted by the subjects or their delegates.

Jacques Pépin in his studio.

The Stamford Museum & Nature Center in Stamford (SM&NC) is presenting “The Artistry of Jacques Pépin,” a retrospective of the celebrated chef and James Beard award-winner’s artwork. The exhibition will feature more than 70 of his works of art from the past five decades. The exhibition, opened to the public Nov. 19, will be on view through Jan. 30. An opening reception with the artist will take place Dec. 2 from 4 to 7 p.m., along with the annual SM&NC Holiday Artisan Market. Melissa H. Mulrooney, CEO of the Stamford Museum & Nature Center, said “Jacques’ paintings are a natural extension of his legendary cooking and his passion for artistic expression is on full display in this show. What a feast.”

Pépin, known primarily for his pioneering French cooking, began painting over 50 years ago. Born in Bourg-en-Bresse, France, Pépin has lived in Connecticut since 1975. His artistic journey began with hand-illustrated menus he created to celebrate mealtime gatherings with family and friends. He eventually expanded his practice into a creative exploration of animals, farm scenes, still-life and rural landscapes. Pépin has said, “I don’t know whether my painting has helped my cuisine or whether my cooking has helped my painting and I don’t know if one borrows from the other. All I know is that, certainly for me, cooking and painting can live in harmony together. Both are different expressions of who I am and both enhance

my life considerably.” Pépin is an acclaimed chef who helped introduce generations of Americans to refined French cuisine through his PBS television series with Julia Child. The winner of 24 James Beard Foundation awards and the author of over 30 cookbooks, Pépin most recently won the Emmy Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2019. Celebrating 85 years, the Stamford Museum & Nature Center is a vital cultural and educational resource for the community and a focal point for family activity. Pre-registration for the event is requested at stamfordmuseum.org/pepin. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., and 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Sundays.

BEST SHORT-STAY REHABILITATION FACILITY For the fourth year in a row, United Hebrew of New Rochelle in New Rochelle, New York, has been recognized by “U.S. News & World Report”with the highest-rating possible for its short-stay rehabilitation facility for 2021-2022. Of the 13,500 facilities evaluated, just 1,651 earned the coveted rating. That places United Hebrew’s short-stay facility among the top 12% in the nation. The designation is awarded only to facilities that satisfy the U.S. News’ assessment of the appropriate use of key services and consistent performance in quality measures that impact resident care, safety and outcomes. Rita Mabli, president and CEO, said “Finding a safe, professional and well-regarded short-term rehabilitation center quickly after major surgery or life-changing health event can be a stressful process…. Highly trained staff and our stateof-the-art equipment are what help our

State-of-the-art rehabilitation equipment at United Hebrew of New Rochelle.

short-term patients speedily regain their mobility, balance and independence so that they may return home as fast as possible.” The short-term rehabilitation cen-

ter is part of United Hebrew’s campus of care, which includes skilled nursing, assisted living, Alzheimer’s and dementia care, independent senior housing and home care. FCBJ

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Bianca LoGiurato

LITIGATING FOR THE RISK INDUSTRY Two new attorneys have joined Ryan Ryan Deluca LLP, a litigation firm, with offices in Bridgeport, Stamford, West Hartford and New York. The firm’s practice places special emphasis on litigation for the risk industry and has represented the interests of insurance carriers and self-insureds for more than 50 years. Randall M. Hayes is a trial attorney who focuses on the defense of premises liability contract liability, professional liability (E&O) and product liability cases in both state and federal district courts. He has extensive experience in the defense of attorney, accountant, insurance broker and architectural malpractice cases. He’s based in the West Hartford office. Bianca LoGiurato earned her J.D., from the University of Connecticut School of Law in 2021 and earned a CALI Excellence for the Future Award for her work in “Gender, Sexuality and the Law.” During law school, LoGiurato participated in the Mediation Clinic, where she helped resolve employment discrimination disputes as a mediator and a clinic in the United States Attorney’s Clinic Department of Civil Rights Enforcement. She’s based in the Bridgeport office. NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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Facts & Figures

westchester county

U.S. BANKRUPTCY COURT White Plains & Poughkeepsie Local business cases, Nov. 10 - 16 CMC Construction Group Inc., Bloomingburg, George Molfetas, president, 21-35821-CGM: Chapter 7, assets $34,500, liabilities $141,782. Attorney: Michelle L. Trier. Findlay Estates LLC, Suffern, Sheindy Grunhut, sole member, 21-22647-RDD: Chapter 11, assets and liabilities from $1 million to $10 million. Attorney: Leo Fox.

U.S. DISTRICT COURT, White Plains

21-cv-9314-NSR: Enforcement of employee benefits. Attorney: Michael S. Adler. Teamsters funds, Elmsford vs. PCI Industries Corp., Mount Vernon, et al, 21-cv-9316-NSR: Enforcement of employee benefits. Attorney: Michael S. Adler. Teamsters funds, Elmsford vs. K&D Aggregates Inc., Cortlandt Manor, et al, 21-cv-9318-NSR: Enforcement of employee benefits. Attorney: Michael S. Adler. Laborers funds, Chestnut Ridge vs. Casabella Contracting of New York Inc., Buchanan, et al, 21-cv-9327-KMK: Employee retirement. Attorneys: Joshua E. MacKey, Pedro Medina Jr. Lizbeth Chamorro Coronel, Yonkers vs. Hudson Anchor Seafood Restaurant, Sleepy Hollow Manor, et al, 21-cv-9329KMK: Fair Labor Standards Act. Attorney: Jordan A. El-Hag.

Local business cases, Nov. 10 - 16 Danielle Warren vs. HV Poughkeepsie Inc., doing business as Orangetheory Fitness, et al, 19-cv-10315-KMK: Sexual harassment, 2019 case closed and reopened. Attorneys: Jack B. Tuckner, William J. Sipser. Operating Engineers funds, Briarcliff Manor vs. State Contracting Corp. of New York, Yonkers, 21-cv-9291-PMH: Enforcement of employee benefits. Attorney: Michele J. Harari. Combe Inc., White Plains vs. Inova Cosmetics, Istanbul, Turkey, 21-cv-9308-PMH: Patent infringement. Attorney: Ha Kung Wong. Teamsters funds, Elmsford vs. JECI Corp., Bronx, et al, Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

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NOVEMBER 22, 2021

ON THE RECORD

Lewinson, David and Rose Lewinson, New York City. Seller: Opra III LLC, Harrison. Property: 120 Old Post Road, Rye. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Kerry Development LLC, Oradell, New Jersey. Seller: Kerry Hunter 2 LLC, Oradell, New Jersey. Property: 111 Hunter Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $150,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Sight Unseen Farm LLC, Bedford. Seller: Peace and Carrots LLC, South Salem. Property: 1145 Route 35, Lewisboro. Amount: $2.8 million. Filed Nov. 9.

Kim, Daniel Dongkyun, Scarsdale. Seller: Sleepy River Associates LLC, Sleepy Hollow. Property: 8 River St., Mount Pleasant. Amount: $560,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Below $1 million

Konchalski, Ronald and Camille Konchalski, Danbury, Connecticut. Seller: 571 B Heritage Hills LLC, Katonah. Property: 571 Heritage Hills, Somers. Amount: $385,000. Filed Nov. 10.

10 Greens Way LLC, New Rochelle. Seller: William Lawlor and Cynthia Lawlor, New Rochelle. Property: 10 Greens Way, New Rochelle. Amount: $912,500. Filed Nov. 8. 20 Oak Ridge Road LLC, Scarborough. Seller: Janet E. Jean, Sleepy Hollow. Property: 20 Dell St., Mount Pleasant. Amount: $769,000. Filed Nov. 9. 167 BSY LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Barbara Berrios, Yonkers. Property: 167 Beech St., Yonkers. Amount: $380,000. Filed Nov. 12. 1233 Beach Avenue LLC, Bronx. Seller: David Conigliaro and Valerie Conigliaro, Yorktown Heights. Property: 235 Sara Court, Yorktown. Amount: $912,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Park, Timothy Hamin and Gloria Hayoung Park, Palisades Park, New Jersey. Seller: DC NYC Properties LLC, New York City. Property: 21 Kent Road, Greenburgh. Amount: $565,000. Filed Nov. 9. Raimo Real Estate Solutions LLC, Bronx. Seller: Concordia College, Bronxville. Property: 212 Midland Ave., Eastchester. Amount: $506,000. Filed Nov. 10.

1010 North Broadway Realty Corp., Seacaucus, New Jersey. Seller: 1010 North Broadway Realty Corp., Yonkers. Property: 1010 N. Broadway, Yonkers. Amount: $3.1 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Baez, Leidy Indira Marte, Yonkers. Seller: 28 Woodrow Avenue Corp., Yonkers. Property: 12 Drake Place, Yonkers. Amount: $790,000. Filed Nov. 12.

255 North Broadway LLC, Glen Head. Seller: Fable Properties LLC, Tarrytown. Property: 255 N. Broadway, Mount Pleasant. Amount: $1.9 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Bedford Summit LLC, Bedford. Seller: ASG NW Properties LLC, New York City. Property: 166 Horizon Lane, Bedford. Amount: $950,000. Filed Nov. 8.

Bleustein, Jeffrey and Brenda Bleustein, Boca Raton, Florida. Seller: Opra III LLC, Harrison. Property: 120 Old Post Road, Rye. Amount: $1 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Caraceni, Edmund and Mary Ellen Caraceni, Carmel. Seller: Celltane Development Inc., Scarsdale. Property: Route 9 Hudson River, Cortlandt. Amount: $92,500. Filed Nov. 12.

Caljamarca Realty LLC, Mamaroneck. Seller: Meredith Enterprises Inc., Mahwah, New Jersey. Property: 521 Waverly Ave., Mamaroneck. Amount: $3.1 million. Filed Nov. 8. CM Mamaroneck LLC, White Plains. Seller: BPR Mamaroneck LLC, New York City. Property: 651 E. Boston Post Road, Rye. Amount: $3.9 million. Filed Nov. 8. Cohen Purchase Building Company LLC, New York City. Seller: KSB Arrowwood Realty Corp., Stamford, Connecticut. Property: 975 Anderson Hill Road, Rye. Amount: $8 million. Filed Nov. 8.

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Cornerstone Capital Lending LLC, Port Chester. Seller: Silver Lake Property Development LLC, Woodbury. Property: 26 Ann St., Harrison. Amount: $875,000. Filed Nov. 8. Elm Homes 315 LLC, Pelham. Seller: Joyce Carroll and Melissa Carroll, Pelham. Property: 315 Eighth Ave., Pelham. Amount: $725,000. Filed Nov. 10. Fox Rock Properties LLC, Dobbs Ferry. Seller: Dorothy Friedman and Marilyn F. Adelberg, Port Chester. Property: 40 W. Glen Ave., Rye. Amount: $325,000. Filed Nov. 9.

JUDGMENTS

Bradshaw, Kathleen, Bronx. $705,563.53 in favor of Arben Kuka and ABK LLC, Bronx. Filed Nov. 8. Central Florida Street Signs LLC, Ormond Beach, Florida. $43,366.96 in favor of Greenwich Capital Management LTD Partnership, White Plains. Filed Nov. 8. Garcia, Chelsea N., New Rochelle. $1,164 in favor of Midland Credit Management Inc., San Diego, California. Filed Nov. 12. Joe’s Auto Wreckers Inc., Mount Vernon. $5,053.74 in favor of Alison Hwang, Garden City. Filed Nov. 10. New Rochelle Eye Institute, New Rochelle. $5,045.94 in favor of Battiato & Battiato Inc., New Rochelle. Filed Nov. 8.

Rybicki, Craig and Alyssa Williams, White Plains. Seller: Mastrantoni Brothers Inc., Mahopac. Property: 20 Pine Road, Bedford. Amount: $735,000. Filed Nov. 8.

Route 119 Auto Body Inc., White Plains. $1,257.79 in favor of Certified Auto Parts Inc., Mineola. Filed Nov. 8.

Somers Spring LLC, Yorktown. Seller: Michelle L. Bermel, Chappaqua. Property: 7 Crest Drive, Somers. Amount: $185,700. Filed Nov. 10.

State Contracting Group of New York, Yonkers. $25,508.43 in favor of the trustees of the Operating Engineers, Briarcliff. Filed Nov. 10.

Tytus 2 LLC, Hartsdale. Seller: Nadine T. Trinh and Gennaro Olive, Bronxville. Property: 1133 Midland Ave., Yonkers. Amount: $350,000. Filed Nov. 12.

Wiltshire, Allen N., Yonkers. $1,613.89 in favor of Arrow Financial Services LLC, Niles, Illinois. Filed Nov. 9.

DEEDS

Above $1 million

Yi, Easter, Bronxville. Seller: 1803 Eagle Bay Drive LLC, Ossining. Property: 1803 Eagle Bay Drive, Ossining. Amount: $385,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Urble Realty LLC, Yonkers. Seller: Peggy Maginley, Venice, Florida. Property: 57 Alexander Ave, Yonkers. Amount: $330,000. Filed Nov. 8. U.S. Bank Trust National Association, Carrollton, Texas. Seller: Christopher T. Bonante, White Plains. Property: 109 Miller Place, Mount Vernon. Amount: $319,121. Filed Nov. 8. Williams, Allyssa and Craig Rybicki, White Plains. Seller: Mastrantoni Brothers Inc., Mahopac. Property: 20 Pine Road, Bedford. Amount: $735,000. Filed Nov. 8. Williams, Angelyn and Raymond Williams, Bayside Hills. Seller: Somers Crossings LLC, Goldens Bridge. Property: 28 Elderberry Court, Somers. Amount: $869,000. Filed Nov.

LIS PENDENS The following filings indicate a legal action has been initiated, the outcome of which may affect the title to the property listed. Chako, Koshy, as owner. Filed by Yakte Properties LLC. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $285,000 affecting property located at 5 Byram Brook Place, Armonk. Filed Nov. 9. Floriano, Joseph and Michelle Floriano, as owners. Filed by PennyMac Corp. Action: Foreclosure of a mortgage in the principal amount of $752,913 affecting property located at 30 Birchwood Lane, Hartsdale. Filed Nov. 12.

Idohou, Simon and Laure Chantel De Souza Idahou, as owners. Filed by U.S. Bank as Custodian for Actilien Holdings Inc. Action: Foreclosure of a tax lien in the principal amount of $19,877.65 affecting property located at 19 Larry Place, Yonkers. Filed Nov. 8.

MECHANIC’S LIENS

BRP 10 Commerce LLC, New Rochelle. $13,634.46 in favor of New Desing Masonry LLC, Middletown, Connecticut. Filed Nov. 8. Bruce Lord Grand West Associates, Yonkers. $16,500 in favor of A-1 Plumbing & Heating Maintenance, Yonkers. Filed Nov. 12. Croton Westchester LLC, Cortlandt. $124,340 in favor of Always First Services LTD, Maspeth. Filed Nov. 8. Slater Realty Company LLC, Rye. $70,123.75 in favor of Radu Architects, New York City. Filed Nov. 10. WBLM 14 LeCount Owner LLC, New Rochelle. $19,701.88 in favor of Marjam Supply Company Inc., Farmingdale. Filed Nov. 10.

NEW BUSINESSES

This newspaper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

PARTNERSHIPS

Our Home Enterprise, 1C Dassern Drive, Dobbs Ferry 10522, c/o Samantha Daniels and Jaynu Durrich. Filed Nov. 8.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS

914 Thrift Shop, 8 Lockwood Ave., New Rochelle 10801, c/o Pablo Franco. Filed Nov. 12. Caribe Organic, 10 N. Ninth Ave., Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Josefina Bernal. Filed Nov. 12. Clio & Erato Books, 63 Benedict Ave., Tarrytown 10591, c/o Wendy Ann Phillips Kahn. Filed Nov. 10. FA Contracting, 25 Montgomery Ave., Yonkers 10701, c/o Matthew Aqeel. Filed Nov. 12. FA Lightsy Consulting, 385 E. Fifth St., Mount Vernon 10553, c/o Frances-Ann Lightsy. Filed Nov. 12. Initial R E O Services, 4 Pondview Blvd., Mohegan Lake 10547, c/o James Evans. Filed Nov. 10.


Facts & Figures Inos Corner, 326 S. Columbus Ave., Mount Vernon 10553, c/o Donald Cromwell. Filed Nov. 8. Koquitos, 330 Riverdale Ave., Yonkers 10705, c/o Maria Teresa Morales. Filed Nov. 12. Lemon Events, 2 Cascade Terrace, Apt. 1D, Yonkers 10703, c/o Lyidenia Cerda. Filed Nov. 8. Lisa Bargellini Therapy, 297 Knollwood Road, White Plains 10607, c/o Lisa Lusby. Filed Nov. 12. Nail Art Studio by Betzy Martinez, 226 E. Main St., Mount Kisco 10549, c/o Betsy Martinez. Filed Nov. 8. Notes R Key, 56 Sheridan Ave., Apt. 5C, Mount Vernon 10552, c/o David Friedman. Filed Nov. 8. Nytes Camera Action, 188 Warburton Ave., Yonkers 10701, c/o Michael L. Dunkley. Filed Nov. 12. Red Tower Group, 280 King St., Armonk 10504, c/o Jacob Benjamin Reinhardt. Filed Nov. 12. Rene Soto Painting, 31 Oakridge Road, Mount Kisco 10549, c/o Rene Soto. Filed Nov. 9. Taqueria Miranda, 4 N. 10th Ave., Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Virginia Cardono Tomos. Filed Nov. 12. Team Fresh Yung Swagg, 27 Barker Ave., Unit 806, White Plains 10601, c/o Jarrett W. Partlow. Filed Nov. 8. UV Clean, 35 Cortlandt Manor, Katonah 10536. Filed Nov. 10. VPlainsita Health Nutrition, 455 Tarrytown Road, Suite 13, White Plains 10607, c/o Damian Dones. Filed Nov. 10. Westchester Carpet Care, 30 Park Ave., Apt. 1l, Mount Vernon 10550, c/o Randall Gordon. Filed Nov. 9. Westchester Snacks, 25 Hunt Ave., Montrose 10548, c/o Sony Arias. Filed Nov. 12. Wildheart, 657 Washington Ave., Pleasantville 10510, c/o Natasha Frieary. Filed Nov. 12. Woodybroook LN, P.O. Box 1534, Ossining 10562, c/o Luis Arevalo. Filed Nov. 12. Yadira’s Cleaning Service, 300 N. Highland Ave., Ossining 10562, c/o Yadira Plascencia Baldovinos. Filed Nov. 8.

PATENTS Anti-VEGF protein compositions and methods for producing the same. Patent no. 11,174,283 issued to Andrew Tustian, et al. Assigned to Regeneron, Tarrytown. Artificial intelligence designed antimicrobial peptides. Patent no. 11,174,289 issued to Payel Das, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Assessing a treatment service based on a measure of trust dynamics. Patent no. 11,177,039 issued to James Kozloski, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Automatic generating analytics from blockchain data. Patent no. 11,176,277 issued to Gennaro Cuomo, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Building and matching electronic standards profiles using machine learning. Patent no. 11,176,486 issued to Swaminathan Balasubramanian, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Carbonation reduction systems and methods. Patent no. 11,173,422 issued to Samuel Chang, et al. Assigned to PepsiCo, Purchase. Correlating computing network events. Patent no. 11,177,999 issued to Edith Stern, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Fabrication of field-effect transistors with different threshold voltages through modified channel interfaces. Patent no. 11,177,257 issued to Takashi Ando, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Field-effect transistor with controllable resistance. Patent no. 11,177,349 issued to Yulong Li, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Fluidic cavities for on-chip layering and sealing of separation arrays. Patent no. 11,173,486 issued to Evan Colgan, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Geolocation-based activation and de-activation of hardware and software functionalities in the cloud. Patent no. 11,178,237 issued to Ashish Kundu, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Human antibodies to Fel d1 and methods of use thereof. Patent no. 11,174,305 issued to Jamie Orengo, et al. Assigned to Regeneron, Tarrytown.

Method for estimating a quantum phase. Patent no. 11,176,478 issued to Ewout Van Den Berg, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Oblique deposition for quantum device fabrication. Patent no. 11,174,545 issued to Steven Holmes, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Path-sensitive contextual help system. Patent no. 11,175,935 issued to Evelyn Duesterwald, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Patterning material film stack with metal-containing top coat for enhanced sensitivity in extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography. Patent no. 11,177,130 issued to Ekmini De Silva, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk. Predicting outcomes from measures of group cooperation with applications in traffic alert and control. Patent no. 11,176,499 issued to Aaron Baughman, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Feldheim, Zev, as owner. Lender: Citizens Bank National Association. Property: 23 Yale Drive, Monsey. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed Nov. 9. Mimi & Mimas LLC and Just Nowowiejski PLLC, as owners. Lender: United Community Bank. Property: 1535 Route 22, Brewster. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Below $1 million 340 Mansion LLC, as owner. Lender: Loan Funder LLC Series 27432. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $149,000. Filed Nov. 8. JL Performance Horses LLC, as owner. Lender: Farm Credit East ACA. Property: in UnionVale. Amount: $145,250. Filed Nov. 10.

Scroggins, Soroya and Adam Budgor, New York City. Seller: Delta East Holdings LLC, Nyack. Property: 11 Tompkins Court, Nyack. Amount: $3.1 million. Filed Nov. 10.

Below $1 million 3 Beckett LLC, Monsey. Seller: Rose Gabriel, Monsey. Property: 3 Beckett Court, Chestnut Ridge. Amount: $906,000. Filed Nov. 12.

6 Nicole Way LLC, Spring Valley. Seller: Paul Ciarfello and Joan Ciarfello, Chestnut Ridge. Property: 6 Nicole Way, Chestnut Ridge. Amount: $860,000. Filed Nov. 8. 15 Horseshoe Lane LLC, Brooklyn. Seller: Mark G. Hussey, Millerton. Property: in NorthEast. Amount: $520,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Betancourt, Heather and RaShawn Betancourt, Staatsburg. Seller: Champion Properties Inc., Staatsburg. Property: in Hyde Park. Amount: $225,000. Filed Nov. 9. Chardan Properties LLC, Nyack. Seller: Diane Lillian Baranich, Pearl River. Property: 21 Birch St., Orangetown. Amount: $305,00. Filed Nov. 10. Ciment, Chanina S., Spring Valley. Seller: BSD Construction Company Inc., Spring Valley. Property: 34 Mezritch Road, Unit 101, Spring Valley. Amount: $356,000. Filed Nov. 9. Fishkill Creek Associates Ltd., Hyde Park. Seller: Richard B. Riordan, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $275,000. Filed Nov. 9.

POL Mill LLC and POK Mill Housing Development Fund Corp., as owners. Lender: CPC Funding SPE 1 LLC. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $400,000. Filed Nov. 10.

16 Verona LLC, Jersey City, New Jersey. Seller: Elizabeth Altschul, New City. Property: 16 Verona Court, Clarkstown. Amount: $6645,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Friedman, Yehuda, Spring Valley. Seller: BSD Construction Company Inc., Spring Valley. Property: 38 Mezritch Road, Unit 301, Spring Valley. Amount: $409,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Stacked vertical transport field effect transistor electrically erasable programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) devices. Patent no. 11,177,372 issued to Karthik Balakrishnan, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

Swanson, Chloe S. and Edward L. Murphy, as owners. Lender: Mahopac Bank. Property: 720 Route 301, Cold Spring. Amount: $550,000. Filed Nov. 9.

27 High Street Lofts LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Joey-Zero LLC, Chestnut Ridge. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $800,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Girling, Michael M. and Julianna Alvarado, Nyack. Seller: Ryelco LLC, Nanuet. Property: 638 Sierre Vista Lane, Clarkstown. Amount: $340,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Training a machine to automate spot pricing of logistics services in a large-scale network. Patent no. 11,176,492 issued to Pawan Chowdhary, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

35-39 Central LLC, Spring Valley. Seller: Armando Figueiredo and Michelle Figueiredo, Spring Valley. Property: 35 S. Central Ave., Spring Valley. Amount: $800,000. Filed Nov. 9.

Goldberger, Israel and Esther Gitty Goldberger, Monsey. Seller: Maple Park Estates Corp., Spring Valley. Property: 24 Parker St., Unit 201, Spring Valley. Amount: $999,999. Filed Nov. 12.

65 Sproat LLC, Monroe. Seller: Yona Freund, Monroe. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $125,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Goldman, Jacob, Spring Valley. Seller: 21 Zeissner LLC, Brooklyn. Property: 21 Zeissner Lane, Spring Valley. Amount: $850,000. Filed Nov. 10.

Ultrathin multilayer metal alloy liner for nano Cu interconnects. Patent no. 11,177,167 issued to Daniel Edelstein, et al. Assigned to IBM, Armonk.

HUDSON VALLEY

BUILDING LOANS

Above $1 million

60 Suzanne LLC, as owner. Lender: Northeast Community Bank. Property: 8 Francis Place, Monsey. Amount: $3.7 million. Filed Nov. 10. 201 Blauvelt LLC, as owner. Lender: Northeast Community Bank. Property: 7 Cardinal Lane, Monsey. Amount: $2.5 million. Filed Nov. 10.

DEEDS

Above $1 million 315 West Main Street LLC, Valley Stream. Seller: William A. Mari and Debra Mari, Stony Point. Property: 314 and 315 W. Main St., Stony Point. Amount: $1.3 million. Filed Nov. 10. 1547 CSR – Orangeburg LLC, Matawan, New Jersey. Seller: 1 Ramland Road Owner LLC, Los Angeles, California. Property: 1 Ramland Road, Orangetown. Amount: $132.5 million. Filed Nov. 8. Blue Mud Farm LLC, Palo Alto, California. Seller: Samuel G. Simon and Gail J. Simon, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Pleasant Valley. Amount: $3 million. Filed Nov. 10.

235 Route 59 Realty LLC, Dobbs Ferry. Seller: John Sagala and Sheri Sagala, Spring Valley. Property: 235 Route 59, Spring Valley. Amount: $850,000. Filed Nov. 8. 824-826 Main Street LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Main Steele LLC, LaGrangeville. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $425,000. Filed Nov. 12.

Greenzweig, Ezriel and Rachel Greenzweig, Monsey. Seller: Elokus LLC, Monsey. Property: 20 Smolley Drive, Ramapo. Amount: $975,000. Filed Nov. 10. Katz, Raizel, Monsey. Seller: Scooper Holdings LLC, Brooklyn. Property: 177 Maple Ave., Unit 312, Spring Valley. Amount: $750,000. Filed Nov. 10.

CBA of Monsey LLC, Monsey. Seller: Fifty-Four on Main LLC, Monroe. Property: 54 Main St., Monsey. Amount: $1 million. Filed Nov. 12.

Bank of America National Association, Anaheim, California. Seller: James H. Branden. Property: in Hyde Park. Amount: $257,000. Filed Nov. 8.

Five Great Kids LLC, Park Ridge, New Jersey. Seller: Baviloh LLC, Nanuet. Property: 350 S. Main St., Clarkstown. Amount: $2.4 million. Filed Nov. 12.

Barclay Estates LLC, Washingtonville. Seller: Peter C. McGinnis and Carol B. McGinnis, Poughkeepsie. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $420,000. Filed Nov. 8.

Lipschits, Alexander, Airmont. Seller: 7 Pen LLC, New City. Property: 13 Ackerman Ave., Airmont. Amount: $760,000. Filed Nov. 8.

Berrios, Chantilly A. and Alexander Felicier, Bronx. Seller: Jastine Contracting Corp., LaGrangeville. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $475,000. Filed Nov. 12.

Moskovics, Matty and Joel Moskovics, Monsey. Seller: Viola Ventures LLC, Chestnut Ridge. Property: 3111 Corner St., Spring Valley. Amount: $289,000. Filed Nov. 12.

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Liberty Contractors LLC, Congers. Seller: Antionette R. Harris, Pearl River. Property: 191 N. Lincoln St., Orangetown. Amount: $265,000. Filed Nov. 9.

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Facts & Figures presents

THE 2021 ANNUAL GALA AND AWARDS CELEBRATION As Connecticut’s leading agency in strengthening and supporting the economic success of women, the Women’s Business Development Council (WBDC) is pleased to honor our clients and partners of impact from the past year at the virtual Annual Gala and Awards Celebration. Join us on October 29 as WBDC highlights successes through client stories and other speakers, and celebrates the resilience of women business owners. WBDC is proud to make a special annual recognition of leaders in Connecticut that have demonstrated influence on women in business. This year, WBDC is pleased to present an Impact Award to Keitha Kinne, Managing Director, COO, AMG Funds. Keitha is being recognized for her achievements as a trailblazer in investment management, her leadership, and her longstanding commitment to women’s economic equality. “I am an enthusiastic supporter of WBDC and I am honored to receive this award,” Keitha said. “I would not be here without the good fortune to have worked for and with so many strong and supportive women — and men.…Over the course of my career, women have made so much progress, but, we still do not yet make up 50% of work teams and leadership roles. One of the priorities that my colleagues and I have is to make some measurable progress on this metric.…In my view, people are best able to realize their full potential in [a] kind of “big tent” culture where you can be yourself and you feel appreciated and respected. When you know you belong, it clears away obstacles and it frees you to focus on your goals and the purpose of the work you are doing.” WBDC Founder and CEO Fran Pastore encourages all sponsors and guests to host small satellite viewing parties. “When you attend our Gala, you will witness and celebrate this year’s Impact Honorees and Women Rising clients and directly support the women-owned businesses we are so proud to serve.”

For tickets, sponsorships, and more information please visit: ctwbdc.org or contact akalish@ctwbdc.org. The Women’s Business Development Council educates, motivates and empowers women to achieve economic independence and self-sufficiency. From starting or growing a business to improving personal finances, the WBDC drives business success in a tangible and accessible way. Our clients exemplify what happens when ambition, education and preparation come together. For more information, visit ctwbdc.org or call 203-353-1750.

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National Transfer Services LLC, Houston, Texas. Seller: Andrew Fisher and Kelly Fisher, Piermont. Property: 21 Liberty St., Piermont. Amount: $679,000. Filed Nov. 10. RDA Property Group LLC, Poughkeepsie. Seller: Anabel Adams and Mark Adams, Garrison. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Amount: $300,000. Filed Nov. 9. Sajous, Jacelyne and Jean R. Brisardo, Englewood, New Jersey. Seller: Centre Street Corp., Spring Valley. Property: 788 Route 9W, Orangetown. Amount: $230,000. Filed Nov. 10. Schwartz, Simcha, Brooklyn. Seller: MK Solutions LLC, Haverstraw. Property: 5 Pratt St., Haverstraw. Amount: $226,000. Filed Nov. 8.

JUDGMENTS

Baker, John W., Mahopac. $5,512.80 in favor of Capital One Bank U.S.A. National Association, Glen Allen, Virginia. Filed Nov. 12. Belardi, Candice and Mary E. McGouey, Carmel. $35,588.02 in favor of Fox Run Condo Board of Managers, Carmel. Filed Nov. 8. Cloverleaf Electric Inc., Yorktown Heights. $8,157.28 in favor of Swift Electric Supply Co., Teterboro, New Jersey. Filed Nov. 8. Feeney, Patricia, Brewster. $8,867.20 in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio. Filed Nov. 12. KLB Homes Inc., White Plains. $4,600.15 in favor of Laverde Associates Inc., Garrison. Filed Nov. 10. Mahoney, Brian, Mahopac. $13,624.35 in favor of Fordham University, Bronx. Filed Nov. 10. Mercado, Aaron, Lake Peekskill. $20,359.49 in favor of Jefferson Capital Systems LLC, Saint Cloud, Minnesota. Filed Nov. 10. Othmer, Judy A., Carmel. $8,044.60 in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank National Association, Wilmington, Delaware. Filed Nov. 12. Pabon, David, Garrison. $12,704.73 in favor of American Express National Bank, Sandy, Utah. Filed Nov. 9.

Steinberg, Robert, Mahopac. $2,720.47 in favor of Petro Inc., Woodbury. Filed Nov. 12. Recuppio, Michael and Monique Recuppio, Pleasant Valley. $$15,645 in favor of Highfields HOA Inc. Board of Directors, Yorktown Heights. Filed Nov. 8. Regan, Michael F., Mahopac. $2,930.01 in favor of CapitalOne Bank U.S.A. National Association, Glen Allen, Virginia. Filed Nov. 12. Silicato, Joy, Pawling. $18,255.42 in favor of Stephen M. Santoro Sr. PC., Carmel. Filed Nov. 10. Spina, John and Gayle Spina, Garrison. $700 in favor of Nicholson Margaret, Somers. Filed Nov. 10. Szorfi, Zoltan, Carmel. $3,331.19 in favor of TD Bank U.S.A. National Association, Brooklyn Park, Minnesota. Filed Nov. 9. Trade Contracting Corp., Carmel. $11,805.39 in favor of Ford Motor Credit Company LLC, Dearborn, Minnesota. Filed Nov. 12.

MECHANIC’S LIENS

EFG/DAR Heritage LLC, as owner. $652,636 in favor of Armor Refractory Gunite Corp. Property: in Poughkeepsie. Filed Nov. 8.

NEW BUSINESSES

This paper is not responsible for typographical errors contained in the original filings.

PARTNERSHIPS

Cl Candle Co., 238 Konefal Ave., Pine Bush 12566, c/o Cazim Djonbalic and Lisa A. Djonbalic. Filed Nov. 8.

SOLE PROPRIETORSHIPS

A I Heating & Cooling Inc., 125 Pleasant View Road, Pleasant View 12569, c/o Igor Ljekocevic. Filed Nov. 12. Angel Construction, 98 Prospect Ave., Middletown 10940, c/o Angel Urrego. Filed Nov. 12. Bloom With Grace, 266 Tammany Hall Road, Carmel 10512, c/o Samantha Alyssa Rescigno. Filed Nov. 12.

Coppolas Gutter Services, 1037 Rolling Ridge Road, New Windsor 12553, c/o Nicholas Michael Coppola. Filed Nov. 8. Dan’s Automotive, 678 County Route 78, Middletown 10940, c/o Daniel T. Bradford. Filed Nov. 12. Evelin Car Service, 123 Route 59, Suffern 10901, c/o Evelin P. Calva Barrera. Filed Nov. 9. GCW Heating & Air Conditioning, 347 Angelo Drive, Montgomery 12549, c/o Kevin L. Woodson. Filed Nov. 10. Gistory, 5 Sagamore Circle, Pomona 10970, c/o Deborah Rubin. Filed Nov. 10. Healthy You, 106 Windermere Ave., Greenwood Lake 10925, c/o Timothy G. Shea. Filed Nov. 12. Kleber Taxi Service, 33 W. Hickory St., Spring Valley 10977, c/o Kleber Eduardo Orbe Bustamante. Filed Nov. 12. M3G Spackle & Paint & Handyman Services, 12 Saginaw Road, Patterson 12563, c/o Stephen Busi. Filed Nov. 9. Marco AC Car Services, 123 Route 59, Suffern 10901, c/o Marco A. Caiza Pillajo. Filed Nov. 9. Notions Bouquet, 149 Lake Region Blvd., Monroe 10950, c/o Heather Marie Yarrington. Filed Nov. 12. Ramon O Car Service, 38 Rose Ave., Spring Valley 10977, c/o Abado Octavio Ramon Orellana. Filed Nov. 12. Reinozo Taxi Service, 33 W. Hickory St., Spring Valley 10977, c/o Fredis C. Reinozo Bustamante. Filed Nov. 12. Rock Junk Removal, 58 Courtney Ave., Apt. 1, Newburgh 12550, c/o Geovane N. Gordon. Filed Nov. 9. Triple O Home Improvement on Remodeling, 22 Euclid Ave., Middletown 10940, c/o Oshane K. Bernard. Filed Nov. 10. Tsanimp Taxi Service, 453 New Hempstead Road, New City 10956, c/o Charip Edgar Tsanimp Puwainchir. Filed Nov. 9.


Facts & Figures BUILDING PERMITS Commercial A&E Leasing LLC, Norwalk, contractor for A&E Leasing LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 300 Strawberry Hill Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $1,000. Filed Oct. 5. Corporation Rafil, Norwalk, contractor for Corporation Rafil. Reconfigure space at 193 Westport Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $5,000. Filed Oct. 1. D&A Construction Management/General Control Inc., Branford, contractor for Aquarion Water Company of Connecticut. Add antennas and perform improvements at 77 Blachley Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $32,000. Filed Oct. 7. Durkin’s Inc., Danbury, contractor for Stamford Yacht Club. Install a temporary tent with lights at 97 Ocean Drive West, Stamford. Estimated cost: $2,000. Filed Oct. 6. Eastern Communications, Norwalk, contractor for Elmcrest Terrace Limited. Replace rooftop antennas at 4 Elmcrest Terrace, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $30,000. Filed Oct. 6. Ericsson Inc., Plano, Texas, contractor for Metropolitan 1515 Summer. Replace existing antenna, existing cabinet and construct exiting platform at 1515 Summer St., Main Unit, Stamford. Estimated cost: $39,500. Filed Oct. 20. Gesualdi Construction Inc., Stamford, contractor for Myano West LLC. Replace ceiling, carpet, paint entire space and minor drywalls and add pantry at 2001 W. Main St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $200,000. Filed Oct. 1.

Gesualdi Construction Inc., Stamford, contractor for Myano West LLC. Renovate 2,500 square feet of existing office space with new bathroom and nurses’ station in a small medical office at 2001 W. Main St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $138,000. Filed Oct. 27. Heritage Systems Inc., Waterbury, contractor for One Strawberry Hill Association. Remove existing roof and re-roof 1 Strawberry Hill Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $224,200. Filed Oct. 4. Holzner, Louis, Newtown, contractor for Steven Hale and Julianne Living Trust. Install a generator powered by propane at 25 Settlers Trail, Stamford. Estimated cost: $16,281. Filed Oct. 25. HRC 201 II LLC., Stamford, contractor for HRC 201 II LLC. Install new signs, nonilluminated directional signs and nonilluminated wall plaque at 201 High Ridge Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $6,800. Filed Oct. 7. John C. Landsiedel Construction Company Inc., Stamford, contractor for West Avenue Rental Property LLC. Perform interior remodeling at 349 West Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $50,000. Filed Oct. 27. Juang, Gen Lee, Flushing, New York, contractor for Garden Homes Residential LP. Perform interior alterations to create karate studio at 1032 Hope St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed Oct. 25. Tarzia Contracting LLC, Norwalk, contractor for TR South Water Street LLC. Perform replacement alterations at 123 Water St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $15,000. Filed Oct. 5.

Residential Able Construction Inc., Norwalk, contractor for White Barn LLC. Build a superstructure for new single-family residence at 7 White Barns Lane, Unit 7A, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $550,000. Filed Oct. 5.

Items appearing in the Fairfield County Business Journal’s On The Record section are compiled from various sources, including public records made available to the media by federal, state and municipal agencies and the court system. While every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of this information, no liability is assumed for errors or omissions. In the case of legal action, the records cited are open to public scrutiny and should be inspected before any action is taken. Questions and comments regarding this section should be directed to: Larry Miles c/o Westfair Communications Inc. 701 Westchester Ave, Suite 100 J White Plains, N.Y. 10604-3407 Phone: 694-3600 • Fax: 694-3699

Alvin Construction Company Inc., Norwalk, contractor for Claudia M. Siever. Remove existing shingles and replace at 12 Melbourne Road, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $16,500. Filed Oct. 5. Araujo, Sanzio H., Norwalk, contractor for Sanzio H. Araujo. Build a superstructure for addition and alterations to single-family residence at 16 Raymond Terrace, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed Oct. 5.

ON THE RECORD

Bresnan Group LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Charles Klein. Renovate kitchen and install new fixtures at 10 Roosevelt St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $73,381. Filed Oct. 6. Brown Roofing Company Inc., Norwalk, contractor for Michelle A. Moffett. Strip existing roof and re-roof 14 Ledgewood Drive, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $15,256. Filed Oct. 4. Di, Yang, Stamford, contractor for Yang Di. Replace cabinets and appliances and paint walls on first and second floors at 32 Malvern Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed Oct. 18. Digiorgi Roofing & Siding Inc., Beacon Falls, contractor for Cesar A. and Louann Torres Ruiz. Strip existing roof and re-roof 39 Sylvan Knoll Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,747. Filed Oct. 18. Dynamic Contracting Group LLC, Waterbury, contractor for Anne Marie DeGregorio. Perform replacement alterations at 77 Havemeyer Lane, Unit 324, Stamford. Estimated cost: $34,999. Filed Oct. 27. Earthlight Technologies LLC, Ellington, contractor for Jeffrey Forkan and Jeanette Griffin. Install roof-mounted solar panels at 13 Ridgecrest Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,220. Filed Oct. 19. Eastern Jungle Gym Inc., Carmel, New York, contractor for James C. Fleischer and Regan E. Allan. Install a hot tub in backyard with a dedicated electrical panel at 45 Bellmere Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $12,000. Filed Oct. 5. Evolution Hardwood Floors LLC, Beacon Falls, contractor for Megan Elizabeth and Andre De Proenca Moraes. Add a sump pump on basement mechanic room at 115 Colonial Road, Unit Ut68, Stamford. Estimated cost: $2,800. Filed Oct. 18. Exceptional Home Improvements LLC, Trumbull, contractor for Jason Piel. Perform replacement alterations at 127 Greyrock Place, Stamford. Estimated cost: $4,700. Filed Oct. 29. Farrington, George, Norwalk, contractor for George and Christi Farrington. Renovation to include adding two bathrooms and new closet at 22 Sunset Hill Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $35,000. Filed Oct. 6. Flying Colors Roofing LLC, Brookfield, contractor for Deborah P. Alvarez. Tear down roof to sheathing and replace with 30year architectural shingles at 15 Somerset Lane, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,250. Filed Oct. 5.

Flying Colors Roofing LLC, Brookfield, contractor for Ralph D’Agostino and Donna Wlasy. Tear down roof to sheathing and replace with 30-year architectural shingles at 95 Intervale Road, Unit 5, Stamford. Estimated cost: $10,500. Filed Oct. 5. Foti, John, Stamford, contractor for John Foti. Install new roof, siding and garage doors on a detached two-car garage at 1189 Hope St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $25,000. Filed Oct. 7. Fratturo, Brian, Stamford, contractor for Scott A. Jachimski and Nicola A. Donnell. Install a new roof at 35 Andover Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $6,400. Filed Oct. 28. Frederick, Brian, Norwalk, contractor for Ronnette and Jene Grant. Install a generator at 114 Harpsichord Turnpike, Stamford. Estimated cost: $15,503. Filed Oct. 19. Garra, Joseph W. and Philip S. Garra, Stamford, contractor for Joseph W. Garra. Install a flat aluminum sign on left side of the building and also replace existing 4’ x 8’ sign on the front of the building next to the main entrance at 134 Jefferson St., Stamford. Estimated cost: $2,600. Filed Oct. 20. Gilbertson, Gregory G., Trumbull, contractor for Stephen and Dorothy Rappaport. Install a Generac generator on pedestal and connect to natural gas meter via underground pipe at 83 Kenilworth Drive West, Stamford. Estimated cost: $14,700. Filed Oct. 15. GLE LLC, Woodbridge, contractor for Heidi and Steven Aishman. Rebuild a single-family home on the existing foundation at 6 Smoke Hill Drive, Stamford. Estimated cost: $175,000. Filed Oct. 19. Green Power Energy LLC, Annandale, New Jersey, contractor for Isabella and Giles Archibald. Install roof-mounted solar system at 119 Belltown Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $11,700. Filed Oct. 18. Greenleaf General Contractors LLC, Stamford, contractor for Robert Censi. Replace roof and windows at 106 Dolphin Cove Quay, Stamford. Estimated cost: $57,500. Filed Oct. 25. Greenwich Power Systems LLC, Cos Cob, contractor for James E. Harvey and Joan T. Harvey. Install a Generac generator at 104 West Trail, Stamford. Estimated cost: $12,995. Filed Oct. 18.

fairfield county

Guiltec Development LLC, Stamford, contractor for Thomas Egan. Renovate and update existing kitchen at 158 Ocean Drive West, Stamford. Estimated cost: $40,000. Filed Oct. 4.

Northeast Specialty Corp, Norwalk, contractor for Helene Calvin and David Calvin. Remove and replace windows at 48 Howard Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $14,873. Filed Oct. 5.

Holzner, Louis, Newtown, contractor for Alan B. and Cindy Cole-Becker. Install a Generac generator at rear of house to be powered by propane tanks at 464 Webbs Hill Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $13,588. Filed Oct. 26.

Preferred Cleaning Services of Connecticut LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Lourdes Arbito. Repair fire damage at 2 Charles St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $54,709. Filed Oct. 4.

The Home Depot USA Inc., Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Sasha-Gaye Thomas. Remove and replace three windows and one patio door same size, no structural changes at 120 Courtland Circle, Stamford. Estimated cost: $5,631. Filed Oct. 6. The Home Depot USA Inc., Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Lois A. Hogan. Remove and replace 15 windows without structural changes at 58 Albin Road, Stamford. Estimated cost: $16,321. Filed Oct. 13. The Home Depot USA Inc., Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Monte Mark Eugene. Remove and replace two windows without any structural changes at 2475 Summer St., Unit 1E, Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,986. Filed Oct. 12. The Home Depot USA Inc., Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Eric and Denise Alcan. Remove and replace one window without any structural changes at 133 Webb Ave., Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,161. Filed Oct. 27. The Home Depot USA Inc., Atlanta, Georgia, contractor for Ann E. Hogan Remove and replace one window, without structural changes at 1111 Hope St., Unit 12, Stamford. Estimated cost: $1,062. Filed Oct. 15. The Home Depot USA Inc., Norwalk, contractor for Alicea Nelida. Remove and replace three windows and a patio door at 35 Quintard Ave., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $6,164. Filed Oct. 4. Kay, David J., Norwalk, contractor for David Steven Hershkowitz. Install a generator at 21 Mail Coach Drive, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $9,200. Filed Oct. 4. Marotta, Michael and Rona Beth Marotta, Norwalk, contractor for Michael Marotta and Rona Beth Marotta. Renovate a single-family residence, remove walls between kitchen, living room and family room at 6 Jayne Way, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $10,000. Filed Oct. 1.

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S&W Building & Remodeling Inc., Norwalk, contractor for Sarah L. Boles. Install a new generator at 8 Nearwater Road, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $28,000. Filed Oct. 5. Unlimited Services LLC, Norwalk, contractor for Carol Rapp. Remove existing layer of shingles at 54 Nursery St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $10,500. Filed Oct. 5. Vasquez, James, Norwalk, contractor for David Tattersball. Build a superstructure for a one-car garage at 4 Burwell St., Norwalk. Estimated cost: $14,000. Filed Oct. 1. Zakhar, Theodore, Norwalk, contractor for David and Allyson Jaeger. Replace deck at 6 Lori Lane, Norwalk. Estimated cost: $22,860. Filed Oct. 6.

COURT CASES Bridgeport Superior Court Demovich, Susan P., Bridgeport. Filed by Carol J. Pascoe, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Frank J. Riccio Law Offices LLC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6110608-S. Filed Oct. 19. Saint-Jacques, Nicholas A., et al, Stratford. Filed by Vincent Vallillo, Shelton. Plaintiff’s attorney: Lyons Daniel A. Attorney at Law LLC, West Haven. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6110176-S. Filed Sept. 30.

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Facts & Figures Schmid, Annemette, Milford. Filed by James Severine, Southport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Delucia & Levine LLC, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-21-6110709-S. Filed Oct. 22.

DiPierro, Alessandro D., et al, Brewster, New York. Filed by Petra Herceg, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6040052-S. Filed July 15.

Pierre, Jean, Norwalk. Filed by Eden Grandison, Norwalk. Plaintiff’s attorney: Wofsey Rosen Kweskin & Kuriansky LLP, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-21-6053858-S. Filed Oct. 12.

Sikorsky Financial Credit Union, Stratford. Filed by Cynthia Rivera, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Hayber McKenna & Dinsmore LLC, Hartford. Action: The plaintiff suffered overdraft fees by the defendant, which harged the plaintiff for nonsufficient funds when they had enough money in their accounts to cover the transactions. Plaintiff therefore brings claims against the defendant for breach of contract, breach of the implied covenant of good faith and fair dealing, unjust enrichment and money had and received. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-216110173-S. Filed Sept. 30.

Kuhn, Joyce Ellen, Brookfield. Filed by Rafael Fernandez, Danbury. Plaintiff’s attorney: Ventura Law, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBDCV-21-6040861-S. Filed Oct. 5.

Streck, Derek, et al, Sandy Hook. Filed by Zoje Velaj, Stamford. Plaintiff’s attorney: Michael E. Law Skiber Office, Norwalk. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-21-6053123-S. Filed Aug. 19.

Wells Fargo and Co., Hartford. Filed by Janice Hill, Bridgeport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Robert Alan Photos, Bridgeport. Action: The plaintiff was walking on the defendant’s property, when she slipped and fell on ice and snow, causing her to sustain severe injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FBT-CV-216110559-S. Filed Oct. 15. Danbury Superior Court Ceraso, Alisha, Newtown. Filed by Wells Fargo Bank NA, West Des Moines, Iowa. Plaintiff’s attorney: Nair & Levin Law Offices PC, Bloomfield. Action: The plaintiff is a banking association, which issued the defendant a credit account who agreed to make payments for goods and services. The defendant failed to make payments. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $2,500, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-216040904-S. Filed Oct. 8.

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Williams, Terry M., et al, Wilton. Filed by Tiger A. DeFranco, Ridgefield. Plaintiff’s attorney: Smart Donohue & Nejame PC, Danbury. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. DBD-CV-21-6040847-S. Filed Oct. 4. Stamford Superior Court Calve, Diane, Norwalk. Filed by Antoinetta Cappelli, Newtown. Plaintiff’s attorney: Wocl Leydon LLC, Stamford. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendant and sustained severe damages and injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FSTCV-21-6053317-S. Filed Aug. 31. Connecticut Aquatics LLC, et al, Norwalk. Filed by Frank Wood, Westport. Plaintiff’s attorney: Law Offices of William P Lalor PLLC, Wilton. Action: The plaintiff suffered a collision allegedly caused by the defendants’ negligence in a parking lot controlled and managed by the defendants. The plaintiff sustained severe and painful personal injuries. The plaintiff seeks monetary damages of more than $15,000, exclusive of interest and costs and such other further relief the court deems appropriate. Case no. FST-CV-21-6053795-S. Filed Oct. 6.

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DEEDS Commercial 195 Southport LLC, Southport. Seller: Amber 1 LLC, Southport. Property: 195 Southport Woods Drive, Southport. Amount: $376,000. Filed Oct. 4. 531 Rowland Road LLC, Fairfield. Seller: Mark J. Cirilli and Lisa T. Cirilli, Westport. Property: 531 Rowland Road, Fairfield. Amount: $950,000. Filed Oct. 5. 96 Lockwood Avenue LLC, Riverside. Seller: Christopher G. Collins, Norwalk. Property: 96 Lockwood Ave., Stamford. Amount: $940,000. Filed Sept. 30. Apa, Lisa and Michael Apa, New York, New York. Seller: Peanut Properties LLC, Greenwich. Property: 43 LaFrentz Road, Greenwich. Amount: $3,450,000. Filed Sept. 29. Christie, Robert and Jill Christie, Stamford. Seller: Garrose LLC, Stamford. Property: 86 Woods End Road, Stamford. Amount: $1,175,000. Filed Oct. 4. MBD Realty LLC, Longboat Key, Florida. Seller: 28 Dairy Road LLC, Boca Raton, Florida. Property: 28 Dairy Road, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Sept. 30. Muse, Brier, Greenwich. Seller: Cava Mason Street 4H LLC, Greenwich. Property: 169 Mason St., Unit 4H, Greenwich. Amount: $N/A. Filed Oct. 1.

Patel, Rashmin, Fairfield. Seller: SSM Builders LLC, Trumbull. Property: 221 Sterling St., Fairfield. Amount: $695,000. Filed Oct. 4. Sun, Ning, Darien. Seller: US Bank NA, Irvine, California. Property: 106 Dora St., Stamford. Amount: $510,324. Filed Oct. 5. Taqi, Ali and Alyssa Taqi, Greenwich. Seller: US Bank NA, Salt Lake City, Utah. Property: 585 Round Hill Road, Greenwich. Amount: $2,075,000. Filed Sept. 30. Youn, Thomas and Jihae Youn, Old Greenwich. Seller: 294 Hamilton Avenue LLC, Greenwich. Property: 294 Hamilton Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $1,100,000. Filed Sept. 29.

Residential Adams, Charles Vincent and M. Theresa Kelleher, Greenwich. Seller: Charles V. Adams and M. Theresa Kelleher, Greenwich. Property: 7 High St., Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Sept. 30. Affinito, Kelly and James Affinito, Greenwich. Seller: Guido Erich Karl Schmidt and Louise Patricia Schmidt, Westport. Property: 92 Rockwood Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $3,800,000. Filed Sept. 30. Araula, Tracy, Stamford. Seller: Manuel Olguin and Diana Olguin, San Antonio, Texas. Property: 422 Courtland Ave., Unit 1, Stamford. Amount: $416,000. Filed Oct. 5. Aviles, Jessica and Natalia Montalvo-Rojas, Fairfield. Seller: Marie T. Scopa, Fairfield. Property: 45 Linley Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $779,000. Filed Oct. 4. Cafaro, Michael and Sarah Cafaro, East Hampton, New York. Seller: Jonathan C. Adee and Natalie J. Adee, Dallas, Texas. Property: 34 Will Merry Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $2,607,000. Filed Oct. 1. Campbell Pughe, Leigh Fogwell and Jonathan George Campbel Pughe, Cos Cob. Seller: R. Scott Abry and Christine Abry, Southbury. Property: 23 Frontier Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $1,470,000. Filed Sept. 30. Casey, Janina, Wilton. Seller: Bartholomew J. McHale and Susan M. Iversen, Greenwich. Property: 50 Lafayette Place, Unit 3B, Greenwich. Amount: $280,000. Filed Sept. 30.

Cavanagh, Thomas J. and Maureen Cavanagh, Los Angeles, California. Seller: Francis J. Conway and Nancy L. Conway, Fairfield. Property: 217 Collingwood Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $1,475,000. Filed Oct. 4. Colino, Kleber, Stamford. Seller: Robert J. Fischer and Carol Ann Fischer, Stamford. Property: 36 Barclay Drive, Stamford. Amount: $820,000. Filed Sept. 30. Crabtree, Sarah J., Stamford. Seller: Victoria LoRusso and Christopher LoRusso, Greenwich. Property: 2 Old Church Road, Unit 1, Greenwich. Amount: $2,035,000. Filed Oct. 5. DeLeo, James, Stamford. Seller: Anne Fong Ma, Stamford. Property: 700 Summer St., Unit 7B, Stamford. Amount: $185,000. Filed Oct. 5. Desert, Bernard and Sandra Usherov, Stamford. Seller: Michael Pellegrini, Stamford. Property: 15 Burwood Ave., Stamford. Amount: $679,000. Filed Oct. 6. Fazzino, Paul and Elizabeth Fazzino, Middletown. Seller: Mark Peter Jordan, Palos Verdes, California. Property: Lots 17, 18 and 19, Grand Ave., Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Oct. 4. Ferrari, Callie Dawn and Richard Edward Ferrari, Fairfield. Seller: Dale J. Thomas and Barbara L. Thomas, Beacon Falls. Property: 330 Winton Road, Fairfield. Amount: $917,500. Filed Oct. 1. Frandson, Nina, Greenwich. Seller: Kenneth R. Strasnick, Boca Raton, Florida. Property: 273 Riversville Road, Greenwich. Amount: $10. Filed Sept. 29. Freiburger-Benoit, Lynne, Saint George, Utah. Seller: Morgan Ewing, Hudson, New York. Property: Unit 122, The Mosswood Condominium, Fairfield. Amount: $380,000. Filed Oct. 5. Granados German and Saira Maribel Enriquez Millan, Stamford. Seller: Raghunath Nalamada and Niveditha Nalamada, Stamford. Property: 9 Donald Road, Stamford. Amount: $715,000. Filed Oct. 4. Gregory, Paul S. and Leslie Gregory, Greenwich. Seller: Paul Gregory, Greenwich. Property: 749 Riversville Road, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Oct. 1. Hanigan, Virginia Ann and Vitold Michel Hanigan, Greenwich. Seller: Virginia A. Hanigan and Vitold Michel Hanigan, Greenwich. Property: 1 Montgomery Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $1. Filed Oct. 5.

Hayden, Holly A. and Luke S. Hayden, Greenwich. Seller: Michael Grunberg, Greenwich. Property: 82 Buckfield Lane, Greenwich. Amount: $3,195,000. Filed Oct. 5. Ingulli, Katy, Stamford. Seller: Catalina Warrick, Stamford. Property: 75 Courtland Ave., Unit 47, Stamford. Amount: $418,000. Filed Oct. 4. Jackson, George R. and Carol A. Jackson, Greenwich. Seller: George R. Jackson, Greenwich. Property: 18 N. Porchuck Road, Greenwich. Amount: $0. Filed Oct. 4. Joergensen, Joerg, Fairfield. Seller: Rahim Hussain, Fairfield. Property: 72 Sunrise Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $359,000. Filed Oct. 4. Lara, David J. and Andrea J. Lara, Fairfield. Seller: David J. Lara and Andrea J. Lara, Fairfield. Property: 42 Buena Vista Road, Fairfield. Amount: $0. Filed Oct. 4. Lavoura, Victor and Luis Manuel Lavoura, Stamford. Seller: Akancha Kashyap and Yajur Sharma, Stamford. Property: 143 Southfield Ave., Stamford. Amount: $549,000. Filed Oct. 6. Linton, Delroy and Christina Espiritu, Stamford. Seller: Deborah J. Wall, Jersey City, New Jersey. Property: Unit D, Building 4, Riverturn Condominiums, Stamford. Amount: $493,500. Filed Sept. 30. Liu, Xin and Shuang Wan, Fairfield. Seller: Paul Krubiner and Marjorie Krubiner, Fairfield. Property: 1000 Knapps Highway, Unit 4, Fairfield. Amount: $214,000. Filed Oct. 1. Mansell, Agnieszka, Stamford. Seller: Shahzad Khawaja and Freha Miran, Darien. Property: 1611 Washington Blvd., Unit 21, Stamford. Amount: $370,000. Filed Oct. 1. Matlick, Garrett L. and Leah M. Mortenson, Stamford. Seller: Nicole C. Niebisch, Stamford. Property: 39 Colony Court, Stamford. Amount: $682,000. Filed Oct. 5. Qtsuka, Shin, Cos Cob. Seller: D. Robert Stepanian and Bryan A. Stepanian, Greenwich. Property: 63 Indian Harbor Drive, No. 7, Greenwich. Amount: $880,000. Filed Oct. 5. Riche, Gregory, Stamford. Seller: Oscar I. Guerra-Nunez and Susan E. Wilson, Stamford. Property: 8 Clover Hill Drive, Stamford. Amount: $640,000. Filed Sept. 30.


Facts & Figures Selvaratnam, Rushika and Yohan Selvaratnam, Fairfield. Seller: Durgesh Dave and Prerana Dave, Fairfield. Property: 177 Judd St., Fairfield. Amount: $549,000. Filed Oct. 5. Shu, Clifford, Greenwich. Seller: Koji Kawamoto and Yoko Kawamoto, Greenwich. Property: 12A Rockland Place, Greenwich. Amount: $1,150,000. Filed Oct. 4. Simikic, Stefan and Katey Lynn, New York, New York. Seller: Benjamin Browning and Katherine Browning, Fairfield. Property: 300 Mill Hill Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,075,000. Filed Oct. 1. Sozdaeva, Evgenia and Aleksandr Odinayev, Stamford. Seller: Ellen B. Bosselaar and Cornelius T. Bosselaar Stamford. Property: 137 Hubbar Ave., Stamford. Amount: $1,210,000. Filed Oct. 4. Tanner, Alexandra, and Michelle L. DeCurtis, New York, New York. Seller: Mary Anne Infante, Cos Cob. Property: 15 Suburban Ave., Cos Cob. Amount: $1,395,000. Filed Oct. 4. The Town of Fairfield, Fairfield. Seller: Karen L. Wheeler, Fairfield. Property: 409 Quincy St., Fairfield. Amount: $300,000. Filed Oct. 4. Timlin, Sean and Sharon Sathuthiti, Stamford. Seller: Jodi L. Fournier, West Haven. Property: 94 Southfield Ave., Unit 602, Stamford. Amount: $625,000. Filed Oct. 1. Tzoannopoulos, Eugenia, Stamford. Seller: Lee Dunn and Melissa Dunn, Stamford. Property: 6 Muriel Drive, Stamford. Amount: $700,000. Filed Oct. 1. Zhang, Tianhang and Xiaojia Chen, Stamford. Seller: Michael Vosler and Christy Shields, Stamford. Property: 29 Douglas Ave., Unit D, Stamford. Amount: $660,000. Filed Oct. 6.

JUDGMENTS Arteaga, Arnulfo, Stamford. $1,198, in favor of Cavalry SPV I LLC, Valhalla, New York, by Schreiber Law LLC, Salem, New Hampshire. Property: 46 Taylor St., Stamford. Filed Oct. 18. Brant, Christopher, Greenwich. $15,849, in favor of Alex M. Greenberg DDS, New York, New York, by Philip H. Monagan, Waterbury. Property: 417 Taconic Road, Greenwich. Filed Oct. 25. Cavaliere, Joanne R., Stamford. $25,536, in favor of American Express National Bank, Sandy, Utah, by Mark Sank & Associates LLC, Stamford. Property: 75 Carriage Drive, Stamford. Filed Nov. 3.

Reyes, Freddy Geovanni, Fairfield. $3,075, in favor of Discover Bank, New Albany, Ohio, by Schreiber Law LLC, Salem, New Hampshire. Property: 151 Burroughs Road, Fairfield. Filed Oct. 18.

Doodwin, James, Greenwich, by Tom S. Ward Jr. Lender: Morgan Stanley Private Bank, 4270 Ivy Pointe Blvd, Suite 400, Cincinnati, Ohio. Property: 3 Woodland Drive, Greenwich. Amount: $1,140,000. Filed Sept. 23.

Robotti, Donna M., Stamford. $40,616, in favor of American Express National Bank, Sandy, Utah, by Mark Sank & Associates LLC, Stamford. Property: 1287 Stillwater Road, Stamford. Filed Oct. 19.

Flora Jr., Robert G. and Jodi D. Flora, Fairfield, by Richard T. Clomiro. Lender: Loandepot. com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 40 Edison Ave., Fairfield. Amount: $237,000. Filed Sept. 30.

MORTGAGES Abrams, David S. and Tracy G. Abrams, Greenwich, by Jeremy E. Kaye. Lender: Wells Fargo Bank NA, 101 N. Phillips Ave., Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Property: 182 Milbank Ave., No.3, Greenwich. Amount: $767,000. Filed Sept. 28. Aldaz, Maria Fernanda, Stamford, by William Louis Birks III. Lender: Lakeview Community Capital LLC, 507 Prudential Road, Suite 100B, Horsham, Pennsylvania. Property: 36 Baxter Ave., Stamford. Amount: $502,441. Filed Sept. 29. Almeida, Joseph G. and Jill B. Almeida, Fairfield, by Gina DaSilva. Lender: People’s United Bank NA, 850 Main St., Bridgeport. Property: 160 Hawthorne Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $200,000. Filed Sept. 28. Bailey, Nancy L. and William C. Bailey, Fairfield, by Victoria L. Miller. Lender: Prosperity Home Mortgage LLC, 14501 George Carter Way, Suite 300, Chantilly, Virginia. Property: 1383 Brookside Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $427,000. Filed Sept. 27. Bogardus, Joseph F. and Angela R. Bogardus, Fairfield, by Valerie Serrano. Lender: Torrington Savings Bank, 129 Main St., Torrington. Property: 91 Tide Mill Terrace, Fairfield. Amount: $190,000. Filed Sept. 30. Borsuk, Kenneth, Stamford, by Thomas J. Heagney. Lender: William Raveis Mortgage LLC, 7 Trap Falls Road, Shelton. Property: 71 Strawberry Hill Ave., Unit 817, Stamford. Amount: $135,000. Filed Sept. 27. Bridge St. 27 LLC, Greenwich, by Howard S. Ripps. Lender: Nestor Funding Inc., 40 W. Baseline Road, Suite 206, Tempe, Arizona. Property: 27 Bridge St., Greenwich. Amount: $1,610,000. Filed Sept. 27. Bugniazet, Craig, Greenwich, by Cynthia M. Salemme-Riccio. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 7 Sachem Road, Greenwich. Amount: $983,840. Filed Sept. 23.

Gentile, Jessica L., Stamford, by Michael J. Colk. Lender: Loandepot. com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 41 Quintard Terrace, Stamford. Amount: $326,000. Filed Sept. 30. Gharedaghi, Mohammad Hadi and Olivia Begasse de Dhaem, Stamford, by Mark A. Sank. Lender: Bank of America NA, 101 S. Tryon St., Charlotte, North Carolina. Property: 30 W. Rock Trail, Stamford. Amount: $1,120,500. Filed Sept. 27. Hall, James M. and Jessica M. F. Hall, Stamford, by Brooke Cavaliero. Lender: Loandepot.com LLC, 26642 Towne Centre Drive, Foothill Ranch, California. Property: 118 Iron Gate Road, Stamford. Amount: $620,000. Filed Oct. 1. Jennison, Peter and Alexandra Jennison, Greenwich, by Tom S. Ward Jr. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 3050 Highland Pkwy., Fourth floor, Downers Grove, Illinois. Property: 51 Willowmere Circle, Riverside. Amount: $4,000,000. Filed Sept. 22. Langerman, Elliot Saul, Fairfield, by Cameron Elizabeth Snyder. Lender: Webster Bank NA, 145 Bank St., Waterbury. Property: 1506 Burr St., Fairfield. Amount: $90,000. Filed Sept. 29. Lomecka, Magdalena and Tomasz Lomecki, Fairfield, by Scott Rogalski. Lender: Better Mortgage Corp., 175 Greenwich St., 59th floor, New York, New York. Property: 203 Samp Mortar Drive, Fairfield. Amount: $385,060. Filed Sept. 28. Martin, Daniel J. and Rachel A. Martin, Stamford, by C.H. Barrington. Lender: Mutual of Omaha Mortgage Inc., 3131 Camino Del Rio North, Suite 1100, San Diego, California. Property: 21 Newfield Court, Stamford. Amount: $429,200. Filed Sept. 30. McCooe, Matthew J. and Amy F. McCooe, Old Greenwich, by Besnike Krasniqi. Lender: Citizens Bank NA, 1 Citizens Plaza, Providence, Rhode Island. Property: 9 Richmond Drive, Old Greenwich. Amount: $200,000. Filed Sept. 24.

Miranda, Jamil and Pia Miranda, Fairfield, by Susan Willcox. Lender: Webster Bank NA, 145 Bank St., Waterbury. Property: 215 Old Farm Lane, Fairfield. Amount: $200,000. Filed Sept. 27. Nogaki, Shiro and Katherine G. Nogaki, Cos Cob, by Susan Willcox. Lender: Webster Bank NA, 145 Bank St., Waterbury. Property: 219 Orchard St., Cos Cob. Amount: $133,000. Filed Sept. 24. Ragoonanan-Storph, Danelle and Francis Nsaidoo-Storph, Stamford, by Carole M. Gilchrist. Lender: Caliber Home Loans Inc., 1525 S. Belt Line Road, Coppell, Texas. Property: 85 Camp Ave., Stamford. Amount: $348,750. Filed Sept. 28. Reis, George and Justine Benisch, Fairfield, by Jonathan T. Hoffman. Lender: US Bank National Association, 4801 Frederica St., Owensboro, Kentucky. Property: 1800 Hillside Road, Fairfield. Amount: $1,110,000. Filed Sept. 28. Rose, Matthew and Alexis Rose, Greenwich, by Atheeb U. Khateeb. Lender: Citizens Bank NA, 1 Citizens Plaza, Providence, Rhode Island. Property: 28 Griffith Road, Riverside. Amount: $1,088,800. Filed Sept. 27. Schuman, Daina, Stamford, by Tamara Peterson. Lender: Guaranteed Rate Affinity LLC, 1800 W. Larchmont Ave., Chicago, Illinois. Property: 1 Strawberry Hill Court, Unit 7D, Stamford. Amount: $150,000. Filed Sept. 28. Tessler, Jared and Grace Nelson, Greenwich, by Erica Azzarito. Lender: JPMorgan Chase Bank NA, 1111 Polaris Pkwy., Columbus, Ohio. Property: 277 Cognewaugh Road, Cos Cob. Amount: $1,155,000. Filed Sept. 28. Todora, Chasen Jade and Greg A. Todora, Stamford, by Jody Ann Fay. Lender: William Raveis Mortgage LLC, 7 Trap Falls Road, Shelton. Property: 111 Saddle Hill Road, Stamford. Amount: $655,000. Filed Sept. 29. Van Fleet, Steven L. and Brenda L. Van Fleet, Southport, by Timothy A. Malvaso. Lender: People’s United Bank NA, 850 Main St., Bridgeport. Property: 160 Range Road, Southport. Amount: $100,000. Filed Sept. 30 Walker, Michael and Jamie Walker, Greenwich, by Joel M. Kaye. Lender: Rocket Mortgage LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 74 Cedar Cliff Road, Riverside. Amount: $1,500,000. Filed Sept. 22.

Wang, Ruixia and Jingyin Tang, Stamford, by Stephen J. Schelz. Lender: Amerisave Mortgage Corp., 8 Piedmont Center, Suite 600, Atlanta, Georgia. Property: 1 Stillview Road, Stamford. Amount: $548,250. Filed Oct. 1. Wolfe, Jennifer, Fairfield, by Nicola Corea. Lender: Rocket Mortgage LLC, 1050 Woodward Ave., Detroit, Michigan. Property: 31 Ginger Circle, Fairfield. Amount: $273,200. Filed Sept. 29.

NEW BUSINESSES A.M. Home Improvement, 1 Bartlett Manor, Norwalk. 06850, c/o Myrta Afrim. Filed Oct. 7. British Swim School of Fairfield County, 474 Main Ave., Norwalk. 06851, c/o Breeze Aquatics LLC. Filed Oct. 6. British Swim School of Fairfield, 52 Sixth St., Stamford. 06905, c/o Breeze Aquatics LLC. Filed Oct. 6. Crasco Pallets Plus, 680 E. Main St., No. 581, Stamford. 06901, c/o Gerson Hernandez. Filed Oct. 4. Dante’s Gun Shop, 89 Murray St., Norwalk. 06851, c/o Dante Pomponi. Filed Oct. 1. Declutter With Deana, 3 Elmcrest Terrace, Apt. 206, Norwalk. 06850, c/o Deana Guarino. Filed Oct. 6. Delta Limousine Worldwide, 28 Crown Ave., Norwalk. 06854, c/o All County Limousine LLC. Filed Oct. 8.

IFCE Corp. Bird Automotive Division, 18 Edith Lane, Norwalk. 06851, c/o Samuel Bird. Filed Oct. 5. Katerina Makeup and Beauty, 1767 Summer St., Third floor, Stamford. 06905, c/o Katerina Garberman. Filed Oct. 7. Lash Brow Room LLC, 13 Spring St., Second floor, Stamford. 06901, c/o Ekaterina Verdzadze. Filed Oct. 7. LifeTime Living, 130 Tresser Blvd., Stamford. 06901, c/o Steve Kersman. Filed Oct. 7. LifeTime Stay, 130 Tresser Blvd., Stamford. 06901, c/o Steve Kersman. Filed Oct. 7. Modern Healing LLC, 684-A Westover Road, Stamford. 06902, c/o Heather Porter. Filed Oct. 4. Optimum Transport & Logistics, 304 Main Ave., No. 292, Norwalk. 06851, c/o Sharon Denise Smith. Filed Oct. 5. Pro Innovations & Design, 680 Atlantic St., No.1R, Stamford. 06902, c/o Emerson Osorio. Filed Oct. 4. Quite Right LLC, 18 Bettswood Road, Norwalk. 06851, c/o Justo Hernandez. Filed Oct. 13. Rumba Café, 470 W. Main St., Stamford. 06902, c/o EA Entertainment LLC. Filed Oct. 7. Smart Light Electrical Solutions LLC, 48 Union St., Suite 1C, Stamford. 06906, c/o Gerson Rojas. Filed Oct. 5.

Diamond Shine Cleaning Service, 40 Alden St., Stamford. 06902, c/o Maria Bravo. Filed Oct. 6.

So Fresh So Clean, 11 Esetwick Place, Stamford. 06907, c/o Claudia M. Sanchez. Filed Oct. 6.

Easy Tours Travel, 16 Woodway Road, Stamford. 06907, c/o Yesica Araujo. Filed Oct. 7.

The Cedar General Store, 70 Cedar St., Norwalk. 06854, c/o Nino Carmine Group LLC, Filed Oct. 1.

El-Shaddai Supernatural Tabernacle, 1069 E. Main St., Stamford. 06902, c/o Eugene Minouche. Filed Oct. 6. Epic Protect, 1 Selleck St., Fifth floor, Norwalk. 06855, c/o Nathan Baldwin. Filed Oct. 6.

PATENTS Lubricant level sensing for an actuator. Patent no. 11,174,988 issued to Claude Matalanis, et al. Assigned to Sikorsky, Stratford.

Five Star Home Care, 101 Summer St., Stamford. 06901, c/o Toenean Walker. Filed Oct. 7. Frankvel Cleaning Services, 29 Styles Lane, Norwalk. 06850, c/o Francenet D. Velasquez. Filed Oct. 6.

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LEGAL NOTICES Mepa Capital LLC Art of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/30/2021.Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC. Meiliana Paldino 201 Maple Ave Mamaroneck, NY 10543 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62988 Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company. Name: 319 CONNECTICUT LLC (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on October 8, 2021. NY office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to 319 Connecticut LLC, c/o CityLight Realty One LLC, 66 Palmer Avenue, Suite 33B, Bronxville New York 10708. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62989 Notice of Formation of ACM General Contracting LLC. Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on October 9, 2021. Office Location: Westchester County, NY. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: c/o Anthony A Custodio Marte, 1975 Crompond Rd, Cortlandt Manor NY 10567. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #62990

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: E. D 15, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 09/23/21. Office location: Westchester County. Kristen N. Gizzi, Esq. has been designated as Agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The post office address within or without the State to which the SSNY shall mail a copy of any process against the Company served upon him or her is: 201 Saw Mill River Road, Yonkers NY 10701. The Company was formed for any lawful business purpose or purposes permitted under the NY LLC Act. #62991 27 Grandview Ave Realty Co LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 8/4/2021. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 27 Grandview Dr., Mt. Kisco, NY 10549. General Purpose #62992 Notice of Formation of LLC. Technostrobe Offshore Solutions, LLC (LLC) filed Arts. of Org. with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 10/15/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served and SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at c/o United Corporate Services, Inc., 10 Bank Street, Suite 560, White Plains, New York 10606. Purpose: any business permitted under law. #62993

Notice of formation of Limited Liability Company. Name: 319 CONNECTICUT LLC (LLC). Articles of Organization filed with the Secretary of State of the State of New York (SSNY) on October 8, 2021. NY office location: Westchester County. The SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. The SSNY shall mail a copy of any process to 319 Connecticut LLC, c/o CityLight Realty One LLC, 66 Palmer Avenue, Suite 33B, Bronxville New York 10708. Purpose/character of LLC is to engage in any lawful act or activity. #62994 Mepa Consulting LLC Art of Org. filed with the SSNY on 09/30/2021. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC. Meiliana Paldino 201 Maple Ave Mamaroneck , NY 10543 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62995 Gill Gross Media LLC Art of Org. filed with the SSNY on 05/05/2021. Office: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to the LLC, LEGALCORP SOLUTIONS 11 BROADWAY SUITE 615 NEW YORK, NY 10004 Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62996

NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: Neuw Home LLC. Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 10/04/21. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as the agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: Neuw Home LLC, 80 Howard St, Sleepy Hollow, NY 10591, principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: To engage in any lawful act or activity within the purposes for which limited liability companies may be organized.Name of the Limited Liability Company (LLC): Neuw Home LLC #62997 Sainvil & Associates, LLC filed w/SSNY 09/17/21. The LLC is located in Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail copy of process to P.O. Box 1351, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598. Purpose: Any lawful purpose. #62998 NOTICE OF FORMATION OF LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY (LLC). NAME: MSML 1985, LLC Articles of Organization were filed with the Secretary of State of New York (SSNY) on 07/08/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY has been designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail a copy of process to: The LLC, 61 Shoreview Dr. Yonkers NY 10710, principal business location of the LLC. Purpose: any lawful business activity. #62999 Notice of Formation of INTI WELLNESS LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 06/03/2023. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY design. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC,150 E POST RD WHITE PLAINS NY 10601. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #63001

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Sealed bids will be received as set forth in instructions to bidders until 10:30 A.M. on Thursday, December 16, 2021 at the NYSDOT, Office of Contract Management, 50 Wolf Rd, 1st Floor, Suite 1CM, Albany, NY 12232 and will be publicly opened and read. Bids may also be submitted via the internet using www.bidx.com. A certified cashier’s check payable to the NYSDOT for the sum specified in the proposal or a bid bond, form CONR 391, representing 5% of the bid total, must accompany each bid. NYSDOT reserves the right to reject any or all bids. Electronic documents and Amendments are posted to www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/ opportunities/const-notices. The Contractor is responsible for ensuring that all Amendments are incorporated into its bid. To receive notification of Amendments via e-mail you must submit a request to be placed on the Planholders List at www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/opportunities/const-planholder. Amendments may have been issued prior to your placement on the Planholders list. NYS Finance Law restricts communication with NYSDOT on procurements and contact can only be made with designated persons. Contact with non-designated persons or other involved Agencies will be considered a serious matter and may result in disqualification. Contact Robert Kitchen (518)457-2124. Contracts with 0% Goals are generally single operation contracts, where subcontracting is not expected, and may present direct bidding opportunities for Small Business Firms, including, but not limited to D/W/MBEs. The New York State Department of Transportation, in accordance with the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation and Title 23 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 200, Title IV Program and Related Statutes, as amended, issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all who respond to a written Department solicitation, request for proposal or invitation for bid that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability/ handicap and income status in consideration for an award. BIDDERS SHOULD BE ADVISED THAT AWARD OF THESE CONTRACTS MAY BE CONTINGENT UPON THE PASSAGE OF A BUDGET APPROPRIATION BILL BY THE LEGISLATURE AND GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. Please call (518)457-2124 if a reasonable accommodation is needed to participate in the letting. Region 08: New York State Department of Transportation 4 Burnett Blvd., Poughkeepsie, NY, 12603 D264670, PIN 881551, FA Proj Z0E1-8815-513, Westchester Co., RESURFACING BY MILLING AND PAVING Routes 141 and 117, Town of Mount Pleasant., Bid Deposit: 5% of Bid (~ $375,000.00), Goals: DBE: 10.00%

Sealed bids will be received as set forth in Instructions to Bidders (https:// www.dot.ny.gov/bids-and-lettings/construction-contractors/important-info) until 10:30 A.M. on Thursday, December 16, 2021 at the NYSDOT, Office of Contract Management, 50 Wolf Rd, 1st Floor, Suite 1CM, Albany, NY 12232 and will be publicly opened and read. Maps, Plans and Specifications may be seen at Electronic documents and Amendments which are posted to www.dot.ny.gov/doing-business/opportunities/const-notices. The New York State Department of Transportation, in accordance with the Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 78 Stat. 252, 42 U.S.C. 2000d to 2000d-4 and Title 49, Code of Federal Regulations, Department of Transportation, Subtitle A, Office the Secretary, Part 21, Nondiscrimination in Federally-assisted programs of the Department of Transportation and Title 23 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 200, Title IV Program and Related Statutes, as amended, issued pursuant to such Act, hereby notifies all who respond to a written Department solicitation, request for proposal or invitation for bid that it will affirmatively insure that in any contract entered into pursuant to this advertisement, disadvantaged business enterprises will be afforded full opportunity to submit bids in response to this invitation and will not be discriminated against on the grounds of race, color, national origin, sex, age, disability/handicap and income status in consideration for an award. BIDDERS SHOULD BE ADVISED THAT AWARD OF THESE CONTRACTS MAY BE CONTINGENT UPON THE PASSAGE OF A BUDGET APPROPRIATION BILL BY THE LEGISLATURE AND GOVERNOR OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK. Please call (518)457-2124 if a reasonable accommodation is needed to participate in the letting. Region 08: New York State Department of Transportation 4 Burnett Blvd., Poughkeepsie, NY, 12603 D264523, PIN 876232, Orange, Rockland Cos., Culvert Rehabilitation and Replacement. - Lower Rd (CR12) over tributary to Wallkill River & Wesley Chapel Rd over Willow Tree Brook. - 2018 BRIDGE NY ROUND 2 - CULVERT BUNDLE 5., Bid Deposit: 5% of Bid (~ $75,000.00), Goals: MBE: 9.00%, WBE: 13.00%, SDVOB: 6.00%


LEGAL NOTICES Notice of Formation of Universal Moms, LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/15/21. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Chanell & Katherine, PO Box 462, 119 Pondfield Rd, Bronxville New York 10708. Purpose: any lawful act or activity. #63002 NY Secy of State (SSNY) on 08/24/2021. Office location: Westchester County. SSNY is designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to: 7014 13th Avenue, Suite 202, Brooklyn, NY 11228. Notice of Formation of The Ink Effect, LLC. Arts of Org. filed with Purpose: any lawful activity. #63003 Notice is hereby given that a license, a number pending, for beer, wine, cider and liquor has been applied for by Primitiva, LLC to sell beer, wine, cider and liquor at 422 Old Post Road, Bedford, NY 10506 in a retail in a Tavern/Restaurant under the Alcohol Beverage Control Law at for on premises consumption. #63005 Randy and Eric Holdings LLC, Arts of Org. filed with Sec. of State of NY (SSNY) 4/22/2021. Cty: Westchester. SSNY desig. as agent upon whom process against may be served & shall mail process to 1879 Crompond Rd., apt. E4, Peekskill, NY 10566. General Purpose #63006

Notice of Formation of Slater Property Group. Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 07.25.21. Office Location: Westchester County. SSNY designated as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to Slater Property Group, 516 Forest Ave., New Rochelle, New York 10804. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #63010 Notice of Formation of WLJP CONSULTING LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/02/2021. Office location: Westchester County. Princ. Office of LLC: c/o Wilton Jarrett 38 Claremont Place, Mt. Vernon, NY 10553. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the address of its principle office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. #63011 Notice of Formation of WLJ CONSTRUCTION LLC. Arts. of Org. filed with Secy. of State of NY (SSNY) on 11/02/2021. Office location: Westchester County. Princ. Office of LLC: c/o Wilton Jarrett 38 Claremont Place, Mt. Vernon, NY 10553. SSNY designated as agent of LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC at the address of its principle office. Purpose: Any lawful activity. #63012 Notice of Formation of Pro Serrano Painting LLC Art. Of Org. filed with SSNY on 10/13/21. Offc. Loc: Westchester Cty. SSNY desig. as agent of the LLC upon whom process against it may be served. SSNY shall mail process to the LLC, 22 Cabot Ave, Elmsford, NY 10523. Purpose: any lawful purpose. #63016

Four Brothers General Contracting Co LLC. Filed 9/1/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 10 Old Mamaroneck Rd 1F, White Plains, NY 10605 Purpose: All lawful #63020 10 Stonington Hts LLC. Filed 9/7/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 51 Central Ave, Ossining, NY 10562 Purpose: All lawful #63021 1270 Pleasantville Road LLC. Filed 10/4/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 500 Executive Blvd #302, Ossining, NY 10562 Purpose: All lawful #63022

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JWEF LLC. Filed 11/4/21 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 25 Lawrence Lane, Harrison, NY 10528 Purpose: All lawful #63023 472 Carroll Street Associates, LLC. Filed 9/9/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 399 Knollwood Road, Suite 318, White Plains, NY 10603 Purpose: All lawful #63024 Yogora, LLC. Filed 8/10/20 Office: Westchester Co. SSNY designated as agent for process & shall mail to: 31 Thunder Lake Rd, Wilton, CT 06897 Purpose: All lawful #63025

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FCBJ

WCBJ

NOVEMBER 22, 2021

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PAY SPECIAL ATTENTION TO EMPLOYEES DURING COVID-19 RECOVERY You need to make sure that they’re healthy and you need to make sure that there’s a sense that you as an employer have their best interests at heart. However, you will find there are circumstances with the potential for employer liability. There are quite a few State, Federal and NYC employment laws you need to be very sensitive to in terms of whether you can compel somebody to come to work…” (Excerpted from the Westchester County Business Journal, Aug. 3.)

WE CAN HELP JEFFREY D. BUSS jbuss@sbjlaw.com 914-476-0600

YONKERS, NY

733 Yonkers Avenue, Suite 200 Yonkers, NY 10704 914.476.0600

NEW YORK CITY

60 East 42nd Street, Suite 4600 New York, NY 10165 212.688.2400

LONG ISLAND, NY

1305 Franklin Avenue, Suite 300 Garden City, NY 11530 516.207.7533