Issuu on Google+


A rtistic K itchens by

M ichAel s Mith

Louisville’s Finest Cabinet Makers 1 2 0 5 E Wa s h i n g t o n S t r e e t / L o u i s v i l l e , Ky 4 0 2 0 6 / S h ow r o o m : 5 0 2 . 6 3 9 . 3 4 2 2


Barry Wooley Designs

Residential

|

Commercial

|

Hospitality

www.barrywooley.com 835. E. Main St. | Louisville, KY 40206


designing for the way you live

residential & commercial design custom handcrafted furniture | design accessories 7 3 1 E a s t M a i n S t r e e t | 5 0 2 5 8 4 6 3 4 9 | w w w. b i t t n e r s . c o m | f a c e b o o k . c o m / b i t t n e r s d e s i g n


SPECIAL EVENTS • GRAND GALA hermitagefarm.com | 502.228.1426


For Her

For Him

St. John Armani Collezioni Tori Burch Longchamp BASLER Lafayette 148 NY ETRO ESCADA Alexis Bittar Stuart Weitzman

Ermenegildo Zegna Isaia Canali Peter Millar Eton Scott Barber Zanella Agave Samuelsohn Robert Talbott

For Him • For Her LOUISVILLE | 4938 Brownsboro Road | 502.753.7633 | www.rodes.com


P E W T E R

H A N D M A D E

I N

I T A L Y

M A T C H 1 9 9 5 . C O M

Gift With Purchase Event

Just in time for the holidays! Now through December 20th! (while supplies last) See store or our facebook page for details.

Holiday Hours: Monday - Saturday 10 to 6; Sunday 1 to 5


2212c Holiday Manor center 502.425.8999 Mon-fri 10-6, sat 10-5


most wonderful • it’s the

time of the year!

WE LOOK GOOD ON PAPER.

502.425.9277

4 9 1 3 b r o w n s b o r o r oa d w w w. e t c e t e r a o f l o u i s v i l l e . c o m


MAY ALL YOURS COME TRUE

502.893.4441 OPEN TUES-SAT 9AM-7PM 2850 Frankfort Ave. Louisville, KY 40206


REST ASS URED, WE KE E P

OUR PROMISES. And now we’re delivering.

Introducing the new Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital. The redesigned hospital fulfills the promises we made after listening to what women want for themselves and their families. From breasts to bones to babies, we are putting women first. For more information, visit NortonHealthcare.com/NWKCH.


Fashion Forward without spending a Fortune. Hours Mon–Sat 10–5 pm Thurs 10–8 pm

502.895.3711 150 Chenoweth Lane in St. Matthews


Letter from the Publisher Between the hustle and bustle of holiday traffic, the out of town guests and worrying about who made the naughty or nice list, allowing yourself to actually enjoy the holidays tends to be placed on the back burner, right next to your grandmother’s gravy recipe. And while the days are undoubtedly shorter, the spirit of this time of year lasts throughout the pages of the Winter edition of The Voice of Louisville magazine to hopefully bring a bit of holiday cheer and relaxation to easily one of the more stressful times of year. Amidst the chaos and full house, let yourself indulge in the latest winter fashions, get lost in stories of hope and use this time as a reminder of what is most important to you this holiday season. While candy canes and gingerbread are synonymous with the holidays, to some the symbols of the season take on a much different form. Since 1865, The Salvation Army has made certain that their signature bell-ringers and red kettles are fixtures of hope and meaning to those in need. Although the Salvation Army works year round, their mission is particularly challenging during this time of year when Christmas is often experienced as a season of despair to those less fortunate. We meet two Florida transplants who are working tirelessly to make sure the sound of bell-ringers is never too faint and that hope is ever present. Not until the last homemade ornament is hung and the cookies are set out can one actually settle in and appreciate just how lucky we really are. The memories made by upholding family traditions ignite nostalgia and help us reflect on who we are and how we got here. For Matt Powell, his road to now was nothing short of strategic determination, forged with the goal of creating a legacy that one day he too would be proud to pass on to future generations. Flip through a scrapbook of memories as we share Matt’s journey from the locker room to the board room and the man that inspired him along the way. Among other reasons, we should be especially thankful for the fact that our city has some of the best hospitals and doctors in the nation. To show just how proud we are, The Voice of Louisville caught up with a few of them to gain insight into what motivates them to become the best at their chosen professions. We hope you will appreciate this brief glimpse under the microscope at some of the city’s leading practitioners. With the to-do lists are getting longer and the weather is growing frigid, it seems like hiding under a wool blanket is the only option when venturing outside. But fear not, we have pages of fabulous winter threads just waiting to find a home in your closet. From trendy vests to cocktail-ready dresses you’ll be sure to find something that can let your inner holiday hostess shine bright. For that person who has everything Bittners has provided an assortment of inspiring treasures ideal for the home while Louisville’s top jewelers have chosen exquisite pieces that will fit perfectly under the tree. It is inevitable that at least one out of town guest will make their way to your household this season and we have just the place for you to send them. As the most renowned export in the Bluegrass, bourbon is making new waves with the unique Evan Williams Bourbon Experience, conveniently located right in our backyard. For close to 250 years master distillers have been perfecting this spirit and we sit down with one such master, Charlie Downs who, together with Heaven Hill, puts his three decades of distilling experience to create award-winning bourbon. Seeing as half of next year’s weddings will stem from Christmastime proposals, we got a head start and reveal a fairytale ceremony sure to warm your heart, inspire your inner romantic and maybe even spark the fire outside of your chimney.

Enjoy,

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

15


FEATURES 24

40

58

ARMY OF RESCUERS A LIVING LEGACY A WOMAN’S TOUCH

60 Norton Healthcare Neurology Services 62 Orthopaedic Specialists 64 Norton Healthcare Women’s Services 66 Gaddie Eye Centers 68 Peaceful Nights Dental Center 70 All Women OB/GYN 72 Metropolitan Ankle & Foot Center 74 Vein Treatment Center

16 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

82

PEAK SEASON

98

160 YEARS OF GIVING

112

WISH LIST

128

A MASTER AT WORK

144

ONE LOVE

158

WILDFIRE WINTER 2014


Executive Assistant to the Publisher

Lauren DePaso

VOL. 3 • NO. 5

Style Editor

Lori Kommor

Production Director

Joanna Hite Shelton

W W W.V O I C E - T R I B U N E .C O M

TRACY A. BLUE Publisher LAUREN DePASO, Executive Assistant to the Publisher

Chief Photographer & Designer

Designer

Chris Humphreys

Malissa Koebel

Copy Editor

Advertising Operations Director

Account Executive

Account Executive

Staff Writer

Igor Guryashkin

EDITORIAL LORI KOMMOR, Style Editor JOANNA HITE SHELTON, Production Director CHRIS HUMPHREYS, Chief Photographer & Designer MALISSA KOEBEL, Designer IGOR GURYASHKIN, Staff Writer ADAM DAY, Copy Editor JAMIE HUBBARD, Style Assistant CARLA SUE BROECKER, Columnist JOHN HARRALSON, Contributing Photographer PAULA BURBA, Contributing Writer BREANNA PRICE, Contributing Writer WESLEY KERRICK, Contributing Writer LAURA ROSS, Contributing Writer REMY SISK, Contributing Writer CLAY COOK, Contributing Photographer ROBERT BURGE, Contributing Photographer

ADVERTISING

Adam Day

Shari Baughman

Bridgette Borraga

Sales Manager

David Harris

Account Executive

Julie Koenig

Karen Pierce

Receptionist

Circulation Administrator

BRIDGETTE BORRAGA, Advertising Operations Director DAVID HARRIS, Sales Manager SHARI BAUGHMAN, Account Executive JULIE KOENIG, Account Executive KAREN PIERCE, Account Executive ASHLEY BECKHAM, Account Executive

CIRCULATION STEPHANIE PARROTT, Receptionist JOHN AURELIUS, Circulation Administrator CLARENCE KING, Newspaper Deliveries

Account Executive

Ashley Beckham

Stephanie Parrott

John Aurelius

BLUE EQUITY, LLC JONATHAN S. BLUE, Chairman & Managing Director of Blue Equity DAVID M. ROTH, Vice Chairman JUAN REFFREGER, Executive Vice President

YO U R V O I C E @ V O I C E -T R I B U N E.C O M

WINTER 2014

Style Assistant

Jamie Hubbard

Columnist

Carla Sue Broecker

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

Photographer

John Harralson

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

17


ADVERTISER INDEX A Taste of Kentucky - 502.895.2777; 502.566.4554; 502.244.3355 .. 142 All Women OB/GYN P.S.C. - 502.895.6559 ....................................... 110 Angel’s Envy - www.angelsenvy.com.................................................. 176 Apricot Lane - 502.708.2822 .............................................................. 53 Artistic Kitchens - 502.639.3422 .......................................................... 2 Baptist Health/Milestone Wellness Center - 502.753.7554 ............... 77 Barry Wooley Designs - 502.569.7101 ................................................. 3 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices - 502.238.2432 .......................... 38 Bittners - 502.584.6349 .....................................................................4-5 Blue Grass Motorsport - 502.894.3428 ..................................... 178-179 Boutique Serendipity - 502.423.0058 ............................................... 143 Brasch Constructors - 502.587.7175 ............................................... 173 Brecher’s Lighting - 502.426.1520; 859.273.3124 .............................. 22 British Custom Tailors - 502.897.1361 ............................................. 124 Browning Equipment - 502.777.1390 ............................................... 122 CaloSpa - 502.814.3000 ..................................................................... 20 Cara King - 502.418.2882 ................................................................. 139 Clay & Cotton - 502.456.5536; 502.690.4123.................................... 154 Closet Factory - 859.277.0277 ......................................................... 111 Dolfingers - 502.895.3226 .................................................................. 94 Dover House - 502.899.1699 ................................................................ 8 Downtown Bardstown ..................................................................... 175 Draped in Style - 502.297.8884 ........................................................ 156 Etcetera - 502.425.9277 ..................................................................... 10 European Wax Center - 502.895.1414; 502.245.5598 ....................... 177 Evan Williams Bourbon Experience - 502.272.2611 ......................... 23 Gaddie Eye Centers - www.gaddieeye.com ......................................... 76 Gross Diamonds - 502.895.1600 ...................................................... 125 Gumer & Co. - www.gumerjewelry.com ................................................ 80 Hermitage Farm - 502.228.1426 ........................................................... 6 Hilliard Lyons - 502.588.8400 ............................................................. 79 Ice House - 502.589.4700 ................................................................. 123 J Wagner Group - www.jwagnergroup.com .......................................... 78 Jefferson County Clerks Office - 502.569.3300 ............................... 156 Jeff Ruby’s - 502.584.0102 ............................................................... 109 18 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

Korrect Optical - 502.895.2020; 502.447.2020; 502.228.2020 ............ 54 Louisville Marriott Downtown - 502.671.4260 ................................... 39 Lyndia R. Willis Hair Spa - 502.893.4441 ........................................... 11 Mall St. Matthews - www.mallstmatthews.com .................................. 157 Massage Envy - 502.992.0701; 502.253.2980; 502.895.2007; 502.425.0000 .. 57 Mercí - 502.893.4252 .......................................................................... 95 Meredith-Dunn School - 502.456.5819 ............................................ 140 Merkley Kendrick Jewelers - 502.895.6124 ....................................... 19 Metropolitan Ankle & Foot Center - 502.409.4271; 502.741.4905 ... 141 Nanz & Kraft - 502.897.6551 ............................................................ 156 Norton Healthcare - www.nortonhealthcare.com/NWKCH .................... 12 Norton Neuroscience Institute - www.nortonneuroscienceinstitute.com ... 55 Nu Yale - 812.285.7400 ..................................................................... 174 Orthopaedic Specialists - 502.212.2663 .......................................... 126 Oxmoor Center - www.oxmoorcenter.com ......................................... 157 Peaceful Nights Dental Center - 502.290.8233 ................................ 155 Rodan + Fields - 502.713.9181 ........................................................... 96 Rodeo Drive - 502.425.8999 ................................................................. 9 Rodes - 502.753.7633 ........................................................................... 7 Royal Jewelers - 502.895.9934 .......................................................... 56 Sassy Fox Upscale Consignment - 502.895.3711 .............................. 13 Semonin Realtors - 502.396.8348; 502.435.9830; 502.648.6841; 502.649.6688; 502.552.5418; 502.649.6688 ................................ 94, 174 Seng Jewelers - 502.585.5109 .................................................... 97,180 Skyn Lounge - 502.894.3335 .............................................................. 37 Sunny Daize - 502.244.5580 ............................................................... 21 Tassels - 502.245.7887 ....................................................................... 52 The Brown Hotel - 502.583.1234 ...................................................... 142 The Leatherhead Shop - 502.451.4477 .............................................. 36 The Vein Treatment Center - 502.895.6600 ...................................... 172 Two Chicks & Co - 502.254.0400 ...................................................... 108 UBS Financial Services - 502.420.7600 ........................................... 127 Z Spa & Salon - 502.426.2226; 502.618.8000 ..................................... 81 WINTER 2014


Giving

Perfection

138 Chenoweth Lane, Louisville, KY 40207

895.6124

www.mkjewelers.com


Chanel Louis Vuitton Lafayette 148 Tory Burch Missoni Robert Rodriguez Hermes Valentino Ferragamo Burberry Christian Louboutin Milly Fendi Gucci + so many more!

11809 SHELBYVILLE ROAD 502.244.5580


See the Light Come to the Source! Builders and Designers agree that good lighting in the home provides the best visual impact for the least dollar amount invested!

Brecher’s has been the source for lighting since 1866. Visit one of our showrooms for the latest in lighting. For selection, service, and style come to the source.

Celebrating 148 years in lighting!

www.brecherslighting.com

Est. 1866 Louisville: 105 S. Hurstbourne Pkwy. at Shelbyville Rd. - 502.426.1520 Mon. - Sat. 9-5 Thursday til 8 Lexington: 104 W. Tiverton Way at Nicholasville Rd. South of Fayette Mall 859-273-3124


24 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


ARMY OF RESCUERS

Courtesy Photos Written by Paula Burba WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

25


Photography by Clay Cook 26 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


The Salvation Army Majors Art & Ann Penhale, Commanding Officers

I

t would be unusual not to catch a glimpse of an Angel Tree or a Bell-Ringer standing beside a red kettle while you go about the business of preparing for the holidays. They are subtle reminders of the many people who need a little help at Christmas time. And thanks to The Salvation Army, the church known more for its mission work than its dogma, they’ve become symbols of the season. This year in Louisville, there are two new faces heading up those enormous projects: Majors Art and Ann Penhale, the Salvation Army’s new Louisville Area Commanders who reported for duty here in June. They’ve been working for months to get those iconic bell-ringers and 10,000 or so paper angels, each one representing a local child whose family can’t afford much in the way of Christmas gifts, in place throughout the community. Together they bring more than 55 years of experience to the Louisville Area Command’s headquarters in the re-purposed, old Louisville Male High School. The church’s officers typically relocate every few years. “To us, it’s what we’ve known,” Ann Penhale, 52, said in a recent interview. “It gives us a sense of urgency: you want to get as much done as you can, with the hopes that you get to stay five years.” Just in case their assignment here is brief, their strategy is to always hit the ground running, she said, “You don’t want the ball to ever stop. You’ve got to keep moving forward, because we don’t

WINTER 2014

ever close. We’re open 365 days a year.” Art Penhale, 56, also became General Secretary of the Kentucky-Tennessee Division in June. Even though division headquarters is just down the street from the Louisville Area Command, “Logistically, I have to really plan well, so I don’t find myself being double-booked,” he said. “So far, so good.” “It is challenging,” he added. “The programs in Louisville alone are full-time responsibilities. Right now, we’re knee-deep into the Christmas programs.” From their relatively brief Louisville residency so far, the pair have been surprised by both the hometown feel of the place and its immense diversity. “We love the city. People have been very friendly,” she said. “We’re never bored, neither professionally nor personally. There are so many things to see and do.” Of course, she admitted, “There are those days when you wish you could be a little bit closer to your children.” Their son, Paul, and daughter, Sarah, live in Tampa, Florida. “They both kind of landed in Tampa because Florida is really where we lived the longest, for seven years,” mother, Ann Penhale said. “I don’t think we’ll ever drag them out of Florida,” she said of their two children, who grew up moving throughout the church’s Southern Territory on a fairly regularly basis as well. “They survived it,” she said. “They actually flourished, and I think they have a pretty rich life from it.”

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

27


28 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

29


The Penhales were born and raised in the South, as well. Art grew up in West Palm Beach, Florida., and has been a lifelong member of the church. Ann grew up in Hattiesburg, Mississippi, and joined the church after moving to Texas to work at one of its summer camps. She’d earned her music degree at the University of South Mississippi and got an offer to stay after her summer job to work in the church’s music department in Dallas. He was already a commissioned officer when they met in Texas. She felt called to ministry by then, though, “I didn’t necessarily think I wanted to be a full-time officer and all that,” she said. “But eventually I realized the Lord had other plans.” In the Salvation Army, married couples are both required to be officers, and so off to training college she went. They’ve served together ever since, making for, as Ann puts it, “a crazy, busy life. And we’ve been just about everywhere.” They celebrated their 29th wedding anniversary in late October. Like his wife, Art Penhale felt this career calling as a teenager. “I really thought God was leading me into full-time ministry,” he said. “And I’ve always liked the practical application of the Salvation Army. We have the ability to morph, and do what we need to do,” he said, to address both spiritual and physical needs, however they might present themselves. “Anyone who comes to us for help, we help,” he said. “We’re not proselytizing; you don’t have to be part of the church. We have no discrimination.” They’ve served together as corps officers in Portsmouth, Virginia, Montgomery, Alabama, and Fort Myers, Florida, as well as on the staff of the Evangeline Booth Training College and as divisional youth leaders for nine years in Maryland/ West Virginia and Florida. They came to Louisville from Atlanta, where they were Territorial Youth Secretaries. “Every one of those positions is different,” he said. But through them all, they keep a steady grip on their mission. “Trying to change lives, that’s always been kind of my mantra,” he said. “It’s not to spend too much time in judgment, or asking how they got there,” he said, but figuring out how to get them to where they need to be. “Helping them change direction,” he said, is the bottom line.

30 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

Mrs. Penhale reiterated that sentiment. “We want every person who comes in to be treated with dignity and respect. We work with some very broken people.” One lasting impression she’s gained here is from watching parents gathered on the lawn outside her office window, waiting for their children to get off the school bus. “Nobody wants their children raised in a shelter,” she said. “You want to offer them hope, that somehow life can be better and help them find a better way.” Housing is one of the great needs in Louisville they want to become more effective at serving, especially with emergency assistance, transitional housing and getting veterans into housing and connected to resources and all the benefits they’ve earned. For those with little or no resources, Christmas creates additional despair, the Penhales said. The holidays are expensive even for people who have resources, and for those already struggling, according to Art Penhale, “the holiday becomes a burden.” More than a practical or material need, however, offering hope is the heart of the organization’s Angel Tree operation. “Hope is so powerful,” Ann Penhale said. “Because when people lose hope, they lose everything.” This year, 20 volunteers worked ten days to register close to 11,000 children, 13 and younger, from about 5,100 families for the Angel Tree program. The process is time-consuming: registration that includes identity and income verification, gathering clothing sizes and toy wish lists for all those children, and organizing it all in a database to keep the massive logistics operation as orderly and successful as possible. With registration complete, they get the angels distributed to malls, corporations and wherever else they can. Then there’s about a two and a half week window of gifts coming back to them, which they check to make sure each angel gets both some clothing and toys in the right sizes and ages. Next, they orchestrate five days in the middle of December for all those families to come pick up the gifts. The Penhales have both been surprised by the number and the diversity of those in need this year: every race, every nationality. And inevitably they stop to consider what difference their efforts might

WINTER 2014


make. “When you do something that takes that much effort: you really think about it,” Ann Penhale said. “If you give a child a toy and an outfit, that’s not gonna change their life, change their situation.” “I’ve had to search my soul for that one,” she said. “If a child’s in poverty, it’s not their fault.” A new outfit and a toy may not make a significant difference, she believes, but it might make them feel normal. And that message that someone who doesn’t even know them cared about them enough to make their holiday brighter, does give them hope, she believes. Of course, that need is not limited to children. Neither is their response. Although many of the bell-ringers in front of those iconic red kettles are volunteers, the Salvation Army also uses its annual fundraiser to employ people for six weeks. People who can’t find jobs, or who can only earn a limited amount because of rules tied to benefits they need, Art Penhale said, can earn some money with the added satisfaction of giving back to the community. It’s a particularly good opportunity for the veterans they hope to focus more on in the

WINTER 2014

future, he said. Right now, they have 28 dedicated beds for veterans needing shelter and 28 veterans filling them. In the next year, they’d like to increase that number, and address the expanding need for women who’ve served in the military as well. “One of the first people I met here,” Ann said, “was a veteran, living off the street, suffering from PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder). His family had kicked him out, because he was unstable, and he’d started using drugs and alcohol, pretty much to self-medicate.” They learned he had a combat injury, which led to discovering several benefits he was entitled to, including the G.I. Bill. Now, he’s a student at the University of Louisville and he’s found a place to live. “That’s the kind of difference we can make, because of the support we get from the community,” she said. “There’s just a lot of good stuff going on. And it’s good to be a part of it.” The Salvation Army of Louisville, Kentucky 911 South Brook St. Louisville, Kentucky 40203 502.671.4900 www.salvationarmylouisville.org

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

31


32 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

33


34 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

35


® A LUXURY BRAND AT

The Leatherhead Shop 1601 Bardstown Road, Louisville, KY 40205 Monday-Saturday 11:30am-7pm • Closed Sunday 5 0 2 . 4 5 1 . 4 4 7 7 • w w w. t h e l e a t h e r h e a d . c o m


Body Scrubs CARITA Chemical Peels Clarisonic Cosmetics Bar Dermafile Dermaplane Eye Brow / Lash Tinting Face and Body Waxing LED Light Therapy Make-up Application Massage Therapy OBAGI SkinCeuticals PCA Skin Penhaligon’s Fragrance SkinMedica TRUFFLE Therapeutic Facials ZenSKYN Color Collection

Louisville’s Premiere Boutique Spa 227 Chenoweth Lane 502.894.3335 skynlounge.com | zenskyn.com Gift cards available. Gift Wrapping Complimentary.


A real estate company is like a home. The great ones have a strong foundation. Our agents come with a network of experience and are backed by the most admired name in the business. Call Susan Ulrich at

502-238-2432 to have one

of our expert agents market your home or if you are interested in a career in real estate.

Residential Services

Relocation Services

Commercial Services

Property Management

Finished Walkout

139 Rest Cottage $850,000

1906 Ashford Drive $650,000

1320 Kennesaw Creek Way $670,000

18316 Standwick Drive $435,819

Dave Parks • 502-238-1905

Ellen Shaikun • 502-238-1847

Elite Homes Team • 502-238-1970

Ball Homes Team • 502-238-1890

SOLD

7601 Crestline Road $350,000

1204 Falls Creek Landing

New Albany, IN • $459,900

$385,000

2136 Cherokee Parkway $700,000

Thieneman Builders • 502-238-1952

Karen Foster • 502-238-2490

Dave Parks • 502-238-1905

Judie Parks • 502-238-1906

303 Hidden Oak Way

Still locally owned for over 60 years.

www.BHHSParksWeisberg.com Parks & Weisberg, Realtors® ©2014 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently owned and operated franchise of BHH affiliates, LLC. Berkshire HomeServices and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of American, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity.


Creating Memories CAPTURING DREAMS

HOLIDAY PARTIES | BANQUETS | BUSINES S MEETINGS FAMILY GATHERINGS | CHARITY EVENTS Whether you’re gathering a group of 10, 100 or 1,000 the Louisville Marriott Downtown is your event destination. We’ll help you execute your event to perfection from the food and drinks to the decor and more. Give us a call and let us help take the stress out of party planning.

Contact Richard Ayson (502) 671.4260 | rayson@marriottlouisville.com


40 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


A LIVING LEGACY

Photos by Adele Redding Written by Breanna Price WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

41


42 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Matt Powell, CFP Account Vice President, UBS Financial Services, Inc.

Being told as a kid that you can own Mickey Mouse is roughly the equivalent of all of your wildest dreams coming true. And when young Matt Powell saved up his birthday and Christmas money and bought his first stocks — Disney and Ford — at just 7 years old, he didn’t immediately realize he had planted the initial seed for what would be a lifelong love of career. Powell, now 36 and Account Vice President and Financial Advisor at UBS Financial Services Inc., first consciously realized his fascination with finance by watching his father. “I’ve known since I was about 10 that this is what I wanted to do,” Powell said. “My dad would be watching the stock market every day and I remember going in his office and asking him what it all was about and being so intrigued by it.” This intrigue stuck with Powell through college, where he went on to graduate from the University of Kentucky in 2001 with a double major in Finance and Business Management. Before graduating, however, Powell, at 20 years old, along with his two younger sisters, Jennifer at age 16 and Stephanie at age 10, received the hardest news that children of two parents can hear: Mom and Dad are getting a divorce. Cast into the category of unwanted family heartbreak, Powell found himself at the helm of the household, trying to finish school while trying to act as a father figure and help his mom raise his two younger siblings. “I think that with what my sisters were going through with my parents as far as not having a father at home, and financially what we were going through, we all faced a lot of challenges,” Powell said. “So I just tried to do my best and be a kind of role model. I tried to help teach them how one day they would be able to use these struggles as future

WINTER 2014

life lessons.” In trying to be a father figure to his sisters, Powell found himself in need of someone to play the same role to him. After his parent’s divorce, he became estranged from his father for almost 15 years. “Although growing up my father was my best friend, after the divorce it became a difficult situation. My uncle recognized my need for a role model and he took it upon himself to fill that void.” Though his initial exposure to the world of wealth management came through his father, it was his relationship with his uncle, Edmund Nasief, that most significantly impacted his life and career choices from then on. Despite the burdensome and sensitive nature of his responsibilities, Powell remained resilient, with the help of his mother and uncle, and pushed himself to move past the difficult family time so that he could look forward to what was next. After graduating from the University of Kentucky, Powell attempted to jump right into the world of finance. However, being a 22-year-old in the business world didn’t immediately work out for him. “Everyone basically told me I was too young and that I needed about 8-10 years of business experience before I could thrive in that industry,” Powell said. “It’s hard for someone that age to approach people about investing with them when all they’re thinking is ‘You look like my grandson; I’m not going to give you my life savings.’” At the suggestion of Nasief, Powell begrudgingly took the advice and pressed on. Having worked at an auto retail store for two years before graduating, Powell asked to manage one of the stores upon the completion of his degree in order to acquire some exposure to the management side of the business, as well as to gain

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

43


Matt walking his sister, Stephanie, down the aisle.

experience in sales and working with clients. After four years, though only half of the recommended time frame of field experience, Powell began applying for the jobs he wanted in wealth management. Nasief’s company, UBS, still turned him away, labeling him as too young. But convinced he was ready, Powell continued to apply elsewhere and, to some shock of his own, landed an interview with one of UBS’ competitors. When news got to his uncle of the decision, he approached his mentee. “He advised me that I should wait until I was 30, but I told him I wanted to start now, at 26,” Powell explained. “He really listened, set up an interview with UBS, and five months later I had a job.”

44 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

It was a defining moment for Powell. He had overcome trials and setbacks and now was getting his chance at the company he wanted it most from. “I always wanted to come to UBS because that’s where my uncle was.” But even with this happy opportunity, Powell knew the hardest part of his work was still ahead. “In our industry, especially when younger advisors come in, most of their beginning clients are their family and friends,” Powell explained. “But my uncle had already been in the business almost 30 years at that time, so my personal network all worked with him. Even my mom was with him; my uncle didn’t allow my mom to move her account to me until I had been in the business for two years.

WINTER 2014


And his philosophy with that — which I didn’t agree with at the time, but now think it’s one of the best things he ever taught me — was that one account is not going to make or break you in this business, so you always have to go out and get other accounts.” Powell, despite being the nephew of the Managing Director at UBS, didn’t receive any handouts — and he didn’t want them, either. For the first seven years at UBS Powell worked as a sole practitioner, separate from his uncle, on his own team, doing his own business. “My uncle still mentored me and taught me his investment philosophies, strategies and offer advice, but as far as working together with clients or finding new business – he left that up to me to figure out on my own,” Powell said. Starting out with nothing proved to be a welcomed task for the goal oriented financier. “Because I started out with nothing, I wanted it more than anything. It made me fight harder to hit certain numbers. It forced me out of my comfort zone a little, but looking back I’m most proud of that period of time and what I did on my own.” Powell identified himself as being ready for the task, applying the skills he had learned through the sports he played growing up to the new challenges before him. “When I played sports at St. X there weren’t really “breaks” throughout the year. I would go straight from baseball to football, so there was very little down time,” Powell explained. “I think because of the fast-paced schedule that comes with being a year round athlete, I was able to apply that to business. I put it in my head that I wasn’t going to take a break until I hit a certain point.” That was 10 years ago, and Powell still has yet to take an actual vacation. Applying the disciplines he learned from playing sports helped carry over into his career goals. “My personal success is always gauged by the goals that I help my clients achieve. And that’s the same way I felt about my teammates. We are all working for one common interest and I want to help them achieve their personal goals – in turn, that helps me with the professional goals I’ve set for myself. I take all the positive attributes from the mind of an athlete and I apply them to my everyday business model.”

WINTER 2014

But it wouldn’t always be smooth sailing. In 2008 the financial crisis presented Powell with a daunting problem, asking again for guidance from his uncle would become necessary. “Especially in 2008 when the market crashed, it was an unsure time. I had clients that knew I had only been in the business a few years,” Powell explained. “My uncle Ed was there to coach me and help me through it and give my clients confidence that he was working with me, teaching me.” It was Nasief’s help, at the time, that kept Powell from losing a large part of the business he had worked so diligently to earn, and allowed Powell to uphold the legacy of those clients he had worked so hard for and with: a legacy of holding pride in one’s work and of acting for the good of humanity in a world of dollar signs and bottom lines. It’s this professional and moral legacy that has permitted Powell to become not only a financial advisor, but also a mentor to others, just as his uncle was to him. Evolving from father figure to professional mentor and finally to friend and confidant, the relationship between Powell and Nasief has only deepened with time. But the lessons over the years that Nasief was able to provide Powell, helping him to develop sound mental determination, clarity and strength, would be tested when their roles were reversed eight years ago, when Nasief’s wife was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. “She survived for about five years, and I was able to help him with his business so he could spend more time being the caregiver for her. She passed away in April 2012, and during those last couple of years when he was taking care of her, he was devoted to her at the expense of his own health,” Powell said. It was a difficult and trying time for Nasief, during which his own wellbeing was no longer his priority, so it became Powell’s turn to be his uncle’s guide back to a healthy lifestyle, and to offer support to the man who had been a source of strength for him so many times before. Powell became the inspiration Nasief needed during his personal struggle and helped his uncle rebuild just as Powell had in his adolescence and just as the economy had to after it crashed. “[Nasief] had never played athletics, but I played

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

45


baseball and football in high school at St. X and then two years of football at UK, so I had always been around working out and strength-conditioning,” Powell said. “And where he had mentored me through the business, this was one way that I could help pay him back by taking my knowledge to help him get back in shape. So we started working out every morning before work and he ended up losing about 30 pounds.” This personal triumph marked a turning point in Powell and Nasief’s relationship, transforming it from one of one-sided guidance to two-sided friendship. Powell had used the natural motivation he had found as an athlete and the mental tenacity he had learned from Nasief to bring their relationship into the present. A present where Powell is now taking on the role of mentor, providing guidance to the new generation of up-and-comers that he now advises. “10 percent of what I do is investments, the rest is really relationship building and helping to create the lifestyles that my clients want – for themselves and for their loved ones. I’m helping parents plan so they can help their children buy their first home, I’m helping grandparents invest wisely so they can help pay for their grandkid’s college. It all comes full circle and I feel very privileged that these clients let me have a hand in creating their legacy,” Powell said. In helping others to uphold and extend their family legacy into the future, Powell is upholding his own. Still applying the lessons etched into his life by his uncle, Powell is looking to expand his family’s, as well as UBS’, generational impact. “I have such an advantage in that a lot of my clients are 20-30 years older than me, and a lot of Ed’s clients are in their 80s and 90s. So I get to see the challenges Ed’s clients have faced when they were younger, and watch Ed help them – and then I get to

46 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Edmund Nasief and Matt Powell WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

47


50 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


apply that to my younger clients and help them prepare and hedge for future experience,” Powell said. “It’s like getting a glimpse into the future and being the beacon of hope for these families that I’m working for. I’m preparing my clients for what is to come based on what older generations have already faced and preserving their wealth in hopes that it transfers to the next generation.” In this industry, when working so closely with families and learning about how they’ve turned their own personal struggles into triumphs, Powell is blessed with daily reminders of just how far he’s come – and where he wants to be. “I’ve hit a point that I said I wanted to hit career-wise, and now I want to take myself to the next level. I want to be a top financial advisor by the time I’m 40, and help as many families as possible. I strive for those relationships and take great pride and joy in helping my clients the best I can.” Though at first glance an unattainable timeline, this will be a challenge that is, in some ways, nothing compared to others from Powell’s past. And despite the uncertainty of life, the future, and the stock market, his track record suggests this won’t be the last time Powell does exactly what he sets his mind to do. UBS Financial Services Inc. 4801 Olympia Park Plaza Suite 4000 Louisville, KY 40241 502.420.7600 matthew.powell@ubs.com www.ubs.com

Matthew Powell is a Financial Advisor with UBS Financial Services Inc. Any information presented is general in nature and not intended to provide individually tailored investment advice. Investing involves risks and there is always the potential of losing money when you invest. The views expressed herein are those of the author and may not necessarily reflect the views of UBS Financial Services Inc. ©UBS 2014. All rights reserved. UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

51


Fine Fine Fabrics Fine Fabrics Fabrics ◊ Furniture ◊ Furniture ◊ Furniture ◊ Accessories ◊ Accessories ◊ Accessories Interior Interior Interior Design Design Design 1200412004 Shelbyville 12004 Shelbyville Shelbyville Rd. Middletown, Rd. Middletown, Rd. Middletown, KY 40243 KY 40243 KY 40243 502.245.7887 502.245.7887 502.245.7887 | Mon—Sat | Mon—Sat | 10-5 Mon—Sat and 10-5Thurs and 10-5Thurs and 10-5Thurs 10-5 10-5 www.tasselslouisville.com www.tasselslouisville.com www.tasselslouisville.com


502.708.2822 1301 Herr Lane Louisville, KY 40222 In The Westport Village Shopping Center Sophia Meinhart from Heyman Talent.


holiday glasses

holiday glasses

Dupont:

4036 Dutchmans Ln.

895-2020

Shively:

4747 Dixie Hwy.

447-2020

www.korrect.com

Prospect:

9219 U.S. Highway 42

228-2020

www.optikbykorrect.com


STRONG WOMEN

STRONG DOCTORS STRONG MEDICINE Norton Neurology Services

Norton Neuroscience Institute is proud of our women neurologists, who specialize in caring for the thousands of patients in our community living with neurological disorders. Rebekah J. Woods, D.O., epilepsy Geeta A. Ganesh, M.D., multiple sclerosis Angela M. Hardwick, M.D., Parkinson’s and movement disorders

Learn more at NortonNeuroscienceInstitute.com.


What’s An Engagement Without

ROMANCE ?

(502) 895-9934 | Across from Shelbyville Road Plaza | Royalfinejewelers.com


A WOMAN’S

TOUCH

Photography by Clay Cook Location, The Pointe 58 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

59


Written by Stephanie Parrott 60 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Norton Healthcare Neurology Services Drs. Angela Hardwick, Geeta Ganesh and Rebekah Woods

W

e always hope that when we step into a doctor’s office, they approach our visit with an individual caring for each patient they see. For Drs. Geeta Ganesh, Angela Hardwick and Rebekah Woods, a patient can rest assured knowing that caring is the driving force behind why they do what they do. Drs. Ganesh, Hardwick and Woods are Neurologists at Norton Healthcare, sub-specializing in Multiple Sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease and Epilepsy respectively. The desire to become a doctor started early in life for each of them. “I knew I wanted to be a doctor at a young age,” Dr. Ganesh says. “My mom is a doctor in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. When I was a kid, I volunteered at my mom’s hospital and saw how people viewed her as a leader.” Dr. Hardwick had a similar experience in her early years, while interacting with patients at her nursing home job in high school. “The patients told me that they wished their doctors would listen to them as I did, and I knew then that when I became a doctor, I would still be that person that listened.” Dr. Woods is the first person in her family to become a doctor. Once she discovered she wanted to pursue medicine at the early age of 15, she began trying to accelerate her education. The world of neurology can be confusing for layman and patients alike. There are several categories when it comes to neurological diseases, and to Dr. Ganesh one of the most important responsibilities in her work with multiple sclerosis patients is to make sure they are as educated about their disease as possible. “Each

Norton Neurology Services – Brownsboro 502.394.6460 Norton Medical Plaza I – Brownsboro, Suite 305 4950 Norton Healthcare Blvd. Louisville, Kentucky 40241

initial visit requires a tremendous amount of education on what MS is and what the future holds for a patient.” She feels that it’s crucial that her patients leave her office feeling empowered, rather than feeling controlled by their diagnosis. According to Dr. Woods, that same education should be shared with the rest of the world as well, because they often see their patients with neurological disorders discriminated against. “I would like to see people accepted more often for being who they are, and for the public to take a moment to educate themselves, even if it is just by asking a question.” Dr. Woods has been in the city of Louisville for 16 years, but for Drs. Ganesh and Hardwick, the city of Louisville is fairly new. Dr. Ganesh just arrived here in July of 2014 and for Dr. Hardwick, it’s been two years. All three of them have full lives outside of the work place that include everything from singing in the church choir (for Dr. Hardwick) to children who lead very active lives of their own. “My son Ethan, who is soon to be 7, is a fierce soccer player and Noah, who is 5, has his mother’s love of music and questions,” says Dr. Woods. Dr. Ganesh’s son is only 2, and if you’ve ever been a parent to a 2-year-old, you know that can be an additional occupation in itself. “We spend most of our time making sure he isn’t getting into trouble.” Although they may be tackling different neurological disorders, they all share one common philosophy for overall healthy living: take care of yourself by exercising, eating right, following your doctor’s advice and most importantly, taking care of others to the best of our ability.

Norton Neurology Services – St. Matthews 502.899.6782 Norton Medical Plaza 2 – St. Matthews, Suite 310 3991 Dutchmans Lane Louisville, Kentucky 40207

NortonNeuroscienceInstitute.com

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

61


Written by Wesley Kerrick 62 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Orthopaedic Specialists Dr. Stacie Grossfeld

I

t’s midseason and you tear your ACL. You can’t play now, and that’s the pain that hurts most.

So you do the only thing you can, you make an appointment with an orthopaedic surgeon. Dr. Stacie Grossfeld will see you now. It boosts your confidence to know she’s been practicing orthopaedic medicine since 1997 – and that she’s an athlete herself. Grossfeld rates at 4.5 out of 7 on the United States Tennis Association’s classification of skill level, which means she’s quite a force on the court. Additionally, she bikes and lifts weights. So when you tell Grossfeld that all you really want is to get back to your sport, she understands. “If somebody comes in because their knee hurts when they run, I don’t tell them, ‘Oh, just quit running,’” she said. “As a sports medicine doctor, I try to figure out, well, how can I get you back to running?” Grossfeld is board certified in both orthopaedic surgery and sports medicine. She spends most of her time reconstructioning knees and shoulders. “That’s kind of my area of expertise,” she said, “but I do a little bit of everything.” A graduate of UofL’s school of medicine, Grossfeld served her internship and residency at the University of Minnesota. She also completed a fellowship in sports medicine at the Fowler-Kennedy Sports Medicine Center in London, Ontario. Grossfeld got her start working with Thomas Loeb, the orthopaedic surgeon she had shadowed while in college. She worked with him until opening her own prac-

tice, Orthopaedic Specialists, about three years ago. Additionally, Grossfeld is an Assistant Clinical Professor at UofL in the Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine. “It’s fun; it’s great teaching these residents orthopaedic stuff,” she said. “They kind of bring a freshness to your day.” She also serves as the team doctor for Assumption High School, South Oldham High School and the Louisville Ballet. Grossfeld was voted one of the top 10 orthopaedic surgeons in Louisville by America Top 10. In 2013, she received the departmental award from the Department of Family and Geriatric Medicine at UofL. “That’s probably the award I’m most proud of,” she said. “I kind of was like, wow, this means a lot to me.” The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons reports that only 4.3 percent of orthopaedic physicians are women, but Grossfeld never let that stop her. In high school, she ran on the boys’ cross-country team because there was no girls’ team. “I was always at the forefront of an area where women weren’t necessarily popular,” she said. Grossfeld has been an athlete since she was a teenager growing up in Wisconsin. “In the summer I raced my bicycle, and then in the winters I raced my skis,” she said. “Just the idea of being able to help other people that were injured get back to sports, to me seemed like the most fulfilling sort of thing I could do.” And fulfilling it is. “I really love my job,” Grossfeld said, “and there are very few days that I’m not excited to go to work.”

www.louisvillebones.com | 502.212.2663 4001 Kresge Way, Suite 330, Louisville, Kentucky 40207

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

63


Written by Paula Burba 64 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Norton Healthcare Women’s Services Lynnie Meyer, Dr. Jennifer Evans and Charlotte Ipsan

W

hen the ribbon is cut Dec. 22 on the completed Norton Women’s and Kosair Children’s Hospital in St. Matthews, the community can thank a dedicated trio of women for their commitment to making it happen: Charlotte Ipsan, Lynnie Meyer and Dr. Jennifer Evans. The three women worked more than three years wherever needed during the massive, $117 million renovation: Behind the scenes designing state-of-the art facilities and programs. Before public forums listening to what patients wanted. Beside the full spectrum of staff members rooting for the smallest details to deliver better patient care. Between the barriers of an active and intricate construction zone, creating efficient detours so patient care wasn’t disrupted or compromised. “Everything we promised that we were going to do in the beginning; it’s done,” Ipsan, Chief Administrative Officer/ President of the new hospital, recently told The Voice. “Pride in the integrity of the process and the commitment to the promise,” Meyer said, is her finest personal reward. The Chief Development Officer for Norton Healthcare and System Vice President of Women’s and Children’s Community Partnerships, Meyer is proud of the staff, as well. “They went through so much out there trying to build his vision and take care of patients.” Under those circumstances, it was Evans, division chief of Obstetrics and Gynecology and medical staff president of the hospital, who was the pivotal interface between administration and staff. “Making the translation,” she said, and “keeping the physicians informed from the administrative side, and vice versa,” about why they did things the way they did. The result of all that work: “It’s just a jewel box,” Meyer said. “In the scheme of things, it just seems like so much minutia,” Meyer said. But those details—from valet parking, to a partnership with Joseph’s Salon, to making morning newspapers available – make a difference. “Not a day goes by that I don’t wake up and say, I love my job,” Ipsan said. “The centerpiece of our facility is special programming for women and children. We don’t want people in our community to leave for care.” Just as important, she said, “This is a regional destination-point.” All mothers and nearly the same age—Ipsan and Evans are

50, while Meyer is 49—none of the three can pick a single aspect of the new facility as the most impressive, but they are all quick to describe dozens of things that make it unique. For Evans, the transition has been about ease of access and quality of care. She’s especially proud of the new aroundthe-clock staffing of specialists, including in-house obstetricians, obstetrical anesthesiologists and neonatal care. She also enjoyed being involved in the design of what’s known as wayfinding—architecture and design in the context of helping patients get where they need to be. “Find a way to work smarter, not harder,” Ipsan calls their strategy. “You’ve got to get the right people in the room. You’ve got to ask a lot of questions and push back,” she said. “You have to tear down those walls, and say, ‘I don’t care if we’ve done it this way for 25 years. Let’s use our skills and make it happen.’” Ipsan has been in healthcare 29 years, from staff nurse to her previous role of vice president of another groundbreaking project: the Kosair Children’s Medical Center—Brownsboro, Kentucky’s first pediatric outpatient medical center. Now that the hospital is officially complete, she plans to finish up her doctoral degree. Meyer, too, will soon be wrapping up her doctoral degree. She also started her healthcare career as a nurse at Kosair Children’s and the former University Hospital. For six years she served as president and CEO of The Center for Women and Families before being hired as Chief Development Officer of the Children’s Hospital Foundation for Kosair Children’s Hospital and Norton Healthcare Foundation. The two independently mention that when they were named co-transition leaders, more than one person predicted they would, to put it nicely, butt heads. Turns out, those naysayers were wrong. “It was just a pleasure to work with Charlotte,” Meyer said. “We got to where we could just look across the room at each other and be in unison. And we are very different.” “I helped her be more confident,” Meyer said of Ipsan, “and she helped me be more patient. We just worked perfectly together.” “We have not had one ill word in this whole time,” Ipsan said of their partnership. “And she is amazing.”

www.nortonhealthcare.com/NWKCH WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

65


Written by Breanna Price 66 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Gaddie Eye Centers Drs. Laura Lea Bassett and Sharon Thompson

W

hen Dr. Bruce Gaddie founded Gaddie Eye Centers in 1969, his vision for the practice came with high expectations. Over 40 years later, that vision for the highest quality eye care still extends through Dr. Gaddie, but now includes his son, Dr. Ben Gaddie, and their team of doctors. With five Kentucky locations in the Louisville, LaGrange and Carrollton areas, their family has grown to include over 45 employees. Dr. Laura Lea Bassett of Gaddie Eye Centers’ Oxmoor and LaGrange offices, whose area of expertise lies in ocular disease, says that Gaddie Eye Centers do more than just recite a good motto — they strive to live it each day in the office. “Gaddie Eye Centers is family-owned, which these days makes us unique,” Dr. Bassett explains. “We strive for excellence in all aspects of patient care and service — from the highest quality and newest diagnostic equipment, to high-fashion eyewear and specialty contact lenses. Part of our mission statement is this: ‘…the doctors… and staff are genuinely concerned, helpful and friendly towards all.’ To me, this extends way beyond the eye exam. In my nine years at Gaddie, I have comforted patients’ babies, shown kids to the water fountain, assisted elderly patients down hallways, and grieved with patients who were suffering.” To back up their personal touch to each patient’s care, the best possible equipment is used at Gaddie Eye Centers in order to ensure top-notch vision service as well.

Dr. Sharon Thompson, who can also be found at Gaddie Eye Centers’ Oxmoor and LaGrange offices, is excited about the Prevencia technology that was recently announced in October and is now being used at Gaddie Eye Center locations. “Over the years, there have been lots of changes in technology and patients’ vision requirements. In the ‘80s no one was on a computer for more than a couple of hours a day. Now, most people use their computer technology the majority of the day,” Dr. Thompson explains. “So, now we see a lot of patients struggling with fatigue, eye strain, and dry eye. But, there have been lots of advances in computer lenses and coatings to help relieve stress on the eyes. The newest coating is called Prevencia — it blocks blue light and UV that is emitted by computer screens and other electronic devices.” This ‘blue light’ that Prevencia combats comes from computer screens, tablets, smartphones and even fluorescent lightbulbs, is harmful to eyes, and is one of the risk factors for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), which is the leading cause of vision loss and legal blindness in adults over the age of 60. Both Dr. Bassett and Dr. Thompson have a fearless passion, stemming from personal experience, to see the optometric care they provide at Gaddie Eye Centers continue to push forward and make the world we see even clearer, just like Dr. Bassett’s first pair of contact lenses did for her at age 15, and just as Dr. Thompson’s first pair of glasses did when she was 11 years old.

www.gaddieeye.com | 502.423.8500 5 Area Locations

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

67


Written by Wesley Kerrick 68 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Peaceful Nights Dental Center Dr. Kim Westermann

W

hat’s the connection between a good night’s sleep and a visit to the dentist? A little device called an oral appliance. It’s been known to resolve a host of health problems and turn lives around. At Peaceful Nights Dental Center, it’s the preferred treatment for sleep apnea and the cornerstone of Dr. Kim Westermann’s practice. People with obstructive sleep apnea didn’t used to go the dentist. Instead, they’d be fitted with a cumbersome machine to wear to bed each night. If they didn’t wear it, they’d be stuck with the disorder, which meant repeated pauses in breathing throughout the night. Today, Westermann custom-fits sleep apnea patients with an oral appliance that’s kind of like a retainer. It holds the patient’s lower jaw slightly forward, keeping the tongue and jaw from blocking the passage of air. “It’s the most rewarding thing I’ve been able to offer my patients in 27 years,” Westermann said. Westermann has been in dentistry since she was 17 years old. She started her own practice in 1987. Mostly, she’s conducted regular dental work, and she still provides all types of traditional care you’d expect from a dentist. Over the years, Westermann has seen the positive effect of good dental health on the wellbeing of the whole body. Her interest in overall health is what led her to sleep apnea treatment. It was a natural fit, especially since her husband has sleep apnea. “He was my first patient I was able to treat,” Westermann said, “and it’s really improved his life, and mine, as well.” Westermann has traveled over the country and participated in over 150 hours of education and training

from sleep apnea experts. When a patient comes to Westermann, she draws from that wealth of knowledge to design an oral appliance that not only fits the patient’s mouth, but also effectively treats sleep apnea. “A lot of people can make an oral appliance, but the key is making sure that it’s effectively treating the condition,” Westermann said. Sleep apnea doesn’t just cause excessive daytime sleepiness; it can also lead to high blood pressure, acid reflux, heart attacks, stroke, depression and muscle pain. A seemingly simple oral appliance can make a world of difference. “When patients come in and talk about how the oral appliance has improved the quality of their life, and just knowing that my team and I were a part of that, it’s just amazing,” Westermann said. At 10212 Westport Road, Peaceful Nights is small and independently owned, not part of a dental corporation. “We intentionally keep our practice intimate so that we can provide the tailored care with state-of-theart treatment,” Westermann said. In 1997 she became the first female doctor appointed to the Kentucky Board of Dentistry, and to follow, in 2003, Westermann was inducted into the American College of Dentists. The honorary organization recognizes exceptional contributions to dentistry and society. Westermann is among the mere 3 percent of the world’s dentists who are members. “It’s like the Oscar’s – even being nominated is an honor,” she said. “The most important thing to me is being a good healthcare professional,” Westermann said, “but if I can be an example for other women, that’s amazing too.”

www.peacefulnightsdental.com | 502.290.8233 10212 Westport Road, Louisville, Kentucky 40241

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

69


Written by Paula Burba 70 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


All Women OB/GYN Rachel Thompson, APRN and Drs. Tanika Taylor, Lisa Crawford, Aimee Paul, Elena Salerno, Amy Deeley

I

n the quickly-evolving world of health care, the independent practice All Women OB/GYN is a true anomaly.

For starters, there’s the “independent practice” part. In an industry where becoming a hospital affiliated practice is the norm, they have no plans to forfeit their independence. In terms of partnership, they don’t subscribe to the senior/junior partner method, either: all five physicians are equal partners in the practice. And all five of those doctors are women, with the motto: “A health care practice for women by women.” “We have been very happy. We continue to be independent, and we have the ability to provide the best care for our patients,” Dr. Elena Salerno recently told The Voice, speaking on behalf of the group. She joined All Women in 1999. A native of Italy, where she completed her residency at the University of Genoa, Salerno came to the U.S. with a three-year scholarship to work on the Women’s Health Initiative at University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, Texas. There she met her husband, an Australian who was also studying medicine, and in 1992 they moved to Louisville for a job he landed here. “We really get along very well, professionally,” Salerno said of the practice (though that’s likely true of her husband as well). “We all bring a little difference in how we approach things,” she said. Her partners are: Dr. Lisa Crawford, who joined the practice when it was owned by two male physicians, both now deceased, and took over the practice when they retired; Dr. Aimee Paul; Dr. Amy Deeley; and the newest partner, Dr. Tanika Taylor, who joined after practicing in Madisonville, Ky., for six years. “We can treat our practice the way we want,” Salerno said, without the financial and administrative pressures of those partnered with large hospitals or health care networks. They don’t have the pressure of demonstrating the cost-benefit analysis of their treatment decisions to the higher-ups. While not faulting

others for taking such a route, that business plan is not for All Women,” Salerno said. One factor in that decision is simply cost—not for the practice, but for their patients. A simple test like a mammogram, if ordered by a physician whose practice is partnered with a hospital or network, is usually done at the hospital, which is coded differently than the same diagnostic procedure done in a physician’s office. “The physician doesn’t make any more money,” Salerno said, and the test is identical. But for the patient, she said, “the cost difference is huge.” “We’re not a hospital; we’re an office,” she said, and that affords their patients cheaper care—in terms of money, not quality. They are also more free to be open-minded with alternative medicine, like helping interested patients find doulas to assist with pregnancy and natural childbirth. The practice also prescribes bioidentical hormone therapy. They still embrace traditional gynecology, offering in-office surgery and minimally invasive hysterectomies. Another advantage with their independent status is they are free to refer to any primary care physician or specialist that they feel best suits their patient’s needs. Hospital-affiliated physicians are pressured to refer within that system. Additionally, All Women OB/ GYN offers deliveries and surgeries at both Norton and Baptist hospitals so patients have more options. And they are happy with the size of their practice. “We don’t want to become huge,” she said. “We like that we know our patients and they get to know us.” Obstetrics and gynecology is a unique specialty, she said. “It allows you to treat a lot of medical disorders. You get to do surgery if you need to. You get to do everything. You either hate it or love it.” Salerno loves it. “It’s not just a job. This is what I choose to live by,” she said, and that means embracing the evolution of medicine, with its demands to perpetually learn more. “It’s not black and white. Medicine is not an exact science.”

www.allwomenobgyn.com | 502.895.6559 4123 Dutchmans Lane, Suite 601, Louisville, Kentucky 40207 WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

71


Written by Remy Sisk 72 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Metropolitan Ankle & Foot Center Dr. Ann Pinski

F

eet are what make us mobile. They’re what we use to drive to work, what we stand on when we walk and what we slip into stylish shoes. But for Dr. Ann Pinski, the physician of the Metropolitan Ankle and Foot Center, they’re her livelihood. Dr. Pinksi knew medicine was in the cards for her from a young age. Her OBGYN father had always encouraged her medical pursuits, but it wasn’t until her senior year of college that podiatry became a possibility. Pinski had been involved in sports, had worked as a student athletic trainer and had received encouragement from both professor and peer to consider podiatry. “I applied January of my senior year and got into every school I applied to,” Pinski recalls. “So I figured God was telling me something.” She went on to graduate from the Pennsylvania College of Podiatric Medicine, now a part of Temple University School of Podiatric Medicine, in 1984. Following medical school, Pinski was involved in a partnership for over 25 years before starting her own practice. The Metropolitan Ankle and Foot Center, located at 3901 Dutchman’s Lane, specializes in the surgical and non-surgical management of foot and ankle problems from injuries to ingrown toenails to bunions. While Pinksi describes her practice as upbeat with solid and tailored relationships with its patients, she does believe being a woman gives her an edge in the field. As a female physician, Pinkski says she can “look at things from different perspective; you can relate to patients who are mothers, who are working moms, who are in society and very conscientious of fashion,

who have to take care of their families as well as themselves.” As a working mother of a junior at St. Xavier high school, Pinksi knows the daily struggles that mothers are faced with and consequently works to help her patients find more practical solutions to podiatric problems. “You’ll see a mother who comes in…and she’s been told to stay off her feet, but she has a 2-year-old and a 5-year-old! And you just look at her and think ‘well that’s not gonna happen!’ Because I know what it’s like to be a mom.” So, Pinksi ardently works to tailor treatment not only to the specific problem but to the specific person. However, aesthetic cannot be forgotten. Pinski also works with patients to find solutions that are effective as well as fashionable. Aware of the effect feet have on fashion, Pinksi contends, “you wear a plain black dress and you change the shoes, you will change the look completely.” She is accordingly proud that treatment is often built around fashion as well as function. Pinski is nonetheless ever-cognizant of the primary goal for her patients: health and functionality. “The foot and the ankle need to not only look good, but feel good and work well,” she says. However, she is indeed always ready to tailor to the patient’s specific needs. With a laugh, she promises, “I might not be able to put you in a 3-inch heel, but I can get you in a 2-inch heel.”

www.metropolitanankleandfoot.com | 502.741.4905 3901 Dutchmans Lane, Unit 103, Louisville, Kentucky 40207

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

73


Written by Igor Guryashkin 74 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Vein Treatment Center Dr. Leesa Richardson

D

r. Leesa Richardson spent 30 years working in urgent care having spent time specializing in internal and emergency medicine. Today, away from the hustle, bustle and chaos of the hospital, Richardson runs one of the city’s favorite places that specializes on the treatment of varicose and spider veins - The Vein Treatment & Aesthetic Center.

For Richardson, who is a graduate of the University of Kentucky as well as University of Louisville’s medical school, the change in career paths ensured she was able to take on a business where she could take even more care over patients, all while guaranteeing repeated satisfaction. Set in a small former home in St. Matthews that was built in 1920, the cozy and welcoming atmosphere is complemented by the fact that patients have market-leading treatments on offer when it comes to veins. “We now have such minimally invasive procedures for vein treatment that it’s amazing,” Richardson explains. “Compared to the old vein stripping, we can use a tiny laser with a puncture and people can have it done on a Friday and be back at work on a Monday typically. There is very little down time for most patients and it’s amazing how much better they feel.” And it’s because of this that Richardson feels the center has seen more and more patients being referred to her from a variety of places – a real testament to the quality of the care she and her colleagues are able to provide. “We do the veins a bit differently; it’s unique so we get quite a few referrals from dermatologists, plastic surgeons and word of mouth. A lot of people will come in for their veins and end up staying and doing botox, or fillers, or some of the chemical peels. There are also some other laser treatments that we offer for cosmetic purposes.” One of these pieces of equipment that Richardson is a fan of because of the great results it delivers is called

Clear + Brilliant. “We have another room with cosmetic lasers and so we offer a treatment that we absolutely love called Clear + Brilliant,’” explains Richardson. “It’s like a mini fraxel laser...it is a laser so it’s light energy that’s piercing the skin. It’s piercing it like multiple almost needle sticks, and the thing with the fraxel, is that it’s going in at one angle as well as another, without disrupting the integrity of the epidermis. It can be used for spider veins, but it improves skin tone and texture, skin laxity, pore size, abnormal pigments.” Another machine that Richardson is a huge proponent of is CoolSculpting, again because of the fabulous cosmetic results on offer. “What it’s used for is focal fat reduction,” adds Richardson. “Along the waist, the flanks, it’s for people at or close to their ideal body weight that have spots that need reduction and that they can’t get rid of. The way that it works – it’s got a vacuum pad and it’s a device that will actually vacuum out fat and then freeze it. You just attach it on the surface with a gel pad and that gets sucked into the tissue, then anything above a certain level on the treatment bar is going to be frozen.” For now though Richardson is just happy that her practise is going from strength to strength, all while maintaining a small and welcome atmosphere that a boutique firm is able to offer. “We like the small feel of this,” concludes Richardson. “We branched out and started bringing in body sculpting, and I feel like if we start introducing too many procedures, it gets too difficult to manage. But I love doing procedures. It’s a very small boutique practice, the patients are just wonderful. We have a great group of patients, great ladies that work for me. It’s just a fun environment.”

www.veintreatments.com | 502.895.6600 201 Fairfax Avenue, Louisville, Kentucky 40207 WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

75


SALT Eyewear.

Inspired by Nature, Found at Gaddie.

SALT Eyewear. Inspired by Nature, Found at Gaddie.

www.GaddieEye.com

www.GaddieEye.com


EVE 2015 NEW YEAR’S

DECEMBER 31 | 9PM - 2AM

$75 ALL

INCLUSiVE

Mellwood Arts Center 1860 Mellwood Avenue, Louisville

Includes: Top Shelf Open Bar Appetizers Champagne Toast

MEDIA SPONSOR:

For tickets, visit nye2015louisville.eventbrite.com VIP Tables Available | For Info, email Joey@Jwagnergroup.com


More for daughter Samantha, less for Uncle Sam.

Without proper planning, estate and inheritance taxes can consume assets you would prefer to pass on to your heirs. Our planners, together with your attorney and accountant, can help you work to minimize taxes and maximize what you leave to the next generation. Hilliard Lyons is as committed to optimizing your assets as you are to establishing your legacy.

Hilliard Lyons Trust Company, LLC and J.J.B. Hilliard, W.L. Lyons, LLC (Hilliard Lyons) are subsidiaries of HL Financial Services, LLC. Securities are offered through J.J.B. Hilliard, W.L. Lyons, LLC | Member NYSE, FINRA, & SIPC | Hilliard Lyons and Hilliard Lyons Trust Company do not

offer tax or legal advice. Please consult your tax advisor or attorney before making any decision that may affect your tax or legal situation.


T

n o s a e S e si th

! t e e w s e to b

Shop Gumer & Co. this Holiday Season and find the perfect gifts for all your loved ones.

Engagement Rings, Earrings, Diamonds, Watches, Designer Jewelry, and all your favorite brands!

225 South Hurstbourne Parkway â—† www.GumerJewelry.com Mon-Fri 10am-6pm | Sat 10am-5pm


The Gift of WOW

The Artist

Gift Cards Online SHELBYVILLE ROAD

|

HIGHLANDS

|

ZSALON.COM


PEAK SEASON

Style Editor and Creative, Lori Kommor Style Assistant, Jamie Hubbard Photography by Clay Cook Makeup by Isidro Valencia, Casey Ritchie Hair by Matthew Tyldesley and Ashley Flora Models Lucy Duane, Anne Shook, Alice Harris with Heyman Talent; Alaina Mitchell, Talia Blue 82 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Alaina is wearing a Marc Cain floral techno stretch pencil skirt, Marc Cain faux fur multicolored jacket, available at RODES.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

83


Anne wears a Chetta B floral-embellished shrug and Aiden Maddox full-length skirt, with a Linda Richards genuine Rex Rabbit infinity scarf, available at RODES. Sweet Turn fingerless gloves, available at QUEST OUTDOORS.

84 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Lucy is wearing an open back silk mini dress by Kate Spade along with mini Kate Spade handbag with chain detailing, available at KATE SPADE.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

85


Talia is wearing a tiered silk polka dot skirt, Hunter Bell riding-style jacket with leather accent with jewelry by W&M, available at MERCĂ? BOUTIQUE.

86 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Alaina is wearing a twisted neck Trina Turk jumpsuit and Andrew Marc moto leather jacket, available at RODEO DRIVE. Sweet Turns fingerless gloves available at QUEST OUTDOORS.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

87


Anne is wearing Cartise houndstooth pants with white quilted jacket by Sisters clothing, available at BOUTIQUE SERENDIPITY. Talia is wearing a Joie printed dress with Luii leopard jacket with three-quarter length sleeves and Intercontinental black patent gloves, and a Red ostrich “Kelly” bag by Kathryn Allen Couture and silk Ferragamo scarf, available at SUNNY DAIZE.

88 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Lucy is wearing Michael Kors sequined plaid pants, available at MICHAEL KORS, with black cashmere blend turtleneck sweater and bib chain necklace.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

89


Anne is wearing Analili color block leggings, Jude Conelly turtleneck with Cartise black and grey coat with leather detailing, available at BOUTIQUE SERENDIPITY. Sweet Turns knit cap from QUEST OUTDOORS.

90 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Alaina is wearing Coatology down vest with a 100% cashmere sweater by LaFayette 148 and Dennis Merotto pencil skirt, available at RODES. Sweet Turns knit hat with pompoms and gloves, available at QUEST OUTDOORS.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

91


Alaina wears an On Trend fur vest with Esley printed top, available at APRICOT LANE BOUTIQUE. Talia is wearing Ledor peach jacket with Glam printed notch blouse, highrise Paige Denim and W&M jewelry, available at MERCĂ? BOUTIQUE. Both are wearing hats from Sweet Turns, available at QUEST OUTDOORS.

92 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Anne is wearing cotton and silk blend gathered polka dot skirt with pink somerset cardigan, triple strand pearl necklace and Bloom Drive Margot bag, availabe at KATE SPADE.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

93


Celebrating Our 151st Christmas In The Heart Of St. Matthews... Chenoweth Square! 3937 Chenoweth Square 502-895-3226 | www.dolfingers.com

Mockingbird T e r r a c e

Distinctive Living by Design

1409 Mockingbird Terrace Drive 7 minutes from Downtown

Located in Prestigious Mockingbird Valley (one of Louisville’s Top 10 High Value neighborhoods)

3-bedroom condos with sweeping hilltop views - Priced in the $400s

1 6 Home s S ol d

2-Bedroom Condos Priced from the $300s

Now offering special financing for qualified buyers

Designer finishes including: new condominiums - open floor plans 2, 3 & 4 bedroom designs. granite countertops 10’ ceilings individual granite balconies abundance of Windows & natural Light Wood/Tile Flooring energy Star Stainless Steel appliances

FULLY FUrniSHed ModeL oPen: Saturday & Sunday 1-5pm Professionally Marketed by Semonin Realtors® New Construction Specialists

Wanda Powers

(502) 552-5418 | wpowers@semonin.com

Walda Highfield

(502) 649-6688 | whighfield@semonin.com

www.mockingbirdterrace.com


For Making Us Your

Favorite Boutique!

3911 CHENOWETH SQUARE • LOUISVILLE, KY 40207 • 502.893.4252


Tim Kaelin Independent Consultant For a free sample of our product Go To our Mobile Friendly site‌

www.treatyourskinwell.com/Video.html After the video follow the on screen instructions. Visit us on facebook, too! www.facebook.com/RodanAndFieldsYoungerlookingskin Call Tim at 502.713.9181 TreatYourSkinWell@gmail.com


Photography by Robert Burge 98 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


160 Years of giving WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

99


C

apture the legendary “Bittners touch” in your

holiday gift this season. The following pages preview those great home gifts where splendor, elegance and a little whimsy come together. Whether looking for a piece for the “hard to get for” person or wanting a one-of-akind present, giving the gift with a designer twist can be your answer. Celebrate the spirit of the holidays at Bittners, the iconic place to find that perfect holiday gift.

100 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Gilded modern horse sculpture on marble base WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

101


Brass-soldered iron geometric shapes

Playful picnic brass ant sculpture

Ralph Lauren glen plaid hurricane

Assortment of sterling silver frames

102 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Hand-soldered gilded gold dandelion sculpture

Hand-brushed gold leaf piglet

Silk pillow with 19th century italian metallic applique

Gilded iron loop de loop table with stone top

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

103


Skull cast in polished brass 104 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Brass antler lamp with acrylic base WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

105


e

xperience the magic of giving a Bittners

custom-made gift box. Made from Kentucky burl walnut, each box is personally handcrafted by Bittners on-site Master Craftsmen who take artistry to a whole other level. Blending art and function, the Bittners handmade box is created as a one-of-a-kind gift. For that special someone in your life, add a Bittners gift certificate. Find delight in that magical moment of giving this holiday season with a unique gift from Bittners.

106 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Bittners custom box made from Kentucky burl walnut WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

107


There’s No Place Like Home for the Holidays Treasured Gifts For All Ages and Occasions THE ORIGINAL GEOGRAPHY COLLECTION

Celebrating all 50 states, cities, regions, countries...

and even the North Pole!

502.254.0400

12121 Shelbyville Road • Middletown, KY 40243

www.�wochicksan�compan�.com


You’re Invited to an OB Open House January 29 • 6-8 pm Come meet the doctors and see our office. Meet the Doulas and a lactation specialist. Hear short informational sessions on topics such as: customizing your birth experience • pain management options • breastfeeding • and much more! ALL ARE WELCOME. YOU DO NOT HAVE TO BE A PATIENT TO ATTEND. There will be Door Prizes and Giveaways, and hors d’oeuvres and beverages.

502.895.6559 “All Women, OBGYN”

The Women’s Pavilion • Plaza III • Suburban Hospital 4121 Dutchmans Lane • Suite 601 • www.allwomenobgyn.com

Amy M Deeley, MD • Elena Salerno, MD • Aimee V Paul, MD • Lisa Crawford, MD • Tanika Taylor, MD • Rachel Thompson, APRN ALL PHYSICIANS ARE BOARD CERTIFIED.


Your wardrobe fits, shouldn’t your closet?

“LOVE, LOVE, LOVE THE CLOSET” You should have a fabulous closet—a smartly planned personal space that makes every day easier. Closet Factory is the only Kentucky closet company to offer natural wood closets with custom paint or stain finishes as well as state-of-the-art glazed, textured, metallic or high-gloss laminate solutions.

Call 859-277-0277 for a free consultation or visit us online at closetfactory.com Showroom: 246 Walton Avenue (inside WillisKlein)

Closets | Garages | Home Offices | Entertainment Centers | Wall Beds | And More ©2014 Closet Factory. All rights reserved.

the art of organization


Jewelry from Seng Jewelers, sengjewelers.com 112 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WISH LIST Style Editor and Creative, Lori Kommor Style Assistant, Jamie Hubbard Photography by Clay Cook Makeup by Isidro Valencia, Casey Ritchie Hair by Matthew Tyldesley and Ashley Flora Model Theresa Krosse WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

113


Jewelry from Gross Diamond Co., grossdiamonds.com 114 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Jewelry from Merkley Kendrick Jewelers, mkjewelers.com WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

115


Jewelry from Seng Jewelers, sengjewelers.com 116 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Jewelry from Gumer & Co, gumerjewelry.com WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

117


Jewelry from Merkley Kendrick Jewelers, mkjewelers.com 118 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Jewelry from Gross Diamond Co., grossdiamonds.com WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

119


Jewelry from Gumer & Co, gumerjewelry.com 120 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Jewelry from Seng Jewelers, sengjewelers.com WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

121


This Year... Skip the Wool Socks

Ask for the Titus Browning Special and receive a free gift with every equipment purchase now through Dec. 31st.

For fast and easy on-line ordering go to www.BrowningEquipmentCompany.com 1338 River Road, Louisville, KY 40206 • 502.777.1390


We take pride in using organic, sustainable food from local vendors and bring these components together in dishes that are both delicious and beautiful to behold. 502.589.4700

crushediceevents.com


British Custom Tailors British Custom Tailors

502.897.1361

502.897.1361 www.britishcustomtailors.net info@britishcustomtailors.net info@britishcustomtailors.net

www.britishcustomtailors.net Men‘s & Women’s Professional Alterations • Men‘s & Women’s Professional Alterations including bridal & formal wear, including bridal & formal wear, jeans, furs, leather, suede, etc. jeans, furs, leather, suede, etc.

Custom-Made clothing such as suits, shirts, • Custom-Made clothing such as suits, shirts, pants, shorts, dresses, etc. pants, shorts, dresses, etc.

Over 10,000 Fabrics From All Over the World such as such asHolland & Sherry, Tallia di Delfino, etc. Holland & Sherry, Tallia di Delfino, etc.

Over 10,000 Fabrics From All Over the World


PREMIER LOUISVILLE JEWELER BILL GROSS WILL OFFICIALLY RETIRE AFTER 53 YEARS SERVING THE LOUISVILLE COMMUNITY. GROSS DIAMOND COMPANY IS LIQUIDATING THEIR ENTIRE INVENTORY.

BILL IS OFFERING EXQUISITE JEWELRY AT UP TO 70% OFF


get

back in the

GAME

Orthopedic Surgeon and Sports Medicine Specialist

Services and Procedures

⋅⋅ ⋅⋅ ⋅⋅ ⋅⋅ ⋅⋅ ⋅⋅ ⋅⋅ ⋅⋅

Knee pain and Injuries Shoulder pain and injuries Arthroscopic surgery Arthritis Foot and ankle pain and injuries Cartilage, ligament and tendon injuries Independent Medical Examination (IME) Sports Medicine

Orthopaedic Specialists TWO CONVENIENT OFFICE LOCATIONS: 4001 Kresge Way, Suite 330 10216 Taylorsville Rd. Louisville, KY 40207 Louisville, KY 40299 APPOINTMENTS MAY BE MADE BY CALLING 502-212-2663

About Dr. Stacie L. Grossfeld ⋅⋅ Recipient of the 2013 Vitals Compassionate Doctor Award ⋅⋅ Patients’ Choice Award Winner for 2012 ⋅⋅ Received the 2013 Family Medicine Departmental Award from the University of Louisville and Geriatrics, June 22, 2013 ⋅⋅ Team Physician for Assumption High School, South Oldham High School and the Louisville Ballet ⋅⋅ Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Louisville, Department of Family Medicine ⋅⋅ Board Member, Louisville Sports Commission, Health and Wellness Co-Chair ⋅⋅ Avid tennis player competes in 4.5 USTA, 2014 Sectional Qualifier/Competitor

Find Dr. Grossfeld and Orthopaedic Specialists online at: www.louisvillebones.com and on Facebook: www.facebook.com/OrthopaedicSpecialistsPLLC


Listening. Leading. Succeeding. UBS salutes Edmund G. Nasief, named to Barron’s Top 1,200 Financial Advisors For listening to his clients and inspiring them to turn their dreams into goals. For leading in a world that is changing every day. For succeeding at building strong relationships and delivering relevant and insightful advice. Congratulations on all your accomplishments.

Edmund G. Nasief Managing Director–Wealth Management Portfolio Manager UBS Financial Services Inc. 4801 Olympia Park Plaza, Suite 4000 Louisville, KY 40241 502-420-7600 800-333-0502

ubs.com/team/nasiefmeyer

As a firm providing wealth management services to clients, we offer both investment advisory and brokerage services. These services are separate and distinct, differ in material ways and are governed by different laws and separate contracts. For more information on the distinctions between our brokerage and investment advisory services, please speak with your Financial Advisor or visit our website at ubs.com/workingwithus. Accolades are independently determined and awarded by their respective publications. Neither UBS Financial Services Inc. nor its employees pay a fee in exchange for these ratings. Accolades can be based on a variety of criteria, including length of service, compliance records, client satisfaction, assets under management, revenue, type of clientele and more. For more information on a particular rating, please visit ubs.com/us/en/designation-disclosures. ©UBS 2014. All rights reserved. UBS Financial Services Inc. is a subsidiary of UBS AG. Member FINRA/SIPC. 1.00_Ad_8.375x10.875_LV1111_NasE


128 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


A MASTER at WORK

Photography by Clay Cook and Courtesy of Heaven Hill Distilleries Written by Igor Guryashkin WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

129


130 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Charlie Downs Artisan Distiller, Evan Williams Bourbon Experience

I

t’s still dark outside when Charlie Downs starts to make his way from his home in Bardstown and drive towards the river and the taller landscape of Louisville. His day begins at 5:30 each morning within the confines of an old, tall downtown building on Main Street. Inside, Downs and his two colleagues will spend an entire day toiling – checking barrels, pot stills, temperatures, alcohol levels. When they leave for the day, they do so safe in the knowledge that years from now they crafted a single barrel that day – as they do each day – that will be enjoyed by bourbon lovers throughout the world when it’s aged to perfection and finally bottled. Charlie Downs is an artisan distiller and has been working for Heaven Hill for 38 years. Starting out in the bottling plant then making his way into the distillation process and now finding himself at the epicenter of the now one year old Evan Williams Bourbon Experience, Downs is working on a beverage that was distilled only yards away from where Evan Williams himself – a late 18th century Louisville settler – is reputed to have built the first commercial distillery in the city. And for Downs, despite the years he’s put in at Heaven Hill, every day still produces a challenge and a level of unpredictability that conversely leads to the high standards he’s used to.

market, with each barrel trying to taste as consistently delicious and fragrant as the next. “[The taste] isn’t something you can develop overnight, or even over four or five years,” Downs says. “You have to learn from the masters before you, because they learned from the masters before them. Mr. Earl learned from his brother and his father, and Parker learned from Mr. Earl, his father. And then Craig learned from Parker. And I’ve had the advantage of working with all three of them, so they have actually taken me under their wings and shown me some of the secrets in the distilling, that no person could learn over night. It takes a while to develop what you’re actually looking for.”

“You have to learn from the masters before you, because they learned from the masters before them.”

“It’s quite a bit interesting here” Downs explains. “It’s never routine because if you think you’ve gotten into a routine, that’s when you’re going to mess up. You’ve got to be on your toes at all times. That’s what was driven into me over the years by our master distiller’s department, Mr. Earl, Parker and Craig Beam. ‘It doesn’t matter how good you think you know something, you can mess something up.’ They’ve always told me that.” And it’s from these distilling masters that Downs has been able to develop the palette that has seen him produce some of the finest bourbon on the

WINTER 2014

And the way to find that is to constantly monitor every single barrel full of bourbon – making sure that it’s as lovingly cared for as the one before it. “If you do the same thing day in and day out, do not change any times or temperatures whatsoever, then you’re going to have that sense of continuity in your product,” Downs explains. “With what we do everyday here with our pot stills, we are constantly pulling samples. We pull 40-60 samples a day and taste half that many. With each degree or change in proof and temperature you can detect some flavor changes. So that’s what we’re looking for all the time – for that unique cleanness, and quality of our finished product.”

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

131


132 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

133


One thing that’s for certain is that the enduring success of the Evan Williams Bourbon Experience rests a lot on the fact that visitors can see with their own eyes the distilling process – to watch Charlie Downs and his colleagues at work, all while soaking in the history of bourbon right here in downtown Louisville. “We want people to understand that they have a unique opportunity to see the history of bourbon as told through Evan Williams, here in downtown Louisville,” explains Joshua Hafer, Communications Director at Heaven Hill. “We’re right across the street from where Evan Williams was distilling more than 200 years ago and you can see that almost in effect here [at the center].” “We’ve done a wonderful job here and we’re so excited about it,” Hafer continues. “We’ve now got everybody talking about it and Charlie is an integral part of that. He does such a good job because one of the principle surprises – and we’ve not been veiled about this or anything – we have a distillery appear [during the tour]. And it works and it’s great. Those blinds go up and people see Charlie. And Charlie’s not some animatronic back there. He is making whiskey. They’re blown away by the fact that we have a distillery in that small of a space.” And with the daily visitors coming to the Experience, even Downs gets to learn a thing or two. “Not only do I learn in what I’m doing, but I’m

134 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

learning from people that come in,” Downs says. “People are coming here and asking me questions. And I’m still learning from them. You may think you know everything in the world, but you don’t. There are people out there that have other ideas and views.” “We have a lot of people come through that have distilling in their background. Everybody here in Kentucky has someone in their family that has worked at a distillery, or made moonshine, or something like that, and they have their point of view. So it’s interesting to learn from them.” And despite being surrounded by his product every single day, Downs himself never gets tired of sampling, tasting and enjoying it when he clocks off at the end of a day’s work. “Just sitting down having a nice bourbon neat, or on the rocks, no, I never get tired of that,” Downs explains. “I don’t drink any other liquors. I may drink a little tequila every once in a while. But my passion is bourbon. I don’t drink any beer, hardly. I may drink six beers a year. My drink is bourbon.” Evan Williams Bourbon Experience 528 West Main Street Louisville, KY 40202 502.584.2114 www.evanwilliams.com

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

135


136 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

137


Gold Rush Cocktail Ingredients 1 Âź oz. Evan Williams Single Barrel Vintage Bourbon 1 oz. Domaine de Canton French Ginger Liqueur Âź oz. Fresh Lemon Juice Combine all ingredients in a mixing glass, add ice and shake until wellchilled. Strain into a cocktail glass and garnish with a Luxardo cherry.

138 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


N

aturally, our agents possess an intimate knowledge of our properties, but they also develop a deep understanding of our clients’ needs. It is the artful melding of the two that is our great skill.

Cara King 502.418.2882 • cara-king.com

A rtfully uniting extraordinary properties with extraordinary lives


Children with learning differences do not benefit from simply “getting by” in school. If your child’s school is “accommodating” his learning, they are working around his learning differences. At Meredith-Dunn School we demystify those differences and challenges and develop strategies to work through them. We call it remediation. Once the mystery to learning is solved, anything is possible!


Life is Too Short for Ugly Shoes.

Dr. Pinski and her staff understand the stresses of balancing work, home, and family – as well as limitations when mom needs help We combine function & fashion We treat surgical & non surgical ankle & foot issues Now offering a new cartilage replacement surgery for damaged joints, which can restore function in many cases We understand the busy life of today’s women We believe in tailoring treatment to the person & thinking outside the “shoe box”

Metropolitan Ankle & Foot Center 3901 Dutchman’s Lane, Suite 103 Louisville, Kentucky 40207 502.409.4271 • 502.741.4905 Accepting new patients • Most insurances accepted

Dr. Ann Pinski


SOME PLACES SIMPLY SPEAK FOR THEMSELVES. HERE’S WHAT THE REST OF THE WORLD IS SAYING:

“Named one of the BEST 500 HOTELS IN THE WORLD” TRAVEL + LEISURE MAGAZINE

“Best of Weddings” THEKNOT.COM

“Best Chef’s Table” FORBES MAGAZINE

“Service was exemplary. I checked out with regret.” CHICAGO TRIBUNE

“The English Grill has emerged as the finest restaurant in the city.” WINE SPECTATOR

Fourth & Broadway • Louisville, KY 40202 • (502)583-1234 www.brownhotel.com • AAA F O U R -D I A M O N D A WA R D


S H O P

I N

S T Y L E

Great Holiday Wear Arriving Daily Come to the Westport Village Fill Your Stocking Night Friday, Dec. 5th....and enjoy special sales and libations at Boutique Serendipity. Invite your friends to our Men’s Bourbon and Shopping Night on Thursday, December 18th from 6-8pm where we will be offering men’s personal shopping, gift wrapping and bourbon!

S H O P

I N

S T Y L E

Boutique Serendipity – the latest in fashion, accessories and jewelry Monday thru Saturday 10 - 6, Thursday ‘til 7 and Sunday 11 - 4 Westport Village • 1201 Herr Lane, Louisville, KY • 502.423.0058 www.facebook.com/BoutiqueSerendipity


144 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


THE

ONE

Photos by Susan Stripling Photography Written by Remy Sisk WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

145


146 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


EDEN BRIDGEMAN & GREG SKLENAR

I

t was a month and half ago but it feels like a lifetime ago,” Eden Bridgeman says of her Sept. 20 wedding. Daughter of basketball legend Junior Bridgeman, Eden was living in Chicago, pursuing an MBA at Loyola University, when she met Greg Sklenar on Memorial Day weekend in 2011. The two are recently married, and Eden is simply ebullient as she describes her wedding. “We wanted an experience that was a reflection of us,” she muses. “We didn’t want what was hot, what was listed as the top thing to do for your wedding. We wanted it such a way that people would walk away and say ‘that was Eden and Greg.’” The two met at a bar in Chicago, but how they came together is a real-life Cinderella story. “I left my sweater at one of the bars that we frequented, and he was the only number outside of my friends’ numbers that I had, so I sent him a text asking if by chance he had my sweater!” Bridgeman explains. Greg didn’t have it, but was able to locate it, and the two used the returning of the sweater as an occasion for a first date. “Instead of a glass slipper, there was a BCBG sweater!” she jokes. Nearly two years later, in March 2013, the couple took a day trip to Los Angels from San Diego, where they were vacationing. Bridgeman was actually born

WINTER 2014

in L.A., and Greg used his familiarity with the city of angels as inspiration for his proposal. He took Bridgeman to a friend’s apartment, which had been filled with tea candles, and as their song was playing, Bridgeman recalls, “he says ‘I want L.A. to be even more special, so that we can start our lives together here.’ Then he gets down on one knee and I, you know, waterworks all night long.” For several reasons, the pair decided to marry the following September. One of the main causes of the prolonged engagement was to allow ample time to plan. Bridgeman says, “I wanted a little bit longer engagement, just so that I could really think about what I wanted for the wedding.” To begin that process, she tracked down Louisville wedding planner Arnie Levin, whom she met through a family friend. Although Levin’s attention to detail and aptitude for meeting his clients’ exact needs were unparalleled, Bridgeman says she couldn’t have planned the wedding without her mother. “On one hand, she loved helping me plan the wedding,” Bridgeman remembers fondly. “But then again, she still had to be my mother and make sure I stayed on track and didn’t make it into a circus.” A family affair, the Bridgeman/Sklenar wedding aimed to be classic and elegant, and the first step toward its visualization was the dress.

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

147


Bridgeman shopped around several boutiques in Chicago where she was living, but it was the bridal salon at Macy’s that had the answer in a luxurious Lazaro dress. “Lazaro happened to have everything I wanted in a dress. I didn’t tweak it or add anything, except for my belt, in an effort to add some bling to it,” she proudly asserts. With a flowing train and stunning detailing, Bridgeman believes it was the perfect dress for her. Of her wedding, she claims, “it’s the only time I feel that a woman is able to really be a princess, and the dress very much reflected that, from the train to the delicate lace detail, to the super long veil.” The glorious dress was later accented by makeup by Michella Reeves from The Mac counter and hair by Bridgeman’s longtime friend and hairstylist Shatika Brawner. The ceremony itself, attended by roughly 300 guests, took place at St. John’s Church of Christ, where both of Bridgeman’s older brothers were also married. Pastor Bob Russell of Southeast Christian Church performed the ceremony, and while the couple maintained convention with traditional vows, they also wrote their own. “We really wanted that personal touch of being able to say our own words to each other,” Bridgeman reasons. In addition to the vows, one of her husband’s favorite poems, “The One,” was also read at the ceremony, as it discusses what it means to find “the one” and to be “the one.” The wedding party was made up of eight groomsmen and eight bridesmaids, but included a twist. Bridgeman decided to forgo custom and not have a maid of honor. “With all the ‘bridezilla’ moments that could potentially happen, I decided that’s a lot of pressure for one person,” she argues. “Also each one is so special to me, I really wanted to give each one a special task or role that made them shine, so they could see how much I was honored that they would go through that 18-month process with me all for that one weekend.” Flowers were done by In Bloom Again, who, Bridgeman remembers, adeptly assisted in executing her vision as opposed to their own. The arrangements perfectly matched the couple’s colors of gold, butter, ivory and black and were fairly subtle. “I wanted it to be very classic, just simple chic,” Bridgeman recollects from early planning. “I’m not one for a lot of bold colors, especially when its fall. The trees and landscape would take care of all the colors I’d need.” The autumn landscape provided the perfect backdrop for New York photographer Susan Stripling to shoot the couple’s wedding photos. Stripling took

148 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

149


150 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


photographs for one of Bridgeman’s brothers’ wedding, which is how Bridgeman came to adore the photographer’s work. “I wanted to source someone locally to keep that hometown feel, but I was just obsessed with her!” Bridgeman exudes. Because the couple did not do first look photos, Bridgeman’s wedding photos included the rings. Dallas Beal of Dallas Jewelers, who Bridgeman claims as the family’s jeweler, did both the bride’s and groom’s wedding bands. After the rings were exchanged, it was time for the party. The reception was held on the Bridgeman family farm, Fleur-de-lis Farm, off Wolf Pen Branch Road in Prospect. At Levin’s referral, Masterson’s catering provided the three-course sit-down dinner, which Bridgeman sincerely wanted to expedite “because, Greg and me, we love to dance,” she says. In keeping with her theme of the personal touch, Bridgeman decided to skip a wedding cake and instead include something more individualized. “My favorite dessert is crème brulee,” she claims. “Masterson’s was nice enough to do a nice-sized crème brulee for us, and that was our cake.” Guests received a dessert trio, and Bridgman holds that this twist of events was an especially memorable and personal aspect of the reception.

Only my mother and Greg knew. Toward the end of [“My Girl”], the music just went into [“Turn Down for What”] and we did our hip-hop dance and kind of ended in a cool pose.” With a chuckle, she contends that, all jokes aside, it was wonderful to be able to share that very silly and very special moment with her father. At the end of the night, her father actually surprised the newlyweds, along with the rest of the guests, with a firework show. Bridgeman recalls being awestruck by the surprise and subsequently moving away from the crowd with Greg to share their first special moment as a married couple. “Being able to watch the fireworks as Greg and I had our own little private moment, and just thinking about what we said to each other is a key moment that I still think about to this day.” It was truly a spectacle to end a spectacular day.

Music for the occasion was performed by jazz and R&B violinist Maestro J. The couple had their first dance together as husband and wife to John Legend’s recent hit “All of Me,” and closed the night with the singer’s “You and I.” Of the Legend song choices, Bridgman explains, “his songs came out at the perfect time and just summed up what we were feeling about each other.” While the mother and son dance, which was performed to Stevie Wonder’s “You Are the Sunshine of My Life,” was a touching moment, it was the father and daughter dance that made the real impression on guests. “Out of all the comments I received about the wedding, that was one of everyone’s favorite part,” Bridgeman reveals. The pair began with a beautiful routine to The Temptations’s classic “My Girl,” before launching into a full-blown hip-hop number choreographed by Ashley Chase to DJ Snake & Lil John’s “Turn Down for What.” Bridgeman recalls it as one of her favorite moments of the night and relates, “we surprised everyone.

WINTER 2014

The couple took an Australian honeymoon and travelled between Hamilton Island, Sydney and Melbourne. “I would tell anyone ‘go!’” Bridgeman insists, recollecting the beauty of the country and the hospitality of the people. But what really made the honeymoon special was sharing time with her new husband, the man she will spend the rest of her life with, that’s how Bridgeman’s princess fairytale concludes.

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

151


152 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

153


Happy Holidays

Margy Taylor and Cotton.

Celebrating 10 Years of Service Locations 1341 Bardstown Road Louisville, KY 40204 (502) 456-5536

10716 Meeting Street Prospect, KY 40059 (502) 690-4123

Unique Gifts for Everyone on Your List


If you have

SLEEP APNEA

and are not happy with your CPAP We May Have a Simple, Comfortable Solution for you. Call 502-290-8233 for an Appointment www.peacefulnightsdental.com

Dr. Kim Westermann is a dentist with experience in treating snoring and sleep apnea.


SEPTEMBER 16 – DECEMBER 16, 2014

Silhouette® Window Shadings

SAVE $100* OR MORE WITH REBATES on qualifying purchases of Hunter Douglas window fashions

It’s time to decorate your windows for the holidays. Save with mail-in rebates on a selection of stylish Hunter Douglas window fashions, September 16–December 16, 2014. Ask for details.

Draped in Style

9412 Norton Commons Blvd Ste 101 Prospect KY Call today for your free consultation Custom blinds, shutters, draperies, bedding, cornices, upholstery and more! 502-297-8884 www.louisvillewindowtreatments.net www.louisvillewindowtreatments.com

SEPTEMBER 16 – DECEMBER 16, 2014

* Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/14 –12/16/14 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 7 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2014 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas. HOL14MB3

Silhouette® Window Shadings

SAVE 100 $

OR MORE WITH REBATES on qualifying purchases of Hunter Douglas window fashions

*

It’s time to decorate your windows for the holidays. Save with mail-in rebates on a selection of stylish Hunter Douglas window fashions, September 16–December 16, 2014. Ask for details.

Draped in Style

9412 Norton Commons Blvd Ste 101 Prospect KY Call today for your free consultation Custom blinds, shutters, draperies, bedding, cornices, upholstery and more! 502-297-8884 www.louisvillewindowtreatments.net * Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/14 –12/16/14 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 7 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2014 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas. HOL14MB3

46615

Season’s eatings. Give the gift of local flavor. Nationwide shipping. Same-day local delivery.

Your homegrown florist.

502-897-6551 • nanzkraft.com

79552_NANZ_Holiday_3_6x4_8.indd 1

10/7/14 10:31 AM

46615 * Manufacturer’s mail-in rebate offer valid for qualifying purchases made 9/16/14 –12/16/14 from participating dealers in the U.S. only. Rebate will be issued in the form of a prepaid reward card and mailed within 6 weeks of rebate claim receipt. Funds do not expire. Subject to applicable law, a $2.00 monthly fee will be assessed against card balance 7 months after card issuance and each month thereafter. Additional limitations apply. Ask participating dealer for details and rebate form. ©2014 Hunter Douglas. All rights reserved. All trademarks used herein are the property of Hunter Douglas. HOL14MB3


Sophie wears a Johnny Was velvet champagne tulip blouse, Johnny Was velvet jacket with flower detailing from CLAY & COTTON and Sweet Turns knit hat available at QUEST OUTDOORS

WILDFIRE

158 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Style Editor and Creative, Lori Kommor Style Assistant, Jamie Hubbard Photography by Clay Cook Makeup by Isidro Valencia, Casey Ritchie Hair by Kayla Inman and Ana Perez Models Sophia DeSimone, Anne Shook, Alice Harris with Heyman Talent; Talia Blue Location, Bernheim Arboretum and Research Forest WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

159


Alice wears a mixed elements cowl neckline and gathered lace trim with accessories, available at ALTAR’D STATE


Sophie wears a Johnny Was floral printed button down dress, available at CLAY & COTTON, and a knit hat with pom poms from Sweet Turns available at QUEST OUTDOORS.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

161


Anne wears a Tracy Reese sweater coat with Theory turtleneck, available at SASSY FOX

162 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Talia wears a relaxed Aran cable pullover sweater, heritage quilted vest, straight-leg cords and printed scarf, available at J. JILL, with Sweet Turns and knit fingerless gloves available at QUEST OUTDOORS


Alice wears aVintage Havana poncho, plaid shirt, Black Swan distressed denim and accessories, available at APRICOT LANE

164 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Anne wears faux leather pants with printed blouse and faux leather and fur vest, available at bebe


Sophie wears Yoanna Baraschi plaid wool dress with red cashmere wool blend wrap with fur pompoms, available at RODEO DRIVE. Talia wears Michael Kors oversized plaid cardigan, available at MICHAEL KORS. Beautiful lamb leather hair on handlaced hobo bag, available at LEATHERHEAD.


Alice wears a patchwork genuine rabbit fur jacket with black satin shorts and blouse, available at SASSY FOX.

WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

167


Sophie wears a fur-trimmed embroidered coat, available at MICHAEL KORS.

168 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

WINTER 2014


Sophie wears a Theia strapless floral print ball gown with jewelry, available at RODEO DRIVE.


Anne is wearing fringe sweater, printed blouse and mustard pants, available at ANTHROPOLOGIE. Talia is wearing a plaid dress by Voom and A’Nue Ligne gray turtleneck, available at SUNNY DAIZE. Soft lamb leather handbag with alligator tail detailing and removable strap, available at LEATHERHEAD. Sweet Turns knit hat and fingerless mittens, available at QUEST OUTDOORS.


WINTER 2014

W W W. V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

| THE VOICE OF LOUISVILLE

00 171


Are Your Legs reAdY For Special occaSionS? MEMBERS American College of Phlebology

Tr u s t y o u r v e i n c a re n e e d s t o a member of the American College o f P h l e b o l o g y, l e a d e r s i n i n n o v a t i o n s i n v e i n t re a t m e n t s

louisville’s FIRST vein center where all vein procedures are performed in the office by a Board Certified Physician.

Now iN Network

Louisville’s FIRST an with most major insurance companies experienced vein ce

procedures are perf

LEESA RICHARDSON, M.D.

office by a physicia • EVLT • • Diagnostic Ultrasound • • Offering Botox, Juvederm, Refirme, Radiesse, • • Injection Sclerotherapy and Belotero for Cosmetic Spider Veins, Varicose• • Injection Sclerotherapy for Cosmetic Spider • Veins andbc:bc Bulging Hand9:19 VeinsAM Page 126283 richardson 9/24/08 Veins, Varicose Veins, Facial Spider Veins, and • •Bulging Hand Veins EVLT •

• Diagnostic Ultrasound

V

To Schedule your Consultation: The

Hair Removal Skin Rejuvenation Chemical Exfoliation • Skin Rejuvenation Treatment of Rosacea • Hair Removal Obagi, Skin Ceuticals, and glo Minerals 1 Coolsculpting • Treatment of Rosacea Tru Sculpt (FDA approved for cellulite removal)

• Facial Spider Veins

LE

502.895.6600 • 112 South Sherrin Ave., Louisville, KY 40207 • ww

V E I N T R E AT M E N T & Aesthetic Center

201 Fairfax Avenue, Louisville, KY 40207 To schedule your consultation: 502.895.6600 Visit us at www.veintreatments.com NEW EXPANDED HOURS


nd most

enter where all

formed in the

an.

EESA RICHARDSON, M.D.

ww.veintreatments.com


Experience Elegant

Newly Furnished

Downtown Living

Models Now Open

PRICED FROM $300’s 2 & 3- Bedroom Flats & Townhouses Park-like Courtyards & Private Balconies Rooftop Terrace with River Views Secured climate-controlled parking Exercise & Commuity Areas

abtiloens l i a v le c esur AFinish Se m o H Yo

324 East Main Street Louisville, Kentucky 40202

Sunday 2 - 5p.m. or By Appointment Donna Jones 396-8348 * Julie Davis 435-9830 * Mike Brewer 648-6841

y o9nalize With l n O er s P To

www.fleurdelisonmain.com

Suede & Leather Deserve the Finest Care! As a certified Leather and Suede specialist, you can confidently trust our experienced staff at Nu-Yale Cleaners. Year after year, you’ll be glad you did.

Trust your fine suedes and leathers to us. We clean Uggs® too!

812.285.7400 • NUYALE.COM Family Owned and Operated Since 1956!


BARDSTOWN

Most Beautiful Small Town in America Named

Logo

Shop Downtown Bardstown, Kentucky Louisville’s Perfect Shopping Getaway 1

2

Celebrating all things Bourbon. Souvenir & Gift Shop Boutique Liquor Store Bourbon Cocktail Bar & Tasting Room

Women’s Men’s Gifts Shoes

3

4 Women’s Men’s Gifts Shoes Women’s Men’s Gifts Shoes

5

6

upcoming events The 12Th Day of ChrisTmas Friday December 12, 2014

Women’s Men’s Gifts Shoes

Women’s Men’s Gifts Shoes

Fill your heart with Joy and your hands with gifts for all. Enjoy refreshments, music and treats in downtown Bardstown! A perfect night to get the girls together to shop for last minute gifts, enjoy a bourbon or a glass of wine and dinner Participating shops open until 9pm

moonlighT maDness sale Friday January 2, 2015 Up to 75% off Sales Downtown Bardstown Participating Shops Open Until 11pm

Upscale boutiques • fine dining • extraordinary art • gifts • history Just a short 40 miles from louisville Bardstown is a perfect day trip shopping destination.


© 2014 EWC Prices may vary by region

GORGEOUS UNLEASHED

europeanwax waxcenter.com

LOUISVILLE - BROWNSBORO POINT 502 895 1414 1901 Rudy Lane, Suite #6

LOUISVILLE - MIDDLETOWN 502 245 5598 12911 Shelbyville Road


$

2015 JAGUAR XF 2.0T PREMIUM

PER MONTH*

36 MONTH LEASE $3,995 + TAX, TITLE AND FEES DUE AT SIGNING $0 SECURITY DEPOSIT

*2015 Jaguar XF 2.0T Premium, 36 month lease, $3,995 due at signing includes $2,721 down, $0 security deposit, $795 acquisition fee and first month’s payment, excludes retailer fees, taxes, title and registration fees. Actual rates and payments of closed-end lease may vary. Take new retail delivery from dealer stock by 1/2/2015. Lessee responsible for insurance, maintenance, excess wear and excess mileage over 30,000 miles at $0.30/mile. Based on MSRP of $51,100 (includes destination and delivery) with a residual value of $29,638 as of 10/1/2014. For well qualified lessees as determined by approved lender. All amounts shown are estimates, retailer sets actual amounts. Residency restrictions apply. Lessee has option to purchase vehicle at lease end at price negotiated with retailer and approved lender at signing. Termination fee may apply. See your participating Jaguar Retailer for complete details, or call JAGUAR-USA / (855) 524-8278. **For complete details on the Jaguar Warranty Program, including limited warranty and maintenance coverage and exclusions, please visit your local Jaguar Retailer Š2014 JAGUAR LAND ROVER NORTH AMERICA, LLC.


RANGE ROVER SPORT

ELEVATE YOUR DRIVING EXPERIENCE.

AND GAIN A NEW PERSPECTIVE ON THE BUSINESS ADVANTAGES OF LAND ROVER OWNERSHIP. When used predominantly for business, the luxurious and exceptionally capable Range Rover, Range Rover Sport and Land Rover LR4 qualify for an accelerated tax depreciation schedule.* In today’s tough business climate, that tax advantage can help you gain higher ground. Learn more by calling or visiting your local Land Rover Retailer before December 31, 2014.

$64,000 RANGE ROVER SPORT VS. $64,000 LUXURY CAR Total allowable depreciation, years 1 through 4

89% $57,261 FOR RANGE ROVER SPORT

1

25% $21,185 FOR LUXURY CAR

2

LAND ROVER LOUISVILLE 4700 Bowling Blvd. 502.895.2451 landrover.bluegrassauto.com * Individual tax situations may vary. The information presented was accurate at time of publishing. Federal rules and tax guidelines are subject to change. Consult your tax advisor for complete details on rules applicable to your business. 1. Range Rover depreciation can continue at $6,796 in Year Five, and $3,399 in Year Six, at which point it is fully depreciated. Range Rover Sport depreciation can continue at $4,492 in Year Five, and $2,247 in Year Six, at which point it is fully depreciated. Land Rover LR4 depreciation can continue at $2,880 in Year Five, and $1,440 in Year Six, at which point it is fully depreciated. 2. Luxury car depreciation can continue at $1,875 per year for each succeeding year until the vehicle is fully depreciated or sold. © 2014 Jaguar Land Rover North America, LLC.



The Voice of Louisville