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What keeps them smiling? Healthy minds and bodies

Delta Dental of Kentucky announces their partnership with Blessings in a Backpack to feed the future of America. #MakingSmilesHappen

Feeding The F uture Of A merica

TM

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Join Us in Welcoming Marvin F. Stich, AKD Architectural Kitchen Designer Over 30 Years Experience!

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Y R U C R E M M O O R L L A B 10/16 10/17 10/23 10/24 10/25 10/27 10/30

JOEY BADA$$ VINTAGE TROUBLE ANDY MINEO MAC MILLER THE LONE BELLOW MAT KEARNEY SUN SUNDY BEST

10/31 11/06 11/15 11/17 11/21 11/28 2/4

SUNDY BEST BIG K.R.I.T. LIGHTS & THE MOWGLIS MACHINE HEAD BON JOVI TRIBUTE NIGHT ENGLISH BEAT CHIPPEN CHIPPENDALES

Buy tickets at MercuryBallroom.com, The Louisville Palace Box Office, or charge by phone at 800.745.3000.

10/9 10/16 10/17 10/27 10/29 11/6 11/08

Last Comic Standing Masters of Illusion The Beach Boys Rob Thomas Theresa Caputo Nephew Tommy Alvin & The Chipmunks

11/13 Ben Folds 11/17 Joe Bonamassa 11/19 The Price is Right 11/21 Kem and Tamar Braxton 11/28 Festival of Praise 12/10 Mercy Me 2/2 Peppa Pig

Buy tickets at LouisvillePalace.com, The Louisville Palace Box Office, or charge by phone at 800.745.3000.

DON’T JUST SEE A SHOW

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Photography by Clay Cook 14 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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FALL 2015


Letter from the Publisher The arrival of fall means a few things: pumpkin flavored everything, chunky sweaters with booties and all things football. I think we Kentuckians are lucky to have the beautiful season of fall to enjoy. Not all states get to enjoy four seasons, and I sometimes take that for granted. As F. Scott Fitzgerald says in “The Great Gatsby,” “Life starts all over again when it gets crisp in the fall.” As things settle down from our crazy summer schedules, we’re able to start fresh with a new season. With the cooler temperatures comes much more planning around indoor activities, and in this fall issue of The Voice of Louisville we talk all things arts and entertainment. Who better of an entertainer to discuss than Kenny Chesney? To country music lovers, he really is at the top of the charts as one of the best performers. We had the pleasure of featuring his right hand woman, Jill Trunnell. This down-to-earth lady does one hell of a job keeping Kenny Chesney and his crew organized and moving along from concert to concert. I love Trunnell’s “fly by the seat of your pants” outlook, how she can problem solve any obstacle you throw her way and how humbled she is – even when she is working with some of the top celebrities of our time. I feel lucky to have this remarkable woman on the cover for this fall magazine and even luckier that we have yet another Louisville woman making a name for herself. She sure does make this state proud to call her our own. Her life is anything but boring. Flip through the pages and check out this woman’s entertaining life. Another amazing woman we featured is Kylee Ervin. She also deals with A-list celebrities – mainly country singers. However, Ervin’s job entails something much different than Trunnell’s. Ervin designs top of the line tour buses for artists and entertainers. You’d be surprised just how much she can fit into one bus. Ervin’s hard work and determination, something learned from her father, is what keeps her business rolling. These five-star hotels on wheels are something worth reading about as they show how Ervin can make anything happen within a 45-foot long bus and in her life. Along with these women, we kept with the arts and entertainment theme and profiled some of Louisville’s best places to catch a performance. Whether you are looking for an outdoor concert at Iroquois Amphitheater or a dinner and a play at Derby Dinner Playhouse, we think we’ve covered something for everyone.

spice latte, a blanket and bestselling Louisville author J. R. Ward’s new book. We sat down with this typically private author and got the scoop on her newest book series, “The Bourbon Kings.” She describes this new series as the Downton Abbey of Louisville, Ky. It was such a treat to be able to sit down with the author who is usually so busy writing romance novels that she hardly gets a chance to talk publicly. Whether it is “The Bourbon Kings” book series or actual bourbon, what Kentuckian doesn’t love anything and everything bourbon? We are so excited to have Woodford Reserve as part of this fall issue. With the start of fall comes National Bourbon Heritage Month in September. There’s no better way to celebrate that month, and every month to follow, than with Woodford Reserve! I encourage you to visit the distillery to see how Woodford Reserve is made and even get a bottle to take back home with you. Cheers to that! As for a grander tour, The Waterboys took a tour of Tanzania, Africa, but this trip was far from glamorous as they began their quest of bringing clean water to the area. When Chris Long, founder of Waterboys and NFL St. Louis Rams player, is off the field he is on a mission to create clean water for those who really need it and raise awareness about this growing issue. Long hired Nadus Films to gather footage of the project. The Voice of Louisville photographer Clay Cook helped capture these images, and we knew they would be truly amazing and eye opening. After reading this article I realized just how lucky we are to live in this great country, where clean water is something that we don’t even think about. New entertainment plans on the schedule call for new outfits and jewelry. Take a look at the fall fashion spread. We searched the city for the most up-todate fall trends. From fringe to leather, we’ve got you covered. We couldn’t have done this fashion spread without Walsh Construction Company; they were very helpful and accommodating to us. They’re helpful to this community too, as they bridge together two states that have often been thought to be divided. We thank them for helping make this community stronger. Louisville really is the city without limits. Sit back, relax and enjoy your read.

And if you don’t feel like traveling to your entertainment during this fall season, then grab a pumpkin

FALL 2015

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Photo by Clay Cook

FEATURES 22

40

THE WOMAN BEHIND THE SCENES  he Story of T MOM’S MUSIC

46  PUTTING

WHEELS

DREAMS ON

Artistry: IROQUOIS AMPHITHEATER

104  A

House of Music: MERCURY BALLROOM

110  WHERE

THERE’S A WELL, THERE’S A WAY

130  One

Singular Destination: DERBY DINNER PLAYHOUSE

58  Outdoor

64  J.R.

WARD’S HEART IS IN LOUISVILLE

72 A

Haven for Creativity: KENTUCKY CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

78  MODERN

TWIST ON A FRENCH PROVINCIAL

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HIGH MAINTENANCE

156 G  IRL

SCOUTS HELP WOMEN FIND THEIR VOICES

162  FRUITS

OF LABOR

170  THE

BOURBON LOVER’S BOURBON

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ARTISTIC GRACE FALL 2015


Executive Assistant to the Publisher

Style Editor

VOL. 4 • NO. 3

Production Director

Lori Kommor

Hollis Gargala

Joanna Hite Shelton

W W W.V O I C E - T R I B U N E .C O M

TRACY A. BLUE Publisher

Chief Photographer & Designer

Designer

Chris Humphreys

Designer

Malissa Koebel

Hannah Krill

HOLLIS GARGALA, Executive Assistant to the Publisher

EDITORIAL

LORI KOMMOR, Style Editor JOANNA HITE SHELTON, Production Director CHRIS HUMPHREYS, Chief Photographer & Designer MALISSA KOEBEL, Designer HANNAH KRILL, Designer IGOR GURYASHKIN, Staff Writer REMY SISK, Staff Writer NICOLE TROXELL, Staff Writer NADIA LONDON, Style Assistant CARLA SUE BROECKER, Columnist JOHN HARRALSON, Contributing Photographer LYNN HAMILTON, Contributing Writer A.J. JONES, Contributing Writer STEVE KAUFMAN, Contributing Writer ALICIA KELSO, Contributing Writer WESLEY KERRICK, Contributing Writer BREANNA PRICE, Contributing Writer CLAY COOK, Contributing Photographer ROBERT BURGE, Contributing Photographer CHRIS HOLLO, Contributing Photographer

Staff Writer

Staff Writer

Igor Guryashkin

Advertising Operations Director

Bridgette Borraga

Staff Writer

Remy Sisk

Nicole Troxell

Account Executive

Account Executive

Account Executive

Account Executive

Shari Baughman

Julie Koenig

ADVERTISING

BRIDGETTE BORRAGA, Advertising Operations Director SHARI BAUGHMAN, Account Executive JULIE KOENIG, Account Executive KAREN PIERCE, Account Executive ASHLEY BECKHAM, Account Executive JUDY ROYCE, Account Executive

Account Executive

Karen Pierce

Ashley Beckham

Distribution Sales Coordinator

Circulation Administrator

Judy Royce

CIRCULATION

ROCKO JEROME, Distribution Sales Coordinator JOHN AURELIUS, Circulation Administrator KATIE WENDT, Receptionist CLARENCE KING, Newspaper Deliveries

Rocko Jerome

John Aurelius

Receptionist

Katie Wendt

BLUE EQUITY, LLC

JONATHAN S. BLUE, Chairman & Managing Director of Blue Equity DAVID M. ROTH, Vice Chairman JUAN REFFREGER, Executive Vice President

YO U R V O I C E @ V O I C E -T R I B U N E.C O M

Photographer

John Harralson

FALL 2015

W W W.V O I C E - T R I B U N E . C O M

Columnist

Carla Sue Broecker

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Manny & Merle – 502.290.8888���������������������������������������������������������������������45

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Bittners - 502.584.6349��������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 4-5

Merkley Kendrick Jewelers - 502.895.6124�������������������������������������������������� 19

Blue Grass Motorsport - 502.894.3428������������������������������������������������194-195 Boombozz Craft Pizza & Taphouse – www.boombozz.com�����������������������45 Brasch Constructors – www.braschconstructors.com������������������������ 128,155 British Custom Tailors - 502.897.1361���������������������������������������������������������� 155 Brown-Forman – www.brown-forman.com����������������������������������������������������39 Caden Boutique – 502.384.2155������������������������������������������������������������������ 128 CaloSpa - 502.814.3000������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 9 Cartwheels Papers & Gifts – 502.895.1800������������������������������������������������ 168 Delta Dental – 800.955.2030��������������������������������������������������������������������������� 2 Derby Dinner Playhouse – 812.288.8281������������������������������������������������������36 Evan Williams Bourbon Experience - 502.272.2611����������������������������������� 55 Favorite Things Boutique – 502.647.2111���������������������������������������������������� 160 Fourth Street Live – www.downtown.4thstlive.com����������������������������������� 109 Girl Scouts of Kentuckiana – 502.636.0900���������������������������������������������� 154 Gross Diamond Co. - 502.895.1600������������������������������������������������������������� 135 Hilliard Lyons – 888.373.6392�������������������������������������������������������������������������� 8

Mockingbird Terrace – 502.552.5418; 502.649.6688��������������������������������54 Mom’s Music – 502.897.3304������������������������������������������������������������������������ 56 Nu Yale – 812.285.7400����������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 69 Oxmoor Center - www.oxmoorcenter.com��������������������������������������������������� 129 Pinot’s Palette – 502.409.4572��������������������������������������������������������������������� 68 Posh – 502.222.7757�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 108 Posh Home – 502.742.5380����������������������������������������������������������������������������38 Rodeo Drive - 502.425.8999��������������������������������������������������������������������������� 37 Rodes - 502.753.7633����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� 7 Salzman Cosmetic Surgery & Spa – 502.425.5200���������������������������������� 103 Sassy Fox Upscale Consignment - 502.895.3711����������������������������������������� 21 Semonin Realtors – 502.420.5000����������������������������������������������������������������76 Seng Jewelers - 502.585.5109������������������������������������������������������������������12,196 Skyn Lounge - 502.894.3335��������������������������������������������������������������������������63 Starlight Distillery – 812.923.9463��������������������������������������������������������������� 126

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Java Construction – 502.548.1022���������������������������������������������������������������� 62

The Kentucky Center – 502.584.7777; 502.566.5144�������������������������������� 101

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The Louisville Palace – 502.883.5804; 800.745.3000��������������������������������� 6

John Waters Inc. – 502.896.0850���������������������������������������������������������������� 169

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FALL 2015


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Writen by Remy Sisk Photos Courtesy of EB Media 22 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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FALL 2015


THE

WOMAN BEHIND THE SCENES FALL 2015

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FALL 2015


Jill Trunnell

hasn’t been home for more than three consecutive weeks in more than three and a half years. Her life is lived from one suitcase to another – from boarding passes to hotel rooms. But she wouldn’t have it any other way. As one of the primary tour coordinators for country icon and eight-time Entertainer of the Year Kenny Chesney, her life is always on the go, which satisfies an itch Trunnell has had ever since she was 18. By her account, she is and always will be a modern-day gypsy.

Though it’s extraordinarily extensive, this is a process that sometimes happens as much as five times per week, which is not the industry standard. “Most country tours are ‘weekend warriors’ where you do shows Thursday, Friday and Saturday and that’s it!” Trunnell relates. “And you come home on Sunday and revive, then travel out on Wednesday to do it again. But this year, Kenny did four or five shows a week,” which means at most, Trunnell had three days at home per week.

Trunnell, 44, has been working with Chesney for 12 years and has loved every minute of it. In her words, she is part of “air-traffic control” for the tour, along with six other members of the production team. They supervise all movements of the tour, including every detail of trucks, busses, catering, stagehands and more. They keep all the parts moving in the right direction, which, with 306 total members of the tour including supporting acts, is no easy job.

Due to her production duties, though, she usually would go weeks on end without returning home. On off days, Trunnell and those working in the production office frequently have to go on what are called site surveys for Chesney. “Say there’s a stadium that Kenny’s never played before,” she poses. “The show can’t go on sale or even start getting designed or built until we’ve gone there and physically seen it … You have to worry about sightlines for the fans to make sure we’re not selling tickets in a place where the fans won’t get the optimal experience.”

And with that many pieces that need to perfectly fall into place, every day can be different. “It kind of depends on what’s coming up,” Trunnell describes of her day-to-day duties. “You’re always working ahead to build that show and have every aspect ready from the catering to being prepared for guests – one show we might only have 20 or 30 guests and one show we might have 300 guests, and that affects meals, parking, tickets, passes, credentials to get everybody in and hotel rooms for family members. The list goes on and on.” On a show day, at 7 a.m., the team begins marking out the space and doing the rigging. The first trucks then start loading in at 8 a.m. “We go into a building that’s an empty shell and create our little city,” Trunnell explains. The team has until 6 p.m. – or sometimes 4 p.m. – to be ready to open the doors and await the arrival of anywhere from 20,000 to 60,000 eager fans. Then, once the show starts, Trunnell’s job still isn’t over as she’s become the official photographer for Chesney’s performances; she literally works all day and all – or at least most of -- the night.

FALL 2015

And there’s a lot of fans who want that experience. Kenny Chesney tours roughly February through early September every year and consistently sells out each venue he plays. The star plays an average of 15 to 25 NFL football stadiums per year, all of which sell out in minutes. To close his most recent tour, “The Big Revival Tour,” Chesney played Gillette Stadium in Foxborough, Massachusetts, with fan attendance of 120,206 over two nights. The first show sold out in three minutes and the second in five. The two shows combined grossed $11.6 million, while the tour as a whole grossed $114 million and drew over 1.3 million fans. “There are fans that might come to 10 or 15 shows across the country every single year,” Trunnell reveals of Chesney’s legions of fans known as the No Shoes Nation. “It’s goosebump moments when people see what Kenny does in these NFL football stadiums. He speaks to every single fan, like eye-toeye contact that a lot of other people just don’t do.” Though she is truly living a dream right now, looking back on where she was 25 years ago, Trunnell

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never would have imagined she’d be coordinating the tour of some of the biggest country music stars on the planet. She was born and raised in Louisville up until elementary school and then she and her family moved to Owensboro, Kentucky. As soon as she graduated high school, she moved to Los Angeles in an effort to see a bit more of the world. Homesickness eventually got the better of her and she returned home after only a few years of being away. “I had no job, no car, no nothing,” she remembers of the time. “I had a bed and a television.”’ Although her family was in Owensboro, Trunnell moved to Louisville in order to be close to family but still live in a bigger city. She got a place at Churchill Park Apartments and heard that a new place called Hooters was hiring. This was 1993, and at the time, Hooters only had locations in Florida. Needing a job and, ultimately, rent, Trunnell applied and got a job with the new chicken wing eatery. With unshakeable determination, day after day, she took a cab to work until she saved enough money to buy a car. Thanks to her initiative, drive and attitude, Trunnell was quickly noticed by the higher-ups and consequently asked to assist in opening a location in Cincinnati. She stayed there for six months and opened two stores before going to Indianapolis and opening a location there. She continued to bounce around opening Hooters locations for several years in different cities until her family, once again, won her heart. Wanting to be closer to them, Trunnell returned home. She nonetheless remained eager to stay with the company for which she had worked so hard, and thus was able to convince Hooters to give her a position at the Louisville headquarters in marketing and promotion. She remembers telling them that with all the carwashes and charity events at which the Hooters girls would make appearances, there needed to be someone in a position of leadership to coordinate these remote affairs. “Somebody actually needs to organize this stuff,” she remembers saying to her superiors. It didn’t take long for Trunnell to regain her gypsy itch, however, and after one year in this new position, she headed to Canada to open more Hooters locations and work to make the brand international. She refers to it as one of the most difficult times of her life due to the task itself but fondly recollects her contribution to the company. But after she had spent only a couple of years abroad, her grandfather became ill. Always one to put family first, Trunnell decided that she had to move back home to be close to her family and help take care of her grandfather. Consequently, after spending nine years with Hooters and opening a total of 36 restaurants, she resigned from the company. Trunnell moved back home and found herself in a

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similar situation she had been in nine years prior, without a steady job. This is when fate stepped in. Trunnell had a friend from her early Hooters days named Edie, and Edie now worked as a local stage runner connecting touring musicians with local help when they would come through Louisville. Whether the tour needed local stagehands, catering assistants or dressing room attendants, Edie would connect the parties. Edie first solicited Trunnell to be the driver for the touring metal band Pantera as they came through Louisville. Trunnell was initially resistant, but once she tried it, she loved the opportunities working with the tours presented. “It was fun to meet people and spend 12 hours with people you didn’t know and make friends,” shares Trunnell. “You’d see the show, it would be over, and they’d leave town. But then you’d have this empty feeling of ‘I miss them! I want to do it again!’ And then there’d be another show.” Trunnell was so enamored by the experience that she was determined to make it her full-time job. She inserted herself as a key player into not only the Louisville market but also those of Indianapolis, Lexington, Cincinnati and Evansville.

“When I went out and saw bits and pieces of his show for the first time, I was like, ‘Wow, this is amazing,’”

Over the years, she got to know certain artists and would stick with them as they toured the region each year. Meanwhile, one particular country tour was annually coming to the region to prep for their national tours. Trunnell got involved with their camp and worked with them each time they came through the area. She got to know the crew, and so, when Chesney embarked on his first stadium tour in 2004, the team knew they’d need more help and hired Trunnell to work with them on the stadium shows. After working on just her second performance in a stadium with the team, she was hired to work year-round for Chesney. With the majority of her experience having been with rock and heavy metal tours, Trunnell admittedly reveals it was after she first became comfortable with her permanent behindthe-scenes job that she decided to take a peek in front of the curtain and catch a glimpse of the man she was working for. “When I went out and saw bits and pieces of his show for the first time, I was like, ‘Wow, this is amazing,’” she exudes. “Once I saw what he does I thought ‘I’m never leaving here.’” Indeed, if Trunnell was not so moved by or did not fully believe in the spirit and music of Chesney, it wouldn’t be a job she’d want to keep forever. “It’s definitely hard at times to live this life,” she ponders. “But we become those people. We’re like gypsies. We’re

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not used to sitting still and being in one place.” Fortunately for Trunnell and the rest of her band of gypsies, their boss is a true gentleman and exemplary leader for the group. “I love him with all my heart,” she gushes of Chesney. “He’s like a brother to me. We spend 12 to 15 hours a day, three to five days a week for six to nine months out of the year together. He’s so funny; he’s so witty; he’s so country! He’s just such a good soul.” One of Trunnell’s favorite memories with Chesney happened last summer during a year that Chesney took off from touring in order to create his album “The Big Revival.” She remembers him telling her six weeks in advance he wanted to do a small, intimate show at a local beachside bar, Flora-Bama. Because he had taken the entire year off, most of his staff was on other tours and unavailable to work. Trunnell thought it would be okay since it was a small show, but then two weeks later, Chesney told her and his production team he wanted a bigger show. It continued to grow from there. “Over the course of the six weeks, it went from a little stage, no big deal, to a full on stadium show in the sand with most of our crew missing,” Trunnell recalls. “We were a skeleton crew doing this. We didn’t have any runners; we didn’t have any golf carts, but somehow we muddled through and put on this free, three-hour show for 60,000 people.” That wasn’t the only mammoth show Trunnell was a part of last summer. When

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Chesney wasn’t touring, she would also work for George Strait. When Strait embarked on the second leg of his two-year “The Cowboy Rides Away Tour” during 2013 and 2014, Trunnell was able to join him as Chesney wasn’t touring at the time. She remembers it as an exceptionally emotional tour to be on, as every night was a countdown to “parking the bus for good,” but Strait’s final show at the AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas was particularly memorable. Strait played in the round in that stadium, allowing for a record-breaking number of fans to be included. “We knew it was going to be massive, but we didn’t realize just how massive until we were really in it,” Trunnell recounts of the show. Sure

“It’s definitely hard at times to live this life. But we become those people. We’re like gypsies. We’re not used to sitting still and being in one place.” enough, thanks to Strait’s iconic career and a host of guest stars including Martina McBride, Jason Aldean, Eric Church, Sheryl Crow, Vince Gill, Alan Jackson, Miranda Lambert and, of course, Kenny Chesney, an unprecedented 104,793 fans

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turned out for the event, making it the largest indoor concert ever in North America, a record previously set by The Rolling Stones in 1981. As she continues on with her nomadic lifestyle, Trunnell looks forward to setting more records and always staying one step ahead in her field. “Every day that you’re working on a show, you can almost forget the show that you’re working on because you’re moving forward to tomorrow’s show and the next show and the show next week, and there seems to always be a show coming up that’s bigger than the one you’re doing,” she describes. This is the life she has always dreamed of living--from high school to Hooters--she has always been on the move and enjoyed moving from place to place. “I love to be busy,” she admits. “I get really antsy if I sit still. And because of all the traveling, I’ll come home and sort of go through a moment where I ask myself ‘what will I do with myself today?’” This fall, though, will be the first time in a long time that she’ll get to spend an extended amount of time at home, reconnecting with old friends, catching up with her mom and playing with her cat, Sammy. But as happy as she is to be home, she’s always looking at the road ahead. “As long as our road family is passionate about this, I’ll do it with them,” she asserts. And that’s just how her life is. She couldn’t sit at an office desk even if she wanted to. Trunnell is a woman who lives and breathes music, who has an insatiable desire to see the world. With a grin that gives her away, she concedes, “I love being home, but then all of a sudden I get this weird feeling of, ‘I need to pack a suitcase, and go somewhere. I have nowhere to go, I have nowhere to be, but I need to travel and go somewhere.’”

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“It’s goosebump moments when people see what Kenny does in these NFL football stadiums. He speaks to every single fan, like eye-to-eye contact that a lot of other people just don’t do.”

Photos Courtesy of EB Media FALL 2015

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Written by Nicole Troxell Photography by Clay Cook 40 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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Dick Clark, Rock School, Guitar Toilets:

THE STORY OF

MOM’S MUSIC

I

n the 1960s when Marvin Maxwell and his band Soul Incorporated auditioned and won a spot touring with Dick Clark’s Caravan of Stars, he never dreamed he would end up becoming an internationally known Louisville icon – or that he would open Mom’s Music, a staple of Louisville’s music culture. Maxwell joined the grueling touring scene with the Caravan of Stars in 1960s, performing 30 shows in 30 nights in 30 states. But one thing it taught him was how to be a good musician. “Since we were pretty together as far as backing acts and things, we could learn tunes and such very quickly, and so we were hired out as studio musicians for a lot of people back in the ’60s and ‘70s,” Maxwell recalls. “I’ve been a player all my life.” His studio musician skills lead him to backing various bands in Louisville at a studio called Sambo, later Alan Martin Productions, where some of the earliest rock bands in the area recorded. By the mid 1960s, Maxwell took a job with Baldwin Piano Company, then looking to get into the latest craze – the rock ‘n’ roll business – which lead him straight into the instrument business and finally to founding Mom’s Music on Frankfort Avenue in 1979. When Maxwell started Mom’s, he had to figure out what to call the business. He considered his initials and thought about how if you just inserted an ‘o’ in the middle, it spelled ‘mom.’ That’s when it hit him: Who’s ever taken better care of you than your mom? And Mom’s became not only the name, but the philosophy behind how he runs his business. Maxwell believes in operating a wholesome, family-friendly FALL 2015

business, with “good honest people who treat you like your mom.” Mom’s sells some of the best quality brands of musical instruments, Maxwell says, but more than that, they provide a service to the community. The space is equipped to repair instruments, and the staff is composed of people who know how to recommend what you need. Maxwell has schooled family and employees on the complexity of the music business and its instruments. Mom’s also provides private studios, rehearsal spaces and music lessons to both adults and children as part of his School of Rock program. Some of his pupils

have gone on to audition for “American Idol,” including his own granddaughter. Maxwell believes in instilling music appreciation in the family and at school.“If kids play music, they become smarter and they behave better,” he argues. “Some have even improved in school.” Maxwell children’s rock school was among the first in the country, he says. He already had a reputation as a skilled musician, so he was approached by Yamaha of Japan with a proposal to start the rock school for non-players. What’s different about this type of music lesson is that it helps pupils form and learn to play in their own bands, which, Maxwell says, is every

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“If kids play

MUSIC,

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music-lover’s dream in the first place. The first day of class, he groups students into individual bands. He’s even had a fatherson team in a band, which is a great way to spend time together, he thinks. When he first started it, he didn’t think it was possible. “I thought, ‘You can’t do this. You cannot have kids who have no musical experience, teach them how to play and put them in front of parents and friends within two months and have it be a success. But we did, and it worked,” he remembers. Maxwell has been sold on the idea of the rock school ever since, and it continues today. Mom’s also delivers services to the community. A large part of the business involves designing and installing new sound systems inside churches and schools. But perhaps the most unique adventure Mom’s is embarking on today is custommade guitar toilets seats. Maxwell got the FALL 2015

idea for a guitar toilet seat back in the ’60s. He wanted to make himself a guitar, so he bought a cheap toilet seat for the body and constructed a guitar functional enough to play in shows. “It was funny at the time. But then I got to thinking, ‘Why don’t I just do the opposite?’” And that’s when the guitar toilet seat was born. To construct the toilet seat, Maxwell attaches the body of a guitar to a toilet lid and then to the seat itself for a custom made toilet. He took his product to the National Association of Music Merchants show 20 years ago, and it exploded. Conan O’Brien, “Today” and The Wall Street Journal have all featured his toilets. He first made models named for bands, like the Van Halen model, but then started playing on words for the names of his later models such as the “Guitarlette,” the “Screamer” and the “Pee-ano.” Now he can’t produce enough and has

actually set up shop in China to churn them out faster to the likes of Steven Spielberg and Dolly Parton, who incidentally bought one engraved with a secret message that was sent to an unnamed top Hollywood producer. “She wouldn’t tell us what she wanted engraved or who it was going to,” he reveals. While Maxwell is excited about the prospect of rock ‘n’ roll toilets, he emphasizes that the purpose of Mom’s is to give back to the community through music. Whether people go to Mom’s to learn to play or to somewhere else doesn’t matter as much to him. “I want people to play music no matter where they shop,” he contends. “Music teaches love. It’s a gift.” Mom’s Music is located at 1900 Mellwood Avenue. For more information, call 502.897.3304 or visit www.momsmusic. com

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Mellwood

antiques&inter iors Now accepting new dealers. Sunday - Thursday 10 -5 • Friday & Saturday 10 - 6 1860 Mellwood Avenue • Louisville, KY 40206 502.895.1306 • mellwoodantiques.com

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PUTTING DREAMS ON WHEELS Written by A.J. Jones and Remy Sisk Photography by Chris Hollo

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KYLEE ERVIN President of Diamond Coach Leasing LLC

W

e’ve all seen them. Whether on the highway or near a large music venue when an artist is in town – big, sleek tour busses that speak of success, of glamour, of making it. While to most of us, they’re simply what take an artist from one city to the next, for Kylee Ervin, they’re the realization of dreams.

Ervin is the president of Nashville-based Diamond Coach, a company that provides touring artists and entertainers with high-quality, luxurious tour busses. Although she is now the woman behind a stunningly impressive line of coaches – having worked with the likes of Kelly Clarkson, Rascal Flatts, Miranda Lambert and Hunter Hayes – Ervin fell into this business by complete chance. She grew up in Toledo, a small farming community on the eastern side of Illinois. After graduating from high school, she moved to New Albany, Indiana so that she could attend mortuary school in nearby Jeffersonville. “I was 18, and I didn’t know what I wanted to do with my life,” she recalls. “Really, I wanted to be a jockey, but I outgrew that option when I was about 5,” she adds with a laugh. Nonetheless, she did indeed successfully graduate from mortuary school and then began planning her future in Louisville. But then came the errand that changed the course of her life forever. Ervin’s father, who she refers to as her hero, had been an investor in a Nashville entertainment coach company. Displeased with how things were going in Tennessee, he asked his smart, trustworthy and business-minded daughter to go down to Nashville and investigate for herself. The plan was for Ervin to gather more information, collect the equipment and weigh the option of leaving the industry. But while she was there, she met the business manager of one of the artists who was using her father’s busses. Though Ervin was planning on packing up and leaving Nashville, her new acquaintance encouraged her to stay and give the industry a shot for herself. Intrigued by the business, Ervin called her father and told him she wanted to stay and go forward in the entertainment coach industry. FALL 2015

“My expectations are probably entirely too high because I saw the way my father and family worked, and they didn’t quit.”

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Photos Courtesy of Diamond Coach

of transportation. Once you know that part, you can learn the more political side of things: trying to keep bus drivers and road managers and artists and business managers and everyone happy. It takes time to learn how.”

“It wasn’t neurosurgery,” she remembers thinking. “It just seemed like a fun way to get into the transportation business.” Eager to jump-start her new career, Ervin buckled down and began learning the basics, which started with the busses themselves. “The maintenance is so important,” she asserts. “If your maintenance program isn’t good, it’s really 50 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

hard to fix things on the road … These new motors are so advanced that finding techs that can work with them is always a challenge.” But Ervin also had to learn how to keep people happy. With so many different parties involved, there’s a lot of customers she has to keep happy. “Maintenance is maintenance, no matter what the mode

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Despite the myriad of skillsets she had to very quickly acquire, she was infused with drive and determination as she watched her business steadily grow. “It’s been a good ride … It’s essentially a hotel fleet,” she describes of her business. “Imagine all of the things you must do to run a hotel and then combine it with all that you must do to run a transportation or shipping business.” Each week, Ervin works with her staff of 30 and driver staff of 100 to ensure everyone is pulling their weight and operating at the highest possible rate of productivity and efficiency to get the tasks at hand completed. “My expectations are probably entirely too high because I saw the way my father and family worked, and they didn’t quit,” she ponders. “I think I learned that from my dad: You do whatever it is that needs to be done until the job is done. And this job? It is never done. There is always more FALL 2015


Photos Courtesy of Diamond Coach


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“ I can design a trash chute that is hidden, a dog kennel to look like a coffee table, fit it in a bus with room for many people to sleep and everyone is comfortable and happy.”

to do.” She stops for a moment to collect her thoughts. “It’s like a circus,” she finally says.

product to an artist who’s been dreaming of his first tour bus since he was a little boy.

But a circus can’t operate without the keen and watchful mind of its ringleader, and what keeps this ringleader going is 100 percent customer satisfaction. “My passion is bringing somebody’s dream to real life,” she explains. “That’s what’s satisfying to me and what brings me such fulfillment. It makes all the other nonsense worth it.” To be in this business, one must be direct and straightforward, attentive to the customer without seeming overbearing. And that’s what Ervin has down to an art.

But Ervin absolutely relishes the opportunity to create and, ultimately, deliver this kind of happiness. “It’s great to be able to do work when the results make you proud of what you have done,” she relates. “I can design a trash chute that is hidden and a dog kennel to look like a coffee table; I’ll fit as much as I can in a bus with enough room for many people to sleep and everyone to be comfortable and happy. And it looks nice…I take their vision, and I build it in a 45-foot tube.”

Her preeminent priority is doing everything she can to realize the client’s dreams, especially when those dreams have been years in the making. “One of my clients has been cutting out pictures of busses since he was old enough to cut,” she describes. And she is all too aware that she cannot deliver a less-than-stellar

This is not to say, however, that her job is without hardship. “It can be a challenge, too,” she confesses. Entertainers will usually hit the road on Wednesday or Thursday, and when they get back, it turns into crunchtime. “They will come back in on Monday or Tuesday, but that means we only have a day or two to do all

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of the mechanical maintenance, clear and reset the interiors and get it ready to go. And there are 65 buses on this schedule.” There’s truly never a moment to lose. With the inherent frenzy of her job, Ervin cherishes her – very scarce – downtime. She enjoys spending it either working on her 80 acre farm just outside of Nashville or relaxing in the nearby city. “I love horses and the farm,” she says. “And I love fancy shoes and shopping. And I love that I can have both. I’m really lucky and really happy.” Ervin looks forward to maintaining her business’s growth and keeping up with the constant stream of demands. As the artists she works with continue to grow, she, too, must grow. But when it feels just a little too hard to keep going, she thinks of her father and how his perseverance and drive inspired her. “I always go back to that. To not quitting because it’s important to do what I say I will – no matter how long it takes.”

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Musical Instruments: Guitars, Drums, Keyboards and Accessories Professional Audio & Installation • Rock School Program • Lessons Band Instrumental Rental • Repairs

- SINCE 1979 -

1900 Mellwood Avenue • Louisville, KY 40206 • 502.897.3304


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OUTDOOR ARTISTRY Iroquois Amphitheater

Written by Nicole Troxell Courtesy Photos 58 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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F

rom Liberace to Billy Idol, Iroquois Amphitheater has seen it all. Built in 1938 as part of the federal Works Progress Administration – the largest initiative sprung from Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal to provide jobs to the unemployed – the amphitheater has seen the likes of Alice Cooper, Carol Channing, REO Speedwagon, Greg Allman and more. Situated in scenic Iroquois Park, the amphitheater has been a staple of the city for decades. But less than 10 years ago, when the economy hit bottom, the venue was lulled into a period of inactivity. The park’s business and offerings were impacted, and the amphitheater seemed to be fading on the horizon. Now, in 2015, it expects to see more than 80,000 visitors before the end of the year. What changed? A successful revamping of marketing goals, strategies and the building itself. In 2004, Iroquois Amphitheater underwent a major makeover by Metro Parks. After receiving funding from the Commonwealth of Kentucky and the Louisville Olmstead Park Conservancy, the city installed more seating, a partial roof to keep out weather conditions, a new stage, concession stands, a place for community meetings and more restrooms. For performers, renovations offered updated dressing rooms with heating and cooling systems and a green room. Metro Parks made use of original building materials in each detail. Then, the agency worked to bring in acts that would bring the amphitheater back to life. Mike Slaton, Iroquois Amphitheater and rental office manager, started working there in 2011, and he’s watched the venue grow immensely as a result of realizing its ambitions. “One of the things that we’ve done is have a partnership with Production Simple for the last five years,” Slaton describes. “They bring out the Coors Light Iroquois Amphitheater Summer Concert Series. The first year I was out here, they did 10 shows, and now it’s closer to 17 shows. That has grown progressively. The orchestra came out last year for the first time since the recession started, and they’re coming out here again for their second show of the season. They did a paid show in July, and they’ll do a free show in FALL 2015

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“We make sure that dance and music are a part of what we do out here every year. If we can just get a few people in here to experience that and become arts patrons, that’s important.” September. I think since the economy is picking up [guests] are able to come out.” These days, you’re likely to see nationally known acts, both older and contemporary, such as The Shins, The National (a sold-out show), Umphrey’s McGee, Wilco, Arctic Monkeys and a return visit from The Decemberists. But the amphitheater isn’t just interested in money-making acts. They aim to offer the community a chance to be exposed to as many art forms as possible. “We’ve built in some arts programming at a low cost or completely free with groups like the Louisville Winds and the UofL Dance Theatre,” Slaton explains. “We work with them to produce free shows. We’ve really beefed up our calendar from 2008/2009, when there was almost nothing going on … We also have the Louisville Philharmonia, which is a free orchestra. In the past we’ve worked with the Derby City Brass Band, and UofL School of Music has a jazz quartet that came out and did a show.” Though concerts are the biggest draw and usually sell out, the Louisville Orchestra performed last year on short notice to an estimated 1,400 people, just over half of the venue’s 2,348 seating capacity and certainly a decent turnout for a local arts event. And those audiences are growing, according to Slaton, but competing with blockbuster movies or national acts is tough for arts events. Slaton attributes that to decreasing arts education and the widening gap between arts 60 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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traditions and what the public has learned to appreciate. But the amphitheater is determined to stay the course. And many other local events help make up the difference. Each year, the venue holds the Americana Community Center’s World Festival, the Kentucky Music Weekend and even the Jack-o-Lantern Spectacular, which is expected to draw as many as 90,000 people within three weeks. The Spectacular highlights the craft of pumpkin-carving, showcasing as many as 5,000 jack-o-lanterns in one week, pulling people from all over the country to marvel at its magnificence. The money earned from the more popular events goes to build playgrounds like the California Playground in West Louisville that is accessible to children of all abilities. Though arts events don’t always profit as substantially, Slaton says they want to continue these traditions as long as they can be financially responsible about how money is spent. “We’re a public agency, so we have to be good stewards of public money. There are times when we have to take risks if we want to bring the arts out, but at the same time we can’t take a huge loss time after time doing events,” Slaton says. “We’ve done some theatre. The first three years I was here, I produced a musical each year,

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trying to continue to have theatre be apart of what we did. People were coming. We probably had about 1,500 people here the last year over six nights, which is not a terrible attendance for a theatrical production in Louisville, but it wasn’t enough for us to be able to justify the time and effort that was going into it and the number of dates we had to tie up.” Though the agency couldn’t quite figure out the perfect formula to continue theatre, Slation says they’re still interested in giving it a try and that they always want a variety of arts to continue to be a part of what they’re doing. “We make sure that dance and music are a part of what we do out here every year,” he expresses. “If we can just get a few people in here to experience that and become arts patrons, that’s important.” Regardless of the programming, Iroquois Amphitheater is sure to continue to engross the Louisville community for years to come. It is the only theatre of its size and of its kind (i.e outdoors) in the city. That alone makes it a venue that Louisville must embrace, support and cherish as it continues to enrich our culture with diverse and engaging offerings. To view Iroquois Amphitheatre’s concert calendar, visit www.iroquoisamphitheatre. com.

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J. R. WARD’s

Heart is in Louisville “

I

’m actually not that interesting.”

As I sit down with J. R. Ward in her formal drawing room, I find that hard to believe. In the past decade and a half, she’s gone from being the chief of staff at of one Harvard’s academic medical centers in Boston to an author with multiple #1 New York Times bestsellers. There are over fifteen million copies of her books in print and her work has been translated into twenty-nine different languages and sold around the world. Oh, and then there’s the television pilot deal with NBC and Endemol Studios for her newest series, The Bourbon Kings.

days a week. And she wouldn’t have it any other way. “I’m grateful for the work. The thing is, I have no idea when this train is going to end. Tomorrow? A year from now?

“Provided you can keep the quality up,” Ward hedges. “Which is where the work comes in.” Ward is not a fan, as she puts it, of vacations, downtime, days off, relaxation- and that is a good thing considering how many books she’s contracted to write in the next twenty-four months. She is one year into a three year deal to write nine books for Penguin Random House, and I can hear the exhaustion in her voice when she talks about her schedule.

So surely she has to be even a little interesting. “I think people have this romantic notion about writers. That we wait for a muse to come and inspire us, that we write into the wee hours by candlelight and then are feted by our adoring public. None of that is true; at least not for me. Ninety percent of my job is sitting alone in my room and typing. It’s not glamorous or romantic. It’s grinding out the work day after day and trying to keep my head straight under the pressure. I’m more boxer shorts than ball gowns, I promise you.” When she tells me she’s taken a total of nine days off in the last decade, I start to get a feel for what she’s talking about. Ward looks at her creative career as a job like any other, one that has her up before seven and working until dinner, seven FALL 2015

shift in publishing that she says started about five or six years ago. Before that time, there was a widely held belief that authors should put a book out no more than once a year for fear of saturating their audience. Now, with the advent of eBooks, she says, publishers and authors are discovering that releasing two or three works every twelve months, or even more frequently, is a successful career strategy.

Twenty years? You never know how long you have in this business until the day you get out of it, and I refuse to take my readers for granted. They pay hard earned money for what I put out, so I need to leave it all on the page with every single book I write.” Ward goes on to describe a market

“It’s about four hundred and twenty thousand words of finished product a year. So that’s taking each book through the outline stage, drafting, revising, copyedits, galleys, first and second pass. You have to be very efficient to make those kinds of deadlines, and the mission critical is a good outline. The Black Dagger Brotherhood books, for example, are very complex, and I can’t afford to get into the weeds in the middle of one because there’s no time to course correct.”

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Ward maintains she doesn’t actually think up the stories. Instead, she says, they come to her like snippets of movies, revealed at their leisure and discretion, not hers. The images, which are accompanied by a full complement of sounds, smells, textures and emotions, can interrupt her at anytime, although they are most clear when she goes for one of her six mile runs.

So how did an elegant woman like her get started writing about vampires? She laughs. “It’s just what showed up in my head. I have no better an answer than that. I’d been let go by my first publisher- my initial books had been critically well-received, but they weren’t selling well enough, and therefore my contract wasn’t renewed. I needed to reinvent myself if I was going to survive in

this business... and after teasing around a couple of ideas, BAM! These leatherclad, tattooed, strangely named vampires turned up and made it clear that they were going to be written about. Within two weeks, I had ten books outlined in my head. You know, it’s funny, I didn’t expect the vampire stories to sell because the stuff was just so out there. In the first book, at the “wedding,” the hero gets the heroine’s name carved into his back. I was, like, oh my God, I’m finished. This is it; I’m going to have to be a lawyer for the rest of my natural life.” Instead, her Black Dagger Brotherhood

“It’s a little Downton Abbey, a little Dynasty, but set in Louisville.

And no, it’s not based on any families here in town, not even remotely.”

books helped to define an entire subgenre of romance. Ward’s name is synonymous with the paranormal craze which struck hardest, she says, about five years ago. Her Black Dagger Brotherhood series remains very popular, but that isn’t enough for her. “I had this other idea,” she says. “And it was based on the fact that I want to be Alexis Carrington Colby when I grow up.” After a decade of writing vampires, Ward has branched out into the moneyed South with a new series called The

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Bourbon Kings, and by all accounts, the diversification is paying off: NBC has purchased the pilot option on the books which feature a dysfunctional, doublecrossing bourbon dynasty with a lot of dark secrets and a very real financial crisis. “It’s a little Downton Abbey, a little Dynasty, but set in Louisville. And no, it’s not based on any families here in town, not even remotely. The series is a complete work of fiction, although there are a few characters that were loosely inspired by some friends of mine. You know, one of the things I love about Louisville is the

number of eccentrics we have in town, and for the first time, I found that the people in my head did bear some tangential relationship to folks I actually know.” Like who? I ask. “One of my favorite characters in The Bourbon Kings, Samuel T. Lodge, has a lot in common with one of my husband’s hunting buddies. The man in question is a true Southern gentleman who’s a wildly successful businessman from an old family. I remember being at a party with him, staring at his distinguished face and thinking... holy crap, you are a living breathing

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archetype. And before I knew it, Samuel T., the charismatic bad boy with a good heart, showed up in this man’s vintage Jaguar and was living on the guy’s farm out in Prospect. Who knew? But again, what happens to Samuel T., the choices he makes, the things he struggles with, have nothing to do with my husband’s buddy.” When Ward initially pitched the idea to her publisher a number of years ago, she wasn’t sure whether they’d like it. And yes, it is hard to imagine a more complete departure from the vampire core of her brand than a bunch of high-flyers in Louboutins and Lamborghinis. But there

are similarities, she insists. “My books are very character-driven, probably because I’m fascinated by people and what motivates them, ruins them, resurrects them. And good stories are all about conflict that feels real and is resolved in a surprising, but credible way. I’m not Hemingway, and I don’t pretend to be. But I’m very good at what I do and there is nothing wrong with giving people a fun escape.” On that note, I ask her how she gets away from it all. But, as with most questions I try to focus on her, she deflects.

You’ve got to have some vices? I press. A favorite bourbon? She shakes her head. “Actually, I don’t drink. I also don’t smoke, do drugs, or eat chocolate, cookies, cake, candy, ice cream. And if you pull an Adam Ant on me, you won’t be the first.” As I blank, she leans in. “Don’t drink, don’t smoke, what do you do...” As I laugh, she gets serious for a moment. “Basketball. I love Louisville Cardinal basketball, but it stresses me out. My big book release is at the beginning of every April, and I’m always a frickin’ mess between the NCAA tournament and

everything that has to happen to support the book going on sale. When the Cards went all the way in 2013, my head nearly exploded!” She pauses. “I also like playing poker with my buddies. That’s about it, though.” Ward says that both The Bourbon Kings books and her Black Dagger Brotherhood series are open ended, and she hopes that she will be writing into her seventies. And living in Louisville. “My soul is in New England,” she says quietly. “But my heart... belongs to Louisville.”

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A HAVEN FOR CREATIVITY

Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts Written by Wesley Kerrick Photo by Michael Fitzer 72 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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Photo courtesy of The Kentucky Center

T

here’s plenty to marvel at as you stroll down Main Street in downtown Louisville. Stunning architecture abounds, but one building in particular makes a bit more of an impact than all the rest: The Kentucky Center for the Performing Arts.

we have an incredible history of arts and culture here. It’s a very unique, very different vibe that blends traditional arts and culture with really fantastic contemporary visual arts and music, and I think that it puts us on the map as a worldclass city.”

Located at 501 W. Main St., the center is a massive building with a gorgeous glass facade that features dazzling light displays when the sun goes down. It’s the city’s bastion for the arts and as such makes a definite statement about its community: Louisville values the arts.

Baker’s three daughters are all involved in the arts, too. “I guess I just can’t get enough of it,” she says, laughing. “… So when I’m not here, I am having a blast with them.”

“Arts and culture are so much of what defines a place,” says Kentucky Center President Kim Baker. “And it’s what also gives us our spirit.” Indeed, not only does having a vibrant arts community give the city first-class entertainment options but it also wholly enriches the culture of the community. And no one knows this more than Baker, who first joined the center some 23 years ago and became president in 2014. Now that she’s in the top spot, she relishes the responsibility of leading Louisville’s arts hub into the future. “Culture is very important,” maintains Baker, the wife of attorney Mark Baker and mother of three daughters, 9, 8 and 5. “I think that in the city of Louisville,

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From its perch on Main, the center hosts more than 1,500 events each year. Between the three venues inside the center – the gargantuan 2,448-seat Whitney Hall on the main level, the mid-sized 659-seat Bomhard Theater on the east side of the center, and the intimate, experimental 139-seat MeX Theater on the second floor – the building sees about half a million visitors pass through its doors annually. Each theatre plays host to myriad festivals, lectures, plays and performances by everyone from small local companies to powerhouses such as the Louisville Orchestra and the Louisville Ballet. Programmed by the center itself, the “Kentucky Center Presents series brings world-class comedy, dance, theatre, film and more to the center. The venue can

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also host weddings, meetings and school groups. “It is a super busy place,” Baker says. Visitors come for guided tours of the center’s small but exquisite art collection. Or, they just sit in the lobby to eat lunch and talk with friends. “It’s kind of a hub of activity where all different kinds of things come together,” Baker describes. Yet for all its bragging rights, the Kentucky Center isn’t as interested in making itself a destination as it is in being a partner for the arts. Dan Forte, the center’s vice president of programming and events, sees this as a collaborative kind of leadership.“We want to see synergies,” he explains. “We don’t have to necessarily be top gun every time.” Throughout the year, The Kentucky Center partners with the Kentucky Science Center, the Louisville Film Society and the Mayor’s Music & Arts

“ARTS

AND CULTURE

are so much of what defines a place. And it’s what also gives us our spirit.” Series – to name a few. And it’s also the homebase for IdeaFestival each fall. As Forte and Baker name these partnerships, it becomes clear this enumeration could go on for a long time. “There are literally almost a thousand partners,” Baker presents. More than just a venue in Louisville, the center also coordinates arts education programs across the state. The center is the homebase for Kentucky’s Governor’s School for the Arts. The program brings high school sophomores and juniors to Centre College each summer for threeweeks of focused arts instruction. The Governor’s School also provides handson arts enrichment workshops – or

74 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

President Kim Baker.

“ArtShops” – in four Kentucky cities each fall. Along with several other organizations, the center is doing its part to give children, as Baker puts it, “a very wellrounded education, which makes them creative and better equipped to succeed in college and the workforce – and in every other aspect.” To aid in this mission, the Kentucky Center’s statewide teacher academies train teachers to bring the arts into their classrooms. “Arts in our school system is something that, over the last several decades,

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Photo by Clay Cook

has really declined in presence and support and funding,” concludes Baker. Although arts education is sadly dwindling statewide, the Kentucky Center is thankfully working around the clock to maintain the arts presence in Louisville – to be a protector and supporter of the arts and to provide artists locally and nationally with the foundation they need to perform. All that’s left for them to do is create. To view Kentucky Center for the Performing Art’s event calendar, visit www. kentuckycenter.org.

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Photo by Michael Weintrob

Straight No Chaser will perform Tuesday, November 10 at Whitney Hall.

Photo by Lois Greenfield

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Mother Falcon and Ben Sollee will perform Sunday, October 11 at The Brown Theatre.

Parsons Dance will perform Thursday, October 15 at The Brown Theatre.

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Photography by Robert Burge Written by Steve Kaufman 78 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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MODERN TWIST on a FRENCH PROVINCIAL FALL 2015

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A nod to the French countryside designed by Bittners T

he stately French Provincial-style stucco home sits back off the road, behind a large gravel courtyard, surrounded by several acres of leafy woodland with trees and horse trails – yet another example of historic Anchorage architecture from the early 20th century. Except this house was built in 2008. “They were looking for new construction with an old world feel,” Christopher Prather, designer at Bittners, says of homeowners’ Anna and Mike Boone. “And inside, they wanted an Italian classic feel, but not too opulent or fussy. Formal, but inviting. A functional house that could be comfortable to their children and grandchildren, yet still have a sense of style.” “The process took several years,” says Prather. The intent was that each room be somewhat different, not a trendy series of matching set pieces, but with a consistency so that every room flowed. And, says project Architect Frank Pierce, Anna Boone “wanted drama.” That drama starts right at the beginning, a foyer just inside the three front doors, a central entryway that Pierce refers to as “the gallery.” Because of the symmetrical architecture of the H-shaped house, the gallery is actually a long, wide hallway between the two wings. The length of the gallery gave Prather several opportunities to make distinct statements with elegant chandeliers and marble floors. “We tried to keep it classic with a neutral color and pattern, but with a dark brown marble border in the flooring.” Almost everything is symmetry, including a pair of antique Italian consoles on either side of

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the entrance into the living room, with identical Venetian-style mirrors, a pair of side chairs and antique urns beneath the console. “Using antique pieces as accessories adds to the older feel of the home, but we took our time and tried to be very specific to get the right pieces,” says Prather. For example, the designer says, “the console tables sat for two years without anything around them because we just couldn’t find what we wanted. Then Bittners got a couple of marble urns in, and both Mrs. Boone and I said, ‘That’s just what we’ve been looking for!’ ” According to Prather, Bittners’ President and COO Douglas Riddle regularly shops the antique markets in Chicago, New York and Atlanta for new finds, and Prather was on the lookout with every delivery. “The advantage of being both the manager of the showroom and deliveries at Bittners is that I can get my hands on everything that comes into The Design Studio,” he says. “As we developed the style we wanted for the house, I was able to show the client many interesting pieces and accessories.” Another “just the right find” in the gallery is a plaster Greco-Roman bust on a black table with a marble base. It looks like the perfect purchase from a European antique gallery. He had Bittners’ master craftsmen make a wooden table for it and now, Prather says, it’s the focal point at the front of the house, a piece of understated elegance that everyone loves. Tying the gallery together is a commissioned mural by Louisville artist Sandy Kimura, a pastoral Anchorage scene of woodsy animals, trees, creeks and stone fences that wraps all the way around the space. “The foyer sets a tone of elegance but not

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pretentiousness, with a soothing and subtle palette that doesn’t overwhelm,” Prather says. Directly from the center of the gallery is a view through a two-story great room to a set of French doors and into the woods beyond. The room is furnished with the plush, stylish but comfortable seating that Bittners is known for designing and manufacturing – in this case cut-velvet upholstery with a raffia fabric on the side and antique nail heads. Patterned pillows and seats blend in with the cream and beige of the upholstery and antique rug. Prather mirrored an alcove wall at one end of the room to provide a counter focal point against a stone fireplace with an Italian old-world feel at the other end of the room. A wooden chandelier with a gilded finish accentuates the room with the beauty of aged gold. The home’s palette of mostly creams, whites and beige is not only elegant and understated, but allows the Boones a comfortable, casual lifestyle, especially when their many grandchildren come over. The rooms are large, the grounds sprawl and the abundant acreage permits plenty of spreading out and also plenty of exterior views. For that reason, French doors and tall windows, many without window treatments, let the outside pour in. The architectural symmetry is not only from side to side but also from front to back so every window and door in the front is mimicked on the back wall by windows and doors. A lower-level walk-out in the back, where the ground slopes down, leads to terraces, patios and gardens. Light circulates through the space as do air currents, keeping the interior cool. However, as a practical matter, the house is insulated just as it might have been done if it were really built 100 years ago. The front wall of the house is 12 inches thick, says Pierce, and cladded with real stucco, not a product emulating stucco. Not every room features the neutral palette of softly painted walls. At one end of the entry hallway

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is a soothing study, with dark wood wall paneling and moldings, leather and earth tone furniture and built-in bookcases filled with antique books. “It’s meant as a retreat for after-dinner drinks,” says Prather, “but Mrs. Boone has found this to be her favorite room to go into and read, just a warm and cozy solitude.” Even here, though, Prather didn’t abandon the elements of color throughout the rest of the house. A green band ingeniously inserted between the paneling and the molding, and curtains with a leafy/floral pattern, reflect the mural in the adjoining hallway. There’s another change of pace in the hearth room adjoining the open kitchen, an open space with vaulted ceiling lines and beams and a more contemporary piece of art, also by Sandy Kimura, hanging over a contemporary fireplace. “This room is for when the family comes over,” Prather explains. “The open space that leads directly from the kitchen is how people gather in today’s lifestyle. The kitchen used to be in the back of the house and closed off. Now it’s where people want to congregate.” Another gathering space is the family room on the lower level. The room is a little more informal and casual featuring a beautiful cowhide rug on the floor. The creamy upholstered seating, polished wood floors and arched mirrors with window-like panes keep the room classical and elegant. And nice surprise is a guest bedroom in the back of the lower-level area featuring four built-in bunk beds, complete with shelves and reading lights, oversized pillows and stuffed animals. On the opposite wall is a matching entertainment cabinet with a TV and gaming system, clearly intended for the younger grandchildren. From family gatherings to formal entertaining, this home took a modern twist on a traditional French Provincial with the expertise of a legendary design firm, Bittners.

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A HOUSE OF MUSIC Mercury Ballroom

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he distinctive Tudor-Gothic building at 611 S. Fourth St. in Downtown Louisville has a past worthy of a spot on the National Register of Historic Places, where it landed in 1984. On April 9, 2014, that building experienced a renaissance, and further justified the city’s presence on Time Magazine’s list of Best Music Scenes. The then-brand new Mercury Ballroom hosted its first concert on that Wednesday evening back in 2014 – country singer Corey Smith. It has since filled its schedule with an eclectic roster of performers, from hip hop to country, and from DJs 104 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

to cover bands. What was once a basic office building for Old Charter Bourbon Whiskey distributors Wright & Taylor, Inc. is now a modern, state-of-the-art, 900-capacity entertainment venue. Matt Schwegman, Senior Talent Buyer for the venue’s owner, Live Nation, said the transition took about five months to get from first hammer to open doors. “It was interesting to watch it go from a gutted old building into what we’ve got now, an exciting new live music venue with state-of-the-art lights, sounds and décor. It was vacant prior – literally rubble. Someone had a much grander vision than me to make this space what it is

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now,” he said. The Mercury Ballroom is run by the same company that runs the Palace Theater, and is on the same block in the city’s theater district, which also includes dining options, a new hotel and radio stations. Schwegman, who moved to Louisville about two years ago from Indianapolis, said the two venues complement each other perfectly. “It makes a lot of sense to have another live music venue in that little district that’s really starting to blossom. There are a lot of really awesome venues here in town and we’re lucky to be a part of it,” he said. FALL 2015


“It was interesting to watch it go from a gutted old building into what we’ve got now, an exciting new live music venue with STATE-OF-THE-ART LIGHTS, SOUNDS AND DÉCOR.” The two Live Nation venues serve different purposes – the Palace holds about 2,500 people and is generally used for larger acts and shows, while the Mercury gets anywhere from 500 to 900 people in its doors to watch up-and-coming acts, such as The Lone Bellow, Mat Kearney, Tori Kelly, Mac Miller and Sundy Best. “There’s a large enough gap between the type of acts that come to the Mercury versus the Palace. We can be successful with 400 people in the room and it still looks great in that space. There are a lot of bands at that stage in their career that fit nicely into that slot,” Schwegman said. The Palace is also very much a traditional theater, while the Mercury was meticulously updated to reflect modern aesthetics, from the lighting fixtures to the refurbished barn wood and funky chandelier. “It feels comfortable and cozy and clean,” Schwegman said. But what the venue’s developers really focused on was the sound system, which he says is basically an arena-grade (JBL line array) system modified for a club. “We had to let music fans know that we are committed to the best show and experience and we’re fortunate enough to have access to this sort of sound system through House of Blues Entertainment (a Live Nation subsidiary),” Schwegman said.

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“I’ve been really proud of the schedule. We’ve intentionally been

ECLECTIC.

We’re aimed at being a place you can go to see any kind of act” His enthusiasm about the Mercury Ballroom is infectious and fresh, especially considering his 20 years of experience working at music venues. He said business so far has met expectations and proudly lists off a host of musical acts that have graced the Mercury’s stage; acts that no doubt showcase the venue’s commitment to variety – Chase Rice, Megan Trainor, Dr. Dog, Sturgill Simpson, Halestorm, Christina Perri and Lindsey Sterling, for starters. “I’ve been really proud of the schedule. We’ve intentionally been eclectic. We’re aimed at being a place you can go to see any kind of act,” Schwegman said. “We’ll stick with a plan of trying to hit what I call 360 degrees of entertainment, where mom and dad come one night to FALL 2015

see a band, brother and sister come the next night and your uncle comes on the weekend.” He says Louisville can absolutely support and sustain another musical venue, especially one like the Mercury that is aimed more at “quality acts versus quantity of acts,” and that is accessible for emerging performers and local musicians. “Our city is growing and developing and there is a lot going on here,” Schwegman said. “Louisville has found its way with food, culture and music and there’s always something cool going on here. There’s a good buzz and we’re excited to be part of it.” To view Mercury Ballroom’s concert calendar, visit www.mercuryballroom.com.

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where there’s

A WELL, there’s a way

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hey huddle inside Land Rovers, waiting out the blinding sandstorm that’s kicked up unexpectedly. They swipe at the sand that has somehow found its way into many covered crevices. The team, divided between two vehicles, have journeyed thousands of miles to document a community in the Rift Valley. Their thoughts, however, are not on the distance they’ve come, but on the distance the people of Tanzania have to walk through the desert to retrieve water, water that could eventually kill them, in order to survive.

Louisville native and founder of Nadus Films, Coury Deeb and his production crew —Justin Gustavison and Clay Cook — are joined by the captain of the St. Louis Rams and nonprofit Waterboys’ founder, Chris Long, his wife Megan Long, WorldServe leader Laura Chauvin, Director of WorldServe John Bongiorno, and Goodwill Ambassador to Tanzania (and Brad Pitt’s better-looking brother) Doug Pitt. They each take turns peeking out from scarves they’ve pulled over their eyes, noses, and mouths. From the granulated horizon they watch as one, two, then six Maasai warriors emerge like pixilated mirages. They are joined by women and children from their village. Undeterred by the winds and sand, the nomadic tribe, clothed in a confusing collection of red, plaid wraps and Western branded t-shirts, walk toward them. They are on a journey, one they make daily to collect drinking water from a stagnant source they share with wild beasts. The pool of water they are heading for is brown from both dirt and defecation. As the Americans wait for the sand to stop blowing, they understand the value of this moment; it’s the one they have come to capture, but they are quickly losing light. Jumping into action, Coury shouts instruction to Justin and Clay, his voice barely detectable over the buzz and whirl of the storm. He tries not to think about what sand could do to the tens of thousands of dollars of gear. He just knows that people need to see this. Coury, Justin and Clay grab their cameras, Chris grabs a football, and they all step into the sand storm. Two months after their trip to Tanzania, Chris Long is back at work in the States. The St. Louis Rams had their third preseason game this past Sunday. He’ll put in twelve hour work days from now on into, with any luck, February. That leaves little time for growing an initiative. But somehow, Chris manages to dig deep and finds a way.

In a rare free moment, we spoke with him about his initiative called

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How do you have time to be both an NFL player and run a non-profit? Working on an initiative off the field, in season, is valuable and rewarding. It creates that balance I think every athlete should have. Football takes 95% of your waking life in season. How you spend the other 5% is what keeps you sane. I love working on it when I can, but I have a strong team that works even while I’m on the field or in the meeting room at Rams Park. Nicole Woodie, who runs my foundation, works tirelessly. In conjunction with Doug Pitt, John Bongiorno and Laura Chauvin at WorldServe international, I’ve got a winning team. Most Americans are aware of the shortage of clean water in Africa. Assuming you didn’t start Waterboys to promote awareness, what did you start it for? There is danger in assuming Americans are aware of the issue. I think many are mildly aware, but understanding and caring are a different thing. Not only are we raising real money, we are also trying to raise awareness and make people give a damn. This portion is critical because this isn’t just an Africa problem. It’s a worldwide issue, and could affect all of us in the near future. Being a human being doesn’t have borders or a nationality, and this is a good campaign to show that.

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CHRIS LONG Founder of Waterboys

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Top: Chris Long, NFL player and founder of Waterboys, and Doug Pitt, Goodwill Ambassador For Tanzania, surveying the poor water conditions in a Maasi village in the Monduli region near Arusha, Tanzania. Bottom: A drill strikes water for the first time at Waterboys Well Site #1 near Singida, Tanzania.


...giving the gift of

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Why Tanzania? Why I picked Kilimanjaro to climb 3 off seasons ago, I’ll never know. But the beauty of the region and the people struck me. Equally, the extreme nature of the poverty and the stoicism of those suffering from it struck me. How could I leave this place that had given me such a surreal experience and not do something to engage with it positively? There are so many places in the world that need help. If everyone sat around all day paralyzed with the decision of where to start, nothing would get done. It’s where I’d been. It’s what stayed on my heart. It’s also a place where [the American] dollar goes a long, long way. On top of that, giving the gift of clean water can make a very tangible, measurable and instant difference.

What was the goal of this latest trip to Tanzania? It was both functional and an investment into the future of our initiative. We got some good bootson-the-ground work done, visiting prospective well sites and striking water for Waterboys Well #1. With the help of Nadus Films, we were able to gather valuable footage to help tell the story to other players and prospective donors. How did you get connected with Nadus Films? Through Laura Chauvin, a Louisville native that helped me immensely in getting Waterboys off the ground. As usual, Laura made the right call.

How was it working with Coury Deeb and his team from Nadus Films? Great! They’re always pushing the envelope, and their focus is social justice. They’re very well traveled, so they know their way around a third-world country. They’ve filmed in Guatemala, South Sudan, India, and Tanzania. When you’re spending every waking hour with a group of dudes half-way around the world, who they are as people is just as important as camera skills. How would you like to see your fellow athletes partner with Waterboys? To see what I see and develop a passion for what we are doing. From Director Of Photography Justin Gustavison, Producer and Director Coury Deeb, and Production Photographer Clay Cook.

On the World Serve website Doug Pitt writes, “Since 2001, WorldServe has brought high capacity wells to East Africa, each serving upwards of 5,000 people. With the help of Chris and the team of NFL Waterboys he has assembled, we will be able to serve tens of thousands more.” How did you meet Doug Pitt and how did he help with the development of your vision for the Waterboys initiative? I met Doug at a bar in Tanzania two years ago. My teammate James Hall and I had just finished an eight day Kili climb and were celebrating. In walks Joe Buck and Doug Pitt. So there were four St. Louis guys sitting in a bar half way around the world completely random. Joe introduced me to Doug, and Doug introduced me to the issue. They were leaving for a water project in the morning. I left Tanzania days later without a clue that what Doug and Joe told me about in that bar would move me to start this initiative. Fast forward two years. I had the platform and an idea, and Doug had all the knowledge and experience on how we could put that idea into motion. He’s been instrumental to say the least. 118 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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With the help of

NADUS FILMS , we were able to gather valuable footage to help tell the story to other players and prospective donors.

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Director Of Photography For Nadus Films Justin Gustavison captures a class of African children near Singida, Tanzania.

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there, the process occurs organically. A number of guys in the NFL have given a ton of money and time to the cause. I’m far from the first. This initiative is unique because it brings us together and leverages that combined platform to affect change, and I hope guys see that. With whom else would you hope to partner? We hope that we can not only attract athletes from other sports, but also make connections with corporations and influencers that can raise money and awareness. We’ve even built in ways to cross over into other industries outside sports, like music and entertainment. People will have to stay tuned for that. After watching the promotional video, what is one thing someone can do in response? We hope that they’ll recognize a problem that is in dire need of a solution, and not just in East Africa, but worldwide. We hope they’ll donate at www.waterboys.org, engage with the project on social media and spread the word. Another way we’ve encouraged people to do is to share a picture or a selfie with their favorite beverage, in conjunction with a donation, using the hashtag #drink4water. The exercise is to stop and think about what a luxury it is to enjoy this beverage, whether it’s water, a sports drink, or your favorite beer. Let’s take a moment to appreciate that luxury while simultaneously trying to spread it. Think of it like a toast to our efforts to fix this problem.

HEY

Louisville, huddle up. Chris Long has something important to say. You can watch his video and learn more about his organization at www.waterboys.org. Also, find more of Nadus Films productions at www.NadusFilms.com.

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ONE SINGULAR DESTINATION Derby Dinner Playhouse

C

ross the bridge to enter Indiana, drive for only a few minutes, and you’ll soon come across something you will not see anywhere else in Louisville or Southern Indiana: a dinner theatre. Upon entering Derby Dinner Playhouse during showtime, you’re immediately confronted by hundreds of patrons preparing to enjoy a delicious meal, imbibe great drinks and witness an absolutely superb theatrical performance. For over 40 years Derby Dinner Playhouse has been serving up great food, drinks and more importantly widely acclaimed theatre to thousands of theatre hungry patrons looking for a night out that is as entertaining as it is a value. For Lee Buckholz, the theatre’s associate

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producer, the coming season promises to be as special as always. It opens with a production of Agatha Christie’s “And Then There Were None,” a classic murder mystery running September 28-November 8. Among others, the season also includes such favorites as Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas,” “Into the Woods” and “Legally Blonde.” Rightfully so, Buckholz is just as proud of his season as he is of Derby’s one-ofa-kind niche. “It’s a unique animal here at the Derby Dinner Playhouse because you’re getting dinner, you’re getting a show and free parking for way less than something you could see at a different venue,” he explains. “The focus for us is this – we’re dealing with a wide-range of clientele and serving a lot of people. That’s

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exciting. In such an arts-rich community as ours, we don’t want to pigeonhole ourselves … and we spend a lot of time listening to our 10,000 subscribers.” In Buckholz’s mind, the enduring appeal of Derby Dinner Playhouse has been two-fold. While the majority of plays elsewhere are proscenium – with the audience all facing front and looking ahead toward the stage – Derby Dinner Playhouse is set up in the round. This means that performances take place with audiences on all sides, yielding no bad seat in the house and a more intimate experience for patrons as they’re never far from the action. “Because we’re in the round we get to focus on the people – the relationships and how they affect each other on stage” affirms Buckholz. “A good portion of the

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“But here, we have discovered that we offer shows that you wouldn’t necessarily see elsewhere, and they won’t be at some of the smaller theatres in town.”

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audience is very close, and that changes the whole experience.” But another reason for the company’s success is the fact that its audience will see productions they’re unlikely to see elsewhere. “If you lived in New York you could see plays like ours all the time,” adds Buckholz, who regularly visits the Big Apple to seek out new productions to stage back in Indiana. “But here, we have discovered that we offer shows that you wouldn’t necessarily see elsewhere, and they won’t be at some of the smaller theatres in town. We have the budget to give them the attention and the production qualities that they need. We’re bringing in acting talent from New York City for our shows, for whom we have our own housing.” With over 40 years of success under their belt, Derby Dinner Playhouse can also start venturing into theatre with a bit more of an artistic edge than is usually found in the more classic musicals. One show that fits that bill this season is Stephen Sondheim’s “Into the Woods” which Buckholz could not be more excited about. “[‘Into the Woods’] is very contemporary and will be the first time that our theatre has put on Stephen Sondheim,” beams Buckholz. The composer is notorious for extraordinarily difficult music for singers and musicians, and for shows that deal with often very dark themes. However, the beauty of the artistry and pure elegance of the music makes his material absolutely unparalleled when done right. “A lot of people think ‘Oh, Sondheim,’” Buckholz says of the composer’s intimidation. “But the truth is that a lot of Sondheim is very accessible. So ‘Into the Woods’ is a way for us to introduce people to Sondheim, and that will open up a whole new world for us to do.” Whether you’re going for the heartwarming standards like “White Christmas” or the poppy contemporaries like “Legally Blonde,” there is something for you at Derby Dinner Playhouse. And with dinner included in your ticket price, what more could you want? It’s dinner and a show all under one roof. To view Derby Dinner Playhouse’s schedule, visit www.derbydinner.com. FALL 2015

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Creative Director and Style Editor, Lori Kommor Stylist, Nadia London Styling Assistants, Nickoli Neville, Michael Braaksma Photography by Clay Cook Photographer Assistants, Zach Erwin, Kelsey Page Location, Downtown Louisville (Walsh Construction Company) Hair by Nick Carter, Tiffany Moore, Joseph’s Salon & Spa Makeup by Isidro Valencia, Casey Ritchie Models, Emme Metry, Heyman Talent Sadie Miller, New View Model & Talent Talia Blue, Abby Garrett, Laura Kirkpatrick 136 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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Emme is wearing a Tanya Taylor faux fur jacket with orange trim and a Tanya Taylor neon yellow ribbed turtleneck, available at Rodeo Drive. Navy faux leather pleated skirt available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Betsey Johnson Taxi crossbody purse available at Macy’s.

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Laura is wearing a Rachel Roy metallic tank, available at Macy’s and black faux leather pants, available at Banana Republic. Marc Cain patent leather red trench coat available at Rodes. Earrings available at The Willow Tree and bracelet available at Banana Republic.

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Sadie is wearing a Rails white and navy plaid shirt, available at Rodes, and a Finders Keepers navy button pencil skirt, available at Caden Boutique. Inzi red alligator embossed tote available at Rodeo Drive, and black and silver statement necklace available at The Willow Tree. Neon vest provided by Walsh Construction.

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Abby is wearing a Julie Brown navy blue dress, available at Merci Boutique, with a Haute Hippie grey leather jacket, available at Sassy Fox. Black chain-link bracelet available at Caden Boutique.

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Talia is wearing a Tyler Boe Navy winter vest, available at Merci Boutique, and Vince leather pencil skirt, available at Rodes. Yellow crossbody bag available at Off 5th Avenue. Earrings available at Caden Boutique.

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Laura is wearing a Karina Grimaldi black crop top and wide-leg black trousers, available at Liv Boutique. Necklaces available at Banana Republic & Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH.

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Emme is wearing a Finders Keepers winter white jumpsuit with stripe detail, available at Caden Boutique. Red and yellow handbag available at The Willow Tree and bracelet available at Sunny Daize.

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Sadie is wearing a Finders Keepers navy blue top, available at Caden Boutique, with Ack & Co. orange leather cutout skirt, available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Necklace available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. FALL 2015

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Laura is wearing a Lamarque navy moto jacket with woven detail, available at Rodes, and a Plenty by Tracy Reese orange laser cut out dress, available at Sassy Fox. Necklace available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Shoes by Brian Atwood. FALL 2015

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Sadie is wearing a Joseph Rilkoff leather laser cut jacket, available at The Willow Tree; a Rachel Roy orange top, available at Macy’s; and Annie Griffin navy blue shorts, available at Merci Boutique. Black and white geometric clutch available at The Willow Tree. Gold necklaces available at Rodes.

Talia is wearing a Line + Dot black bralette, available at Caden Boutique; a J.O.A. Los Angeles silver pencil skirt, available at Caden Boutique; and an Ă la carte silver threequarter-sleeve jacket, available at The Willow Tree. Kensie royal blue backpack with exposed zipper available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Chain necklace available at Rodeo Drive. Shoes by Burberry.

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Laura is wearing a Tracy Reese front zip dress, available at Rodeo Drive. Neon vest provided by Walsh Construction. Rebecca Minkoff crossbody studded bag available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Black cuff bracelet available at Macy’s.

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Abby is wearing a Brooks Brothers plaid reversible jacket, available at Brooks Brothers, and a royal blue skirt, available at Banana Republic. Kensie yellow backpack with exposed zipper and Ray Ban aviator sunglasses available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Black cuff bracelet available at Macy’s. Shoes by Christian Louboutin.

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U N C O M M O N

STYLE A

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DEALS

Find your fall fashion at the Commonwealth’s most luxurious shopping destination, located at exit 28 off I-64 outside of Louisville.

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Discover Your Inner Girl Scout. Volunteer to be a troop leader.

Girl Scouts helps girls explore new fields of knowledge, learn valuable skills and develop strong core values. Girl Scouts have a higher education level, socioeconomic status and sense of self, and are more likely to volunteer and vote. Help build courage, confidence and character. Change the future for girls one troop at a time. For more information, please visit us at gskentuckiana.org or call 502.636.0900.


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GIRL SCOUTS Help Women Find Their Voices

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ou might think Girl Scouts is all about selling cookies and earning badges, but two Louisville-area Girl Scouts are challenging that stereotype. Savannah Guerrero wrote a book about Cuban refugees as a Girl Scout project. Soozie Eastman, a former Brownie, is making her second documentary film.

Guerrero started out in the Girl Scouts at the rank of “Daisy.” She was in kindergarten at the time and has been in the Girl Scouts for as long as she can remember. “My troop did so many other activities in addition to selling lots and lots of cookies over the years,” Guerrero describes. “We earned merit and try-it badges for participating in activities such as archery, wilderness survival and first aid safety. I walked a high-rope that was 10 feet in the air even though I’m terrified of heights. My troop participated in Thinking Day at Louisville Slugger Field where we often wore costumes and made food from other countries. We collected donations for international projects as well as washed and groomed animals at the Kentucky Humane Society.” Guerrero earned her share of awards, of course. “Some of the more significant awards I earned while a part of Girl Scouts were my bronze and silver awards,” she proudly explains. “For the bronze award, my troop had to organize a day camp for several other Girl Scout

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troops. We blocked time for different activities, greeted the girls when they arrived, led songs and games throughout the day, bought and prepared the food, and helped everyone clean up after the day had ended.” “For the silver award, I helped my troop organize and host a self-esteem workshop for middle school girls. During this workshop, I did a presentation on media advertisements and how they were often misleading by presenting false images of girls. This workshop was especially significant for me because I struggled with self-esteem and insecurity when I was in middle school. This presentation gave me a chance to connect with other girls who may have had that same struggle. It was also my way of letting them know that they are beautiful just the way they are, and they do not have to try and conform to views of beauty as portrayed in the media.” In 2010, Guerrero took a Girl Scoutsponsored destination trip to Europe with other Kentucky scouts. On that trip, which took them to France, England, Switzerland and Italy, they met Girl Scouts from London and Adelboden, Switzerland. The Kentucky scouts presented United States pins to the other ambassadors and learned about their cultures and traditions. The achievement of which Guerrero is most proud, so far, is her book, “Con Acento Cubano.” One summer, she

found herself working as a volunteer with Cuban refugees and immigrants. “I became aware of the struggles of these people as they came to America and then Louisville, Kentucky,” Guerrero recounts. So she wrote a book. “Con Acento Cubano” is a cookbook which combines recipes with narratives about the lives of Cuban immigrants. “By sharing personal stories and favorite dishes from their homeland, I am hoping that people will have a better understanding of Cuban culture and a greater respect for the Cuban people who enter the country today,” Guerrero expresses. Today, at 19 years old, Guerrero is a sophomore at the University of Louisville where she is majoring in marketing. Her dream is to work with an international company and one day have her own business. When she became an adult Girl Scout, her troop presented her with a lifetime membership in Girl Scouts. “As an older Girl Scout, I will continue to be an advocate by recommending the organization to others and always keeping the lessons I learned in the forefront of everything I do,” asserts Guerrero. Meanwhile, Soozie Eastman’s Girl Scout story is a little different. She was a Brownie when she was 7 years old and continued in the scouts for only two years. Nevertheless, she believes her scouting experiences had an important and

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It was phenomenal to have that family that I could look forward to seeing every week.

It broke down barriers. I was learning how to start a fire, I was learning leadership skills, I was learning that my voice mattered.

positive influence on her development. “It really leveled the playing field for everybody [and] brought together a cross section of girls that might not have gotten to know each other in school,” she describes. An only child, Eastman looked forward to meeting every week with what became, for her, an extended family. “It was phenomenal to have that family that I could look forward to seeing every week. It broke down barriers. I was learning how to start a fire, I was learning leadership skills, I was learning that my voice mattered,” she affirms. 158 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

The essential equality of all women was a lesson she learned as a Brownie. “When you came to Girl Scouts, there was no hierarchy of popularity. Everybody had a stake in the activity.” Eastman thinks that the “equality” and “inclusiveness” she learned in the Girl Scouts contributed to shaping her into a documentary filmmaker, someone who is inherently unafraid of taking risks and speaking up.” There are so many little girls that are told be quiet or you’re too animated,” Eastman laments. And Eastman’s current documentary

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project requires the courage to tell a story. “Overload: America’s Toxic Love Story,” the new film’s working title, is about the synthetic chemical industry and how many people have been exposed to dangerous chemicals, often without even knowing it. Her new film is, in many ways, a film about women because, “Women, who are the heads of households, purchase 85 to 90 percent of everything that comes into the home,” Eastman explains. And many of those products contain chemicals that could harm one’s health.

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It ties directly back into what she learned in the scouts about valuing other women. Eastman learned that, “Women are your past; they are not your enemies. I’m taking some of these stories and pushing it out there on behalf of all of us.” Guerrero and Eastman both say that, if they have daughters, they hope those girls, too, will be scouts. “The support that girls receive by being Girl Scout members is as relevant today as in the past,” contends Guerrero. “Girls constantly need support from other girls in

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safe zones where they can be free to be themselves.”Girl Scouts live by the mission statement, which is to build girls of courage, confidence, and character. Personally, the organization has helped me with leadership skills and my public speaking abilities. It has also made me feel that I have no limits and that I can do anything that I set my mind to do.” “I will absolutely have little scouts,” agrees Eastman, though she notes that she needs to finish her film before starting a family. “Today, more than ever, there is a barrage of images and words that are

used to destroy the female psyche, and that starts at a very young age.” Girl Scouts is an important antidote to that problem. According to Eastman, Girl Scout troops “encourage them and show them their strengths instead of pointing out their weaknesses.” Guerrero and Eastman indeed agree that the lessons learned in Girl Scouts stay with a young woman for a lifetime. “To this day, I ‘scout’s honor,’” Eastman says referring to the universal three-finger scout salute. “It still means something to me that I was a scout.”

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Favorite Things a chic boutique

Favorite Things is located at 617 Main Street • Shelbyville, KY • 502-647-2111 favoritethingsboutique


unique gifts home dĂŠcor artisan jewelry uncommon apparel 2830 Frankfort Avenue Louisville, KY 40206 502-384-5434 Monday-Friday 10am to 6pm Saturday 10am to 5pm Closed Sundays https://www.facebook.com/TheUrbanFarmhouseMkt


Fruits Labor of

Jewelry from Seng Jewelers www.sengjewelers.com 162 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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Creative Director and Style Editor, Lori Kommor Stylist, Nadia London Photographer, Clay Cook FALL 2015

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Jewelry from Seng Jewelers www.sengjewelers.com 164 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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Jewelry from Merkley Kendrick Jewelers www.mkjewelers.com FALL 2015

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Jewelry from Seng Jewelers www.sengjewelers.com 166 T H E V O I C E O F L O U I S V I L L E |

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Jewelry from Merkley Kendrick Jewelers www.mkjewelers.com FALL 2015

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THE

BOURBON

LOVER’S BOURBON

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WOODFORD RESERVE

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ummer went out with a bang this year as we celebrated National Bourbon Heritage Month in September. It’s a month that means more bourbon celebrations, more bourbon tours, more bourbon tastings and just more bourbon throughout Kentucky. Though Congress officially titled bourbon “America’s Native Spirit” in 1964, it was Republican Senator Jim Bunning that first sponsored a bill declaring September National Bourbon Heritage Month in 2007. The bill passed unanimously. Both measures are designed to celebrate the heritage and legacy of bourbon in the U.S. And this is the perfect year to continue celebrating the bourbon tradition. Bourbon sales are at their highest since 1970, challenging Kentucky distillers to keep pace for the first time in 45 years. In fact, Woodford Reserve’s category of bourbon, the ultra-premium segment, has grown 27 percent year after year. Fortunately, the company is in a prime spot to take on the increasing demand. Its distillery has been in operation for most of the past 200 years. The first distilling onsite was in 1812, and its current distillery was erected in 1838. And Woodford Reserve made the most out of the month by involving fans across the country in a celebration. “Woodford Reserve is involved in numerous tasting and dinner events across the country during the month of September as well as the Kentucky Bourbon Festival here at home.” Woodford Reserve Master Distiller Chris Morris describes.

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Whether you’re new to bourbon or you’re a history buff, the Woodford Reserve Distillery has something for you. The gorgeous historical yet timeless site offers visitors a chance to see where this incredible bourbon is produced. The distillery is a registered National Historic Landmark, and patrons are invited year-round to explore the property in Versailles and take an informative and engaging tour. The company’s newest products, Sweet Mash Redux and Double Oaked from the company’s recent Distillery Series, are available for tasting at the visitor’s center at the end of the tour. The inaugural series was actually years in the making before its release. For those who want to join in the continuing celebration and are new to bourbon, Woodford Reserve recommends trying it in a classic cocktail like a Manhattan – a mix of bourbon, sweet vermouth and bitters – or in an Old Fashioned, where it’s combined with orange, cherry, sugar and bitters. For just the pure taste of bourbon, try it neat (room temperature), or refreshingly cold on the rocks. Just like fine wine, there’s a process in the tasting of it. Woodford Reserve recommends holding the glass just below your nose, inhaling the aroma and taking a sip. Then hold it on your tongue to get a sense of the complexity of flavors. But if you want to be a real Kentuckian, try it in a Mint Julep, made with bourbon, crushed ice and fresh mint. Though it’s most popular during Derby time, for true bourbon fans, there’s no limitation to what cocktail to drink and when, especially when it’s made with Woodford Reserve, one of Kentucky’s finest bourbons.

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WOODFORD RESERVE OLD FASHIONED 2 ounces Woodford Reserve 0.5 ounces Demerara Syrup 3 dashes Woodford Reserve Aromatic Bitters 2 dashes Woodford Reserve Sassafras and Sorghum Bitters 1 orange peel

Add ingredients to a mixing glass. Add ice to the mixing glass and a serving glass. Stir ingredients for 30-40 seconds. Strain into a serving glass. Garnish with a lightly expressed orange peel.

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WOODFORD RESERVE MANHATTAN 1.5 ounces Woodford Reserve 1 ounce Sweet Vermouth 2 dashes Woodford Reserve Aromatic Bitters 1 orange twist

Fill mixing glass or cocktail shaker with ice, add ingredients and shake or stir according to your own preferences. Strain into a cocktail glass.

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YOUR #1 SUPPORTER OF LOUISVILLE METRO POLICE FOUNDATION. THANK YOU FOR KEEPING US SAFE OVER 1,800 NEW & USED FIREARMS, ACCESSORIES & AMMUNITION.

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It’s more effective at detecting breast cancer. And it’ll be here at Women First very soon! C

M

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MY

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Because we’re committed to providing you with the same exceptional care we’d want for our own mothers, our daughters, and ourselves, we’re investing in 3D tomosynthesis mammography—a powerful new tool to detect breast cancer much, much earlier. We’re very excited and think it’s the biggest thing to happen to breast cancer since the pink ribbon.

K

Don’t wait to learn more! Go online for more information or to schedule a patient appointment— womenfirstlouisville.com or call us today at 502.891.8788. Baptist Health Medical Pavilion • 3900 Kresge Way , Suite 30 • Louisville Our Women First Physicians, left to right, back row: Dr. Margarita Terrassa, Dr. Leigh Price, Dr. Kelli Miller, Dr. Holly Brown, Dr. Michele Johnson. Front row: Dr. Lori Warren, Dr. Mollie Cartwright, Dr. Rebecca Terry, Dr. Ann Grider, and Dr. Rebecca Booth. Not pictured: Dr. Amanda Davenport.


Corporate Gift Giving

Giving a basket from Kelli’s Gift Baskets is an easy way to convey your appreciation to colleagues, clients and partners that help grow your business. Gift baskets range in price and size from the affordable $19 to the decadent $250. The full range of our designs are available online at www.gottagetabasket.com We have over 20 years’ experience getting your name in front of your customer.

Wishing you and your clients a joyous holiday season

Personalized Orders

Your logo and business tag line can be imprinted on the ribbons of all your gifts to keep your name in front of your customers. We will stock and add any logo’d product that you would like to provide in all your gifts at no additional charge.

Free Delivery on Orders Over $500

Delivery is to one non-residential address on orders placed within the Louisville KY area. Orders need to be placed by December 5th for delivery on or before December 18th.

Place your order by calling Kelli’s Gift Baskets at (502) 417-0253 Gift Giving Made Easy for You and Your Business


Sophie is wearing a Johnathan Kane red with black sequin dress available at Posh Jeweled cuff available at Rodeo Drive. Cocktail Ring available at Sassy Fox.

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artistic grace

Creative Director & Style Editor, Lori Kommor Stylist, Nadia London Styling Assistants, Nickoli Neville, Michael Braaksma Photography by Clay Cook Photographer Assistants, Zach Erwin, Carly Seacrest, Dana Rogers Location, Louisville Visual Arts Association Hair by Matthew Tyldesley, Ashley Flora Makeup by Isidro Valencia, Casey Ritchie Models, Sophie DeSimone, Heyman Talent Talia Blue, Abby Garrett, Laura Kirkpatrick FALL 2015

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Talia is wearing a red jersey dress available at Alter’d State. Gold Necklace and cuff available at Sassy Fox.

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Abby is wearing St. John black sheer detail wide leg pant and Vince red silk blouse available at Rodes. Gold chain necklace available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Black cuff available at Macy’s.

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Laura is wearing a Line + Dot black bralette available at Caden Boutique. Wide leg culottes available at Brooks Brothers. Shoes by Pour la Victoire. Bracelets available at Altar’d State.

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Talia is wearing a Jovani tulle dress and statement necklaces available at Sunny Daize. Statement Ring available at Sassy Fox. Bracelet available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH.

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Sophie is wearing a Stephen Yearick Black Gown available at Sunny Daize. Diamond pointed necklace available at Banana Republic. Bracelet available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH.

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Abby is wearing a Shoshanna red lace dress available at Rodes. Earrings available at Altered State. Statement ring available at Sassy Fox. Valentino bag from Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH.

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Sophie is wearing a Panoply blue sequin dress available at Posh. Statement ring available at Sassy Fox . Silver necklace available at Banana Republic.

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Laura is wearing a Diane Von Furstenberg nude shift dress available at Sassy Fox. Necklaces available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH and Rodes. Ring available at Sassy Fox. Shoes by Oscar de la Renta.

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Laura is wearing a cranberry dress with lace detail available at Altar’d State. Gold triangle necklace available at Liv Boutique. Gold bracelet available at Merci Boutique.

Abby is wearing a Chic Luxe lace long sleeve blouse available at Merci Boutique. Ivory lace pant available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Necklace available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH.

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Laura is wearing an ivory crop top with lace detail, available at Merci Boutique, and Raffinalla black pant with circle detail, available at The Willow Tree. Necklace available at The Willow Tree. Bracelets available at Altar’d State. Shoes by Pour la Victoire. Abby is wearing a lace, sleeveless blouse available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Pearl Necklace available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH. Shoes by Oscar de la Renta.

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Sophie is wearing a blouse with neck tie available at Macy’s, and My Tribe black mini skirt available at Liv Boutique. Talia is wearing a sheer black blouse available at Sassy Fox, Joseph Ribkoff black wide leg pant with sheer cutouts available at Rodeo Drive. Lace bralette available at Rodeo Drive. Statement necklace available at The Willow Tree. Shoes available at Aldo. Bracelet available at Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5TH.

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Land Rover Louisville 4700 Bowling Blvd, Louisville, KY 40207 502-895-2451 | landroverlouisville.com


The Voice of Louisville  

Fall 2015

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