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Giving a Voice to the Voiceless Animal Care Society Hosts Third Annual Benefit Bash

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Fillies Derby Ball

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INDEX

Sports Card Chronicle ��������������������������������������������������������������16 Catnip ���������������������������������������������������������������������������� 17 High School Sports �������������������������������������������������������18

Society

An Evening of Fashion ������������������������������������������������� 20 Tulips and Juleps ����������������������������������������������������������21 Modern Release Party ��������������������������������������������������22 Paul Hornung Awards ���������������������������������������������������23 March Art Show�������������������������������������������������������������25 Denny’s 80th Birthday Bash �����������������������������������������26 Trinity High School CelebraTion �����������������������������������27 Leadership Summit �������������������������������������������������������28 IACP Awards������������������������������������������������������������������30 Art as a Part of Healing ������������������������������������������������� 31 St� Patrick’s Parade �������������������������������������������������������34 Back Door Fundraiser ���������������������������������������������������35 Partyline ������������������������������������������������������������������������36 On the Town with Veteran Photographer John H. Harralson Jr.

Lincoln Day Dinner��������������������������������������������������������38

Life

Spotlight: Fillies Derby Ball������������������������������������������ 40 Fashion: KDF Spring Fashion Show ���������������������������� 42 Health & Wellness: CaloSpa ���������������������������������������� 44 Out & About: Derby Memories �������������������������������������45 Tastes: My Modern Cookery �����������������������������������������48 KDF Taste: Rose Julep Winning Recipe ���������������������� 49 Homes: Speed Museum Party Planning Tips ���������������50 Arts & Entertainment: “Secret Louisville”��������������������� 51 Prestigious Properties: Floyd Home ����������������������������52 Voice of Style: Derby Decor �����������������������������������������54

Features Giving a Voice to the Voiceless

Animal Care Society Hosts Third Annual Benefit Bash ���������������������������������������������������� 6

Metamorphosis

KDF Spring Fashion Show Promises to Entertain �������������������������������������������������������� 42

Derby Decor

Work the Metal and KDF Have the Perfect Items for Derby Entertaining �������������������������� 54

Essentials Masthead �������������������������������5 Business Briefs�������������������� 13 Obituaries���������������������������� 14

Event Calendar ������������������� 56 Dear Abby ��������������������������� 59 Classifieds ���������������������������60

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Puzzles �������������������������������� 61 Pets of the Week����������������� 61

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TOP PHOTO BY TIM VALENTINO | BOTTOM PHOTO BY BILL WINE

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It wasn’t until an hour before the scheduled photo shoot for this week’s feature story on Animal Care Society’s Benefit Bash that I started to mildly panic. I had naively and casually instructed the participants, “Bring your pets…it’ll be fun!” It was too late to change course when I realized that this could be a fur-flying disaster. I’m relieved to report that was not the case. As you can see, they all came ready for their close up and stole the show as animals often do. Sure, the lone cat had a few cat moments, but settled in to relative compliance quickly. My cat would have climbed me like a tree, claws and all, had I tried to involve her in a photo with three dogs, so I was impressed with any behavior that didn’t result in bloodshed. This week’s undisputed bravery award definitely goes to Johnna Kelly for pulling off this photo shoot with her “failed feline foster” with grace, a smile and injury-free. I think it is the hilarious absurdity and mulish obstinance of cats that solidifies me firmly in the “cat person” camp, the very reasons others are not feline fans. This week’s profile on successful developer Walt Wagner and his cat Cappy delighted me in his unabashed embrace of all his cat’s quirks. You can read all about Walt and Cappy’s serendipitous introduction, adventurous travels and their plans for a big celebration this year. Whether you are a dog or a cat person, a Cats or a Cards fan, we can all agree on the noble cause of protecting the voiceless and vulnerable. The Animal Care Society’s dedication to Tonya Abeln compassion, integrity and dignity for all people and animals is a mission every animal-lover ought to support. Read this week’s feature story to find out how you can. Meanwhile, Derby is starting to creep into our content with an informative article from the Speed Art Museum on tips for throwing the perfect Derby party. This week’s Voice of Style is dedicated to eye-catching items to incorporate into any Derby dinner or brunch. Like any good hostess, we are ready to open wide the doors to spring and invite her to stay for a spell. This week is merely a teaser. Look for our Voice of Louisville Derby Preview to hit stands next week. I can’t wait to share the season with you.

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Giving a Voice to the Voiceless ANIMAL CARE SOCIETY HOSTS THIRD ANNUAL BENEFIT BASH PRESENTED BY PLANET FITNESS

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By Remy Sisk Photos by Ryan Noltemeyer

n March 25, it’s all about the animals. That’s when the Animal Care Society (ACS) will be hosting its third annual Benefit Bash presented by Planet Fitness. Proceeds from the event will be benefiting the operation and sustainability of the Animal Care Society, which is Louisville’s first no-kill shelter. The four co-chairs of the event have been ardently working on this year’s bash for nine or 10 months, and thanks to their passion, skill and dedication, it’s sure to be the best iteration of the event yet. Kate Hendon, Josh Laughlin, Matthew Porter and Johnna Kelly may have a myriad of links between them, but there is one common thread that has united the quartet in their work for the Animal Care Society: a true commitment to the cause. All four of them have their own, unique experiences adopting pets, and, as Hendon puts it, that is partially what brought the four – all of whom have worked on this event in the past in some capacity – together. “I guess it really just started with some of the committee members and some of the other chairs here being involved through the shelter through volunteer and board work and really seeing the beginning parts of the benefit – this is only

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the third year – and seeing the opportunity to get the minds together and continue through it for many years to come,” she describes. “And that’s how we as a group connected because we’ve all been involved in animal rescue on some level for at least a decade.” The ACS, founded in 1984, is the city’s first no-kill shelter, which means that it never gives up on its animals; it constantly works to match each and every one with a forever home. Over just the last 10 years, the ACS has placed over 8,000 pets in loving, caring and safe homes, and according to Porter, “It’s fundraisers like these that really keep everything going. And the Benefit Bash is the largest one we put on every year.” The event itself will take place March 25 at the Mellwood Arts & Entertainment Center from 6 to 11 p.m., and Hendon ensures it will be an absolutely marvelous time. “We have not only an amazing dinner provided but also a complimentary bar with spirits from Tito’s and Four Roses with signature cocktails they’re going to create specifically for us,” she relates. “We’re going to have a DJ present – Derby City Diva – and we’re also going to have not just an amazing silent auction but also opportunities to donate directly to the shelter if an actual item is not your

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jive. We have an amazing trip to Tuscany that we’re going to be auctioning off that we’re really excited about and just opportunities to pick up other items here and there that you may not find anywhere else. And it’s going directly to the animals.” Hendon goes on to detail the significance of these funds in the lives of these animals. Because ACS is no-kill, it can sometimes be a very expensive process to revive an injured or sick animal, but with events like the Benefit Bash, this kind of work is possible every day. “Some of the animals – whether they’re puppies or kittens or adult dogs – they come and they have serious medical conditions,” she says. “And because it’s a no-kill shelter … it can take a lot of time and resources to rehab these animals and prepare them to go to their forever home. Not only is [the fundraising] just for the upkeep of building and staff – which is mostly made of volunteers – it’s mostly to be sure these animals are as healthy and prepared to go home as they can be.” Laughlin echoes how critical the funds raised from the Benefit Bash are to the ACS. “I think it’s extremely important,” he maintains. “We’re a very grassroots organization, the first no-kill shelter in Jefferson County, and this event is so important because we do whatever

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“My cat Griffin is what you call a ‘foster failure.’ I foster kittens for Metro Animal Services, and he was probably my second batch of kittens. I took him back when they went to get spayed and neutered, and I went back to check on him and I couldn’t leave him. So he came home with me. That was five years ago.” — Johnna Kelly and Griffin

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we can to save any animal that we have. It’s not even animals that are dropped off at the shelter – we go throughout the state and rescue other animals. So while we might have some pushback on our budget for the benefit, when it comes to each individual animal, no way. No matter what it costs, we’re going to do

whatever it takes to save each animal and also to find their forever home. It’s not an easy process for you to adopt an animal through the Animal Care Society because we want to make sure it’s the right fit. We want them to be in a great, safe, fun warm family home.” If you think you could provide just the

sort of home the animals at the ACS are looking for, attending the Benefit Bash will be a great first step. Not only will you enjoy the incredible food and singular cocktails, but you will also have the opportunity to learn about the ACS adoption process and even see some photos of the adoptable animals. And

“As soon as I moved back from New York City, I knew that I wanted a dog and was going to rescue a dog, and I rescued him from the Jefferson County Shelter in Madison, Indiana. And he was the first litter that I went up to, and he pummeled over the other dogs to come up to me – he was the only one I played with. And he’s been the best friend, amazing companion ever since then. He’s 7 and a half years old now.” — Josh Laughlin and Rocco

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“We decided we wanted to look for a third dog and we went around to all the shelters and found this little guy at Metro. And he has something of a sad story. He was abandoned in a backyard and not cared for. He came up to the glass and put his paw up as soon as we walked by. He had limited time – about three days left – but here we are three years later.” — Matthew Porter and Percy

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“We own some property in Shelby Park and he was abandoned in a yard of our neighbor. And we took him in and I was convinced we were going to get him healthy, work with one of the local rescues I do work with and find him a new home, and less than a week in, I said, ‘He’s not going anywhere. This is his home.’ Five years later, he’s now our little boy’s best friend and just the sweetest companion to our family.” — Kate Hendon and Francis

if you see a puppy, a kitten or an adult dog or cat that you would love to welcome into your home, you can plan your shelter visit to meet them in person. While you’re there, you can learn even more about what the ACS does on a daily basis. With an executive director like Bunny Zeller, who Laughlin says “would jump in front of a bus to save an animal,” you can be assured that the ACS is more steadfast than ever in its endeavors to place animals in loving homes. It works tirelessly year-round to accomplish this goal, and it simply couldn’t happen without the Benefit Bash. So on March 25, enjoy the drinks, enjoy the food, enjoy the dancing, but also keep in mind that your ticket money is going toward saving animals’ lives and helping them find their forever homes. Tickets are $100 in advance and are available at animalcaresocietybenefitbash.com, where you can learn more about how this event and others like it so importantly help those who simply cannot help themselves. “I think this event is about giving a voice to the voiceless,” Porter emphasizes. “Because we have to take care of them and then they in turn take care of us. They are the voiceless and we have to speak for them.” VT

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Happy Cappy By Tonya Abeln

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t has been said when rescuing an animal, that ultimately, it is the animal that rescued the human. Walt Wagner would agree. It was the least of his intentions when he stumbled upon a small adoption fair by Woodstock Humane Society with friend Jody Zimmerman, but fate and spontaneity brought the two together. It’s very likely you know or at least recognize the name of Walter Wagner, Jr. from his storied and successful career in commercial real estate. When he opened his first company in 1959, he brokered the land lease with his first major client who developed Mall St. Matthews, the first fully enclosed mall in Kentucky, and acted as the leasing agent for the mall. Over the course of the next few decades, his recognizable client roster expanded to include names like Kroger and Kentucky Fried Chicken. The Walter Wagner Co., LLC celebrates 57 years in business this year and includes a thriving property management business, overseeing the leasing and management of office buildings, retail centers and industrial properties for clients. Walt is used to taking risks when it comes to business that usually pay off, but when Jody suggested he adopt the friendly tan and white cat that playfully approached him that day, the proposition was met with studied hesitation. He had not had a pet since his children had lived at home and had never entertained the idea of welcoming another into his home. “Cappuccino” they called him for his coloring, and there was something about him that Walt could not resist. After signing the contract and honoring the mandatory waiting period, “Cappy” came home to Walt’s residence, now dubbed “Chez Cappy” signifying just how comfortable he has made himself in that home. Walt is full of humorous anecdotes regarding Cappy’s charmed life since coming to live with him: “Some people say it is nice for me to let Cappy rest on the dining room table while I eat. That’s not exactly right. It is kind of Cappy to let me share his table while he is resting!” To hear Walt share stories about Cappy is to hear a voice filled with pride, unending amusement and sincere love. While they

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Walter Wagner, Jr. and Cappy.

Portrait of Cappy by Steve Sawyer.

do spend half of the year together at Chez Cappy, the cat accompanies Walt the remainder of the year to his winter home in Sarasota, Florida. Though he doesn’t enjoy the same freedom to go in and out as he pleases like he does in Kentucky due to the busy highway by the beach, Cappy does get his daily dose of the warm sun. “I have trained him to walk on a leash,” Walt shares, explaining that the special cat’s personality is almost more like a dog than a typical cat. “We get a lot of stares walking around with that leash,” he continues with a laugh. To commemorate the honored and elevated status of Cappucino in Walt’s home, his friend Jody, credited for encouraging the adoption in the first place, commissioned artist Steve Sawyer from Versailles, Kentucky, to paint a regal portrait of Cappy. In fact, Walt is working with the “Art 4 God” artist on another special commission to commemorate an important upcoming occasion. Walt

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Cappy having a refreshing drink.

will celebrate his 85th birthday this June with a festive affair following a noon Mass at the Cathedral of the Assumption led by his son, Father Walter. In an invitation signed Cappy Wagner, guests are invited to enjoy a cocktail buffet at Chez Cappy before seeing the new portrait unveiled at 7 p.m. “Now,” the invitation concludes, “it is time for my catnap!” Winters in Florida, portrait sessions with famed artists, his own entertainment budget—what good fortune for Cappy that Walt Wagner happened into that adoption fair, though I’m sure Walt would claim the good fortune as his. It really is no wonder that they call him “Happy Cappy.” VT

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ARTESANO VINO TAPAS Y MÁS ADDS LATIN DISHES, MUSIC NIGHTS Louisville Chef Fernando Martinez last week announced a new spring menu at his Ole Restaurant Group’s Westport Village restaurant, Artesano Vino Tapas y Mas. Martinez is marrying Iberian recipes with fresh, locally-grown spring ingredients, as well as adding an array of Latin American dishes that are inspired by his experiences working and traveling throughout Central and South America. “Executive Chef Mark Ford and I worked hard on the new menu,” said the Food Network-featured chef, Fernando Martinez. “Several years ago, after we sold Havana Rumba and Mojitos, my wife Cristina and I spent some time living and cooking in her native Venezuela. We also traveled extensively throughout the region and you will see Venezuela, Peru, Argentina, and a bit of my Cuban background in the new menu.” Wednesdays are now a night of wine and music, with half-priced bottles glasses from 4 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the casual and authentic Spanish tapas and Latin restaurant. Cuban singer-songwriter Dayron Reyes and his band A-corde play lively vallenato meringue, salsa, and other Latin American music to life each week on Wed. and Thurs. from 6:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. The new menu now includes nine gluten-free dishes like salmon quinoa, plantain mushroom empanadas and sofrito calamari with gluten-free flour, and the crunchy Cubana salad. BOYS & GIRLS CLUBS OF KENTUCKIANA PARTNERS WITH JCPS TO EXPAND SERVICES TO REACH MORE YOUTH The Boys & Girls Clubs of Kentuckiana (BGCK) is launching a new partnership with Jefferson County Public Schools (JCPS) that will expand the organization’s out-of-school-time services into area public schools. The expansion into JCPS will begin with the opening of BGCK’s first school-based Club within Frost-Stuart Middle School on Tuesday, March 14. The Frost-Stuart Club, located at 4601 Valley Station Road, will be open four days a week, Monday through Thursday from 2:30 to 6 p.m., now through the end of the school year. Plans are in place to continue operating the Club at Frost-Stuart middle school through the upcoming 2017/2018 school year. All children in the community grades six through eight are eligible to enroll as Club members by completing an application in person at the Club or online. All membership fees have been waived for youth attending the Club. BGCK will offer programming aligned with three priority outcome areas: Academic Success, Good Character & Leadership, and Healthy Lifestyles. Club members will be provided access to the school’s classrooms, gym, library and computer lab, as well as an after-school snack. Boys & Girls Clubs across the country have experienced significant growth and positive impact within the school settings, particularly in the middle schools. The partnership between the schools and the Clubs helps to provide youth with additional services supporting their academic success. Dr. Donna Hargens, JCPS Superintendent remarks, “JCPS is excited to partner with the Boys & Girls Clubs of Kentuckiana, creating opportunities for our students to not only build on what they’ve learned during the day, but to make that learning fun, intentional and relevant.” AWARD-WINNING AUTHOR’S BOOKS REISSUED When Kentucky Poet Laureate Frank X Walker coined the term “Affrilachia” in the early 1990s, he and a group of like-minded writers founded the Affrilachian Poets to challenge the perception of a racially homogenous Appalachia and to highlight the under-represented presence of African Americans in the mountain South. Among that group was Crystal Wilkinson, whose love and fond regard for the land and people of this region is evident in all of her work. When her first short-story

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to submit your business brief email rsisk@redpinmedia.com collection, “Blackberries, Blackberries,” was released in 2002, it was proclaimed as “a stunning debut” by Today’s Librarian and won the Chaffin Award for Appalachian Literature. Her success continued with her subsequent story collection “Water Street,” which was a finalist for both the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award and the Orange Prize for Fiction, now The Baileys Women’s Prize for Fiction. Her newest work, “The Birds of Opulence,” was released in 2016 to broad acclaim and was named the winner of the Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence.

and explore the world of Panem as created in the films. More than 1,000 authentic costumes and props, high-tech and handson interactives and detailed set recreations reveal the amazing artistry and technology that brought the incredible story to life. Visitors follow Katniss Everdeen’s inspirational journey, from her humble beginnings in District 12 to her emergence as the Mockingjay. The exhibition features seven galleries including District 12, Tribute Train, The Capitol, Making the Games, District 13, Fan Gallery and Katniss’s Journey.

In the wake of the success of her newest book, University Press of Kentucky has reissued Wilkinson’s previous short story collections in new, widely-available paperback editions. “Blackberries, Blackberries” includes a new foreword by National Book Award winner Nikky Finney and a new afterword by acclaimed author Honorée Jeffers, and Water Street has a new foreword by Jacinda Townsend and new afterword by Marianne Worthington. Deeply informed by the author’s own experiences growing up as a young black girl on her grandparents’ tobacco farm in Indian Creek, Wilkinson’s writing simultaneously crafts a series of intensely human portraits and creates a monument to the unique black experience of the Appalachian region. As Townsend says in the foreword to “Water Street,”“I, too, could lay claim to having been represented on the page: in the grand ballroom of literature, I could, as a Black Kentuckian, claim to exist.”

Highlights include iconic costumes from the films, such as the Girl on Fire dress, the Mockingjay dress and the Mockingjay armor; key artifacts including the Mockingjay pin, Cinna’s sketchbook and Katniss’s bow; and interactives, including an exploratory map of Panem, a gamemaker’s control table, and a stunt choreography interactive.

BRISTOL BAR & GRILLE CELEBRATES 40TH ANNIVERSARY WITH “THROWBACK” BEER PRICES AT HIGHLANDS LOCATION In honor of Bristol Bar & Grille’s 40th anniversary this year, Bristol Highlands is now offering “throwback” beer pricing on local and regional beers on tap, craft and domestic bottles, hard-to-find ciders and Belgian style ales until May 1. “We’re really excited and grateful to be celebrating 40 years! We have lots of things planned at all our locations this year but wanted to give an extra special gift where it all began…in the Highlands,” said Director of Operations T.J. Oakley. “We are essentially giving up our profits on beer as a gift to everyone that lives in, or loves to visit the neighborhood.” The Bristol Highlands’ beer menu includes 10-ounce drafts starting at $1.50, 20-ounce drafts starting at $2.75, craft and imported bottles starting at $1.75, all domestic bottles for only $1.25 and reduced pricing on global beers and rare sours. They now offer the following local and regional beers on tap: Apocalypse Brew Works (Louisville), Goodwood (Louisville), New Albanian (New Albany, Indiana), Ethereal Brewing (Lexington), West Sixth (Lexington), Blue Stallion (Lexington), Braxton Brewing Co. (Covington), Rhinegeist (Cincinnati), Upland Brewing (Bloomington, Indiana), and Flat 12 Bierwerks (Indianapolis/Jeffersonville, Indiana). THE HUNGER GAMES: THE EXHIBITION TO OPEN AT FRAZIER HISTORY MUSEUM The Frazier History Museum, in association with Lionsgate (NYSE: LGF.A, LGF.B), a premier next generation global content leader, and Imagine Exhibitions, Inc., recently announced “The Hunger Games: The Exhibition” will open April 1, 2017, at Louisville, Kentucky’s Frazier History Museum. Louisville is the hometown of Academy Award winner Jennifer Lawrence who starred as Katniss Everdeen in the blockbuster The Hunger Games film franchise. “‘The Hunger Games: The Exhibition’ not only delivers a stunning interactive experience for guests, it also offers them a way to celebrate their hometown hero’s success,” said Frazier History Museum President Penny Peavler. “We are excited to bring a blockbuster exhibit to Louisville that could both ignite the spirit of the people of Kentucky and drive regional tourists to Louisville’s Main Street and downtown hotels.” “The Hunger Games: The Exhibition” invites visitors to step inside

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Louisville marks the exhibition’s fourth tour stop after its global premiere in New York City, with subsequent stops in San Francisco and Sydney. Tickets are now on sale with individual tickets starting at $26. A discounted four pack of tickets for both families and individuals is available starting at $90. Contact the Frazier Museum directly for student and group discounts. UNIVERSITY OF LOUISVILLE MEDICAL STUDENTS SPONSOR 29TH ANNUAL HEALTHCARE CLASSIC 5K RUN/WALK TO BENEFIT THE HEALING PLACE U of L Medical School students will walk and run to help others on their journey to recovery by sponsoring the 29th Annual Healthcare Classic. The 5K run/walk will be held Saturday, March 25th at 9:00 a.m. at Cherokee Park (745 Cochran Hill Road) at Hogan’s Fountain. Packet pick up and registration begin at 7:30 a.m. Participants should register online at www.active.com. Entry fee if registering before March 1st is $20. After March 1, through day of event, registration is $25. T-shirts are guaranteed for all pre-registered participants and prizes will be awarded for the top three male and three female finishers. The mission of The Healing Place is to reach men and women suffering from drug and alcohol addiction, provide the tools for recovery, and restore productive lives. Founded as a homeless shelter in Louisville in 1989, The Healing Place has become one of the nation’s most effective long-term, social model recovery programs. BRACKET-STYLE FUNDRAISING TOURNAMENT ENTERS SECOND ROUND WITH 32 CHARITIES CONTINUING TO RAISE AWARENESS AND FUNDS This March, Louisville residents have the opportunity to rally behind their favorite charitable causes to achieve victory in an online bracket-style competitive giving tournament called Brackets for Good Louisville 2017. Brackets for Good pairs with corporate and nonprofit sponsors to host online, bracket-style fundraising tournaments in philanthropic communities around the United States. In 2016, Brackets for Good Louisville raised $267,759 for local charities with 1,998 donations made. In Week 2 of the Louisville tournament, 32 Louisville charities have successfully emerged as winners, moving toward the final $10,000 prize. After Week 1, over $70,000 was raised for the initial 64 Louisville charities. The tournament continues each week through the end of March, with charities being narrowed down to 16, 8, 4 and finally a championship between the 2 remaining opponents. All donations are made online and $1 equals 1 point. Donations to Louisville charities through Brackets for Good go 100% to the charity. Louisville’s bracket can be found online at https:// louisville.bfg.org/bracket.

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OBITUARIES

obituaries John C. Bennett

Mr. John C. Bennett, age 85, of Shepherdsville, returned to his Heavenly Father on Saturday, March 11, 2017. Mr. Bennett was born on August 5, 1931 in Louisville, Kentucky to the late John and Bessie Bennett. He was a member of Eastern Gate Baptist Church. Among those who preceded him in death include, his siblings, Hugh Bennett, Joe Bennett and Mary Cooper. He leaves to cherish his memory, his wife of 66 years, Doris Bennett; his children, John “Skip” Bennett, Cheri L. Schanie (Alan) and Joseph Michael Bennett (Ginger); grandchildren, Nicholas, Jack, Grant, Lindsay, Brooke and Christa; great grandchildren, Bennett, Brayden, Bristol and Brielle; sister, Dorothy M. Bennett and a host of other family and friends. Funeral service will be held at noon on Thursday, March 16, 2017 in the chapel of Schoppenhorst, Underwood and Brooks Funeral Home (Preston Hwy. at Brooks Rd.) with entombment in Evergreen

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Rena Walker Byers

Rena Walker Byers, 90, died Friday, March 10, 2017. She was a retired personnel clerk for Sears, volunteer at Raulerson Hospital in Okeechobee, Florida, and member of Douglass Hills Church of Christ. She was preceded in death by her first husband, John W. Walker; and son, Steve Walker. She is survived by her husband, Ed Byers; daughter, Shannon Key (David); grandchildren, Jonathan Corum (Andrea), Juliette Cross (Alex), Jacob Walker (Ellen), and Katie Soyers (Nick); great grandchildren, Colton and Callan Cross, Jake Walker, and Levi, Hannah and Micah Soyars; stepdaughter, Joan Coffey (Larry), Stepson, Curtis Byers (Terri); step grandchildren and great grandchildren. Her funeral was Wednesday March 15 at Fern Creek Funeral Home, 5406 Bardstown Road with private burial.

George Douglass Carter, Jr.

George Douglass Carter Jr., 88, passed away March 11, 2017. He was the owner and operator of C & W Service Co., and a member of Resurrection Episcopal Church. He was preceded in death by his parents, George, Sr. and Jessie (Lear) Carter and his nephew, Robert S. Carter. Survivors include his brother, William Carter (Thelma); niece, Michaelyn Carter; great nephews, William “Bill” Carter and Robert Carter (Tammy); great niece, Jessica Padgett (Kenneth); and great great nephews, Bradlee, Brent and Brandon Padgett, Christopher and Matthew Carter. Burial is in Resthaven Memorial Park. Memorial gifts may be made to the WHAS Crusade for Children.

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Lawrence Askew Warner

Larry Warner was the first of three sons born to Mabel Askew and Lawrence Glover Warner in Vicksburg, Mississippi, on September 30, 1933. Larry spent his childhood in Vicksburg and his summers in Sandy Hook, Connecticut, with his grandmother and extended family. Larry graduated from Woodberry Forest School in Virginia in 1952, where he was a prefect and lettered in wrestling and football. Larry loved Woodberry. He taught there briefly following college and maintained Woodberry friendships throughout his life. Larry graduated from the University of Virginia in 1956, where he was a member of St. Anthony Hall

(Delta Psi) and “Grand Banana” of the Eli Banana Ribbon Society. He attended his 60th reunion in 2016. Larry graduated from the University of Virginia Law School in 1959. He married Mary Stoll of Louisville, Kentucky, with whom he had three daughters: Stuart, Ann and Polly. That marriage ended in divorce.. In 1974, Larry married Cappy Wales, of Bronxville, New York, and became a father to Cappy’s sons: Whit, Bob and Sid Wales. Larry began his career at Citizens Fidelity Bank and Trust Company of Louisville, before joining First Kentucky Trust Company, where he became president. Larry was active in the community, serving on the Boards of the Louisville Zoo, St. Francis School in Goshen, The Louisville Country Club, The River Valley Club, The Louisville Free Public Library, Actors’ Theatre of Louisville and Planned Parenthood. Larry loved golf and paddle tennis. He liked lunchtime backgammon games at the Wynn Stay Club. Larry was an extraordinary cook. He and Cappy enjoyed spending their summers in Little Compton, Rhode Island and Stowe, Vermont. And, wherever he was, whenever there was music, Larry loved to dance. Following his retirement from First Kentucky Trust, Larry and Cappy became residents of Boca Grande, Florida. Larry continued to enjoy golf and rediscovered his passion for bridge. He was a member of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, where Cappy served as Assistant Rector. He was also a member of GICIA and other local organizations. Larry is survived by Cappy, his younger brother, Chick Warner, all six of his children as well as twelve grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. First and foremost, Larry will be remembered for his buoyant energy and jovial nature, his love and appreciation of good conversation with family and friends. A service for Larry will held at St. Andrews Episcopal Church in Boca Grande on March 18th at 2 p.m. with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, contributions in Larry’s memory may be made to St. Luke’s Chapel, Attn: The Reverend Lisa Tolliver, 7540 Westport Road, Louisville, Kentucky 40222, or St. Andrew’s Legacy Fund, P.O. Box 272, Boca Grande, Florida 33921.

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The Return of Christmas in March

Regular season college basketouisville had missed ball games on ESPN averaged a out on the postsea5.5 rating in Louisville this season before 2016. The son, which means that an averCards didn’t play in the age of 5.5 percent of the city’s big dance in either of the households are watching college hoops on “the worldwide leader years immediately before in sports” anytime it is airing a or after winning the 1986 game. For a sport with dwinnational championship. dling attendance numbers and MIKE They missed out on March audiences across the RUTHERFORD television Madness and had to watch country, and whose product has @cardchronicle been referred to as “unwatcha Kentucky team they had able” a number of times this seabeaten cut down the nets son, Louisville remains both a rock and an in 1997, they had even not heard outlier. their names called on Selection SunThe next largest market for college basday twice under Rick Pitino, both in ketball viewing? Raleigh-Durham, which his first season of 2001-02, and in finished with a 2.4. Only three other cities -- Kansas City, Indianapolis and Greens2005-06.

I think everyone can agree that 12 months ago, watching an NCAA tournament sans Louisville felt much different than it had in years past. For the same reason, watching the Cardinals play in the tournament a year later is also going to feel like something of an original experience. Earning a No. 2 seed when the common thought was that you were going to be a No. 3? Cool. Getting to play your first two games of the tournament close by in Indianapolis? Awesome. Getting what appears to be a somewhat manageable draw? Swell. All of this minutiae that would have Louisville fans howling in past seasons has taken a back seat to the mere fact that the Cardinals are simply playing in the tournament again. Christmas in March has returned to the Derby City a year after flying right over it, and that makes the opening of every single present that much more of a rewarding experience than it would have been otherwise. This sort of talk might seem crazy to an outsider, but there’s little about Louisville’s relationship with college basketball that makes much sense to the rest of the country. Earlier this month, The Wall Street Journal named Louisville as the unofficial “college basketball capital of the world.” The title wasn’t assigned because of the Cardinals’ overwhelming success in recent seasons under Pitino, it was given because Louisvillians watch more hoops than any other city in America ... by a lot.

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boro -- finished with a 2.0 or better. Basically, Louisvillians will obviously support their local teams, but they also care more about college basketball in general than any other place on the planet. We love the game 12 months out of the year, every year, but we really love it in March, in large part because it lays claim

to the best postseason in American sports. Regardless of what you’ve achieved or haven’t achieved over the course of the previous four months, you get the opportunity to play until you lose. In that way, it’s easy to make the case that college basketball is the most Democratic sport that America boasts. This time of year is so special in the city because it represents the endless possibilities of the weeks ahead. The bracket has been filled in with 68 names, but it’s still blank outside of the first round games. The thought of being able to write “Louisville” five more times between now and the first Monday of April is what drives the excitement of this moment. Just a year after having to endure the harsh reality of one of the most negative sagas to ever affect any Louisville sport, Cardinal basketball is dancing again. No one knows what the weeks ahead hold. It could be disappointment, it could be merely meeting expectations, or it could be the ultimate redemption story for all who are still feeling the lasting impact of 2016. Dreaming about the possibilities is the beauty of March, and despite the unseasonal weather, March is beautiful again in Louisville. VT

Louisville Cardinals head coach Rick Pitino yells instructions to his team during the game between the Miami Hurricanes and the Louisville Cardinals at the KFC Yum! Center.

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SPORTS

The Real Season Starts Now The ball doesn’t get stuck in one scored only 24. place, dribble-dribble-dribble, as Kidding. They lost because they got beat the shot clock ticks down. There’s on the boards. Also because they gave up movement, there’s energy, there’s 97 points. Cal once proclaimed this team some solid defense. But Cal is would be the best of all his defensive teams. loyal to Briscoe, and not withThat has seemed laughable throughout · That Kentucky can win out reason. Briscoe does bring the season, but it’s not so laughable now. Catnip without Malik Monk at his best. many intangibles. In the NCAA, In winning its last 11 games, the team has though, there’s less margin for swarmed on defense, Bam has made the · That De’Aaron Fox has an STEVE indulging those “many intangipost position his own. He had played only intensity setting on his energy bles.” You need points and stops, seven games prior to UCLA. He has played KAUFMAN dial, primed for the biggest not fouls and turnovers. 34 now. There are no “freshmen” anymore. moments on the biggest stages. Mychal Mulder may be as good a ninth Before that, of course, Kentucky has to man as anybody in the country. He’s active take care of its business in Indianapolis. · That Bam Adebayo just keeps getting on offense, especially without the ball. The tweaking, rebooting and experimenting better and better. He’s not afraid to launch a shot. He plays are over. The real season starts now. You smart and athletic. He may turn a game do what you have to do, or it’s back to biol· That Dominique Hawkins’ special skill around somewhere in the tournament. But ogy class. set seems a perfect ingredient for this team, he’s small by ‘4’ standards. And when he’s Frankly, I couldn’t imagine more of an going forward. in, rebounding and interior defense often incentive than that. VT suffer. · That the same might be said for Derek So the brackets were Willis, though a good deal less spectacularly. announced, and Kentucky drew He seems to have settled into a role where a two seed. Many on TV said he doubles up on the interior defense, goes Kentucky’s draw was particustrong to the boards and only takes the larly difficult, but probably all occasional three during the course of the the other 67 teams felt the same game. way. The good news is that the So how good is this team, and what’s the Cats start at Indianapolis, a future? short jog for both the team and Anyone who has watched the tournament its Big Blue Nation. But after for any length of time knows that upsets Northern Kentucky, the heat will happen. To almost anyone. All four definitely gets turned up. A Number One seeds do make it all the way potential weekend game would to the Final Four, but it’s far from an annual be against Wichita State – you certainty. know, the undefeated team that As a Number Two seed, Kentucky might fell to the Wildcats in the Sweet be in a position for one of those dramatic Sixteen in 2014. Think they’re upsets. Or it may be the victim. thinking revenge? Doesn’t UK I find myself looking at this team like a think revenge every time West full head of nice thick hair, but with combVirginia shows up? overs here and there to hide a few bald Wichita State is a 10 seed, spots. Adabayo goes out and Isaac Humconsidered low by many TV phries comes in, and the play suffers. Wilexperts. It feels a bit like Kenlis goes out and Wenyan Gabriel comes in, tucky getting Indiana in the secand the play suffers. Both Humphries and ond round a year ago. But this Gabriel seem to have regressed since the is a better Kentucky team than start of the season. (John Calipari raved a year ago. about “Wenyan’s game” – he stepped in It better be, because looming and drew an offensive foul against Arkanin the Sweet Sixteen is UCLA. sas, and hit a couple of foul shots – but oth- And, in the Elite Eight, North erwise, I’m still puzzled by what he’s bringCarolina. ing when he’s in there. Perhaps the best Two of the most memorable thing is for Gabriel to announce he’s not games Kentucky played all year. entering the draft, so Cal can stop trying to Both high-scoring, both down sell him to the NBA scouts.) to the wire. Kentucky won one, Isaiah Briscoe goes out and Hawkins because Monk scored 47 points. comes in, and the play often improves. Dominique Hawkins had 2 steals and 9 points vs GA. They lost the other, because he

O

kay, so what do we know now?

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High School Basketball Kicks off March Madness

he brackets are set, but the question still remains: how long will it take before its busted? Every year around this time, college basketball fans are in a frenzy as they sit at home, at work, in a bar, or in their car waiting on nail-biting finishes to the NCAA Basketball Tournament.

would be on their way to Northern thought would be the favorite to win state. Kentucky University to defend their In Coach Chris Renner’s 19th season, he captitle. tured his eighth regional title after Ballard pulled In their first game of the state the upset over Trinity, and then went on to beat tournament, they would play Sacred Christian Academy-Louisville 60-37 in the sevHeart. That’s right, the Valkyries. enth region championship. While many anticipated Butler and And lastly, one of the craziest moments High School Male advancing to the state tourney, for high school’s March Madness wasn’t the Sports Report Sacred Heart had other plans in the Thrilla in Manila between Ali and Frazier, but seventh region. it was the Alley-brawl at Valley, when Doss and RANDY All season, Male relaxed in the Fern Creek took the court as heavyweights in the sixth region championship at Valley High WHETSTONE JR. limelight, ranked with Butler as a Top 20 team in the nation, until they School. faced their hated rivals in Manual in It was a game that had a lot riding on it. Doss the seventh region tourney. The madness contin- was looking to win the sixth region for the third ued, as Manual slipped by Male 65-64 in what consecutive year, and Fern Creek was trying to some would call an upset, but others would call end their run and go to the state tournament for ‘anything can happen in a rivalry game’. the first time in school history. Some of us will become overwhelmed with Manual then met Sacred Heart in the And historic it was. the amount of sports notifications we will receive regional finals and the Valkyries would win, Since Fern Creek opened in 1923, they never on our cell phones and tablets that will read ‘Upset Alert’, as the seconds tick down to a high 59-52, advancing to the state tournament for the won a regional championship. But on March first time since the 2013-14 season. 7, 2017, that would change. They ended Doss’ seed being upset by an underdog in the greatest Butler would defeat Sacred Heart, and play reign in the sixth region after beating them tourney of them all. The probability percentage of having the cor- Murray in the quarterfinal round of the St. Eliz- 49-45, in what would be the final game coached abeth Healthcare/KHSAA Girls Sweet 16 Basby Doss’ Tony Williams (Williams went 79-24 rect final four will dwindle as the week’s progketball Tournament. The last time these two overall at Doss, including back-to-back appearress, and trash cans and recycling bins will be ances in the state tournament) and punched filled with broken brackets. It all culminates into teams played was December 10 in the Independence Bank Classic at Owensboro Catholic, their first ticket to Rupp Arena for the 2017 the thrilling experience that is March Madness. where Butler demolished Murray 68-50. Whitaker Bank/KHSAA Boys Sweet 16 BasketAnd while the 2017 NCAA Tournament is But three months later, on March 10, Murball Tournament. officially underway, the high school ranks gave ray would pull one of greatest upsets in Girls March is crammed with madness, and high us a preview of coming attractions. Sweet 16 history. They brought Butler’s seaschool basketball was the opening act to what Hmm. Where do we begin?! Of course, son to a close, shocking them with a 65-56 win, should be a dramatic and exciting month. VT ladies first. The defending state champs, Butler, came into the 2016-17 season with the hopes and robbing them of potentially winning of becoming a dynasty by winning three state a state-record, sixth championships in four seasons. championship. Butler They opened the season with a loss to Male. ended its season with After that, they won 25 straight games before a 33-3 record. falling to Sacred Heart (we’ll come back to this If that isn’t enough, school in just a second) on February 8. the madness continMarch 1 then arrived, and at this point, Butler was in full surge as they prepared for back-to- ued. On the boys’ side, Ballard High back titles. They beat Moore and Mercy in the School endured a seafirst couple of games of the sixth region tourson filled with many nament, and battled Bullitt East led by Lindsey obstacles. Plagued Duvall, in the regional championship. with injuries to star This is where the madness begins. Duvall, players, the Bruins who became the all-time leading scorer in Bulbecame resilient and litt East basketball history, looked to cap off her still found a way to senior season by punching a ticket to the state Rupp Arena. They tournament. But she ran into a brick wall in went in as the underButler, who held her to only nine points in the dog versus Trinity on contest - shocking for a young lady who went March 2, but walked the season averaging 23.6 points in her sleep. out as the winner ver- The Fern Creek Tigers hoisted the 2017 6th region championship trophy, the school’s So as Bullitt East fans stood in disarray and first regional championship. eye popping facial expressions of disbelief, Butler sus a team that many

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21 Tulips & Juleps | 23 Paul Hornung Awards | 28 Leadership Summit

SOCIETY

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An Evening of Fashion An evening of fashion and philanthropy for Kentucky Derby Museum was the perfect way to honor late Louisville style icon and lover of Derby traditions Sug Schusterman. Following an evening of wine tastings from O’Brien Estate Winery, a fashion presentation closed the evening featuring Derby season looks from Rodes For Him For Her and Glasscock Boutique with stying by Joseph’s Salon. Jan Corum, Dan Schusterman, Elizabeth Bell, Jean and Bill Shewciw.

Monica Shumway, Emmlee Lowis, Elizabeth and Faith Shumway.

Derby Museum Fashion Show.

Derby Museum Fashion Show.

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Grant Howell, Judy and Paul Roberts, Helen Franzman, Susan and Kevin Flick.

Karen LaClare Casi, R. Wayne Jenkins, Kaye Bowles and Steve Van Hooser.

Tiffany, Lexie, Emily and Diane Wiegel.

Derby Museum Fashion Show.

Tonja Aaron- Wells and Linda Davidson.

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PHOTOS BY BILL WINE

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SOCIETY

Tulips & Juleps The Junior League of Louisville (JLL) hosted their 11th annual art and gift market at Louisville Slugger Field. The three day event included special events all weekend including a free barre3 class, a Nanz & Kraft Florists floral arrangement class and a Juleps After Dark party featuring wine and bourbon pulls and a famous silent auction. Admission to the market was free on Sunday with a new or used book donation to Little Libraries. JLL is an organization of women committed to improving the community. Kathryn Wickenhauser, Clair Colvin, Cari Swanger and Laurin Dixon.

Bren and Syra.

Susan Rosenblatt.

Jonkey Simpson od Material Things.

Danita Carter and L Tonya Leavell.

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Zach Allen-Kelly, Lori Allen-Kelly and Tammy Abboud.

Raine Dougherty and Lauren Songer.

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Alexa Lemley and Samantha Aulick of 240 Sweet.

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Modern Louisville Release Party The contemporary space at Aloft Louisville Downtown was the site of all things modern as readers of Modern Louisville gathered to sip, snack and savor the March/April issue of the region’s premier LGBTQ publication. KDF was on hand with an opportunity to buy the most coveted accessory of the season, the 2017 Pegasus Pin.

Virgil Rosell, Ken Herndon and Joshua Ceasar.

Sister Alma Badhabits, Gunnar Deatherage and Sister Tushie Galore.

Heather O’Mara, Matthew Porter, Marsha Blacker, Randy Blevins and Judy Royce.

Remy Sisk and Steve Squall.

Mike Porto, Kevin Moore and Tim Lawson.

Josh Miller and Angie Lusk.

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Angie Lusk and Jaison Gardner.

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Heather Vonnahme and Chana Fisher.

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Paul Hornung Awards Michigan’s Jabrill Peppers was honored by Louisville Sports Commission as the Most Versatile Player in Major College Football at the annual awards banquet sponsored by KentuckyOne Health and presented by Texas Roadhouse. University of Michigan Head Football Coach Jim Harbaugh and ABC/ESPN commentator Jeremy Schaap were special guests of the 7th annual awards. 7th annual Paul Hornung Award Banquet.

Rich Hendrickson, Maureen Brooks, Jesse and Melinda Schmitt, Ruth Hendrickson, Katie Siler and Karl Schmitt III.

Travis Doster of Texas Roadhouse.

Karl Schmitt, Owen Marecic, Jeremy Schaap, Ivory Bryant, Jabrill Peppers, Jim Harbaugh, Howard Schnellenberger and Paul Hornung.

Karl Schmitt, Brent Rogers and John Asher.

David, Jim and Amy Wombwell, Beth Keyes, Mayor Greg Fischer and Mike Keyes.

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Suzi Tipton and Mike Greenwell.

Paul Hornung Award Winner Jabrill Peppers.

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Mellwood March Art Show Mellwood Arts and Entertainment Center hosted its first juried art show on March 4 and 5. The intent of the show was to make it accessible to all ages of artists by keeping costs down so emerging artists had an opportunity to participate. Over 50 juried artists joined by 20 Mellwood resident artists displayed their talents joined by performances by Flur-De-Lis Ballet and Kennedy Wickers with food provided by Long Shot Lobsta, Hi-Five Doughnuts, Feast BBQ and more! Artist Priscilla Chandler, Craig Lynch and J. Rounsee Mashburn.

Erika Chavez-Graziano of Cellar Door Chocolates and Artist Jeaneen Barnhart.

Ku Hone.

Lisa Hagan of Splendid Bee.

Jenny Pfanenstiel of FormĂŠ Millinery.

Lucy Mistratov.

Melanie and Solomom Parker.

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Denny’s 80th Birthday Bash Susan Sweeney Crum threw an unforgettable birthday bash for her husband Denny Crum at Hurstbourne Country Club. With the theme of “One Cool Dude,” the private party was an opportunity for Coach to celebrate the milestone birthday with family, friends, former players and fellow coaches.

Coach Denny Crum posed with many of his former players and staff members.

Susan Sweeney Crum, Tony Cruise, Joanne Cowgill, Kathi Lincoln and Natalie Remmers.

Bill Lott with Shannon and Michael Seebert.

Shon China Lacy, Coach Denny Crum and Big Rome Kimbrough watched the Happy Birthday video presentation which featured video greetings from many well known coaches, former basketball players and movie stars.

Tammy Cooper and Nate Johnson.

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Mark and Ruthie Blankenbaker with Elisa and Roger Burkman.

Eileen Smith, Turley and Laura Richards.

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Karen Kraft and Jamie Lott.

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SOCIETY

Trinity CelebraTion Each year, Trinity High School Alumnae and supporters gather for a silent auction and dinner to raise money and support the students at Trinity High School. Rhonda Dowdy served as the Chair of this year’s highly successful evening.

Trinity High School CelebraTion.

Greg and Tracy Gitschier, event chair and Associate Director,Trinity Annual Fund, Michelle Walters and Bryan Walters. Scott and Kristin Kelly, David and Karen Rueff, Carolyn and Jeffrey Chou, and Kelly and Don Thieneman.

Circuit Court Judge Judith Burkman, Scott and Jina Scinta with Roger Burkman.

Karen and David Rueff.

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Alexandra and Marcio Schmitt with Mary Anne Conte.

Adele and John Ryan.

Sarah Clay and Brandon Jaggers.

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Leadership Summit The theme of the 2017 Leadership Louisville Summit presented by PNC Bank was Leading for the Future. The curriculum included theories on connectional intelligence and breakthrough innovation, inclusive leadership and mindfulness and future-oriented leadership with a keynote address by author Erica Dhawan. Tami Miller, Cynthia Knapek and David Sachs.

YPAS Student performers.

Sherman Bradley.

Deb Clary.

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Carlos Rivas, Dr. Karen Cost, Bert Kremer and Andrew Bailiff.

Keynote Speaker Erica Dhawan.

Kim Baker and Lisa Zangari.

Lori Orr and Ashton Bissmeyer.

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Dick Sisto.

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—NOW PLAYING—

CRY IT OUT by Molly Smith Metzler directed by Davis McCallum

Mar. 10–Apr. 9, 2017

MADE POSSIBLE BY A GENEROUS GRANT FROM THE

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IACP Awards The International Association of Culinary Professionals gathered in Louisville March 3-5 to celebrate the greatest the industry has to offer. The prestigious awards were presented at The Louisville Palace and were co-hosted by television personality Carla Hall and Dining Editor Joe Yonan. This year’s Trailblazer recipients included Wendell Berry, Kathy Cary, Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer, Edward Lee and Ronni Lundy. The 2017 conference assembled culinary leaders from around the country to the eclectic food scene of Louisville. Brasserie Provence.

Steve Legato.

Ali Bouzari.

Naomi Duguid.

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Anya Hoffman and Alison Tozzi Liu with one of the presenters.

Cara Mangini.

Annelies Zijderveld.

Carla Hall from ABC’s The Chew and Tucker Taylor of Jackson Family Winery.

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Molly Yeh.

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SOCIETY

Art as a Part of Healing Art is the perfect way to celebrate the efforts of recovery for the talented members and therapists at Bridgehaven. Over 50 pieces of art were available for purchase with a music presentation by member band, “The Bridgetime Players.”

Tara Bassett, Samantha Barrett, Ramona Johnson, Tessa Banta and Leslie McNulty.

Cara Bridgeman and Jordan Conley-Endicott.

Linda Probus and Kelli Torpey.

Jean Hollis and Peggy Duncan.

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One of 50 pieces of member art available for purchase.

Judy and Dan Minogue.

The Comfy Cow was dishing out some of their most requested flavors.

Callie Nichols, Zebeeb Nuguse, Grace Gothard and Andi Wood.

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Villanova

1

Mt. St. Mary’s/N. Orleans 16

Wisconsion

8

Virginia Tech

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Virginia UNC Wilmington

Florida East Tenn. St.

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C R E A T I V E S I G N O F F N W M I _ Po ste r _ 1 CZ | Revi si o n # : 0

A Winning Partnership.

SMU Providence/USC

Baylor New Mexico St.

South Carolina Marquette

6

3

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2

Troy

15

Gonzaga

Finals Phoenix, April 1 &

14

Duke

S. Dakota St

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CLIENT SIGNATURE:

DATE:

Notre Dame LOUISVILLE: EMAIL APPROVAL TO YOUR AE OR FAX SIGNED COPY TO 502-584-4654 Princeton

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West Virginia Bucknell

IMPORTANT TO NOTE: If more than three (3) revisions are needed a charge of $100 an hour will be applied to any creative work moving forward.

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5 IMPORTANT TO NOTE: If more than three (3) revisions are needed12a charge of $100 an hour will be applied to any creative work moving forward. 4 13

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© 2014 Outfront Media. All rights reserved.This artwork was created by and remains the property of Outfront Media. Permission is granted for the use of this artwork only by the original recipient and only on the medium and for the purpose for which it was provided and may not be used for any other purpose or transferred to any third party. Any and all sale, rental, transfer, duplication, transmission, posting on any website or otherwise on the Internet or other media of the material contained herein or other use is a violation of federal law.

Maryland Xavier

he property of Outfront Media. Permission is granted for the use of this artwork only by the original recipient and only on the medium and for the purpose for which it was Any and all sale, rental, transfer, duplication, transmission, posting on any website or otherwise on the Internet or other media of the material contained herein or other use is

Florida St. Fla. Gulf Coast

Saint Mary’s VCU

Arizona North Dakota M A R C H 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 • V O I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

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San Jose, March 25

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7 10

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presents

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Kansas Nc Central/UC Davis

8

Miami (Fla.)

9

Michigan St.

5

Iowa St.

12

Nevada

4

Purdue

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MIDWEST 11

Finals oenix, April 1 &2

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Creighton C R E AT

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Kansas City, March 25

3

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Oklahoma St.

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1

North Carolina

16

Texas Southern

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Seton Hall

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Minnesota LOUISVILLE: EMAIL APPROVAL TO YOUR AE OR FAX SIGNED COPY TO 502-584-4654

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Middle Tenn.

Butler Winthrop

LOUISVILLE: EMAIL APPROVAL TO YOUR AE OR FAX SIGNED COPY TO 502-584-4654

SOUTH

DATE:

IMPORTANT TO NOTE: If more than three (3) revisions are needed a charge of $100 an hour will be applied to any creative work moving forward.

© 2014 Outfront Media. All rights reserved.This artwork was created by and remains the property of Outfront Me provided and may not be used for any other purpose or transferred to any third party. Any and all sale, rental, tr a violation of federal law.

6

Memphis, March 26

Cincinnati

11 Kansas St./Wake Forest

© 2014 Outfront Media. All rights reserved.This artwork was created by and remains the property of Outfront Media. Permission is granted for the use of this artwork only by the original recipient and only on the medium and for the purpose for which it was provided and may not be used for any other purpose or transferred to any third party. Any and all sale, rental, transfer, duplication, transmission, posting on any website or otherwise on the Internet or other media of the material contained herein or other use is a violation of federal law.

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UCLA

Kent St.

Dayton Wichita St.

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St. Patrick’s Parade In one of Louisville’s greatest March traditions, the Ancient Order of Hibernians (AOH) hosted the annual parade wtih a theme of “One United Ireland.” As many as 150 units stepped off at Baxter and Broadway at 3 p.m. on Saturday, March 11. The cool temperatures didn’t stop the estimated 100,000 people from watching what is often referred to as the “people’s” parade. A traditional Irish breakfast followed by a Noon Mass kicked off the time-honored celebration.

Elwood Blues, Janet Graff and Jake Blues.

Maggie Rivard, Talia Piccini, Jenny Drake, Jordan Aycock and Michael Taylor.

“The Irish Person of the Year” Tori Murden McClure and Jefferson County Property Valuation Administrator Tony Lindauer.

Voice-Tr ibune Prestig ious Proper ties

elping you plan... H so you can Wine, Beer, Spirits PARTY! Antipasti 2632 Frankfort Avenue

wineshoplouisville.com

Amy Rice and Holly Byrnes.

Ju ne 1 , 2 017

prese nted by

502.721.9148

MENTION YOU SAW US IN THE VOICE TRIBUNE THIS WEEK AND RECEIVE 20% OFF EASTER, DERBY & GRADUATION PARTY INVITATIONS M A R C H 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 • V O I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

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The Back Door Fundraiser While crowds gathered along Baxter and Bardstown Road to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day, The Back Door took advantage of their prime location in Mid-City Mall to do some good for animals in need. From 1 p.m. to 3 a.m. 20 percent of all sales were generously donated to The Arrow Fund. A silent auction was organized to supplement the donation with a notable sponsorship from Tito’s Vodka.

Mike and Mike Cleary.

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Camille Walker, Lauren Francis, Shelby Tron and Richie Michaels.

Daniel Dougherty, Isabelle Clements, Stacey Lemastus, Eric Carter, James Knable and Clay and Krystal Cadarette.

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Kai Knudsen and Marilyn Mayes.

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O

Australian Adventure

ur Cruise on the Regent Seven Seas Navigator continued as we reached BrisPartyline bane, Australia on the eastern coast CARLA SUE of the continent. BROECKER We left the ship and toured the city with a population of 3 million on double decker boats in the bay. It is a lovely place to live or visit. In some respects, it is rather like a Venice with skyscrapers.

We boarded old fashioned tour boats and were served a seated luncheon as we sailed the residential canals. Vocalists entertained us after lunch as we sailed along. After touring Brisbane we boarded our “mother ship” and settled in for two days of imported entertainers, cards, games, lectures, sitting by the pool and reading. Not to mention having delicious meals served by nice, sweet servers who cannot do enough for us. One morning we had a breakfast party. Husband Brad went to the head chef and told him about southern sausage gravy and homemade biscuits. The chef was intrigued by the idea and agreed to prepare it for our crowd, most of whom are Yankees and had no clue. Well, it was a rip-roaring success! Even the waiters wanted servings and loved it. In the evenings we had really good entertainers in the theater after dinner. An all Australian group called “The Tap Pack” had the audience on its feet after the first number. Another night a pianist/comedian from Texas by way of Brisbane wowed us with his musical magic and his “slow draw” Texas humor. His appearance was one of a prosperous undertaker with a paunch, dressed all in black with black crocodile boots. We arrived in Cairns, Australia on a hot day that was close to the end of their summer. Cairns (pronounced “cans”) is a major city on the east coast of Far North Queensland. It was founded in 1876 to serve miners heading for the Hodgkinson River goldfields. It is a popular

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One of many aboriginal entertainers that were brought on board the Navigator to entertain guests before dinner.

tourist destination because of its tropical climate and access to the Great Barrier Reef, one of the seven natural wonders of the world. The estimated population is 150,000. The Cairns area was inhabited by the Gimuy Walubara Yidini indigenous people who still claim their Native Title rights. It was founded in 1876, hastened by the need to export gold discovered on the tablelands to the west of the inlet. The site was mostly mangrove swamps and sand ridges. The swamps were gradually cleared and the sand ridges were filled with dried mud, sawdust from local sawmills, and ballast from a quarry. Debris from the construction of a railway to Herberton on the Atherton Tableland, a project which started in 1886, was also used. During WWII, the Allied Forces operated basses (now the airport), including a major military seaplane base on Trinity Inlet, and US Navy and Royal Australian Navy bases near the current wharf. Combat missions were flown out of Cairns in support of the Battle of the Coral Sea in1942. After WWII, Cairns gradually developed into a center for tourism. The opening of

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the Cairns International Airport in 1984 helped establish the city as a desirable destination for international tourism. Enough history. We went out in the country and took a five kilometer sky lift up to a craft village in the hills. The lift was awesome. The crafts were not as wonderful as on our last visit. I think we are getting jaded! We settled for a cold Coke and sat on a stone wall in the shade till it was time to head “home.” The next day we sailed into Cooktown Harbor, tendered in and looked around. It is in the “Shire of Cook.” It has a population of about 2300 and is where James Cook beached his boat “The Endeavor” for repairs in 1770. Cooktown was founded in 1873 as a supply port for the goldfields along the Palmer River. We toured the mangrove in a small open boat operated by a charming husband/wife team. He described the surroundings and she served coffee and tea along with the “Icelandic donuts” she continued to freshly fry and sprinkle with powdered sugar just before serving. We then had two wonderful, quiet days cruising the Arafura Sea. We passed several

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SOCIETY

One of millions of beautiful butterflies at the Cairns Butterfly Garden.

One of our friends, Marilyn Frederick of Palm City Florida aboard the Skyrail Rainforest Cableway in Cairns, Australia.

Carla Sue beside a termite mound in the Northern Territory Museum & Art Gallery in Darwin.

A 12 foot python on a branch in the Darwin Botanical Garden.

A home overlooking the Cairns Harbor.

big (half mile?) islands that showed little habitation. What sort of people would live on them out in the middle of the ocean? We are talking half mile long islands! We saw no boats docked on our side of the islands. Later we learned that they were uninhabited because they had no fresh water! After lunch on the first sea day, our ship had a big “country fair” around the pool with all sorts of carnival games. Silly games such as being able to walk across the outside deck with a full cocktail glass and not spill a drop, identify photos of iconic structures from around the world and identify the country, volleyball in the pool and so on. There was something for everyone. Prize points were awarded to winners. Most of the “Geritol set” got into it and they were aggressive! One more day at sea and we arrived at Darwin, our last port in Australia. It is

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The Navigator’s country fair on the pool deck.

nearing the end of their summer which is November to April. We started out at their new natural history museum and it was very interesting. Then after lunch we hit the souvenir center on the dock. It was full of crocodile belts, handbags and wallets and lots of opal jewelry. The prices were astronomical compared to a few years ago. Bought nothing! I was disappointed and Brad was relieved! One interesting piece of trivia: There is a memorial, a plane from the Korean War, in one of the parks. One of our friends, Rick Weiler, aboard ship flew that very plane in the war. He had recognized the ID number on the tail the last time he and his wife sailed here! On the Esplanade overlooking Darwin Harbor is a memorial dedicated to the Officers and Crew of the USS Peary, which was attacked and sunk during the first air attack on Darwin by the Japanese during WWII.

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They thought the approaching planes were a storm approaching from the south, instead it was the Japanese. They suffered great damage and loss of life. There were “pill boxes” around Darwin Harbor and two guns to repel the Japanese. One of the guns salvaged from the vessel now serves as a memorial to all those lost in the action. The swampy mangrove groves look like solid land but are liquid. On land the houses are raised about five feet because of prevalence of termites who eat grass and wood. It was soon time to leave Darwin taking with us the wonderful memories of this lovely “island continent.” We are looking forward to being back here next year, but also know that our next two stops are tremendously exotic. The first will be Komodo Island in Indonesia where we will see their famous “dragons” close up. Then it will be on to Bali where we will have an overnight. VT

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On the Town with Veteran Photographer John H. Harralson Jr.

Republican Lincoln Day Dinner The Jefferson County Republican Party held its Lincoln Day Dinner on Feb. 24, at the Bluegrass Convention Center with about 1000 attendees. U. S. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was the keynote speaker celebrating Republican wins in the Kentucky House of Representatives and in the White House. Kentucky Republican Chairman Mac Brown, Vice-Chairman Deanna Brangers and member of the Jefferson County Executive Committee, John Harralson.

Senator Mitch McConnell, Linda Huber and Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao. Joe Altobellis and Rhonda Hahn.

Jim Stansbury and Phil Brun.

Danna and Don Delafield.

Jefferson County Clerk Bobbie Holsclaw and Bonnie Duggins. Emma and Melissa Jones.

Teri and Darryl Isaacs and Carol Whayne .

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Jim Stansbury, chairman of the Jefferson County Republicans.

Rev. Bob Russell and Senator Mitch McConnell.

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SPOTLIGHT

Fillies Derby Ball

On April 8, one of the most celebrated events of the Kentucky Derby Festival will take place at the Louisville Marriott Downtown. The Fillies Derby Ball is always a marvelous evening, thanks especially to the exciting Coronation of the Queen. To learn more about this year’s event, we spoke with Fillies President Kathy Bingham, Ball Chairperson Susan Moore and Fillies Publicity Chairperson Kristen Miller. What is the Fillies Derby Ball? The Fillies Derby Ball is the gala kickoff to the Kentucky Derby Festival season. This long-standing black-tie ball is a Louisville tradition – this year’s iteration is the 59th Fillies Derby Ball – and serves as the largest single fundraiser for the Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation. The history of the Ball stretches back to 1959 when 17 local women formed “The Fillies Club” to help the Kentucky Derby Festival Committee produce an elegant ball, during which a Derby Court would be introduced to the community and one member would be selected as the Derby Queen. The event has seen many changes over the years, but almost six decades later, it’s still going strong – and still producing KDF royalty each and every spring! What can guests expect at the event? Guests can expect an evening of royal treatment filled with music, food, fun and dancing, along with the crowning of the Royal Court. Our mistress of ceremonies will be Vicki Dortch from WLKY. This year, we have a lot of surprises planned, including an artist who’ll be painting a scene of the Ball in real time, a special celebrity appearance from Monte Durham of TLC’s “Say Yes to the Dress,” silent and live auctions, sweet treats and musical entertainment from The Sensations. The highlight of the Fillies Derby Ball is the Coronation of the Derby Queen, who is selected from our group of Derby Princesses by the traditional spin of the wheel. The Queen and her Court will serve as our community’s ambassadors, reigning over Derby Festival events all the way through the first Saturday in May. In her first royal act, the Queen will honor three new Knights and Dames – individuals

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who have distinguished themselves through their support of our community, charitable or civic affairs or the Kentucky Derby Festival. Why is the event important for the Fillies and the greater community? The Fillies Derby Ball serves as the largest annual fundraiser of the Kentucky Derby Festival Foundation (KDFF). Created in 1998, the KDFF has contributed over $1 million to local nonprofits and charities such as Metro United Way’s Success by 6, the Crusade for Children, the Derek Anderson Foundation, Music Theatre Louisville, Police Youth Activities League, Alzheimer’s Association, Every1Reads, American Red Cross and the Presbyterian Community Center. KDFF also supports artistic and scientific education for our community’s youth through underwriting events such as the Student Art Contest, the Academic Challenge and RoboRumble Robotic Tournament. Beyond that, our Ball is the kickoff to a festival that brings our entire community together – and brings people from all over the world to see what Louisville and Southern Indiana have to offer. Anyone who loves the Kentucky Derby and the Derby Festival has to come to the Fillies Derby Ball at least once – it’s a spring tradition and the only way to kick off Derby Festival season! How has the event grown over the years? Adding the partnership with KDFF has made the Derby Ball even more relevant than it was when it originated as an elegant way to start off the Kentucky Derby Festival. Everyone who attends is not only participating in one of Louisville’s grandest traditions, but they are directly supporting the charitable organizations that

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make our community so special. Through this partnership, this event has really become Louisville’s ball – chances are, any organization close to your heart has been supported at some point by the Fillies Derby Ball through our partnership with KDFF. How do you hope the event changes in years to come? We look forward to watching it grow. The best way to ensure those deserving community groups get the funding they need is to make this Ball bigger and better every year, so that’s always our goal. And we are also always on the lookout for new ways to entertain our guests. We know people look forward to the Fillies Derby Ball every spring, and we never want to disappoint! But one thing will never change – by the end of that evening, some lucky young woman will leave the Ball as the official Derby Queen, and she’ll have no idea what kind of adventures are ahead of her! Is it too late to get tickets? This year’s Fillies Derby Ball will be Saturday, April 8, 2017, at the Louisville Marriott Downtown. The cocktail reception starts at 6:30 p.m., and the Coronation of the Queen will be at 7:30 p.m. Dinner follows at 8 p.m. followed by dancing until 1 a.m. It is NOT too late to get tickets! They are $175 each, and VIP tables are also available for $2,500. Call 502.572.3856 or go online to kdf.org. VT Fillies Derby Ball April 8 Louisville Marriott Downtown $175 kdf.org

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Metamorphosis By Tonya Abeln

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he Pointe in Butchertown was abuzz with the most glamorous style of organized chaos. The trendy crowd in no less than four inch heels (often higher) walked quickly to a destination of nowhere stepping to the syncopated rhythm of music. The flow of foot traffic settled into a consistent pattern thanks to “traffic controller” Chris Kaufman, Runway and Placement Director for Heyman Talent. Kaufman is most often referred to as “The Motivator,” because, while this may just be one of a series of rehearsals for the Kentucky Derby Festival Spring Fashion Show, he is determined not to let anyone merely “dial it in.” With a show of this magnitude, every minute of rehearsal time counts and he’s an expert of keeping everyone on task. If you thought the KDF Fashion Show was just another Derby-season opportunity to see spring clothes walked down a runway, you couldn’t be more wrong. “It’s not just a runway show. It’s a spectacle,” Christine Fellingham agrees. Fellingham, a well-established fashion and style expert, is directing the show for her sixth year, and says that this year’s show with a theme of “Metamorphosis” promises to surprise, excite and delight. The annual KDF event, which truly serves as the kickoff to Derby fashion season, is consistently a sell-out — not a small undertaking considering that it is held in a massive ballroom at Horseshoe Southern Indiana. While most traditional runway shows are meant to be enjoyed on an intimate scale, the challenge of producing the KDF fashion show is that you must project and entertain a large crowd (a crowd that may be eating, socializing and cocktailing) for 60 whole minutes. So how does she captivate the attention of a crowd under these circumstances? “This year we are going to incorporate live performances throughout the night,” Fellingham shares. “We want to get people out of their seats and then leave them on their feet.” She also plans to utilize her professional background as a magazine editor

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comes to acknowledging how challenging it can be to work that entire puzzle with the models and the participating boutiques all within a tight schedule and in accordance with the vision she is trying to present.” Fellingham is certainly up to the challenge. She says of the trends she will be looking for, while florals for spring may be nothing new, it is the mixing and matching of floral patterns that will keep things fresh this year. “I also really like the athleisure trend,” she reveals. “I think it is like an interpretation of a strong woman in terms of shapes and color. While I don’t predict anyone will be in bomber jackets and warmup pants for Derby, I do think some of those body conscious silhouettes will be present.” While reserved seating for the show is already sold out, Lounge Tickets can still be purchased for $35 which includes wine and appetizers and a fantastic elevated view of the entire runway production. VT

LIFE

as a tool to engage the crowd. “My strategy is to turn this show into a living, breathing magazine. I try to tell stories in a way that brings the clothes to life and gets people excited about experimenting with clothes themselves.” The show is often compared to the ratings juggernaut Victoria Secret Fashion show because of its hour-long format. “When you think of an hour-long show on television, that’s really just 20 minutes of runway,” Fellingham points out. “This is 60 full minutes of true non-stop clothing. So, to make it feel more manageable, I break it into five scenes that are really like stories.” Part of the metamorphosis theme that the crowd will note is the inclusion of more age and size diversity in this model cast. Fellingham shares, “I wanted to work hard in casting this show with Heyman Talent to establish that we were representing all women.” Kathy Campbell, Director of Heyman Talent in Louisville, agrees that they have been making an effort to cultivate that inclusion within the agency as well. Now comes the unenviable task of selecting and fitting 140 looks for 28 models. Kathy Campbell says of that process, “Christine is extremely humble when it

KDF Spring Fashion Show Presented by Macy’s Thursday, March 30, 5:30 p.m. Lounge Seating, $35 discover.kdf.org/spring-fashion-show

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The Time is Now for Derby Beauty By Graham Pilotte

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ometime around St. Patrick’s Day, Louisville starts to look ahead to Derby. From hats and bow ties to sundresses and shorts, it’s time to bring in spring fashion and we all want to look our best to celebrate the most social time of year. If you’re feeling stuck on how to freshen up for spring, Dr. Bradley Calobrace is here to help.

Now in his twentieth year of practice, Dr. Calobrace is one of the most celebrated plastic surgeons in the nation. The Calobrace and Mizuguchi Plastic Surgery Center specializes in cutting-edge technologies to help patients look and feel their best. “St. Patrick’s Day will be my twentieth year of private practice in Louisville,” Dr. Calobrace explains with a smile. “I remember just moving here; I always consider myself a newcomer in Louisville. But now it’s twenty years later.” Both Dr. Calobrace’s plastic surgery center and CaloSpa, his medical rejuvenation center, feature a variety of treatments to reinvigorate patients. “People aren’t going to come get a facelift or other surgery for Derby,” Dr. Calobrace explains. “But they still want to get ready. We have all kinds M A R C H 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 • V O I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

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of treatments, from Botox to fillers to lasers, that can make people look and feel refreshed before Derby.” Both facial and body treatments are popular. “Some patients really want to make their face look the best by adding Botox,” Dr. Calobrace asserts, “some want to add fillers, to add volume to the face and lips, which creates an anti-aging effect.” Other clients, however, have different priorities. “Some people choose to do laser treatments to help their complexion or pores, or even pigmentation,” Dr. Calobrace says, “and some are just going to have a facial. It’s a very busy time for us, for sure.” “Getting Derby-ready is a great motivator,” Dr. Calobrace says. “I always think of Derby as the time we start to do everything we’ve been putting off. You get the yard ready for summer, and you get the body ready for summer, too.” Of course, like any doctor, he knows that there aren’t shortcuts to real health. “Good nutrition, good health, diet – all those things go together,” Dr. Calobrace explains. However, his treatments are certainly a possible component of a healthy lifestyle, and he encourages a consultation for anyone considering exploring his treatment options. “What’s important is feeling confident and beautiful,” Dr. Calobrace asserts. And if you’re considering a treatment, you’ll want to go to the very best. “Experience trumps anything else, and we have twenty years of experience,” Dr. Calobrace

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explains. Incredibly, he was one of a few pioneers who brought Botox to Louisville before it was even FDA-approved for cosmetic uses. “You can put a filler in somebody’s face and it doesn’t change the way they look if it’s not in the right location, and in the right way,” Dr. Calobrace says seriously. “You need the right hands.” He also practices what he preaches. “On me, personally, I was shocked – a younger, more rested me. I looked totally different,” he says. He recommends starting soon. “If you’re doing a series of treatments, you want to get going on that now rather than later,” Dr. Calobrace explains. “Going in a few days prior to Derby is not the time – we’ve got six to eight weeks right now to really get in and get therapy.” So if you’re considering a treatment, Dr. Calobrace encourages you to come in for a consultation. He says that many patients come to him because of word of mouth – watching the success stories of their friends. “Knowing it’s not surgery and it’s quick and highly effective — that’s what draws people in,” Dr. Calobrace explains. “And anything we can do to make people feel confident is worthwhile.” VT Calospa Rejuvenation Center 2341 Lime Kiln Lane 502.899.9979 calobrace.com PHOTO BY ZACH ERWIN

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OUT & ABOUT

The Most Wonderful Time of the Year

“Seeing all the things and all the people at the Taste of Derby events. I was in the military and just knowing that my city, the city I grew up in, is the center of attention for that week. ... When I was stationed in Japan, people knew about the Derby. We would watch Thunder on the Armed Forces Network.” — Charles Duvall

WHAT ARE YOUR FAVORITE DERBY AND DERBY FESTIVAL MEMORIES? By Jose Aponte

“I love the season as a whole. ... I love how you can take the excitement of one day and stretch it out for months.” —Angela Duvall

“I enjoy Thunder every year.” — Russell Patrick

“My first real Derby live, in the stands. Once you go in the stands, you just can’t go in the infield anymore.” — Samantha Jenkins

“When I was an ambassador last year with the miniMarathon. It was the first half marathon I ever ran.” — Dr. Yvonne Austin

“I love the whole week. The wine tasting usually on Tuesday and Wednesday of that week. And then Oaks Day is my absolute favorite.” — Amber Miller

PHOTOS BY JOSE APONTE

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“The Oaks trip I enjoyed was taking the bus to the Oaks, watching the race from the Paddock and observing all the people and then taking the bus back downtown.” —Carol Duvoss

“Last year it rained really hard a race or two before [the Derby]. I stayed out in it with a guy from Los Angeles.” — Jeff Clark “Oaks Day – haven’t missed one for 25 years.” — April Zirnheld

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Creamy Avocado Kale Smoothie By Paige Rhodes | @mymoderncookery

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ave you ever had a few days where you eat completely unhealthy and feel like your body is craving the nutrients it needs? If so, a smoothie or a juice is a great way to jump-start healthier habits. If you’re feeling a bit sluggish, this vitamin-rich smoothie should give you a nice pick-me-up! It has a creamy base of avocado, Greek yogurt and almond milk with a nutritional boost from kale, mango, cacao and honey. Avocados are a good source of potassium and vitamins C, K, folate and B6, and they are full of heart-healthy unsaturated fat. Kale is chock-full of antioxidants and surprisingly has a lot of fiber for a leafy green vegetable. Cacao nibs contain polyphenols, which may improve the health of your heart and brain arteries by serving as antioxidants and inhibiting blood platelets from forming a clot. If these health benefits aren’t enough to convince you to make this smoothie, the amazing flavor should be!

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Ingredients 1/2 an avocado 1/2 cup kale 1 tablespoon cacao nibs 1/2 cup Greek yogurt 1/2 cup vanilla almond milk 1/2 cup frozen mango 2 teaspoons honey Instructions Combine avocado, kale, cacao nibs, Greek yogurt, almond milk, mango and honey in your blender and blend on high until all ingredients are mixed very well. Top with a tiny sprinkle of more cacao nibs to finish and enjoy!

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Left: the People’s Choice winner, “The Petal Pusher.” Right: the Judges’ Choice winner, “Wild Wilda Mint Julep.”

A Twist on Derby’s Classic Cocktail

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ixologists from eight Louisville-area restaurants and bars competed in the 14th annual Four Roses Bourbon Rose Julep Contest on March 2. The contest was part of the Kentucky Derby Festival’s Festival Unveiled event at the Tim Faulkner Gallery. Each contestant created their own take on Derby’s classic cocktail: the mint julep. Each julep, made with Four Roses, was evaluated on taste, presentation and creativity by a panel of local celebrities and beverage industry judges. Guests at Festival Unveiled also had the opportunity to sample all eight Rose julep recipes and cast their own vote for the “People’s Choice” Rose Julep. While Colleen McCarthy-Clarke of Martini’s Italian Bistro won the People’s Choice Award with her “The Petal Pusher,” Mark Corley of The Silver Dollar won the Judges’ Award with his “Wild Wilda Mint Julep.”

Wild Wilda Mint Julep Mark Corley, The Silver Dollar Ingredients • 5-8 mint leaves • 1/8 oz. Tempus Fugit Creme de Menthe • 1/4 oz. Tempus Fugit Creme de Cacao • 1/4 oz. Cardinal Spirits Songbird coffee liqueur • 2 oz. Four Roses Single Barrel • Crushed ice • Andes chocolate mints, coffee grounds and mint sprig for garnish Instructions Rub 5-8 mint leaves on the inside of a silver julep cup, careful not to break any so it doesn’t release any bitter oils. Then, build the Creme de Menthe, Creme de Cacao, coffee liquer and bourbon in the cup. Give a quick stir, add a small scoop of crushed ice and then swizzle everything together. Fill the rest of the cup with crushed ice and create a nice cone on top. Place a sprig of mint next to the straws and a piece of mint chocolate on top. Dust with a little bit of coffee grounds on top.

COURTESY PHOTOS

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Top Derby Party Tips With event maestros Evan McMahon and Sterling Franklin of the Speed Art Museum By Minda Honey

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ith the Speed Art Museum Gala behind them, we asked event experts Evan McMahon and Sterling Franklin what it takes to pull off an event of that magnitude, and what tips they could share that would translate into throwing a Derby soiree big or small in your own home.

CREATE THE ULTIMATE TIMELINE: “It may seem pointless to take the time to write up a detailed timeline of your event because, let’s face it, something will end up changing in the moment, but having the event written out in front of you adds muchneeded guidance in case of hiccups along the way,” said Sterling Franklin, Special Events Coordinator at the Speed Art Museum. And, share that timeline with the others involved in planning the event. “If you and your team all have the same information in hand, it will keep you from answering 1,000 questions in one night,” added Franklin. USE TRUSTWORTHY AND RELIABLE VENDORS: When at all possible, form a relationship with the vendors you frequently use. “I can’t even count the amount of last minute phone calls and emails I have had to make to one of our vendors asking for an extra something,” said Evan McMahon, Special Events Coordinator at the Speed Art Museum. “Whether it be a flower arrangement, extra linens, more place settings or even chocolate candies in the shape of someone’s face — yes, this has happened — if you have a good working relationship with your vendors they will be more likely help out as needed.” KEEP YOUR SENSE OF HUMOR: Even something as ‘simple’ as an intimate luncheon involves multiple personalities and creative ideas. “Everyone has a vision,” said Franklin. “The most important part of an event planner’s job is to listen carefully and create that vision as realistically as possible.” That said, some ideas just aren’t practical and as event planning swirls, nerves, personalities and demands can clash. “It’s important to

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be patient, yet firm, when conflicts arise, and remember that the end goal is a successful event for all. Tempers will flair and fade and building compromises often saves the day. That, and a smile, knowing, ‘this too shall pass,’” added Franklin. IT’S ALL ABOUT THE MUSIC: Whether it’s a small reception for 30 people or a 750-person Gala, you must have music. Music can set the mood, enhance a theme, or just plain entertain! Piped music is good in a pinch, especially with a well-crafted playlist, but live music is the best way to go. “Louisville has an incredibly rich, live music scene and you can find local groups/artists that can play just about any style or genre you need,” said McMahon. Whether it’s sophisticated jazz, soulful R&B, blues, funk, bluegrass, or rock, you’ll find a talented group of local musicians that can fit the bill. “And, don’t forget DJs,” said McMahon. “Louisville’s DJ scene is also incredibly diverse, with artists (and they are artists!) specializing in countless genres, subgenres, and sub-subgenres, each with their own unique style and mixing prowess.” LET THERE BE LIGHT: It might not be on the top of your event planning list, but don’t discount good lighting for your event. Whether you’re looking at scattered votive candles, knock-em-dead laser light shows or just proper lighting to read a menu or silent auction listing, good lighting is imperative. “Although most guests don’t notice when

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it’s done well, they definitely know when it’s wrong,” said McMahon. “There is nothing worse than too much lighting, especially bright white light. No one wants to feel like they’re having a party in a hospital operating room. Keep it low, and maybe add some color. But, be careful with some colors – you don’t want guests looking like they’re suffering from jaundice.” BE READY FOR ANYTHING: It’s a law of nature. Something WILL go wrong. And, usually, it seems much worse in the moment. “Never say, ‘It will never happen,’ because it will,” said McMahon. Have a back-up plan and items to go with it; like umbrellas, a first-aid kit, a sewing kit, flashlights, and even tape and scissors. Some things, like inclement weather, power failures and the like, are out of your control, but keep in mind all the “what-ifs” and be ready to act swiftly and calmly. And, not all mistakes are game-changers. “Keep it in perspective, too,” added Franklin. “Will anyone other than you remember or notice that the napkins were Kelly green instead of mint? Probably not. Relax, all will be well.” DRINK COFFEE. WEAR COMFORTABLE SHOES. SAY PLEASE AND THANK YOU. SMILE WHEN IT’S THE LAST THING YOU WANT TO DO: Those are the cardinal rules of events. Memorize them and enjoy a fantastic event. VT

PHOTO BY BILL WINE

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Secrets No More By Kate Weiss

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ouisville native Kevin Gibson’s newest book, “Secret Louisville: A Guide to the Weird, Wonderful, and Obscure,” uncovers some real treasures and oddities in our city. If you’ve lived in Louisville long, you’ll probably recognize some of the nearly 100 sites he explores. Most folks know about places like the Crescent Hill Reservoir, but Gibson has new and fascinating facts and history – and a few ghost stories – to share about even these well-known locations.

Did you know that before the reservoir, gatehouse and Crescent Hill Filtration Plant, a glass of water from Louisville would have mud and other nasties in it as likely as not? Not only is the reservoir a nice location to take a walk, our local water company pioneered the researching and implementing of new methods of water filtration, making the city’s water safe for everyone. No Louisville guidebook would be complete without mentioning our legendary racetrack, but in the entry about Churchill Downs, Gibson writes, “the now-legendary track was a financial bust at first and changed ownership multiple times before it finally began to turn a profit in the early 1900s.” It’s interesting to think about what Louisville (and all those guidebooks) would be like were it not for Churchill Downs. Fortunately for us, and travel writers, the track survived. Not all the locations Gibson researched are as well known as the reservoir and Churchill Downs, however. Long-time residents and even natives of Louisville might never have heard of some of the places and events Gibson writes about, or if they have, have never taken the time to visit these secret spots for themselves. Apparently, there’s a second-generation shoe tree in Milltown, Indiana; Elvis’s grandfather was buried in the Louisville Memorial Gardens on Ballardville Road; you can visit Shippingport Island – there’s a small public park there overlooking the Falls of the Ohio; and “Happy Birthday” was first sung at the Little Loom House on Kenwood Hill in the South End near Iroquois Park. Those

are just a few of the dozens and dozens of entries that might surprise you to learn about. “Secret Louisville” gives small doses of history, fun and weirdness in a quirky guidebook style. Each entry is accompanied by a photo or two and an info box with the location, cost and a “Pro Tip” for visiting the site. Most of the locations are free or inexpensive. It might be fun to use “Secret Louisville” as an alternative guidebook or a scavenger hunt in your native city, visiting each site in the book and ticking off that entry as you travel around town. “Secret Louisville” would also be a great resource if you’re looking for some unusual places to bring outof-town guests. This guidebook could additionally be a nice way to do a little armchair traveling. And it’s easy to pick up a little Louisville (and Southern Indiana) history along the way. If you’ve ever wondered about why Mellow Mushroom in St. Matthews has a donut sign on their facade or how the Chicken Steps in Clifton might have gotten their name – and why those steps are there at all – you’ll want to grab a copy of “Secret Louisville” so you can find out. VT Kevin Gibson will be reading and answering questions at Carmichael’s on Frankfort Avenue March 23 and 7 p.m.

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PRESTIGIOUS PROPERTIES sponsored by:

Southern Splendor By Sara Giza

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ituated right in the middle of three of Norton Commons’ beautiful green spaces, sits an antebellum-inspired home with all of the charm of the South.

Sara and Tommy Floyd had already lived in the development and knew they wanted to stay there, so they purchased a lot and hired an architect to help design the home they had always envisioned. “It seemed that every home we had ever swooned over had a common aesthetic – white painted brick and black shutters. Those two design features were a must,” says Sara of her home, which was built in 2012. The 8,000-square-foot house features seven bedrooms and six and a half baths. Over the garage sits a carriage house complete with a kitchenette, bedroom and bathroom. The roof-top porch offers a great view of the neighborhood, along with two side porches for relaxing. The large front porch, lined with columns, offers a bit of Southern hospitality to guests.

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“I think the most unique feature of our home is that it has all of the advantages of an old Southern plantation while also sitting right in the middle of the bustling neighborhood that we love so much,” Sara adds. The family enjoys being a short walk from restaurants, doctor offices, salons and shops. Sara particularly loves sharing her home with her family. “Our family is truly the heartbeat of the house, and the children inspire the life within it,” she says. Architecturally, she loves the combined

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kitchen and hearth room. The large space works well for both daily life and entertaining. “The lofty archway separates the kitchen and living space while still allowing it to feel like one big room,” Sara relates, adding the foyer as one of her favorite spaces too. It provides a perfect formal greeting area. Impressively, Sara decorated the entire home herself. “I love stately home decor, beautifully dressed windows and beds. I like spaces that look somewhat formal but are actually quite livable,” she describes. As a novice seamstress, Sara has sewn many of the window treatments, bed skirts and throw pillows. “I am also very frugal, and doing it myself meant I could purchase the high-end fabric that I so loved without adding the labor or design costs.” The home’s color scheme is filled with neutrals or muted tones that can be timeless. As a photographer, Sara counts images of their children as her favorite pieces of art. Photographs adorn most of the walls, communicating what it most important to them: family. The main floor of the house was designed with a love of entertaining, in mind. According to Sara, they wanted the space to be comfortable for a large group to mingle. “The basement bar and poker room are also great areas for entertaining, especially for televised events like the Super Bowl or March Madness,” she says. They added a large playroom downstairs where the kids can play basketball or dodgeball – near the adults but not underfoot. “The basement/lower level is a true nod to my husband, his love of horse racing and the city of Louisville,” Floyd explains. “Everything from the bottles of bourbon, to the archways made from brick reclaimed from East Market Street tell the story of his hometown.” VT

PHOTOS BY TIM VALENTINO

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PRESTIGIOUS PROPERTIES sponsored by:

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r o c e D y b r e D 1

Derby party season is on the horizon and Louisville does Derby like the rest of the country does Christmas...we start celebrating earlier and earlier each year. Impress your guests with items that reflect the most wonderful time of the year. Here’s a party tip: Leave a Pegasus Pin at each place setting for your guests to take home. Someone could strike gold! 2

1. Wooden horse, $49 from Work the Metal 2. Printed tea towels, $11 each from Work the Metal 3. Small plates, $24 each from Work the Metal 4. Pilleauxtalk throw pillow, $59 from Work the Metal 5. Set of 4 Stone KDF Scene Coasters, $30 from Kentucky Derby Festival 6. Three-section serving dish, $42 Work the Metal 502.584.2841 1201 Story Ave. workthemetal.com KDF Merchandise Available at: 1213apparel.com

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event calendar

to submit your event, visit voice-tribune.com

THIS WEEK’S VOICE CHOICE RODES CITY RUN 10K

2017 represents the 37th running of the Rodes City Run 10K, the 2nd “leg” of the Louisville Triple Crown of Running! The Louisville Triple Crown of Running, which now includes the Anthem 5K Fitness Classic, Rodes City Run 10K and Papa John’s 10 Miler, was formed in 1984. The event attracts nearly 10,000 runners and walkers and draws athletes from all over the country to compete in the ‘heart’ of downtown Louisville. Rodes City Run will take off at 8 a.m. at First and Broadway. The final race, the Papa John’s 10 Miler will take place on April 1. MORE INFO rodescityrun.com

THURSDAY, MARCH 16 KEVIN SMOKLER AT CARMICHAEL’S BOOKSTORE Like few other eras in movie history, the 1980s teen movies have endured and gotten better with time. In “Brat Pack America,” Kevin Smokler gives virtual tours of the legendary movies from that time and why the places they happened are a tribute to their permanence. “Brat Pack America” is a must for any fan of “The Breakfast Club,” “Back to the Future,” “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” “Pretty in Pink” and “Dead Poets Society.” His exploration of highways and main streets of “Brat Pack America” reminds us why we love the teen movies of the ’80s so much and three decades later, still do. Kevin Smokler will be at Carmichael’s Bookstore on Frankfort Avenue on March 16 at 7 p.m. MORE INFO 502.896.6950 “MARY POPPINS” Presented by CenterStage Things are not going well for the Banks family; the children, Jane and Michael, are out of control and in need of a new nanny. When a mysterious young woman named Mary Poppins appears at their doorstep, the family finds that she’s the answer to their prayers – in the most peculiar way! Mary Poppins takes the children on many magical and memorable adventures, but Jane and Michael aren’t the only ones she profoundly affects. Even grown-ups can learn a lesson or two from the nanny who advises that “anything can happen if you let it.” The musical will run at CenterStage at the Jewish Community Center through April 2, and tickets are $20 in advance. MORE INFO centerstagejcc.org I’M WITH U An all-inclusive, intersectional event to cele-

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brate progress towards equality and unity in Louisville, I’m With U, sponsored by Four Roses Bourbon and LEO Weekly will play host to inspiring speakers ranging from politicians to activists to philanthropists, all working toward creating a more compassionate community for Louisville, natives and transplants alike. The evening will benefit ACLU of Kentucky and feature performances by additional beneficiary VOICES of Kentuckiana and a drag show as well as a live painting for auction created by renowned local artist, Peterson Thomas. Get in on the activism and fun at Play from 7 to 10 p.m. General Admission tickets are $10 and includes entry to Play for the entire evening, a VIP Table Upgrade is $35 which includes one ticket but seats up to four people with General Admission tickets of their own. MORE INFO brownpapertickets.com/ event/2889099

FRIDAY, MARCH 17 ST. PATRICK’S DAY CELEBRATION Head to Locust Grove from 3 to 4:30 p.m. for a special party with tasty Irish treats and tea to celebrate St. Patrick’s Day. Special guest will be Gwynne Potts, author and former Locust Grove executive director. She’ll recount the history of the Irish in Louisville including William Croghan, Locust Grove’s founder Admission is $10 or $7 for members. Reservations requested. MORE INFO 502.897.9845

SATURDAY, MARCH 18 PEARLS & PUMPS Get set to rock the runway at The Olmsted from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. in support of Baptist Health Foundation. Rock out in style with your fellow fashion aficionados at this year’s fashion show featuring the new spring lines from Louisville area boutiques. Feel like a VIP and

jam to classic rock favorites while enjoying a delicious brunch buffet, cocktails, celebratory Survivor Runway Walk, shopping the latest Derby styles and a fun photo booth. Event ticket is $75 and raffle tickets for various exclusive items are $10 each.   MORE INFO 502.896.7838 WRAPPED IN RED GALA Celebrating 100 years of the Red Cross in Kentucky! The festivities will kick off at Louisville Marriott Downtown at 6:30 p.m. As the signature event of the American Red Cross Louisville Area Chapter, the gala has become one of Louisville’s premier philanthropic events, serving up a specially prepared three-course dinner, live entertainment and a live auction featuring exciting trips and one-of-a-kind items. Red Lounge dance only tickets are available for guests who want to forgo the sit-down dinner and enjoy the evening’s festivities beginning at 9 p.m., following the gala program and live auction. Entertainment will feature Endless Summer Band and special guest Linkin’ Bridge. Proceeds from the gala benefit American Red Cross community disaster programs. Dress is red tie recommended. A gala ticket is $225 and Red Lounge option is $50. MORE INFO 502.561.3691   RAISE THE BARRE Come into Louisville Ballet Studios (315 E. Main Street) and part with the Louisville Ballet dancers from 7:30 p.m. to midnight. H’ors d’oeuvres and Brown-Forman cocktails will be provided by RYE with music by Sam Sneed. General Admission tickets are $100. MORE INFO louisvilleballet.org/raisethebarre2017 GIFT OF LIFE GALA Make a difference in the lives of kidney patients in our community. Gala guests will

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“RECENT WORKS” BY CAROLYN PLOCHMANN Running through April 18 at B. Deemer Gallery (2650 Frankfort Ave.), don’t miss the opportunity to see Carolyn Plochmann’s newest paintings on display. Born in Toledo, Ohio in 1926, Plochmann remembers spending much of her childhood learning about and creating art. By 1955, she was exhibiting in several Midwestern galleries and the Toledo Museum of Art. In the 1970s, she began showing at the Kennedy Galleries in New York City where she had much success and her career as an American Artist continued to flourish for decades. MORE INFO 502.896.6687

TUESDAY, MARCH 21 HUMANA MILITARY DOWN HOME BBQ Benefiting the Navy SEAL Foundation the down home fun will begin at 6:30 at Gheens Foundation Building at the Parklands (1421 Beckley Creek Parkway). The evening will include live Bluegrass music by Whiskey Bent Valley, a delicious BBQ dinner provided by Mark’s Feed Store and a conversation with Gold Star parents of Chief Special Warfare Operator (SEAL) Aaron Vaughn. The Navy SEAL Foundation provides immediate and ongoing support and assistance to the Naval Special Warfare (NSW) community and their families. WDRB anchor Elizabeth Woolsey will host this inaugural event. Tickets are $100. MORE INFO 502.356.2222   SHOPPING AT BERRY HILL This exclusive shopping event and open house at Berry Hill historic home (5900 Burlington Avenue) will take place from 4 to 8 p.m. The multi-vendor event will feature merchandise not available in retail stores plus a showing of the estate for sale. The free event with refreshments and door prize drawings will feature vendors like Arbonne, India Hicks, LuLaRoe, Matilda Jane, Noon Day, Rodan + Fields, Stella & Dot and W By WORTH.  Realtor Shaw Solomon will show the house from 4:30 to 6:30

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enjoy heavy hors d’oeuvres, signature cocktails, silent and live auctions, an inspiring mission appeal and the opportunity to network with leaders in business, government and medicine. Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the United States. Proceeds from the Gala support research, patient services, public and professional education and organ donation awareness. The elegant evening will take place at the Speed Art Museum with a special VIP awards ceremony at 6:30 p.m. Tickets are $150 and dress is cocktail attire with a splash of orange encouraged. MORE INFO 502.585.5433

during the event. MORE INFO 502.387.8451

THURSDAY, MARCH 23 COUTURE & COCKTAILS Pull off the perfect Derby Day ensemble and discover your most stylish fit no matter where you sit at the Westport Village Derby Fashion Show from 5 to 7 p.m. at Summer Classics. Runway looks from Apricot Lane, Chartreuse, Clater Jewelers, Collections, Darling State of Mind, Fresh Boutique, Shirts Ties N Links and Tunie’s will transform into “realway,” whether your plans include Millionaire’s Row or a backyard Derby party.Enjoy tastes from around the Village, including a bourbon tasting and cocktail hour from 5 to 6 p.m. The styles hit the catwalk from 6 to 7 p.m.After the show, the featured shops and boutiques will remain open until 9 p.m. so you can shop the looks. Tickets are $35 and include 2 drinks, light appetizers and an exclusive coupon card with a total in-store savings and/or gift with purchase greater than the cost of the ticket. MORE INFO westportvillage.com/events/derby-fashion-show

M A R C H 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 • V O I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

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Where are you headed? If you’re ready to get what you want out of your job – out of your life – well, the smart, fast, fun route is at UPS. And with our Earn and Learn and Metro College Programs, part-time employees can graduate 100% debt-free! You’re focused on your future, and we’ll get you moving in the right direction. And even after you graduate, UPS has many career opportunities available!

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From where you are now to earning your degree.

UPS is an equal opportunity employer – race/color/religion/sex/national origin/veteran/disability/sexual orientation/gender identity.

B. Deemer Gallery Fine art • Fine framing

Paintings by

Carolyn Plochmann March 18-April 18 2650 Frankfort Avenue Open Mon-Fri 10:00-5:30 Sat 10:00-3:00 www.bdeemer.com M A R C H 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 • V O I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

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Don’t see yourself?

Visit our redesigned website at www.voice-tribune.com for extended photo galleries and purchase options.

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ABBY

Dad’s Dumpster-Diving Habit Causes His Family Concern

D

••• EAR ABBY: I have DEAR ABBY: My 9-year-old an issue with my daughter has several friends whom father and don’t we love and who are good budknow where to turn. Dad dies for her. However, the rules is in his early 80s and -in their homes are different from those at ours. One friend in paraside from poor eyesight Dear Abby ticular, “Sarah,” eats a lot of junk -- he’s in good health. I’m food and watches more TV than we concerned because he JEANNE allow. When my daughter asks why has developed an unusual she can’t have chips and ice cream PHILLIPS habit. He likes to look after school, or why we watch movies only on weekends, I remind her that good through the dumpsters behind the food and exercise make her healthy, and with grocery store.

Initially he told me it was to get old produce for compost in his garden. But I have learned that he eats some of the things he finds. I have tried telling him this is dangerous. He could cut himself digging through the trash or get food poisoning. He refuses to listen and insists that what he is doing is safe. (He is NOT forced to do this out of economic necessity. He has enough money to buy groceries.) The situation has become critical because he is now planning to cook something he found in the dumpster for a family gathering. I told him not to do it. If he does prepare food from the trash, I told him he must let people know where it came from, so they can make an informed decision about whether to eat it. Abby, please help. -- GROSSED OUT DEAR GROSSED OUT: If you can’t convince your father to disclose to relatives that the food he’s serving may have come from a dumpster, YOU should alert them to that possibility. P.S. A worldwide trend I heard about recently is something called “freeganism.” (The term is derived from a cross between “free” and “vegan.”) Freegans “rescue” food from behind markets to share among themselves to combat food waste, and in Paris, France, there’s even a restaurant that serves food procured this way for a reduced fee. Caveat emptor: People who consume this food should be aware that the food may be past its nutritional peak, and they may risk a food-borne illness if it wasn’t stored properly.

less TV she does better in school. I’m not interested in critiquing Sarah or her family, who are lovely people we really like. However, I do want to make the connection between unhealthy lifestyle choices and possible consequences because this is a subject we’ll keep revisiting as my daughter grows up. I have been trying to say things like, “Everyone makes their own decisions. This is why we do it this way,” but at 9, my daughter sees things as pretty black or white. If our way is right, then their way must be wrong. I’m totally failing at subtlety. Is there a better approach that I could take to talking about this without invoking comparisons? — LIFESTYLE CHOICES IN SOUTH DAKOTA DEAR LIFESTYLE CHOICES: Do not attempt to debate this with your 9-year-old. If your daughter argues with you about your parenting style, tell her that different families have different standards and that you are doing what you think is right for yours. Period. If she needs more of an explanation, then fall back on the message you have been sending her, and in time she will understand. ••• Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Contact Dear Abby at www.DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. ••• What teens need to know about sex, drugs, AIDS and getting along with peers and parents is in “What Every Teen Should Know.” Send your name and mailing address, plus check or money order for $7 (U.S. funds) to: Dear Abby, Teen Booklet, P.O. Box 447, Mount Morris, IL 61054-0447. (Shipping and handling are included in the price.)

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classifieds

CLASSIFIEDS MAY BE PLACED BY CALLING 502.895.9770

RENTALS

SERVICES Distinctive Stonework! Add a BEAUTIFUL stone wall to your garden! Entrance columns, tuckpointing and more! 30 yrs. experience. Bob Rogers, 241-7340. www.distinctive-stonework.com

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Office For ent, 2907 Brownsboro Road, 700 Square Ft., Call Jim For Details 502693-8761 EMPLOYMENT AUTOMOTIVE TECHNICIAN, experienced or very strong basic skills, wanting to gain experience. Large independent shop, known for quality & honesty. Permanent position to be a part of our 40 year history. Weekends o , great hourly pay or flat rate w/benefits. Please email resume to mark huntandknight.com

Classified AD POLICIES AND RATES To ensure the best response to your classified ad, please take the time to make sure your ad is correct in the first issue it runs. We are only responsible for one incorrect week, and liability shall not exceed the portion of space occupied by the error. If for some reason your ad is incorrect, call the following day after publication. All ads are subject to proper classification and editing. We reserve the right to revise or reject any ad deemed objectionable or unacceptable, and we will not be held liable for advertisement omitted by error. Ad position other than classification is not guaranteed.

“I’m Alive... because of organ donation!”

Deadline: Noon on Tuesday prior to publication Line Ads: $10.50 for the first 15 words, plus $.25 for each additional word. (4 or more weeks will be discounted $1 per week) Display Ads: $23 per column inch (nonprofit rate: $18 per column inch)

M A R C H 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 • V O I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

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Leeya, Liver Recipient

www.trustforlife.org 866-945-5433 Supported by

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PUZZLES

pets of the week Colonel Hops is a once-in-a-lifetime kind of dog. This 4-pound senior poodle has a heart of gold and loves being carried like a baby. We wish we knew Colonel Hops’ background, but he came to the Kentucky Humane Society from a rural Kentucky shelter with no information. Sometime in the past, he suffered an injury to his back left leg, which left that leg permanently mangled. Despite his disability, Colonel Hops gets along well, and either “hops” on his “good” back leg as he walks or he drags himself along on his “bad” leg. Colonel Hops also seems familiar with being carried in a purse. We estimate his age to be about 12, but it’s hard to know, as he teeth were in pretty bad shape until we gave him a dental. He’s a sweetheart who will be grateful for a loving retirement home. Since Colonel Hops thrives being in a home, he is going to stay with his foster family until his forever person comes along. To meet the Colonel, email us a dog adoption application found at www.kyhumane.org/dogs. The adoption application can be sent to foster@ kyhumane.org. If you have any further questions, feel free to call 502-366-3355 ext 2260. For more on Colonel Hops or any of our adoptable pets, please call 502-366-3355 or visit kyhumane.org. Looking for a cat who’s got it all? Meet Pocoyo! Four-year-old Pocoyo came to the Kentucky Humane Society when his owners could no longer care for him. Despite having only four teeth, Pocoyo is happier than ever and so excited to find a forever home! Pocoyo may be four-years-old but he’s got plenty of kitten energy still in him. Just take out a wand toy and see for yourself! This handsome, tuxedo cat LOVES to play so much that he’ll even play when no one is around. Wand toys, rattling toys, pipe cleaners- you name it, Pocoyo is playing with it. He’s also quite the cuddly cat and doesn’t mind being held by his people either. If a playful, affectionate friend is what you’re after, you’ll find it in Pocoyo. Pocoyo is neutered, micro-chipped and up-to-date on all vaccinations. He’s waiting for you at our adoption center in the Springhurst Feeders Supply, 9485 Brownsboro Road. For more on Pocoyo or any of our adoptable pets, please call 502-366-3355 or visit kyhumane.org.

For more on any of our adoptable pets, please call 502.366.3355 or visit kyhumane.org

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Questions about your hearing? Ask the expert! We are proud to announce Dr. Katie Austin will be available to answer questions about your hearing health. Join us to learn how cochlear implants and hearing aids can improve your quality of life.

Q: Are cochlear implants covered by my insurance? A: Cochlear implants are covered by Medicare and most insurance plans if you meet candidacy criteria.

March 23rd, 2017

1 PM - 3 PM - or - 5 PM - 7 PM

Bravo! Cucina Italiana 206 Bullitt Lane • Louisville, KY

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Visit us online at www.kyhearingclinic.com M A R C H 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 • V O I C E -T R I B U N E . C O M

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 Intelligent design

Your search is over.

Macy’s Presents the

SPRING FASHION SHOW The stories you tell happen here.

Thursday, March 30 | Horseshoe Southern Indiana 5:30 PM | Cocktails & Boutique Shopping | 8:00 PM | Fashion Show

Reserve your spot at the season’s most exclusive fashion event. – See the latest spring styles from your favorite local boutiques and national brands – Shop the looks you see in the show – Enjoy food and wine with friends

Lounge tickets start at $35.

VISIT KDF.ORG • #KDF2017    17kydf8134_Fashion Show Ad_Voice_9x10.875.indd 1 TVT.indd 63

SM

SPONSORED BY

CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS horizontallogoreversed.pdf

1

1/26/17

9:25 AM

MEDIA SPONSORS

SOUTHERN INDIANA

3/7/17 4:30 PM 3/14/17 2:11 PM


Kentucky Derby Museum’s Annual Hat Sample Sale Kentucky Derby Museum’s Annual Hat Sample Sale

Thursday, 4:30--7:30 7:30p.m. p.m. Thursday,April April66 // 4:30 Over 400 willwill bebeavailable withthetheKentucky Kentucky Museum Overhat 400samples hat samples available along along with DerbyDerby Museum 2017 hat collection, no samplehat hatpriced priced over many as low 2017 hat collection, withwith no sample over$75.00 $75.00andand many asaslow$18.00! as $18.00!

Drinks, Food, Drinks, Food, Fun & More!

Fun & More!

TICKETS: TICKETS: Early bird 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. $20

Early bird 4:30 - 5:30 p.m. $20

Tickets 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. $10 or Tickets $5 for Museum 5:30 -Members 7:30 p.m. $10

or $5 for Museum Members Purchase at DerbyMuseum.org/hats

Purchase at DerbyMuseum.org/hats

704 Central Avenue, Louisville, KY 40208 (502) 637-1111 DerbyMuseum.org

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704 Central Avenue, Louisville, KY 40208 (502) 637-1111 DerbyMuseum.org

3/14/17 2:11 PM

20170316 vt  

March 16, 2017

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