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Kinston High’s student newspaper 2601 N. Queen St., Kinston, N.C.

March 2012

Volume 4, Issue 6

www.thevikingpress.com

Interim LCPS superintendent Mazingo to take permanent post By RESITA COX Editor-­in-­Chief

The boys basketball team celebrates its victory in the 2A state championship game, played Saturday, March 10, at Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh. (Tim Hargett // The Viking Press)

2012 CHAMPIONS Third title in 5 years caps remarkable run By HAYLEY VERMILLION News Editor

Amazing   is   an   understate-­ ment   when   used   to   describe   the   success   of   Kinston   High   School’s   athletic   programs   this   year.     “This   school   has   always   had   great  athletes,  but  we  were  re-­ ally   able   to   capitalize   on   their   abilities   this   year,â€?   Athletic   Director  and  varsity  basketball   coach  Wells  Gulledge  said.   Throughout   the   2011-­2012   school   year,   sports   have   been   very  successful.    In  the  fall  sea-­ son,   the   football   team   played   LQ LWV ÂżUVW VWDWH FKDPSLRQVKLS game  at  N.C.  State’s  Carter  Fin-­ ley   Stadium,   falling   21-­14   to   West  Stokes. However,   the   Vikings   were   QRWVDWLVÂżHGZLWKMXVWRQHVWDWH championship  showing.     With   basketball   season   right   around  the  corner,  the  athletes   and   coaches   geared   up   to   be   just  as  successful  as  football  had   been. The   girls’   and   boys’   varsity   teams   set   high   expectations  

early  on  in  the  season.   “We   set   our   short   term,   as   well   as   long   term   goals,   at   the   beginning   of   the   season,â€?   Gulledge  said.  “We  had  to  talk   about  it  often  and  believe  in  it.â€? The   girls   fell   just   short   of   a   championship   game   when   they   lost   in   the   regional   ÂżQDOV JDPH to   Jordan-­ M a t t h e w s .     Though   a   heart-­break-­ ing   loss,   they   did   make   it   farther   than   the   women   ever   have   in   the   history   of   Kinston   High  School.   “Our  kids  have  put  in  a  lot  of   time,   they’ve   worked   hard   in   the   weight   room,   and   they’ve   received   coaching   well,â€?   said   Hubert   Quinerly,   head   coach   of  the  girls’  team  and  defensive-­ coordinator   for   the   football   team.   “It’s   just   been   a   blessing   to  be  around  such  great  kids.â€?   For   the   boys,   a   hard-­fought  

battle  and  overcoming  37  turn-­ RYHUV LQ WKH UHJLRQDO ÂżQDOV against   Reidsville   paved   the   way   for   a   58-­55   win   against   Cuthbertson   at   Reynolds   Coli-­ seum  in  Raleigh  for  their  third   VWDWH FKDPSLRQVKLS LQ ÂżYH years. As   al-­ ways,   there   were  stand-­ outs   on   WKH ÂżHOG and   court   this   year,   but   head   c o a c h e s   Nick   An-­ derson,  Quinerly  and  Gulledge   all   agree   that   the   players   on   each   team   worked   together   to   make  it  so  far  into  their  seasons. “We   all   had   to   lean   on   each   other,â€?  Anderson  said.   The   coaches,   as   well   as   the   athletes,   also   agreed   on   one   other  component  over  the  year. “We   have   a   great   group   of    

Full story on Pg. 12

See CHAMPS pg. 4

It   didn’t   take   long   for   news   to   spread   that   Dr.   Steve   Mazingo,   in-­ terim  superintendent  of   Lenoir   County   Public   Schools,   was   expected   to   drop   the   “interimâ€?   from  his  title  in  favor  of   a  permanent  position  as   the   county’s   top   school   administrator. “I   was   actually   not   an   applicant,â€?   Mazingo   said,   “but   of   course   the   ERDUGFDQJRDERXWÂżOO-­ ing   the   job   of   superin-­ tendent   however   they   feel  is  best  to  do  so.â€? Mazingo   came   out   RI UHWLUHPHQW WR ÂżOO D position   vacated   by   the   resignation   of   Dr.   Terry   Cline   over   the   summer   and   planned   to   do   so   only   until   the   school   system   could   ÂżQGDIXOOWLPHUHSODFH-­ ment.   However,   upon  

Dr. Steve Mazingo (Megan Towery // The Viking Press)

receiving   the   call   from   the   board,   Mazingo   changed  his  mind.   “I   took   the   job   as   an   interim  and  really  never   thought   about   staying   being  that  I  am  retired,�   Mazingo  said.  “But  I  re-­ ally  enjoyed  being  here   which  is  why  I  am  con-­ sidering   taking   the   job   on  a  permanent  basis.� Even   before   taking   the   job   full-­time   be-­ came  a  possibility,  Maz-­

See MAZINGO pg. 4

Track remains condemned as other maintennce needed By RESITA COX Editor-­in-­Chief

for  next  year.â€? Bryant   must   present   a   budget   to   the   school   board   each   year   of   things  the  school  needs   money   for.   According   to   Bryant,   the   track   is   number   one   on   her   budget  list.   “It  really  just  depends   on   what   the   entire   dis-­ trict’s   budget   looks   like   as   to   rather   it   gets   Âż[HG´%U\DQWVDLG The   Lenoir   County   School   Board,   interim  

Kinston  High  School’s   track  team  is  still  home-­ less. While   track   season   is   underway,   the   con-­ demned  track  surround-­ ing   the   Kinston   High   IRRWEDOO ÂżHOG KDV \HW WR be  touched,  meaning  all   track   meets   this   season   are  at  other  schools.   “It  has  been  presented   to   the   Board,â€?   Princi-­ pal   Angela   Bryant   said,   “and  it  is  on  my  capital   outlay   project   budget   See TRACK, pg. 7


2 - The Viking Press - March 2012

The Viking Press 2601  N.  Queen  St.  /  Kinston  N.C.  28501

The   Viking   Press   is   the   award-­winning   student   publi-­ cation  of  Kinston  High  School   and   is   published   entirely   by   KHS  students  as  a  public  forum. Opinions   expressed   in   The   Viking   Press   are   solely   those   of  the  writer  whose  byline  ap-­ pears  above  each  story. Unsigned  editorials  represent   the  majority  opinion  of  The  Vi-­ king  Press  staff  as  a  whole  and   GR QRW QHFHVVDULO\ UHÀHFW WKH views  or  opinions  of  any  Lenoir   County  Schools  employees. Some   material   courtesy   of   American   Society   of   Newspa-­ per  Editors/MCT  Campus  High   School  Newspaper  Service.

Mission Statement The   Viking   Press,   for   the   purpose  of  allowing  the  voices   of  all  students  to  be  heard,  be-­ lieves   in   complete,   unbiased   reporting   and   strives   for   hon-­ est,   open   dialogue   in   the   KHS   community.

On the Web Find   us   online   at   theviking-­ press.com  or  follow  us  on  Face-­ book   and   Twitter   at   twitter. com/thevikingpress.

Viking Press Staff Editor-­in-­Chief Resita  Cox Co-­Editor Tommy  Tsao News  Editor Hayley  Vermillion Sports  Editor Kyle  Brown Feature  Editor Kenneth  George Entertainment  Editor Malasya  Grajales Opinion  Editor -XOLD*ULI¿Q Business  Manager Anna  Hill Copy  Editors Megan  Towery Anniken  Williams Reporters Akyra  Allen Tim  Hargett Daquante  Jones Angelo  Keyes .KDGĚDK7KRUQH Adviser Michael  Moon

Letters welcome The   Viking   Press   welcomes   letters   to   the   editor.   Submis-­ sions  must  be  300  words  or  less   and  must  be  signed  by  the  au-­ thor.   The  Viking  Press  reserves  the   right  to  edit  letters  for  content   and  length.  

Editorial

www.thevikingpress.com

OUR TAKE More technology, less awareness? IPhones,  iPods,  iPads.   It   can   easily   be   assumed   that  as  teenagers  we  have  at   least  one  of  the  many  Apple   products   that   are   so   popular   not  only  in  the  United  States   but  also  around  the  world.  Our  generation  is  so  tech-­ nology   driven   that   we   tend   to   forget   where   the   things   we   use   as   mere   entertain-­ ment  may  come  from.   Yet   the   question   we   must   ask  ourselves  is:  Do  we  actu-­ ally   care   where   they   come   from?   Though   many   of   us   may   not   be   aware,   consid-­ erable   controversy   has   aris-­ en   as   a   result   of   published   accounts   of   sub-­standard   working   conditions   at   an   Apple  manufacturing  facility  

in  China.   Several  major  media  outlets   have  reported  harsh  working   conditions,   long   hours   and   low  pay  that  have  combined   to  result  in  so  many  attempt-­ ed   suicides   at   the   plant   that   the  factory  had  to  install  nets   between   buildings   to   dis-­ courage   people   from   jump-­ ing  to  their  deaths. As   teenagers,   it   seems   that  the  way  we  receive  our   iPhone   is   the   least   of   our   worries.   But   at   what   point   do   we   put   down   our   Apple   products  and  take  a  stand?   If  we  have  come  to  the  point   where   we   are   inseparable   from   our   electronics,   it   can   easily  be  said  that  our  genera-­ tion   needs   to   reconsider   our  

morals  and  our  priorities. Of   course   it   could   be   ar-­ gued   that   simply   putting   down   our   Apple   products   would   not   really   make   a   change   in   countries   on   the   other  side  of  the  world.   The   initiative   it   takes   to   take  a  stand,  however,  is  what   matters   the   most.   Most   peo-­ ple   have   no   idea   who   made   their  iPhone,  or  for  that  mat-­ ter,  how  it  was  made.  Are  we  asking  you  to  give   up   your   phones   and   music   players   as   a   whole?   No,   the   point  that  is  being  made  is  to   take   the   time   to   become   in-­ formed.   As  American  teenagers  we   can   sometimes   forget   that   something  as  small  as  an  iPod  

Nano   is   a   huge   luxury   that   other   teenagers   across   the   world   would   die   for.   Some-­ times,   it   turns   out,   workers   are  literally  dying  to  produce   these  items.   While   understanding   the   harsh  conditions  and  spread-­ ing   awareness   about   them   PD\EHRQO\WKH¿UVWVWHSLQ many  on  the  road  to  labor  re-­ IRUPDWOHDVWWKH¿UVWVWHSLV being  made. Taking   the   time   out   to   cherish   the   electronics   we   have   simply   shows   our   ap-­ preciation.   Critics   may   say   we   can’t   do   much,   but   we   believe   that   we   can   at   least   do  something.   Be   informed.   Be   grateful.   Be  aware.

from the adviser’s desk

Kinston High a special place to work Let  me  begin  by  saying  this   LV WKH ¿UVW WLPH , KDYH HYHU written   something   for   pub-­ lication  in  The  Viking  Press. Despite   working   as   a   pro-­ fessional   journalist   for   two   \HDUV SULRU WR ¿QGLQJ P\ way  into  the  classroom,  I  do   QRWFRQVLGHULWP\MREWR¿OO space  in  our  newspaper.  I  had   my   turn   in   the   newsroom.   It’s  my  staff’s  turn  now. But   once   in   a   great   while,   I  feel  compelled  to  say  some-­ thing.  This  time,  I  feel  com-­ pelled   to   share   my   thoughts   with  all  of  our  readers. Without   the   slightest   dis-­ respect   toward   any   of   the   previous   newspaper   staffs   that   have   come   through   in   my  four  years  as  the  journal-­ ism   adviser   at   Kinston   High   School,  this  is  the  best  group,   collectively,  that  I  have  ever   worked  with.  I  am  immense-­ ly   proud   of   each   and   every   one   of   the   young   men   and   women  who  are  in  my  class. In   the   space   to   follow,   I   want   to   take   a   few   minutes   to  share  with  you  some  of  the   accomplishments  of  students   I   have   the   privilege   and   the   pleasure   to   work   with   on   a   daily  basis. Senior   Resita   Cox,   our   editor-­in-­chief,   has   worked   harder   in   the   last   two   years  

to   improve   as   a   scholastic   journalist  than  many  profes-­ sional  writers  will  work  in  a   career.   She   has   attended   re-­ gional   and   state   workshops   at   ECU   and   UNC,   and   she   was  among  a  handful  of  stu-­ dents  chosen  from  across  the   nation  for  a  summer  journal-­ ism   institute   at   George   Ma-­ son   University   in   Washing-­ ton,  D.C. She   is   a   published   writer   and   a   great   all-­around   stu-­ dent.  As  a  result  of  her  hard   work,   a   panel   of   judges   -­-­   professors  at  UNC  -­-­  selected   her  as  the  state’s  high  school   journalist  of  the  year,  a  very   prestigious   honor.   (See   our   story  on  Page  1.) Meanwhile,   our   co-­editor,   senior   Tommy   Tsao,   was   VHOHFWHG DV D ¿QDOLVW IRU WKH Morehead-­Cain   Scholarship,   the   most   prestigious   merit-­ based   scholarship   offered   at   UNC-­Chapel   Hill.   While   Tommy   didn’t   receive   the   scholarship,  he’ll  earn  plenty   of   merit   scholarships,   and   KLV SODFH LQ WKH ¿QDO URXQG is   somewhere   a   KHS   stu-­ dent  hasn’t  visited  in  several   years. And  the  classroom  isn’t  the   only   place   our   student   jour-­ nalists  are  excelling.   Two   of   our   current   staff-­

ers  (seniors  Kyle  Brown  and   Angelo   Keyes)   will   play   for   a   state   championship   in   Ra-­ leigh   this   weekend.   By   the   time   you   read   this,   I   hope   we’ll   be   boasting   about   our   third   boys’   basketball   title   in   the   last   six   years.   (Both   played  for  a  state  champion-­ ship   in   football   in   Decem-­ ber,   and   both   are   excellent   students  in  addition  to  being   ¿UVWFODVVDWKOHWHV

Senior   Hayley   Vermillion,   our  news  editor,  was  a  mem-­ ber   of   the   girls’   basketball   team,   which   played   in   the   UHJLRQDO ¿QDOV IRU WKH ¿UVW time   in   school   history   last   week,  and  she  will  certainly   make   a   strong   case   for   be-­ ing   our   conference’s   player   of  the  year  in  soccer  for  the   second  year  in  a  row.   Seniors   Kenneth   George   (feature   editor)   and   Tim   Hargett   were   part   of   a   soc-­ cer  team  that  hosted  a  home   SOD\RII JDPH IRU WKH ¿UVW time  in  school  history  in  the   fall. 6HQLRUV-XOLD*ULI¿Q RSLQ-­ ion   editor)   and   Anniken   Williams   (copy   editor)   were   UHJLRQDO TXDOL¿HUV RQ WKH tennis  team,  and  senior  Me-­ gan   Towery   (copy   editor)   narrowly   missed   qualifying   for  tennis  regionals.

Business   manager   Anna   Hill   couldn’t   take   this   class   both   semesters   due   to   her   rigorous  IB  schedule,  but  she   continues  to  help  us  produce   a  quality  product  on  her  own   time.   It   is   only   a   matter   of   time   before   senior   Malasya   Gra-­ jales   (entertainment   editor)   is  recognized  at  the  state  and   national   level   for   her   excel-­ lent  design  work  in  our  pub-­ lication,  and  reporters  Akyra   Allen,   Daquante   Jones   and   .KDGĚDK 7KRUQH KDYH UH-­ peatedly   showcased   their   skills  in  this  publication. We  stress  that  this  publica-­ tion   is   for   you,   our   students   and   staff,   and   part   of   our   philosophy   is   to   highlight   as  many  people  as  we  can  in   print.   Far   too   often,   that   results   in   the   accomplishments   of   our   own   news   staff   taking   a   back   seat,   but   they’re   doing   too  many  great  things  for  us   to  ignore  their  impressive  re-­ sumes. Consider   me   the   proudest   adviser  in  North  Carolina.   Sincerely, Michael  W.  Moon Journalism  adviser Kinston  High  School


www.thevikingpress.com

3 - The Viking Press - March 2012

Opinion

Schools should move to 21st century

ECW wing challenge truly insane By KENNETH GEORGE Feature Editor

A

fter  being  open  for   only   a   couple   of   years,   East   Coast   Wings  has  quickly  become   a  cornerstone  in  Kinston.   It   is   special   because   it   is   not   only   exclusive   to   the   east   coast,   it   is   exclusive   only   to   the   state   of   North   Carolina. .QRZQIRULWVĂ€DYRUV of  wings,  East  Coast  Wings   has   a   variety   of   dishes   to   offer.  From  burgers  to  chili   cheese   fries,   East   Coast   Wings  knows  how  to  how   WR IXOÂżOO \RXU KXQJHU Their   most   infamous   dish,   the  insanity  wing,  has  hor-­ ULÂżF VLGH HIIHFWV EXW PDQ\ people  still  want  to  take  the   challenge. Junior   Jordan   Keeble   is   among   the   victims   of   the   $1.89  wing.   “It   was   the   hottest   thing   in  this  world,â€?  Keeble  said.   “t   was   crazy   hot.   It   made   me  cry.â€?   Before   ordering   this   “treatâ€?   a   waiver   must   be   signed.  Once  all  the  paper-­ work   has   been   completed,   customers   have   a   chance   to  take  on  the  wing  for  an   opportunity  to  win  a  t-­shirt   and  a  photo  on  the  restau-­ rant’s  “Wall  of  Flame.â€? “I   really   want   to   try   the   insanity   wing   because   it   will   allow   my   taste   buds   to   experience   hotness   like   never   before,â€?   senior   Sherine  Davis  said.   Even   though   the   task   sounds   very   exciting,   the   number   of   people   to   suc-­ cessfully   take   down   the   wing  barely  reaches  double   ÂżJXUHV If   you   think   you   can   handle   the   most   insane   challenge   in   Kinston,   East   Coast   Wings   sits   on   3021   N.  Herritage  St.

“Attract,   retain,   and   de-­ velop   21st   Century   Profes-­ sionals.â€? This   is   one   of   the   goals   of   Lenoir   County   Public   Schools   as   copied   straight   from  the  school  system’s  of-­ ÂżFLDOZHEVLWH By  saying  that  students  are   expected   to   become   “21st   century   professionalsâ€?   this   implies   that   they   will   use   progressive  methods  and  me-­ diums  of  learning. This   would   include   using   digital   media   to   read   books,   using   the   Internet   for   re-­ search   or   using   computers   and   tablets   to   take   down   their  notes. While   many   teachers   do   allow   their   students   to   use   material   from   the   Internet   for   projects   and   papers,   this   usually  takes  place  outside  of   the  classroom.  The  challenge   that  I  see  with  trying  to  “de-­

Tidbits with Tommy Tsao velop   21st   century   profes-­ sionals�   is   bringing   the   new   age  into  the  classroom. Not   all   students   have   ac-­ cess   to   bringing   a   laptop   to   school;͞   however,   it   is   clear   that   most   students   (at   Kin-­ ston   High   School,   at   least)   have   some   sort   of   portable   electronic   such   as   a   smart-­ phone  or  iPod.  These  devices   have  a  wide  array  of  mobile   applications   that   have   more   than  enough  capability  to  re-­ cord  notes  or  instantly  search   Google  for  an  answer. It   does   not   make   a   lot   of   sense  to  me  that  a  student  is   not   allowed   to   look   up   the  

meaning   of   a   word   in   what   would  take  seconds  on  their   phone.   Instead,   he   or   she   would   have   to   take   much   ORQJHUĂ€LSSLQJWKURXJKKXQ-­ GUHGV RI SDJHV WR ÂżQG RQH word. A   counterargument   that   often   arises   here   is   that   this   method  is  “lazy.â€?  I  do  not  re-­ DOO\VHHKRZĂ€LSSLQJWKURXJK a  book  exerts  any  more  ener-­ J\WKDQPRYLQJ\RXUÂżQJHUV along  a  screen. Other   opponents   say   that   being   able   to   access   to   in-­ formation   that   quickly   is   on   the   same   level   as   cheating,   but   the   Internet   has   access   to  the  same  information  as  a   text   and   more.   The   Internet   should   really   just   be   treated   as  a  different  source. Teachers   need   to   incorpo-­ rate   technology   into   their   curriculum.  In  doing  so,  they   can   teach   students   how   to  

properly  use  them  for  educa-­ tional  purposes. Kinston   High   School   had   the   new   addition   of   getting   Wi-­Fi  in  all  of  the  classrooms   this  year.  Why  was  it  put  in   place  if  we  are  not  allowed  to   take  full  advantage  of  it? The   rules   clearly   state,   as   the   administration   has   re-­ cited  to  students  many  times,   that   electronics   are   allowed   on   campus   but   not   out   dur-­ ing  the  instructional  period. To   develop   into   21st   cen-­ tury   professionals,   technol-­ ogy  should  be  embraced  and   not   swept   away   like   some   18th   century   school   child   that   should   be   seen   and   not   heard. It  is  good  that  LCPS  is  set-­ ting  up  goals  of  a  progressive   learning   environment.   Now   they   need   to   follow   up   on   that.

Technology and relationships often at odds Kind words with Khadijah Thorne

Technology  has  made  the   world   an   easier   place,   but   for   couples,   not   so   much.   Insecurity   is   mainly   the   cause  for  that. No  matter  how  much  love   or  trust  a  couple  swears  to   have,   questions   like   “Who   are   you   texting?â€?   or   “Can   I   have   your   password   to   your   phone   (or   Facebook   or   Twitter)?â€?   always   seem   to  come  up.   Whenever   the   answer   is   “no,â€?   the   asker   may   begin   to  wonder  what  their  part-­ ner   is   hiding.   With   these   simple   questions,   the   trust   is   quickly   destroyed   and   the  controversy  begins. Men  and  women  are  inse-­ cure  individuals  and  some-­ times   social   networks   can   easily  add  to  their  worries.   Persistent   problems   arise   such   as   not   texting   your   VLJQLÂżFDQW RWKHU HQRXJK or   not   “showing   enough   loveâ€?  on  their  social  site. While   it   all   seems   im-­ mature,  we  are  all  guilty  of   carrying   on   with   the   non-­ sense.   Technology   is   certainly   necessary,  yet  it  can  some-­ times   cause   a   tremendous  

“When you are chatting with other people on social networks or tex-­ ting the conversa-­ tion can easily go too far.� -­Aniya Rouse

“A relationship is nothing without communication. Social networks and phones help keep communi-­ cation in the rela-­ tionship.� -­Timothy Berry

“It ruins relation-­ ships because status updates are often misin-­ terpreted.� -­Maxine Smith & David Monk

Viking voices We asked these Kinston High students the following question: What impact does technology have on your relationships? amount  of  problems  in  any   type  of  relationship.   Today   when   you   do   not   answer   your   cell   phone,   you  immediately  get  a  fol-­ low   up   text   –   as   if   you   would   respond   to   a   text   if   you   didn’t   answer   your   phone.   This  generation  is  so  reli-­ ant  on  technology  that  we   would   be   lost   without   it.  

For   example,   during   Hur-­ ricane   Irene   when   elec-­ tricity  was  down  everyone   almost  went  crazy  without   their   electronics.     Some   of   us  even  sat  in  our  vehicles   for   hours   burning   gas   just   to  charge  our  gadgets. It  all  comes  down  to  the   fact   that   technology   has   a   lot   of   negative   effects   that   come   with   the   positive  

“I do not have a cell phone, Facebook or Twitter and not having any of that henders even having a relationship nowadays be-­ cause that is what every-­ one bases their relationship around.� -­Lukiss Brooks

ones.   As   young   adults   we   should   learn   how   to   keep   technology   from   driving   our   relationships   or   ruin-­ ing   our   friendships.   Along   with   technology   comes   responsibility   and   we   all   need  to  learn  how  to  han-­ dle  both.  


www.thevikingpress.com

Tip-�Off

4 The Viking Press - March 2012

IB class of 2011 returns to Kinston High for annual award ceremony BY TOMMY TSAO Co-­Editor

Junior Sarah Walker, shown with drama teacher Clay Raines, recently won a Shakespeare monologue contest in New Bern. As a result, Walker will compete in a national contest in New York in April. (Contributed photo)

Mazingo

Champs

ingo  had  many  goals  he  want-­ ed  to  accomplish  for  the  school   V\VWHPDVVXSHULQWHQGHQW “I  really  think  we  can  do  a   better  job  in  the  high  schools   in  preparing  the  students  for   FDUHHUVDQGFROOHJH´KHVDLG “I   think   that   we   do   a   good   job  in  helping  those  kids  who   want   to   go   to   college,   but   I   think   we   are   missing   some   opportunities  to  help  students   DFKLHYHRWKHUFDUHHUSDWKV´ Recently,   the   state   came   out   with   a   new   career   path   known   as   “college   promise,â€?   which   will   permit   more   pro-­ grams   in   high   school   similar   WRHDUO\FROOHJHV7KHSDWKZD\ does   not   solely   lead   students   WR FROOHJH ,W DOVR KHOSV EXLOG FDUHHUVNLOOVLQVSHFLÂżFDUHDV “I   really   look   forward   to   putting   those   (college   prom-­ ise   pathways)   into   place   and   making  sure  our  students  take   advantage   of   all   of   what   our   community  college  has  to  of-­ fer   and   give   them   some   dif-­ ferent   pathways   to   choose,â€?   0D]LQJRVDLG He   also   hopes   to   start   pre-­ paring  the  students  of  Lenoir   County   for   their   after   high-­ school   plans   as   early   as   mid-­ GOHVFKRRO 7KH RIÂżFLDO DQQRXQFHPHQW RI'U0D]LQJRÂśVQHZSRVLWLRQ will  be  made  at  the  upcoming   school   board   meeting   to   be   KHOGRQ$SULO

seniors,   and   that   led   to   great   chemistry   on   all   the   WHDPV´*XOOHGJHVDLG 0RQLTXH/RIWRQDJUHHG “We   were   really   close,   HYHQWKHFRDFKHV7KHFKHP-­ istry   was   awesome,�   said   /RIWRQDMXQLRUSRLQWJXDUG

from page 1

from page 1

The   IB   graduates   of   2011   returned   to   Kinston   High   School   for   a   ceremony   to   receive  their  IB  diplomas  or   FHUWLÂżFDWHV This  is  an  annual  ceremo-­ ny   that   takes   place   every   January  to  reward  these  stu-­ dents   for   taking   IB   courses   over  their  junior  and  senior   \HDUVDW.LQVWRQ+LJK The   students   must   return   to  Kinston  High  in  the  win-­ ter  because  the  IB  examina-­ tions   take   more   than   two   months   to   be   processed,   graded   and   returned   to   the   VFKRRO Each   year   at   the   cere-­ mony,   IB   Coordinator   Ron   Owens   arranges   for   recent   graduates   to   discuss   how   rigorous   academic   program   of  Kinston  High  School  has   EHQHÂżWHGWKHP With  so  much  success,  the   end  of  the  2011-­2012  school   year   will   be   rather   bitter-­ VZHHW7KHIRRWEDOOWHDPZLOO graduate  16  seniors,  the  girls’   basketball  team  will  graduate   six   and   the   boys’   basketball   WHDPZLOOJUDGXDWHQLQH   “I   will   miss   playing   sports  with  some  of  my  best   friends,â€?   Derek   Rivers,   a   se-­ nior   linebacker   and   basket-­

(Tommy Tsao/ The Viking Press)

2011 Kinston High School graduates Rebekah Sparrow, Brianna Rhodes, Abbye Reynolds, Olivia Holloway, Mack-­ enzie Brown and Alex Frankfort were among the IB diplo-­ ma candidates who returned to the school.

“It   was   surreal,â€?   alumna   0DFNHQ]LH %URZQ VDLG Âł,W didn’t   feel   like   I   was   sup-­ posed  to  be  up  there,  but  I’m  

glad  I  got  a  chance  to  talk  to   [the   current   IB   candidates]   since   I   know   [they]   will   ac-­ WXDOO\OLVWHQWRPH

EDOOSOD\HUVDLG ³7KLV FODVV ZDV VR VSHFLDO Everyone   knew   of   the   ex-­ pectations   that   we   had   and   these  young  ladies  produced   in   a   big   way   for   our   pro-­ JUDP´ 4XLQHUO\ VDLG ³7KH\ have  set  the  tone  for  our  bas-­ ketball   program   for   years   to   FRPH´ Overall,   the   success   that   many   of   Kinston’s   athletes,  

coaches   and   fans   have   ex-­ perienced  in  the  past  year  is   something   they   will   never   IRUJHW “We   have   been   spoiled‌ the   community,   the   coach-­ es   and   the   players,   and   we   should   cherish   the   opportu-­ nities   given  to  us,â€?  Gulledge   VDLG


www.thevikingpress.com

Nation/State

5 - The Viking Press - March 2012

Prop. 8 ruling in California overturned By ANGELO KEYES Staff Writer

Same-­sex  marriage  was  al-­ lowed   in   California   for   six   months   after   the   California   Supreme   Court   reversed   a   state  ban  in  May  2008.   The   decision   made   by   the   jury   of   the   U.S.   9th   Circuit  

Court   of   Appeals   ruled   out   that   Proposition   8   is   violat-­ ing  the  U.S.  Constitution.   According   to   The   Los   An-­ geles   Times,   Proposition   8   served   no   purpose,   and   had   no  effect  on  California.   The   ruling   upheld   a   deci-­ sion  by  the  retired  Chief  U.S.   District   Judge   Vaughn   R.   Walker   which   reversed   the  

Junior Anjania Harris: “Yes, because some people can’t help who they love.”

Information   from   CNN. com   and   latimes.com   was   used  for  this  article.  

170  Kinston  High  students  were  asked  if   same  sex  marriage  should  be  legalized.

Junior Camisha Dickens: “No, because it is a sin.” Junior Deandria Bryant: “I think everyone should be entitled to happiness and if WKH\ ÀQG KDSSLQHVV LQ WKH same sex then so be it.”

ballot  measure  in  2010.  After  all  this  the  Proposi-­ tion  8  rule  was  pointless  and   cleared  the  way  for  same-­sex   marriage   to   resume   in   Cali-­ fornia.  

29%

A man killed himself at this Bojangles on Herritage Street on Thursday, Feb. 23. (Tommy Tsao/The Viking Press)

Yes No 71%

Lt. Gov. Dalton visits with The Viking Press By RESITA COX Editor-­in-­Chief

Lieutenant  Governor  Wal-­ ter   Dalton   stopped   by   The   )UHH 3UHVV¶ RI¿FH RQ WKH DI-­ ternoon  of  March  9  to  discuss   his  run  for  governor. While  other  nominees  may   have   had   many   months   and   possibly  years  to  prepare  for   their   campaign,   Dalton   only   announced   his   candidacy   a   few  weeks  ago.

Despite   this   disadvantage,   Dalton   spoke   of   many   plans   he   has   for   North   Carolina,   especially   the   educational   system. Dalton  spoke  on  his  hopes   to   expand   the   growth   of   North   Carolina’s   education   from   the   traditional   “grave-­ yard  method”  of  having  stu-­ dents  sitting  silently  in  rows   to  integrating  more  technol-­ ogy,  such  as  online  courses. “Under   my   leadership   I  

4 students shot by peer at Ohio high school By RESITA COX Editor-­in-­Chief

On  Feb.  24,  a  school  shoot-­ ing   took   place   at   Chardon   High   School   in   Ohio.   T.J.   Lane,   a   17-­year-­old   student   from  the  school  has  been  ac-­ cused  of  killing  three  students   and  injuring  two  others.   Lane   appeared   in   Geauga   County   Juvenile   Court   on   March   6   for   his   court   date   in   regards   to   the   charges   he   received.   They   include   the   murders   of   Demetrius   Hew-­ lin,   16;;   Russell   King   Jr.   17;;   and   Daniel   Parmertor,   16;;   and  the  shootings  of  two  oth-­ er  students.   The   motive   of   the   shooter   is  still  unclear  and  Lane  told   police  that  he  did  not  the  stu-­ dents   he   shot,   as   he   picked   them   randomly.   But   some   of   the   victims   had   been   in  

school  with  him  since  at  least   middle  school.   Although   the   reasons   for   his   actions   are   not   yet   ex-­ plained,   Prosecutor   David   Joyce  has  said  Lane  “was  not   well.”   Student   sources   have   said   that   even   thought   Lane   was   quiet,   he   wasn’t   mean   or   evil.   In   fact   they   were   surprised   that   he   would   do   something  like  this.   Lane  will  not  face  the  death   penalty   if   convicted   though   because  in  2005  the  U.S.  Su-­ preme   Court   ruled   that   ex-­ ecuting   juveniles   is   uncon-­ stitutional.   Lane’s   hearing   will   take   place   March   19,   determining   whether   or   not   he  should  be  tried  as  an  adult   instead  of  a  juvenile. Information   from   The   As-­ sociated   Press   was   used   in   this  report.

think  that  you  would  see  that   we   would   begin   to   modern-­ ize   the   classroom   more   and   use   technology   to   an   even   greater  advantage  and  to  try   to  customize  education  to  al-­ low  students  to  move  as  rap-­ idly  as  possible,”  Dalton  said. Dalton’s   primary   reason   for   being   in   Kinston   was   to   attend   a   local   Democratic   Party   event   hosted   at   King’s   Restaurant.

Man commits suicide at Kinston Bojangles By RESITA COX Editor-­in-­Chief

7KH IDPLO\ LGHQWL¿HG WKH body  after  almost  two  hours   of  the  death.   They   told   The   Free   Press   that  he  “was  a  decent  person   who   treated   everyone   with   respect.”   Investigators   concluded   that   the   victim   had   died   GXH WR D VHOILQÀLFWHG JXQ-­ shot  wound.  The  victim  was   found  dead  inside  of  a  Chev-­ rolet  Lumina.  

Just   a   couple   of   hundred   yards   away   from   Kinston   High   at   the   Bojangles   on   Herritage  Street,  a  man  took   his   own   life   in   the   parking   lot  on  Feb.  23.   According   to   The   Kinston   Free   Press,   the   man   was   preparing   to   celebrate   his   birthday   by   visiting   family   in  town. The   restaurant   remained   Information   from   www. opened   as   KPD   took   blood   kinston.com  was  used  in  this   samples   and   examined   the   article.   crime  scene.  


6 - The Viking Press - March 2012

News

www.thevikingpress.com

JROTC program passes mandatory inspection %\'$48$17(-21(6 Staff Writer

Kinston  High’s  JROTC  pro-­ gram  passed  its  mandatory  in-­ spection  in  February. The   inspection,   held   ev-­ ery   three   years,   is   called   the   Regional   Formal   Inspec-­ tion   (RFI).   Inspectors   from   Ft.   Bragg   visit   the   campus   to   ensure   the   program   meets   highly  regulated  standards  for   JROTC  programs.   Inspectors   look   for   good   communication  skills,  leader-­ ship   skills,   military   bearing,   cadets’   knowledge   of   their   jobs   and,   most   importantly,   leadership.   The   inspection   itself  is  worth  600  points  and   the   brigade   normally   aver-­ ages   about   584   points.   To   pass,  the  program  cannot  lose   more  than  24  points,  meaning   a   minimum   passing   score   is   576.  The  inspection  is  sched-­ uled   and   conducted   by   bri-­ gade  personnel. The   Viking   battalion   con-­

(Daquante Jones // The Viking Press)

-527& VWXGHQWV SUHSDUH IRU DQ RIĂ€FLDO LQVSHFWLRQ RI WKH SURJUDPZKLFKRFFXUUHGGXULQJ)HEUXDU\

sists   of   Cadet   LTC   Tajahn-­ Williams   as   the   battalion   commander,   Cadet   CPT   DaQuante   Jones   as   the   com-­

pany  commander,  Cadet  1SG   Antonio   Sutton   as   the   First   Sergeant     and   Cadet   CSM   Duane   Mills   as   the   Sergeant  

Major.  The  Viking  battalion’s staff   consists   of   Cadet   CPT   T’Keyha  Haddock  as  the  S-­1,   Cadet   CPT   Jamarkus   Gray   as   the   S-­2,   Cadet   CPT   Yolonda   Davis   as   the   S-­3,   Cadet   CPT   William  Sutton  as  the  S-­4  and   Cadet   CPT   Kayla   Charles   as   the  S-­5. The   Color   Guard   was   led   by   Cadet   CSM   Mills   and   the   Drill   team   was   led   by   Cadet   CPT  DaQuante  Jones. With   a   little   less   than   two   months  to  prepare  for  the  RFI,   LTC   Joseph   Tyson   and   MSG   Anthony  Hargett,  JROTC  in-­ structors,   worked   extremely   hard  with  the  cadets  from  last   semester   to   train   new   cadets   that   have   just   entered   the   program  this  semester. “Being   that   the   semester   just  started  in  January  and  in-­ spection   was   Feb.   21,   it   was   challenging   trying   to   train   new   cadets   to   meet   the   re-­ quirements   for   RFI,   and   this   ZDVWKHLUÂżUVWWLPHEHLQJH[-­ posed   to   JROTC,â€?   Cadet   Jay-­

quway  Gaddy  said. The   inspection   failed   last   year,   so   Kinston   was   given   VL[PRQWKVWRJREDFNDQGÂż[ things   that   didn’t   meet   the   requirements.   In   November   2011,   LTC   Tyson   came   out   of   retirement   to   assist   MSG   Hargett   to   get   ready   for   this   inspection.   Tyson   had   spent   20-­plus   years   as   the   senior   army   instructor   (SAI)   of   the   Viking  battalion.  This  inspec-­ tion  was  really  important  be-­ cause  Kinston  could  have  lost   the  program  had  it  failed. Failure   was   not   an   option,   however. “Spending   20   plus   years   in   active   duty   Army,   I   retired   and  came  back  to  give  back  to   the   community   by   teaching   JROTC,â€?   Hargett   said,   “and   motivating   young   people   to   become  better  citizens.â€? “It   was   an   honor   to   pass   the   inspection.   The   cadets   worked  hard  and  I’m  proud  to   say  that  their  hard  work  paid   off,â€?  LTC  Tyson  said.

4XL]%RZOĂ€QLVKHVLQWRSWZRDW1HXVH %\7,0+$5*(77 Staff Writer

For   the   third   straight   year,   .LQVWRQ+LJK6FKRROÂżQLVKHG in   the   top   two   at   the   Neuse   Regional   Library’s   annual   Quiz  Bowl  competition.   Following  a  victory  in  2011   DQG D VHFRQGSODFH ÂżQLVK in   2010,   the   Vikings   earned   second   place   in   this   year’s   competition,   falling   to   South   /HQRLULQWKHÂżQDOURXQG 7KHWHDPKDVQHYHUÂżQLVKHG outside  of  the  top  three  in  ad-­ viser   Clay   Stilley’s   four-­year   tenure  as  the  team’s  coach. “It   feels   great   to   have   a   championship   caliber   team,â€?   Stilley   said.   “The   level   of   TXHVWLRQV ZDV PRUH GLIÂżFXOW and   more   music   based   this   year.â€?   'HVSLWH WKH GLIÂżFXOW\ RI the   material,   Stilley   said   he   thought   his   team   was   well-­ prepared  for  the  yearly  com-­ SHWLWLRQ EHWZHHQ ÂżYH DUHD schools   -­-­   Kinston,   North   Lenoir,   South   Lenoir,   Bethel   Christian   Academy   and   Ar-­ endell  Parrott  Academy. Stilley   said   he   had   “mixed   feelingsâ€?   about   the   outcome   of  this  year’s  Quiz  Bowl. “I  was  happy  we  got  second,  

EXW,ZRXOGKDYHORYHGÂżUVW´ he  said. Senior  Dan  Irvin,  the  team’s   captain,   said   he   was   disap-­ pointed  the  team  couldn’t  de-­ fend  its  2011  title.   “It’s   disappointing,   but   we   had   a   good   year   and   a   good   come   back,â€?   he   said.   “The   questions   were   harder.   We   just  didn’t  get  lucky.â€? )ROORZLQJDÂżUVWURXQGORVV to   Parrott,   the   team   fought   EDFNWRWKHÂżQDOURXQGWRIDFH South   Lenoir.   Kinston   de-­ feated  the  Blue  Devils  in  the  

ÂżUVWURXQGEXWFRXOGQÂśWKDQJ RQ IRU WKH ÂżQDO YLFWRU\ WKDW would   have   given   them   the   title. Now,   Kinston   will   look   to   the  future. Though   the   team   will   lose   four   seniors   to   graduation,   the  Vikings  will  return  sever-­ al  members  of  the  team  next   year.   “I’m   excited   but   nervous   EHFDXVH , KDYH WR ÂżOO 'DQÂśV shoes,â€?  sophomore  Ann  Bing-­ (Contributed photo) ham  said.  “I  love  Quiz  Bowl.   I   got   to   hang   out   with   cool   /HIWWRULJKW4XL]%RZOPHPEHUV'DQLHO,UYLQ(GZDUG1HV-­ EHWK &DLWO\Q :HVW DQG 'LOORQ 3HUU\ ZDLW IRU WKHLU WXUQ WR people.â€?   FRPSHWH


www.thevikingpress.com

Track

from page 1 superintendent  Dr.  Steve  Maz-­ ingo   and   the   director   of   mainte-­ nance  for  Lenoir  County  Schools   are   all   aware   of   the   condition   of   the   track   and   are   all   working   to   Âż[LWDVVRRQDVSRVVLEOH <HW ZLWK RWKHU DQG SRVVLEO\ more   important,   maintenance   SUREOHPV DURXQG .LQVWRQ +LJK DGGUHVVLQJ LVVXHV FDQ EHFRPH D juggling  act. Âł7KLV \HDU WKH ELJ IRFXV IRU WKHGLVWULFWKDVEHHQÂż[LQJOHDN\ roofs,â&#x20AC;?  Bryant  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  things  like   our   track   did   not   make   priority   this   year.   When   you   put   a   track   versus   a   leaky   roof,   leaky   roofs   are  always  going  to  take  priority.â&#x20AC;? French  and  Spanish  teacher  Di-­ ane  Bowen  just  recently  had  her   leaky  roof  of  almost  20  years  tem-­ SRUDULO\Âż[HG Bryant   had   set   up   an   appoint-­ ment  with  the  director  of  mainte-­ nance  to  look  at  damages  within   the   school,   aside   from   the   track,   earlier  in  the  school  year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   walked   him   around   the   school  with  our  head  custodian,â&#x20AC;?   Bryant   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;By   doing   that   we   ZHUH DEOH WR SRLQW RXW DOO RI WKH missing  tiles  and  the  ceiling  tiles   and   when   you   can   put   a   picture  

News WR D SUREOHP \RX W\SLFDOO\ JHW D return.â&#x20AC;? Almost   half   of   Bowenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ceil-­ LQJWLOHVZHUHPLVVLQJEHIRUHWKH district   provided   funding   to   re-­ tar  the  roof.  According  to  Bowen   rain  would  literally  pour  into  her   classroom  via  the  hole. Âł7KHEXLOGLQJQHHGVDQHZURRI entirely,â&#x20AC;?  Bowen  said.   7KHRIÂżFHDQGFODVVURRPEHVLGH Bowen  is  also  in  the  same  condi-­ WLRQEXWKDV\HWWREHÂż[HG With   other   minor,   and   a   few   PDMRU SUREOHPV ZLWKLQ HDFK EXLOGLQJÂż[LQJWKHWUDFNEHFDPH a  secondary  issue.   In   the   interim,   the   track   team   KDV EHHQ SUDFWLFLQJ RQ WKH IRRW-­ EDOOSUDFWLFHÂżHOGDVZHOODVUXQ-­ ning   around   the   campus   and   through   the   parking   lot.   They   also   are   required   to   hold   each   meet  away.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  certainly  disappointing  for   our   student   athletes   not   to   have   something   to   run   on,â&#x20AC;?   Athletic   Director  Wells  Gulledge  said.   8QOLNH PDQ\ VFKRROV .LQVWRQ +LJK KDV D ODUJH QXPEHU RI VWX-­ dents   involved   in   the   track   pro-­ gram.   According   to   Gulledge,   there   are   almost   65   athletes   in-­ volved   in   indoor   and   outdoor   track. 7KH WRWDO FRVW WR Âż[ WKH WUDFN ZLOO OLNHO\ H[FHHG 

Gulledge   said.   In   addition   to   the   high   cost,   timing   and   weather   also  plays  a  role  in  laying  down  a   new  track.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   have   to   look   into   situ-­ ations   where   you   can   only   lay   a   WUDFN GRZQ EHWZHHQ  DQG  GHJUHHV DQG LW WDNHV DERXW WKUHH weeks   to   do,â&#x20AC;?   Gulledge   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;So   you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do  it  in  the  winter  time   or  the  height  of  the  summer.â&#x20AC;? Gulledge  also  said  that  the  track   KDGQRWEHHQUHVXUIDFHGLQDERXW  \HDUV +H VDLG WKDW PDLQWDLQ-­ ing   facilities   within   the   athletic   department  is  a  constant  concern.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  just  like  a  roof  on  a  house,â&#x20AC;?   Gulledge   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   you   neglect   certain   things,   over   time   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   end   up   spending   more   money   in   the   long   run.   You   can   VSHQGDOLWWOHELWRIPRQH\WRNHHS things  up,  or  you  can  spend  a  lot   of  money  at  the  end  when  it  com-­ SOHWHO\EUHDNV´ Aside   from   the   issue   on   the   WUDFN ÂżHOG SUREOHPV VXFK DV WKH OLJKWV RQ WKH EDVHEDOO ÂżHOG EHLQJ RXW RI FRGH DQG WKH J\P Ă&#x20AC;RRU QHHGLQJWREHUHVXUIDFHGVWLOOSHU-­ sist.   Despite   these   and   other   con-­ cerns,  academic  needs  will  always   take  a  priority  over    athletics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  you  have  a  school  with   a  room  like  Mrs.  Bowenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  where   it  rains  inside  of  the  classroom,  I  

7 - The Viking Press - March 2012

(Anniken Williams // The Viking Press)

Senior Edward Nesbeth stands in the KHS parking lot, ZKHUH VHQLRU -XOLD *ULIĂ&#x20AC;Q¡V -HHS UHVWV RQ RQH RI VHYHUDO large pot holes. guess  you  have  to  prioritize  what   ZRXOGEHWKHÂżUVWWKLQJDQGWKHQ the  county  is  going  to  spend  their   DWKOHWLFVZRXOGEHVHFRQG´ money  on,â&#x20AC;?  Gulledge  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;and  I   would  say  certainly  the  classroom  

Viking Press editor Resita Cox named stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top high school journalist; will compete in nationals By DAQUANTE JONES Staff Writer

6HQLRU 5HVLWD &R[ ZDVQÂśW DOZD\VVXUHVKHZDQWHGWREH a  journalist. In  fact,  she  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  enroll  in   DMRXUQDOLVWFRXUVHDW.LQVWRQ +LJK6FKRROXQWLOKHUVHQLRU year. The  editor-­in-­chief  of  The   Viking   press   is   more   than   making   up   for   lost   time,   as   VKH ZDV DZDUGHG WKH  Rachel   Rivers-­Coffey   N.C.   +LJK6FKRRO-RXUQDOLVWRIWKH Year  last  week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   works   harder   than   anyone,â&#x20AC;?   newspaper   advis-­ er   Michael   Moon   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   great   to   see   that   hard   work   recognized  with  such  a  pres-­ tigious  award.â&#x20AC;? &R[KDVZRQPDQ\DZDUGV for  her  outstanding  writing. In   tenth   grade,   she   won   a   state   writing   contest   called   /HWWHUV DERXW /LWHUDWXUH ,W was  at  that  point  that  she  re-­ alized  she  was  actually  good   at  writing  and  this  was  some-­ thing  she  would  enjoy. &R[KDVDOVRLQWHUQHGZLWK 7KH )UHH 3UHVV RI .LQVWRQ and   has   attended   state   and   national   journalism   work-­

shops   at   ECU,   UNC-­Chapel   +LOODQG*HRUJH0DVRQ8QL-­ versity  in  Washington,  D.C. +HU LPSUHVVLYH UHVXPH VHW her   apart   from   other   distin-­ guished   applicants   in   the   VWDWH EXW &R[ VDLG VKH ZDV still   surprised   to   learn   she   had  won. Âł:KHQ 0U 0RRQ ÂżUVW called  me  and  told  me  I  won,   , ZDV VKRFNHG EHFDXVH , didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  much  time  to  get   P\ SRUWIROLR WRJHWKHU´ &R[ said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even   though   the   con-­ tent   was   good,   I   just   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   feel  as  if  I  would  win.â&#x20AC;?

+HU FODVVPDWHV ZHUHQÂśW nearly   as   shocked   to   hear   that  she  had  won  the  award,   ZKLFK FDUULHV D  FDVK scholarship  with  it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   proud   of   her   accom-­ plishments,  and  it  makes  me   want  to  work  harder  so  that  I   can   reach   that   level   in   jour-­ nalism  one  day,â&#x20AC;?  feature  edi-­ WRU.HQQHWK*HRUJHVDLG Said  Moon:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Resita  is  a  ter-­ ULÂżFZULWHUDQGDQHYHQEHW-­ WHUSHUVRQ:HDUHEOHVVHGWR have   her   leadership   in   our   classroom.â&#x20AC;?

Down East Protection Systems Safe, Secure, and Satisfying 2006  N  Queen  St Kinston,  NC  28501 (252)  939-­9500

Senior Resita Cox interviewed Sen. Kay Haganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s (D-­N.C.) press secretary during a national high school journalism conference at George Mason University. Cox was select-­ ed as the North Carolina high school Journalist of the Year in late February, an award that comes with a $2,000 schol-­ arship. (Contributed photo)


8 - The Viking Press - March 2012

www.thevikingpress.com

News

teacher feature

Buie arrives at Kinston High as teacher and coach BY ANNA HILL Business Manager Disoriented   and   in   pain,   Ryan   Buie   struggled   to   re-­ main  conscious.     After  being  thrown  a  pass   in   a   pre-­season   scrimmage,   he   suffered   an   injury   that   would  put  him  on  the  bench   for  the  rest  of  his  high  school   football  career. Years   later,   Buie   is   an   as-­ sistant   coach   for   one   of   the   top   high   school   football   teams   in   North   Carolina   and  the  same  schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  base-­ ball  team,  and  he  is  teaching   Civics  and  Economics  class-­ es  during  the  day.     Though   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   one   of   Kin-­ ston   High   Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   newest   teachers,   Buie   says   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ad-­ justing  to  it  quickly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   adjusted   by   jumping   right   in,â&#x20AC;?   Buie   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Foot-­ ball   helped   me   get   adjusted   quickly.â&#x20AC;? For  those  who  know  Buie,   this   comes   as   no   surprise.     His   love   of   sports   goes   all   the   way   back   to   his   pre-­

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school  years.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   play-­ ing  sports  since  I  was   able   to   pick   up   and   throw  a  ball,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   been   an   important  part  of  my   life.â&#x20AC;? Not   only   does   this   coach   enjoy  being  a  part  of  the  ac-­ tion,   he   is   often   a   spectator   at   East   Carolina   University   football  games,  his  alma  ma-­ ter. A   season-­ticket   holder,   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   very   passionate   about   ECUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  team,  and  not  so  keen   on  opposing  forces. When  asked  how  he  feels   about   teams   other   than   ECU,   Buie   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   have   a   strong,   passionate   dislike   for   the   University   of   North   Carolina.â&#x20AC;? His   roots   are   strong   here,   but  North  Carolina  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  the   \HDUROGÂśV ÂżUVW KRPH Originally   from   Virginia   Beach,  Buie  says  the  lifestyle   here  is  much  different  than   the  one  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  used  to. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Virginia   Beach   is   a   lot  

e   is   the   kind   of   teacher   that   teaches   through  his  humor.â&#x20AC;? 6RSKRPRUH(YDQ+RRG bigger   than   anything   you   see  in  eastern  N.C.,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  lot  more  to  do  and   a  faster  pace.â&#x20AC;?   Back  in  Virginia,  before  he   traded   textbooks   for   grade   books,  he  was  more  of  a  self-­ proclaimed  â&#x20AC;&#x153;class  clown.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   liked   to   talk   and   have   a   good   timeâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;but   I   always   knew  if  I  was  pushing  it  too   far   and   when   to   stop,â&#x20AC;?   he   said. This   witty   side   of   Buie   is   GHÂżQLWHO\ VHHQ LQ WKH FODVV-­ room. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  is  the  kind  of  teacher   that   teaches   through   his   humor,â&#x20AC;?   sophomore   Evan   Hood  said. Athlete,   teacher,   and   role   model,   Ryan   Buie   is   a   dy-­ namic   addition   to   the   KHS   staff   with   a   personality   to   match.

(Megan Towery // The Viking Press) Mr. Ryan Buie works with a student on a civics lesson. $Ă&#x20AC;UVW\HDUWHDFKHUDQGFRDFKDW.LQVWRQ+LJK6FKRRO Buie has cultivated a reputation as a teacher who can EXLOG D PHDQLQJIXO UDSSRUW ZLWK VWXGHQWV ERWK RQ WKH IRRWEDOODQGEDVHEDOOĂ&#x20AC;HOGVDQGLQWKHFODVVURRP

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Deadline  for   ECU,  WSSU,  and   ASU Deadline  for   Financial  Aid

Make-­up  day Deadline  for   UNC   Charlotte


www.thevikingpress.com

Entertainment Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s New?

Odd  Future The  O.F.  Tape  Vol.  2 Release  Date:  3.12

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Death over designerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; tragic side effect of chasing latest trends

The  All-­American  Rejects B.o.B. Leona  Lewis Kids  in  the  Street Strange  Clouds Glassheart Release  Date:  3.13.12 Release  Date:  3.26.12 Release  Date:  3.27.12

Odd Future impresses with instrumentals By KENNETH GEORGE Feature Editor

Odd   Future   is   one   of   the   most   controversial   groups   in   the   music   LQGXVWU\ :LWK Ă&#x20AC;DJ-­ ship   artists   Tyler   the   Creator,   Hodgy   Beats,   and   Earl   Sweatshirt,   OFWGKTA   has   re-­ ally  become  known  for   its   almost   horrorcore   sound.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Internet,â&#x20AC;?   which   is   two   members   of  Odd  Future,  Syd  and  

Matt   Martian,   just   re-­ OHDVHG WKHLU ÂżUVW DOEXP together   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Purple   Naked  Ladies.â&#x20AC;? Even   though   they   are   not   as   well-­known   as   Frank   Ocean   or   Ty-­ ler   the   Creator,   I   was   still   pretty   excited   for   this   album.   After   be-­ ing   digitally   released   on   December   20,   2011   hard  copies  dropped  on   January,   31.   After   giv-­ ing  the  CD  a  few  listens   it  impressed  me  a  lot.  I  

would  buy  it  for  the  in-­ strumentals  alone. A  lot  of  the  tracks  are   not   particularly   long,   with   more   than   one   coming  in  at  under  two   minutes.   The   length   is   made   up   for   though,   as   the   music   is   so   good   the   repeat   button   will   be  used  a  lot.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Visionsâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fastlaneâ&#x20AC;?   are   two   tracks   that   really   stood   out.   What   really   made   me  a  fan  of  this  album,   oddly   enough,   is   how  

the  beats  kind  of  drown   out  the  artist. Usually  that  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be  a  plus,  but  since  Syd   has  such  a  soft  voice  and   the   instrumentals   in   this  album  are  amazing,   it   works   out   perfectly.   Though   under-­rated,   this   album   proved   to   be  very  good.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like  to   hear   more   music   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Internetâ&#x20AC;?  as  I  was   very   impressed   from   their  debut  album.

Project    X Comedy Rated  R Release  Date:  3.2.12

Dr.  Seussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  The  Lorax Drama,  Thriller Rated  PG Release  Date:  3.2.12

Silent  House Drama,  Thriller Rated  R Release  Date:  3.9.12

John  Carter Fantasy,  Action Rated  PG-­13 Release  Date:  3.9.12

one   of   the   best   to   re-­ lease  this  year. If   you   cannot   take   profanity   and   rudeness   then  this  is  not  a  movie   you  want  to  see.   Like   Paranormal   Ac-­ tivity,   Chronicle   and   several   other   recent   titles,   this   movie   takes   place  through  the  view   of   a   video   camera,   which   adds   a   very   re-­ DOLVWLF IHHO WR WKH ¿OP giving   the   viewer   the   feeling   of   really   being  

there. From   the   previews   some   people   would   probably   get   the   idea   of   a   happy-­go-­lucky   SRLQWOHVV ÂżOP 3URMHFW X   is   not   that   movie.   It   actually  has  a  really  in-­ teresting   storyline   that   will   keep   you   focused   on  it  the  entire  time. Project   X   is   outra-­ geous,   yet   nothing   that   happens   is   shock-­ ing.   From   street   riots   DQG Ă&#x20AC;DPH WKURZHUV WR

Project X takes outrageous to new level By KENNETH GEORGE Feature Editor

Project  X  is  a  work  of   art  that  any  teen  would   want  to  paint.   Director   Nima   Nourizadeh   took   par-­ tying   to   a   whole   new   OHYHOZLWKWKLV¿OP Project   X   is   full   of   crude  humor,  raw  com-­ edy  and  realistic  acting.   With  this  combination,   the   movie   proves   to   be  

9 - The Viking Press - March 2012

a   midget   coming   out   of   the   kitchen   oven,   it   takes  everything  too  far   in  all  the  right  ways.   A  lot  of  the  actors  are   unknown   to   the   audi-­ ence   but   still   captures   you   immediately,   giv-­ ing   you   a   feeling   of   someone  you  know.   Almost   every   little   thing   is   right   about   Project  X,  as  it  perfectly   captures   a   teenagerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   idea  of  the  perfect  par-­ ty.

A l m o s t every year Musings there are with new trends Malasya being re-­ Grajales leased. Most of the time, it is teenagers trying their hardest to keep up. One of the major questions dealing with this: Why? Why is this generation so eager to follow others and their possessions of materialistic things? Fashion happens to be one of the most important things to teenagers because it expresses individuality. Individuality is what separates us from everyone else. In my opinion though, teenagers are begin-­ ning to lack individuality and beginning to jump on â&#x20AC;&#x153;bandwagons.â&#x20AC;? They are just following everyone else. We are losing our uniqueness attempting to impress our peers. After all, that is the main reason why people are copying others, right? Everyone is different for a reason. We all have a different purpose to contribute to our community, society, or maybe even the world. So why not just be ourselves? Why not dare to be different? Individuality should be one of the many internal character-­ istics that no one should be able to take from us. Why are we giving it away? It is understandable to want things that are being released because you like them but doing anything outrageous just to have them is ridiculous. Rapper J. Cole once used the phrase â&#x20AC;&#x153;death over designer,â&#x20AC;? referring to recent situations of people killing each other for the latest fashion. On Dec. 22, a young man by the name of Tyreek Waters was murdered over the new Jordan 11â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s: Concords that were being released early the next morning. Does this mean society in our generation is taking it too far? The answer, of course, is yes. Fighting and killing others for things that retail at $100 or more but only costs about $10 to make is taking extreme to the next level. Is it really that serious? Instead of try-­ ing to keep up with everyone else, how about we try to learn about the more im-­ portant things in life, like what is going on around the world. Out of the many ques-­ tions that were asked, will you be willing to ponder about any of them? We should begin to think about what make us dif-­ ferent from anyone else and cherish that. Maybe, sooner or later, we may be able to gain our individuality back.


10 - The Viking Press - March 2012

Feature

www.thevikingpress.com

Waters adjusts to teaching high school BY JULIA GRIFFIN 2SLQLRQ(GLWRU Stuck  between  teacher  and   peer,  being  an  intern  for  high   school  classes  can  be  tricky.   However,   Kinston   High’s   newest   addition,   intern   Nichole   Waters,   has   seemed   WRDGDSWÀDZOHVVO\ Waters   is   still   enrolled   at   ECU   and   is   currently   work-­ ing   toward   her   goal   of   be-­ coming   a   high   school   teach-­ er.  Her  love  for  students  and   drive   to   motivate   people   is   what   triggered   her   passion   for  teaching.   Being   close   in   age   with   high   school   students   can   sometimes   pose   a   problem   when  looking  for  respect  and   recognition  of  authority  from   students.   ³6RPHWLPHV LW LV GLI¿FXOW when   it   comes   to   respect,”   Waters  said.  “I  get  along  with   the   students   really   well   but   sometimes   when   you   try   to   get   serious   with   them   it   is   a   OLWWOHGLI¿FXOW´ Luckily   she   has   not   found   the   task   too   hard   to   over-­ come.   Most   of   her   students   have  really  enjoyed  the  tran-­ sition  from  their  regular  for-­ eign   language   teacher   to   the   new  intern.   Waters   has   been   working  

with   French   teacher   Diane   Bowen  since  the  beginning  of   the   2011-­12   school   year   and   started   observing   and   teach-­ ing  in  Spanish  teacher  Sandra   Baker’s  class  two  weeks  later.   For   Waters,   this   is   an   ir-­ replaceable   learning   expe-­ rience.   Being   a   high   school   Spanish   teacher,   Baker   has   already  gone  through  the  in-­ terning   process   and   she   un-­ GHUVWDQGVLWVVLJQL¿FDQFH “It   is   extremely   important   because   it   is   actually   what   you  are  going  to  be  doing.  It   is   a   chance   to   teach   but   you   still   have   support   from   your   lead  teacher,”  Baker  said.   In   the   classes   Waters   has   full  responsibility  of  teaching   the  class.  This  is  an  intimidat-­ ing   job   because   she   is   now   responsible   for   the   students’   education   and   grades.   Stu-­ dents   say   she   is   very   inter-­ active   with   the   students   by   playing   games   and   holding   conversations   involving   the   entire   class   rather   than   just   having  a  lecture  based  style  of   teaching.   For  the  students,  the  transi-­ WLRQKDVQRWEHHQWRRGLI¿FXOW Junior   Jasmine   Lovick   said   she   is   thoroughly   enjoying   the  change  in  the  classroom.     ³,W ZDV QRW UHDOO\ GLI¿FXOW

to  adapt  to  her  teaching  style   because   they   are   similar,”   Lovick  said.  “Ms.  Waters  just   came  in  where  Ms.  Baker  left   off  and  it  has  not  been  really   GLI¿FXOWDWDOO´ The   students   like   having   someone   who   they   feel   they   can   relate   to.   They   feel   like   since  she  is  a  student  herself,   she  understands  exactly  what   they   are   going   through   and   how  they  feel.   So  far  for  Waters  her  expe-­ rience   at   KHS   has   been   one   she  will  never  forget.  She  has   grown  immensely  from  being   here   and   hopes   that   she   will   continue   to   learn   more   and   more  each  day.     “I   think   the   students   here   are   great   and   I   think   it   has   taught   me   a   lot   of   patience   that   I   did   not   have   before   coming   in,”   Waters   said.   “I   also   think   that   they   have   helped  me  adjust  to  the  teach-­ ing   a   whole   lot   better   than   I   thought  I  would.”   Although   not   all   the   stu-­ dents   are   aware   of   the   chal-­ lenges  that  interns  face,  Wa-­ ters  has  had  an  extraordinary   experience   at   Kinston   High   since   she   has   been   here.   She   -XOLD*ULIÀQ7KH9LNLQJ3UHVV

looks  forward  to  one  day  hav-­ Spanish intern Nicole Waters works with junior Damien ing   a   classroom   of   her   own   Williams on a recent assignment. and  hosting  an  intern  herself.  

Juniors quietly claim top of 2013 class BY MEGAN TOWERY &RS\(GLWRU Actions   speak   louder   than   words,   particularly   when   it   comes   to   juniors   Brittany   Roberts,  VeQuain  Joyner,  and   Alexis  Williams,  all  members   of  the  IB  Programme.   Not   only   do   these   students   balance   various   activities   both  inside  and  outside  of  the   school,  but  they  silently  com-­ pete  for  the  top  three  ranks  of   their  class.   Williams   is   part   of   the   varsity   basketball   and   soc-­ cer   teams   and   recently   got   trained   to   volunteer   at   the   Boys  and  Girls  Club. Listening   in   class,   asking   a   lot  of  questions  and  studying   are  her  tips  for  doing  well  in   her  classes.   The   seemingly   quiet   stu-­ dent   is   not   how   others   per-­ ceive   her,   something   she   ad-­ mits  when  she  says,  “I’m  not   quiet.  I  joke  a  lot.”   Along  with  reading  and  lis-­

0HJDQ7RZHU\7KH9LNLQJ3UHVV

Juniors Vequain Joyner, Brittany Roberts and Alexis Wil-­ liams work together in a science class.

tening  to  music  Williams  also   said  “I  can’t  dance  but  I  love   to  dance.” She   plans   to   attend   a   four-­ year   university   after   she   graduates  and  become  an  OB-­ GYN. Williams   expresses   a   little   bit  of  her  humorous  personal-­

ity  by  adding  that  her  favorite   weekend  activity  is,  “shootin’   pool.” Joyner,   another   Boys   and   Girls  Club  volunteer,  partici-­ pates   in   football,   basketball   and  baseball  at  Kinston  High   School.   Joyner   is   an   usher   at   his  church,  Post  Oak,  and  said  

that   he   has   to   have   his   time   well   organized   in   order   to   juggle   so   many   responsibili-­ ties.   “We’re  really  close  friends,”   Joyner   said   of   his   class-­ mates   Williams   and   Roberts.   “We’ve   been   friends   since   like  elementary  school.” These   modest   individuals   get   their   work   done   quietly   and  spend  their  free  time  par-­ ticipating   in   various   sports,   hobbies  or  volunteer  work.   “I  want  to  become  a  doctor   and  graduate  from  Carolina,”   said   Joyner   about   his   future   aspirations. Of   the   three,   Roberts   is   probably  the  most  talkative.   “I  love  to  talk,”  she  said.  “I   talk  all  the  time.  I’m  not  quiet   ever   though   everyone   thinks   so.”   Roberts  is  an  all-­star  cheer-­ leader   and   she   sings   in   her   church’s  choir.  In  order  to  manage  her  re-­ sponsibilities,  Roberts  tries  to   get  all  her  work  and  studying  

done  ahead  of  time  so  she  can   have  more  time  to  socialize.   “We’re  really  close  friends.   We   love   to   play   together   all   the  time,”  Roberts  said.   They   know   when   to   joke   around   and   enjoy   their   time   together  but  more  important-­ ly   when   to   get   serious,   even   if  they’re  not  all  exactly  sure   what   they   want   to   do   when   they  graduate. “I   think   I   want   to   be   a   doctor   or   maybe   a   neonatal   nurse,”   Roberts   said.   “Maybe   a  teacher.” Teachers  and  students  may   not   know   much   about   the   three   assiduous   students   in   regards   to   their   personal   life   and  interests  due  to  their  qui-­ et  nature.   It   does   not   take   many   words   for   these   students   to   make   a   big   impression   on   their   teachers   and   peers.   It’s   important  to  know  a  little  bit   more  about  the  outspoken  or   candid  students  at  KHS.   Everyone  has  a  story.  


www.thevikingpress.com

11 - The Viking Press - March 2012

Sports

Behind the scenes Managers play important role for Vikings teams By HAYLEY VERMILLION News Editor

Everyone   knows   the   Kin-­ ston   varsity   boys   basketball   team.    While  the  players  and   coaches   receive   all   in   the   spotlight,     what   goes   on   be-­ hind  the  scenes  is  something   that  rarely  gets  attention.   But   according   to   coach   Wells   Gulledge,   his   team   of   managers  holds  a  very  signif-­ icant  spot  on  the  team.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   managers   are   the   backbone   of   our   program,â&#x20AC;?   Gulledge  said.   Being  such  an  integral  part   of   the   team,   the   managers   must   be   just   as   dedicated   as   the  players  out  on  the  court,   if  not  more  so.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;On   home   game   days,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   at  school  from  7:40  a.m  to  11   p.m.    With  such  long  days  my   JUDGHV DUH GHÂżQLWHO\ DIIHFW-­ ed,â&#x20AC;?  manager  Daniel  Heck,  a   sophomore,  said. The  day  is  loaded  with  re-­ sponsibilities,   according   to  

(Daquante Jones // The Viking Press)

Basketball managers Tavonn Wheeler, Brad Herring and Daniel Heck (left to right) watch as the boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; basketball team warms up before a recent home game.

Heck.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   set   up   the   gym,   pull   out  the  bleachers,  set  up  the   scorersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   table   and   the   score-­ ERDUG ÂżOO ZDWHU ERWWOHV UROO out  the  mats,  sweep  and  take   care  of  injured  players,â&#x20AC;?  Heck   said.     Even  with  all  of  the  respon-­ sibilities   and   work   involved,  

each   manager   does   it   simply   because  he  enjoys  it.    It  is  not   a  paid  job  -­  simply  volunteer   basis   -­   but   they   do   get   some   EHQHÂżWVRIZRUNLQJVRFORVHO\ with  the  team.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   managers,   we   get   all   SOD\HU EHQHÂżWV  , JHW WKH shoes,   the   suit,   and   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have  to  pay  for  anything,  all  

the   way   up   to   a   champion-­ ship  ring,â&#x20AC;?  Heck  said.   7KHVH EHQHÂżWV DUH QRW WKH only  reason  Heck  is  complet-­ ing  his  second  year  as  a  man-­ ager  for  the  boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   knew   it   would   help   my   reputation   at   school,â&#x20AC;?   Heck   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  helps  me  to  learn  the   game,  too.    Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  only  sport   I  love  and  my  teammates  are   like   a   second   family.   They   make  me  feel  like  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  part  of   the  team,  like  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  important,   but  people  that  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  on  the   team  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  understand   my  importance.â&#x20AC;? Nakeil   Williams,   a   senior   on  the  basketball  team,  spoke   highly  of  the  team  of  manag-­ ers.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Well,   you   know,   hav-­ ing   managers   takes   a   lot   of   pressure  off  the  players.  The   freshmen  on  the  team  should   be  especially  thankful,â&#x20AC;?  Wil-­ liams   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   there   were   no   managers,   duties   would   fall   on  them.â&#x20AC;? Speaking   of   being   â&#x20AC;&#x153;thank-­

fulâ&#x20AC;?,   gratitude   is   something   the   managers   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   get   too   much  of.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   thankless   job   by   many,  but  one  of  the  most  ap-­ preciated   jobs   from   a   coach-­ ing   standpoint,â&#x20AC;?   Gulledge   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  must  be  trustwor-­ thy   and   dedicated   to   some-­ thing  that  is  not  always  in  the   limelight.â&#x20AC;?     Each   one   of   the   managers   acts   on   these   qualities   daily.     They  use  their  drive  for  suc-­ cess  and  winning  as  a  way  to   get   through   all   of   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;gym-­ keepingâ&#x20AC;?  tasks. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Getting   another   champi-­ onship   ring   is   my   motiva-­ tion,â&#x20AC;?   Mikenda   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dashâ&#x20AC;?   Mc-­ Carter,  a  long-­time  manager,   said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seeing   basketball   through   the   teamsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   eyes   and   having   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Kinstonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   across   my   chest   is   enough  for  me,â&#x20AC;?  Heck  said.  

Staff   writer   Angelo   Keyes   contributed  to  this  report.

Spring sports round-up Soccer undefeated through four games By ANGELO KEYES Staff Writer

Despite   waiting   for   several   key   playesr   to   ÂżQLVK EDVNHWEDOO VHD-­ son,   the   soccer   team   began   its   year   with   a   3-­0-­1  mark. Team   captains   Hay-­ ley   Vermillion,   Becky   Irvin   and   Caitlin   West     have   played   together   since   their   freshman   year   and   are   key   con-­ tributors  to  the  team.     Vermillion   was   the   Eastern   Plains   Confer-­ ence  Player  of  the  Year   last  year  and  has  hopes   of  getting  a  conference   championship   this   year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   a   lot   of   young,   inexperienced   players   this   year,   but   they   are   catching   on  

to   the   game   quickly,â&#x20AC;?   Vermillion   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have  a  lot  of  potential.â&#x20AC;? Though   youthful,   the   team   plays   with   the  poise  of  a  team  that   is   much   more   experi-­ enced. The   team   credits   much   of   its   success   to   a   rigorous   condition-­ ing   program,   which   includes   the   infamous   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vikingâ&#x20AC;?   -­-­   a   two-­mile   circuit   around   the   campus   that   the   team   runs   before   practice   each  day.     The  team  will  use  ev-­ ery   competitive   edge   to  its  advantage  against   conference  rivals  North   3LWW %HGLQJÂżHOGDQG Tarboro  as  the  Vikings   attempt   to   return   to   the  state  playoffs.

%DVHEDOOJHWVĂ&#x20AC;UVW win at Jones Senior

(Kyle Brown // The Viking Press)

Youthful softball team struggles early

(Kyle Brown // The Viking Press)

Damien Williams delivers a pitch against Wal-­ lace-­Rose Hill in the Vikingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; season-­opener at Grainger Stadium. (Story by Kyle Brown, sports editor)

Sophomore Rebecca Boyette delivers a pitch DJDLQVW :DOODFH5RVH +LOO GXULQJ .LQVWRQ¡V Ă&#x20AC;UVW home game of the year. (Story by Khadijah Thorne, staff writer)

The   baseball   team   began  its  season  with  a   1-­3   record   and   picked   up   a   9-­7   win   at   Jones   Senior  to  snap  a  three-­ game  skid. Though   wins   have   been  rare  early  on,  the   team  has  lofty  goals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  wants  to  win  more  

Youth   is   the   key   word   for   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   softball   team,   which   has  no  seniors  and  only   four  juniors. Other  team  goals  are   learning   the   game   and   improving   daily   for   a   squad   that   began   its  

games   than   last   year   and   be   a   senior   leader   supporting   my   team-­ mates   throughout   the   whole   season,â&#x20AC;?   senior   Leslie  Wade  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   huge   po-­ tential   to   become   a   great   team,â&#x20AC;?   assistant   coach  Ryan  Buie  said.

season  0-­4.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   want   the   team   to   be   better   at   the   end   of   every   day,â&#x20AC;?   coach   Mi-­ chael  Moon  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  hope  we  can  come   together   and   win,â&#x20AC;?   sophomore  captain  Re-­ becca  Boyette  said.


12 - The Viking Press - March 2012

Keepin’ it cool with Kyle Brown

www.thevikingpress.com

All they do is win

Boys

Play as many sports as you can during high school

KHS 56, R. Rapids 38 KHS 66, Topsail 48 KHS 77, Croatan 62 .+6%HGGLQJÀHOG KHS 71, Reidsville 61 KHS 58, Cuthbertson 55

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Road to Raleigh Boys and girls playoff results

Girls .+6%HGGLQJÀHOG KHS 42, Farmville C. 32 KHS 75, Northeastern 44 KHS 52, Bunn 51 J. Matthews 61, KHS 28

Players’ perspective (Staff photo // The Viking Press) The boys’ basketball team gets hyped during a pep rally before the state championship game, played at Reynolds Coliseum in Raleigh on Saturday, March 10.

Vikings win third state championship By THE VIKING PRESS

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Andrew Lopez “Coming back home to the stomping grounds, it’s a great accomplishment you work your whole life to be No. 1 in the state.”

Christian Pridge “It felt great to make history. We hope to have started some-­ thing so we can make it further next year.”

*LUOVDGYDQFHWRUHJLRQDOÀQDOV By THE VIKING PRESS

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Senior Caroline DeBruhl shoots a free throw.


The Viking Press - March 2012