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Vol. 12, Issue 6

THE FACTS OF THE SHORT GAME:

PUTTING IS KEY by Brian

Lackey

THE TURN CATCHES UP WITH

SARAH DANT RIGHT, LEFT, OR WHICH ONE? by John

Spelman

SWIFTWICK: THE AMERICAN SOCK TENNIS ANYONE?

2012 GOLF SCHEDULE

Q&A WHAT THE PROS HAVE TO SAY

with Justin Rister, Patrick Jackson, Brian Lackey, John Spelman & Chris Cauthen


contents F E AT U RE ART IC LE S BY T H E PRO S 8 Right, Left, or Which One? by John Spelman Head Golf Professional, Richland Country Club

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14  Catching Up with Sarah Dant

The FACTS of the Short Game: Putting is Key by Brian Lackey

Lead Golf Instructor, The Golf Institute, Gaylord Springs Golf Links

22

FOUNDER Terrence Reed Smith

speaks with Sarah Dant of the Sarah Dant Golf Academy and The Golf Club of Tennessee.

8

EDITOR Will Garcia DIRECTOR OF SALES David C. Madrid

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ART DIRECTOR Edward White GOLF PRODUCT EDITOR Jim Collinge ONLINE CONTENT COORDINATOR Peter Rado PGA MEMBER ADVISORY BOARD Adam Smith,

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Player News

Mr. Consistency: Luke Donald’s Banner Year The player to watch in 2012.

Jack Barber,

13 Swiftwick: The American Sock by Will Garcia, Editor

Jason Sutton,

16 Q & A

What the pros have to say. with Justin Rister, Patrick Jackson, Brian Lackey, John Spelman & Chris Cauthen

18 Golf Travel

Championships at Pebble Beach Resorts

PHONE (304) THE-TURN

by Brittany Cooley

Pebble Beach Tournament Office

 22 What’s New

FAX (206) 984-9667

The Latest & Greatest In Golf

EMAIL info@theturngolf.com www.theturngolf.com

This season’s new toys.

All rights reserved. Reproduction in whole or part without permission in writing is strictly prohibited. Publisher is not responsible for any errors in advertising and editorial.

25 Swinkey: The Golfer’s The Box

26 28

29 2012 Golf Schedules

by Brian Benedictson

Games Tennis Anyone?

The Forehand Drive

PGA, LPGA, & Champion

32 Pro Shop

Printed in the USA

Every Golfers Favorite Section; Look for these products in your Pro Shop!

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LETTER FROM

THE PUBLISHER Here at The Turn we celebrate our cherished pros and connect them with the golf community at large. In fact, if you are reading our magazine you are more than likely to recognize one of the “authors” on the cover page. And after all, what is more unique than the relationship we have with our trusted golf instructors? Who else are we willing to take so much criticism from this late in life? The fact is I love golf and would go to any length to improve my game even just a little bit, maybe by keeping the ball in the fairway a few more times or curbing those pesky three-putts. Indeed there is something special about the game that keeps us coming back weekend after weekend. Some call it an obsession, or as Mark Twain said “a good walk spoiled.” Personally, when I hit that perfect shot, like the ones I see from Tiger or Phil, or from my smiling pro, there is no better feeling. I work in a great industry. I get to work with and pick the brain’s of some of the top PGA instructors from all around the country. With all the advice offered, I wish I could actually finish a round without thinking about the shot or hole that could have been. It is my great pleasure to present my fellow golf lovers with advice and insight from some of the best in the country.

Subscribe

All the Best,

www.theturngolf.com

T. Reed Smith

On-Line For FREE


Right, Left,

or Which One? John Spelman, Head Golf Professional, Richland Country Club

I WISH I COULD SAY I WAS AN AVID READER. I ENJOY IT BUT AM probably just to lazy to become a real reader. When I do read, I’m a bit unorthodox, I tend to pick up books, open them to any page and begin reading. Last night I opened Swinging Into Golf by Ernest Jones. Many of you should be familiar with this book. First published in 1937, Jones was an English professional who lost his right leg in World War I. Jones believed that “the golf swing can be readily taught and consistently performed, but only if it is conceived as one, overall movement. The body and all it’s parts should be treated as disastrous leaders but wholly admirable followers of the actions of the hands and fingers.” I have written to you before regarding what I believe to be the importance of properly used hands and arms in the golf swing. In Swinging Into Golf, Mr. Ernest Jones quotes Bobby Jones regarding this, saying “at the start of the backswing be certain not to lift the club with the right hand; start it back by a push with the left”. Wonderfully simple advice! As a left handed person this is very easy and natural for me. For those of you righties, this may seem less comfortable. As a youngster I can remember a trend in golf instruction that focused on swinging the club with both hands working together as a unit. Sounds great but doesn’t work. We are either left handed or right handed. Some may be able to perform like tasks with either hand but for the most part we are either one or the other. As we swing the golf club, specifically as we begin the golf swing, we naturally will influence the golf club more with one hand than the other, our dominant hand. Over the years it has been widely accepted

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that the golf club should be swung with the left hand, then the right hand will apply the hit. For you left handed golfers, I apologize for speaking in right hand golf terminology. Ben Hogan would say he wished he had two right hands because he felt the power came from the release of the right hand. We have also often heard players that tend to hook the ball that the explanation for these hooks is the influence of “too much right hand”. Well, which one is it, not enough or too much! This is when golf instruction becomes fun, because there is no correct way to swing the club! If there was, someone much smarter than I would have explained it long ago. My point regarding the Misters Jones is that how they swung the golf club worked for them. It may also work for you. What I want you to do is to spend some time and find out whether you have success leading with the left or pushing with the right. It would make sense to me that if I am a right handed person and my right hand is positioned properly on the golf club and I swing the club on the correct path, I should be able to hit the ball as hard as I want with my right hand. Regardless of whether you are right handed or left handed, I promise you at some point in your career you will feel your dominant hand wanting to take over your golf swing, the dilemma then becomes to use it or fight it. One more bit of advice from Ernest Jones: “good golf is easy to play, and easy golf is enjoyable golf. It is regrettable indeed that so many persons who play golf, or play at it, make such a labor of it”. Enjoy your game.


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THE TURN GOLF MAGAZINE 5


The FACTS

of the Short Game: Putting is KEY Brian Lackey, Lead Golf Instructor, The Golf Institute Gaylord Springs Golf Links

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a good putter is a solid repeatable posture. With this in mind, I came up with an easy-to-use teaching aid that promotes good posture by creating a connection between the sternum and putter head, called the Pendulum Putting Rod. You can mark it with a sharpie for your adjusted height to reassure that you get in the same posture each and every time you play. This device also reinforces a solid path that will aid in making more of the crucial short-range putts along with better distance control. The path of the putter is important to maintaining a good solid impact every time. Many times a player will “flip” the putter through impact due to overuse of hands. This is not uncommon in the full swing, but often seen in the putting stroke. I believe the putter should travel in a small arc, working slightly inside on the backstroke and slightly inside on the forward stroke. With the Putting Rod, a player can visually see if there is breakdown before or during the stroke and will also get a sense of disconnection when the path of putter alters any direction other than “pendulum” style motion. The secret to creating a solid path is to have a perfect connection between the shoulders, arms and hands. When these parts work in unison, there is less chance for the putter to take a detour during the stroke and a much better chance to square the clubface at impact.

DID YOU KNOW THAT THE AVERAGE TOUR PLAYER ONLY GETS THE BALL up and down 26 percent of the time from 50-75 yards? That means they are averaging about 10 feet from the hole. And from 76-100 yards that number drops to 17 percent, which means they are averaging close to 20 feet from the hole. I know that seems hard to believe and for most of us, we are saying “they should work on their wedges!” Is the answer to hit it closer or make more putts? When I talk to students about putting, I try to be realistic. The best golfers in the world make nearly 99 percent of their putts from three feet, but only about 56 percent of their putts from five feet, another stat that is mind boggle ling. So we see why they always say “drive for show and putt for dough.” The missing ingredients in most golfers putting game are (1) good posture, (2) a solid putter path and (3) the ability to get the putter face square at impact. One of the more overlooked aspects of putting is posture. Have you ever played a round where you couldn’t get comfortable over the ball? Maybe you felt too tall or too short and the stroke felt all wrong. When posture is out of position, the dynamics of the stroke change and the ability to hit solid putts become near impossible. The foundation of

Many instructors argue that path is not as important as having a square clubface at impact. While there may be truth to that statement as to starting the ball on line, a ball will not stay on the target line if the path is incorrect. According to Ben Hogan, a player needs body control first (posture), club control second (path) and ball control third (impact). Now that we have that in order, impact is the third key to becoming a great putter. When a player creates the perfect union between the clubhead, hands and body then they are ready to work impact or ball control. In my studies, the shaft should be slightly forward at impact to create a solid hit. The hard part is getting the clubface square. Geometry teaches us that a straight line can only make contact with a circle in point. Therefore the only way to get the clubface out of position is if there is shaft roll. This is caused by a breakdown in the hands or the hands get overly involved in the attempt to “square” the face and cause an over squaring resulting in a pull or hold the face open resulting in a push. Drawing a straight line on the ball and trying to get the ball to roll end over end is a great drill for this. Which ever side the line works to will show you if the clubface got closed (line works on left side) or open (line works on right side of ball). Work on these 3 ingredients and you will become a better putter in no time. For more information on the Pendulum Putting Rod, please go to www.eyelinegolf.com or for more information about myself and The Golf Institute, go to www.brianlackeygolf. com. For more help with your putting or other aspects of your game please contact me or your own PGA Professional.

Brian Lackey PGA Lead Golf Instructor The Golf Institute Gaylord Springs Golf Links

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THE TURN GOLF MAGAZINE 7


Mr. Consistency: LUKE DONALD’S BANNER YEAR

WHEN WINSTON CHURCHILL SAID “CONSISTENT EFFORT, NOT

His now cemented status among golf’s elite did not, however, come out

strength… is the key to unlocking our potential”, he could have been

of nowhere. As the star of Northwestern University’s college team he

talking about his fellow englishman Luke Donald. Since 2001, Luke

won the NCAA Men’s Golf Championship in 1999 beating Tiger Wood’s

Donald has been a steady picture of excellence. But in 2011 his

previous college record. In 2001, he became just the 11th PGA rookie to

consistent game exploded into a banner year that catapulted him into

make over a million dollars his first year. With his brother Christian in

the world’s top ranked player.

tow (as his caddy), Donald has finally reached golf’s elite and will

With 2 PGA tour wins, 5 second place finishes, 4 third place finishes and

be the player to watch in 2012 as he seeks his first major.

21 top-tens, Donald’s 2011 season was the blueprint of what it takes

Luke Donald is also recognized as one of the Tour’s true gentlemen.

to be number one. He was Player of the Year in the PGA and European

Outgoing and sportsman-like, his staggeringly successful season has

tours. In October, he came from behind on Sunday to win the Children’s

been applauded by his fellow golfers. His consistency on the course has

Miracle Network Hospitals Classic with 6 straight birdies on the b ack

mirrored his consistency at home: he married his college sweetheart

nine to become the Tour’s money leader, which he held on to for the

from Northwestern. When their daughter Ellie was born this year,

year. Donald also won the Vardon Trophy and the Byron Nelson award

Donald said “I don’t think it’s a coincidence my golf has got a lot better

for lowest scoring average at 68.86. His consistent play and effortless

since Ellie was born.” Donald is also an avid painter, he studied Art

swing made him the talk, and envy, of the Tour.

Theory at Northwestern and has even donated an original painting

Nowhere was Donald more consistent than on the greens. He went

to the PGA for charity.

486 holes without a three putt this year, beating the PGA tour record by

With Tiger back on the rise and Rory McIlroy playing incredible golf

more than 100 holes. He had the lowest putt percentage on tour and

look for Donald to be gunning for each and every major in 2012.

he went 529 for 529 on putts under three feet.

A Wedding to Remember Wedding Florist Sue Workman 128 Meadowgreen Dr. Franklin, TN 37069

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Swiftwick: The American Sock By Will Garcia, Editor

MARK CLEVELAND STARTED AT SWIFTWICK AS A CUSTOMER. For an event he ordered 500 custom compression socks for his business and people went nuts for it. They went out of their way to approach Cleveland and tell him what an incredible sock it was. It ignited something inside his entreprenurial mind, and a vision for an American sock company that emphasized design not style, function not fashion, was born. Made in the USA, Swiftwick has found a true home in Brentwood, Tennessee. Indeed Middle Tennessee is full of lush biking and running trails, not to mention some of the country’s premier golf clubs. This is important to Mark, that he be at home in Brentwood, that the company is truly American. He has had experience manufacturing overseas, and he wanted to be able control the supply chain and closely oversee rigorous quality standards that make Swiftwick socks last so long and perform so well. Cleveland sees it as not only necessary for quality, but also as an important way to go back to our production roots as a country.

Mark Cleveland, President of Swiftwick

Swiftwick products are designed using medical grade materials with highly engineered structures using the latest machinery and materials

Golf definitely has a technology edge in equipment, but not in

that help athletes improve endurance. It’s no cheap cotton sock, its

performance wear. This is where Cleveland saw opportunity.

performance equipment. Any impact sport - running, hiking, biking

For the golfer, compression increases blood flow to your feet,

and even golf - causes swelling of the feet. The compression design

increasing circulation, reducing blood pressure and improving

of the socks creates a tight envelope around the complex bone and

concentration. Who thought a sock could do that? After all, if

muscle structure of the foot, reducing swelling. As golf is more

you’re not thinking about your feet, you’re thinking about your

widely recognized as an endurance sport, PGA Tour golfers are rapidly

game. The high thread count keeps debris out, eliminating the

adopting Swiftwick compression socks for a competitive edge. Davis

most common source of blisters, and for those that spend too

Love III, Camillo Villegas, Chris DiMarco and Harris English are among

much time in the sand, this is a blessing. Cleveland has come up

the professionals that use Swiftwick. The industry has caught on:

with a true innovation here, an American sock that materially can

Swiftwick is now sold in PGA superstores around the country and in

improve your golf game.

the newly opened Brentwood Golfsmith location, in addition to several golf clubs in Brentwood and beyond. Take this technology and make it attractive and useful, we can see why a serial entrepreneur like Mark Cleveland would dedicate his creative energies to building the Swiftwick brand in golf.

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THE TURN GOLF MAGAZINE 9


Sarah Dant

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TT: Once you’re fitted, what’s the secret to putting?

Catching Up With

Sarah Dant The Turn: What are you most excited about this season in golf? Sarah Dant: The new additions I’ve made to my teaching program. A year ago, I had my “aha” moment in teaching. We, the instructors, are responsible for growing the game of golf. To accomplish this huge task we must start by teaching basic skills. More importantly, we need to focus our instruction on helping students score better through short game, putting and on course instruction. I have designed a program where my students accomplish real results, lower their handicaps and learn the fundamentals of the golf swing. I have seen drastic improvements with this new program. TT: Tell me how you got involved with Coutour Golf and their Tri-Fit System? SD: Coutour Golf is a custom fit putter company started by Golf Digest Top 50 Golf Instructor, Todd Sones. The idea behind Coutour Golf is to fit students through instruction. I first worked with Todd in Naples, FL where I teach in the winter months. I was blown away by his method of teaching putting and how he was getting instant results with students. I have spent the last year studying the Coutour Fitting System and am now a certified fitter. I see the same results with my students. TT: What is the benefit of getting custom fitted for a putter?

SD: Let your putter and eyes do the work. In putting, the head and body must remain still while the putter head swings like a pendulum under the body. The swing weight of the putter is very important in relation to tempo. Most amateur golfers struggle with putting because they change the tempo of the stroke instead of the length of the backswing. Let your eyes do the work by visualizing the putt, seeing the ball falling in the hole. React to the distance instead of spending time analyzing how to make the putt. This is when thoughtless putting begins to happen. TT: I hear you have a cool website and newsletter, how can someone get involved? SD: I do have a great interactive website that includes a weekly newsletter filled with articles and my weekly blog. Go to www.sarahdant.retailtribe.com and click on “subscribe to my newsletter”. My readers give me positive feedback each week and consistently say the articles are really helping them get better. The greatest joy I get from my role as a teacher is the feedback and results I see in my students. TT: In as few words as possible, how does someone get from a weekend hacker to a par/bogey golfer? SD: Believe it or not, you will not get better by just practicing. I use this formula from Dr. Rick Jensen on my students: on course performance = skills – interference +/- luck. To play better golf at any level you can follow this formula. Most “weekend hackers” do not have the fundamental skills down. These skills include pre-swing routine, making solid contact, club face awareness, swing plane, body movement and most importantly, learning how to make an effortless swing. Same applies for short game and putting. You must have an understanding of the shots necessary to get the ball in the hole in fewer strokes. Interference is all the mental chatter that blocks us from better performance. Our belief system about ourselves, attitude, emotional commitment, focus and attention are all part of interference we experience on the golf course. Improvement can be achieved if you know where you fit in this formula. And then come see me for help!

SD: If 40% of your score happens on the putting green, then a properly fit putter will be the most important club in your bag. Students should first develop proper setup fundamentals and then get fit to the exact length. A good fit allows for the putter to swing freely under the body. The second benefit is that the student will become a thoughtless putter. Great putters don’t think about how to putt, they focus on making the putt. A properly fit putter will allow the golfer to become more consistent.

Sarah Dant is a PGA Professional at the Sarah Dant Golf Academy and The Golf Club of Tennessee.


With JUSTIN RISTER PATRICK JACKSON BRIAN LACKEY JOHN SPELMAN & CHRIS CAUTHEN JUSTIN RISTER Professional, The Governor’s Club

The Turn: How did you get into golf? Justin Rister: It started with my Grandpa, used to golf with him after school and I just loved it. I knew at 12 that that’s what I wanted to do with the rest of my life. TT: Who is your golf hero and why? JR: Gary Player, he’s done so much for the game, he’s a good investor for golf all around the world. TT: What is your most memorable golf moment? JR: When I was at Coastal Carolina in College I shot a 67, a tournament low for me. TT: Tiger or Phil? JR: Phil. TT: How far can you drive the ball in perfect conditions? JR: 260, but I’d say the best part of my game is distance control with my irons.

TT: What is your favorite part of having a career in golf? PJ: The relationships that have been built with a diverse group of people through the years.

TT: What is your favorite part of having a career in golf? JR: Putting a smile on everybody’s face, providing the variety of services that we do in golf and at the club.

TT: Advice for golf enthusiasts: PJ: Enjoy golf....it’s a game....but it’s just like life.

TT: Advice for golf enthusiasts: JR: Have fun with it, and I encourage everyone to see their local PGA professional.

PATRICK JACKSON Director of Golf, Vanderbilt Legends Club

The Turn: How did you get into golf? Patrick Jackson: Through my dad and brothers. TT: Who is your golf hero and why? PJ: Ben Hogan - he had a drive to succeed like no other. TT: What is your most memorable golf moment? PJ: My first hole-in-one at age 15 on a 310 yard par 4 of all things! TT: Tiger or Phil? PJ: Philger.

BRIAN LACKEY

Lead Golf Instructor, Brian Lackey Golf School, Gaylord Springs Golf Links

The Turn: How did you get into golf? Brian Lackey: My dad got me into golf. He loved to play and was very competitive when I was younger. It was a sport that challenged me and I was the only one to blame for mistakes. TT: Who is your golf hero and why? BL: I don’t know that I have a golf hero.  I am a huge Tiger fan.   As the assistant c oordinator of 1996 NCAA Mens Championship and seeing his love for the inner city kids of Chattanooga during our clinic, I became a fan.  Not to mention he can play a little. TT: What is your most memorable golf moment? BL: Finishing Runner-Up in the Tennessee Section Championship 2010 but playing Augusta is right there too. TT: Tiger or Phil? BL: Tiger, no question.

TT: Belly or standard putter? PJ: Standard. TT: How far can you drive the ball in perfect conditions? PJ: 300 yds downwind…

TT: Belly or standard putter? BL: Standard. TT: How far can you drive the ball in perfect conditions? BL: On average approximately 285.

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TT: What is your favorite part of having a career in golf? BL: H  elping others enjoy the game more. I love my job. TT: Advice for golf enthusiasts: BL: Keep it fun.  Find an instructor that can help you but one that loves the game as much or more than you do.  That way he/she will always make sure you are enjoying yourself.

JOHN SPELMAN Head Golf Professional, Richland Country Club

TT: Advice for golf enthusiasts: JS: Swing hard in case you hit it.

CHRIS CAUTHEN Head Golf Professional, Westhaven Golf Club

The Turn: How did you get into golf? Chris Cauthen: I played golf at a young age with my Dad and my brothers. I developed a passion for the game while trying to compete against them as a kid.

The Turn: How did you get into golf? John Spelman: My parents played and introduced me to the game at age 11.

TT: Who is your golf hero and why? CC: Jack Nicklaus.

TT: Who is your golf hero and why? JS: All of the people that took an interest in me when I was a junior golfer.

TT: What is your most memorable golf moment? CC: Spending the day with my oldest son at the Ryder Cup at Valhalla in 2007. We were able to attend the Sunday singles matches and witness the United States win the cup.

TT: What is your most memorable golf moment? JS: Playing golf with my family.

TT: Belly or standard putter? CC: Standard.

TT: Tiger or Phil? JS: Admire them both as golfers.

TT: What is your favorite part of having a career in golf? CC: I truly enjoy helping others learn and enjoy the game. When I am able to help a person lower their scores and increase their love and involvement with golf, that is my favorite part.  I also feel a great deal of satisfaction when I organize an event that everyone enjoys participating in.

TT: Belly or standard putter? JS: Standard. TT: How far can you drive the ball in perfect conditions? JS: Not as far as I’d like! TT: What is your favorite part of having a career in golf? JS: Developing and maintaining friendships with other golfers.

TT: Advice for golf enthusiasts: CC: Golf is a game to be enjoyed and will never be mastered. The pursuit of improvement should be the goal with regards to your individual game.  It is a “life sport” than can be appreciated at any age or playing ability. theturngolf.com

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THE TURN GOLF MAGAZINE 13


Golf

Championships Pebble Beach Resorts

Travel

AT

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Written by BRITTANY COOLEY


Photo by: Randy Tunnell

THE STORIES OF PEBBLE BEACH CHAMPIONS ARE WRITTEN INTO the lore of golf history. They are marked by the memories of five U.S. Championships, including Jack Nicklaus’ 1-iron in 1972, Tom Watson’s 1982 chip-in and Tiger Woods’ dominant 12-stoke victory in 2000. They began with Sam Snead’s consecutive victories to initiate the Crosby Clambake and are stapled by Mark O’Meara’s five titles at the AT&T Pebble Beach National Pro-Am. Even Lanny Wadkins staked his claim on the hallowed ground, with an epic sudden-death playoff victory over Gene Littler in the 1977 PGA Championship. Many have traversed what Golf Digest has repeatedly called the greatest public golf courses in America, but few have the hardware to prove their titled worth. But what if there was a way for you to become one of those cherished few? What if you could win your own championship at Pebble Beach? You can. Every year, Pebble Beach Resorts hosts numerous tournaments in which anyone can participate. With more than fifteen slated through 2012, each tournament is held on at least two of the resort’s four courses—Pebble Beach Golf Links, Spyglass Hill Golf Course, The Links at Spanish Bay and Del Monte Golf Course—and feature different formats and themes. From celebrity tournaments that let you play alongside world-famous athletes and

entertainers to the annual Pebble Beach New Year’s Championship, each event is entirely unique with different course lineups and scoring arrangements. But because most are net format, you can enjoy the thrill of competition no matter your handicap. Whether as an individual or on a team, in a large tournament or a small one, the Tournament Office at Pebble Beach Resorts can meet all your needs. Each course at Pebble Beach Resorts has its own distinct environment, style and character, and is designed to challenge and thrill every tournament participant. Since 1919, the exquisite beauty and unmatched history of Pebble Beach Golf Links has made the site a pinnacle for all tournaments at the Resorts. Ranked the No. 1 public course in the United States by Golf Digest, this storied tract boasts stunning ocean views, wide-open vistas and cliff-side fairways along the Pacific’s rugged coastline. Spyglass Hill Golf Course, rated as one the toughest courses in the world, features two distinctly different kinds of terrain that influence the way the holes look and play, with the first five holes rolling through sandy, seaside dunes and the following 13 cutting through majestic pines with elevated greens and strategically placed bunkers. The Links at Spanish Bay, designed after the historical European courses, are so authentic that

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THE TURN GOLF MAGAZINE 15


Photo by JOANN DOST Photo by RANDY TUNNELL

Photo by JOANN DOST

even the Monterey coastline mirrors the rugged, natural beauty of Scotland. Here, the golf course provides you with the choice of using your regular shot or a low, running shot to play the firm turf while keeping the ball under the steady ocean breezes. Finally, Del Monte Golf Course boasts a meandering layout that has challenged golfers for more than a century. A favorite among Monterey Peninsula locals, this old-style course rewards tournament players for risky shots and punishes those with errant placements. Playing in a tournament on courses that have provided some of the game’s most dramatic moments is enough to make any golfer feel special. That feeling is only enhanced with the way the tournament office takes care of every detail—welcome receptions featuring gift packages, post-round catered functions and award ceremonies. They can even set up personalized events for you across Pebble Beach Resorts, whether it’s cigars overlooking the 18th green behind The Lodge at Pebble Beach or special tastings by the fire pits at The Inn at Spanish Bay.

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Photo by JOANN DOST

Your options are just beginning, as the highly acclaimed instructors

partners, the tournament office will create your ideal tournament from

at Pebble Beach Golf Academy provide wholly personalized learning

top to bottom, from the moment you step foot onto this amazing corner of

experiences in which you can hone your skills inside world-class

the world to the last winning putt on No. 18. The options for building your

facilities. Led by Laird Small, one of Golf Digest’s “50 Greatest

ideal championship moment at Pebble Beach Resorts are truly endless.

Teachers,” the Academy offers individualized or group lessons for

Walk in the footsteps of those immortalized legends, and make plans to

those looking to work on their game before, during and even after

hoist your trophy today.

the tournament. Take the experience to the next level and coordinate a custom Pebble Beach championship just for you. For friends, family or even business

For more information, visit www.PebbleBeach.com or contact Brittany Cooley at the Pebble Beach Resorts Tournament Office at 877-853-5864 or cooleyb@pebblebeach.com.

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SWINKEY Nicknamed the Swiss Army Knife of Golf Training Aids and Voted Hot Product of the Day at the 2011 PGA Show. The Swinkey is the ultimate game improvement tool helping the golfer with alignment, ball position, stance, swing plane, putting plane, fitness, stretching, video work, balance, club protection, and tempo. All in one, fundamental, and used by over 90 players on the PGA Tour– it’s the Golfer’s Toolbox. List Price: $79.99 www.swinkey.com

latest & greatest THE

IN

GOLF SWIFTWICK These high-quality compression socks can greatly reduce the greatest distraction in golf- tired, sore feet. Compression improves blood flow and circulation, and extends your endurance and peak performance. You can concentrate on your game; not your feet! That competitive edge is why tour professionals wear them. These American-made socks are thin enough to feel the grass, and are so comfortable you don’t know you are wearing them. www.swiftwick.com

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J STEWART GOLF Have you ever spent time searching for your golf bag at the club, because it is like everyone else’s? Stand out from the crowd by creating your own unique bag! The ordering process is simple and easy to follow with no additional set up costs! Once they have your design, they send you detailed drawings for approval before you confirm your order. www.jstewartgolf.com

ROCKET TOUR Join the 100+ PGA Tour players & top PGA Professionals who sport Rocket Tour’s signature knit head covers! Mix & Match between newtheir Retro-inspired styles -Knit Pom Pom & Tassels Covers, Putter & Hybrid Covers in scores of colors! Want your Golf Shop to carry Rocket Tour? Ask your Pro to call them at (303)-415-1199 or email: retail@RocketTour.com for information or order online at www.RocketTour.com.

List Price: $28-$35 each www.rockettour.com

LET IT WHIP The Orange Whip is the ultimate golf swing trainer and fitness tool for today’s golfer and athlete. It is versatile, dynamic and the most effective swing aid on the market. Consistent use of the Orange Whip will improve your golf swing and provide an essential core-muscle workout. List Price: $109 www.OrangeWhipTrainer.com

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THE TURN GOLF MAGAZINE 19


NANOSWING The Nanoswing provides a golfer instant, accurate, real time information about unwanted head movement during the golf swing. The Nanoswing is a small, lightweight device that attaches to the brim of any cap. While the user is making a full swing, the Nanoswing provides instantaneous feedback via three non-obtrusive LED lights.

GOLF GRUVA The Golf Gruva is the ultimate new golf swing training system! The Golf Gruva’s unique, patented design has golfers experience what a professional golf swing should feel like, giving them the confidence to hit the perfect shot, every time.

This groundbreaking innovation will allow golfers to acquire the feel of proper position while actually making a golf swing. It gives golf teaching professionals instant feedback that enables them to say to students, “You are improving and you can see it and feel it.” It also allows the “do-it-yourselfers,” to improve their swing themselves. List Price $139 • www.nanoswing.com

The Gruva is the only system built on the principle of a multi-plane swing that naturally coaches golfers on proper body rotation, wrist technique, and weight transfer. Great for novices and experts alike, the Gruva gives instant feedback to fix bad habits right in its tracks. Say goodbye to casting, hitting over-the-top, over-swinging and inadequate weight transfer. Use your own 6 or 7 iron in the Gruva, and see your results as you hit a ball right out of it! Achieve your ultimate swing, in as little as fifteen minutes a day! www.golfgruva.com.

SWING SPEED RADAR The Swing Speed Radar® is a small, inexpensive microwave Doppler radar velocity sensor that measures the swing speed of golfers. It assists players in developing/optimizing their swing by providing a convenient measure of their swing velocity as they strive to improve their performance. The new Swing Speed Radar® with Tempo Timer compliments tempo training by measuring a golfer’s ACTUAL Tempo Time consistency, from club takeaway to ball contact, to one hundreth of a second, as well as Clubhead Swing Speed within 1 mph up to 100 mph, and 1% over 100 mph.

The Swing Speed Radar with Tempo Timer is fast becoming a hit with serious golfers trying to improve their game, and with instructors and professional clubmakers assisting in accomplishing their objectives. (888) 542-9246 www.sportssensors.com


In the below picture (fig. 1) the shaft of the putter is gliding along the Swinkey. Some would say, “the Swinkey is straight so that is a straight back-straight through stroke.” We know this is incorrect because of the ferris wheel example. The shaft is on a 70 degree angle and the Swinkey will help to keep it there so the putter shaft travels on plane, while the putter head forms a natural arc. If the putter in this picture had a 90 degree shaft angle then the putter would travel straight back, straight through like the ferris wheel.

“Straight Back, Straight Through” or “Arc Stroke”. Explained and Simplified. Brian Benedictson, Inventor of Swinkey Canadian Tour Professional

Here is a rule of thumb for you: the flatter the shaft angle the more the putter head moves inside the target line. Or another way to say it is, the flatter or less shaft angle the bigger the arc. The opposite of this is the steeper the shaft angle the smaller the arc. The ferris wheel in normal upright position equals no arc, while ferris wheel on the ground equals a big arc.

THERE HAS BEEN A LOT OF CONVERSATION ABOUT “STRAIGHT BACK,

A good example of this is the cross-handed or claw grip. Most people

straight through” vs. an “Arc Stroke”. I’d like to give you my

who putt cross-handed or with the claw grip tend to have a steeper

perspective on it and attempt to simplify it for you.

shaft angle which will make their stroke appear to be more “straight

First, let’s talk about what “straight back, straight through” is. This is when the putter head travels back and through on the target line while the putter face stays square to the target line. This would be easy to do if your putter had a 90 degree shaft angle and the golfer stood

back, straight through”. High hands at address will increase shaft angle while low hands will decrease shaft angle. So once again, the steeper the shaft angle the less the arc and flatter the shaft angle the greater the arc.

behind the ball. Visualize a ferris wheel: it is 90 degrees to the ground

Playing on the Canadian and Mini Tours over last seven years I have

and moves straight back and straight through. This is an efficient

seen many different putting styles with varying degrees of shaft angle.

motion, but it is illegal for golf clubs to have a 90 degree shaft angle.

When I introduced the Swinkey to the players, the putting plane

When the putter head travels straight back and through on

function was a topic of conversation. I had many players tell

the target line while the putter face stays square to that line it is

me they don’t putt “straight back, straight through”. After

fighting physics. On average putters have a 70 degree shaft angle. For visualization purposes imagine the ferris wheel on a 70 degree angle. It would

a quick explanation and comparing the stroke to a ferris wheel they had a moment of revelation and understanding. At the end of the day it comes down to plane. Keep the

now make an arc if observed from above or behind. The motion hasn’t

shaft of the putter on plane and the putter head will make an

changed; the plane has just been flattened out. It is on plane, making

arc that matches your shaft angle. This is why the Swinkey has

an arc that matches the angle, which is how we want to putt. This is

proven to be a great putting aid. It works with the shaft of the

how the path of the putter head should naturally move.

putter, not the putter head. There isn’t a perfect arc, or an ideal shaft angle. What is important is to keep the shaft on plane. Keep the tilted ferris wheel in mind, let the putter head swing and you will have a better understanding of what a natural stroke is and in turn make more putts.

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THE TURN GOLF MAGAZINE 21


Tennis Anyone?

Answer to Crossword

The Forehand Drive THE FOREHAND DRIVE IS THE OPENING OF EVERY OFFENSIVE IN tennis, and, as such, should be most carefully studied. There are certain rules of footwork that apply to all shots. To reach a ball that is a short distance away, advance the foot that is away from the shot and thus swing into position to hit. If a ball is too close to the body, retreat the foot closest to the shot and drop the weight back on it, thus, again, being in position for the stroke. When hurried, and it is not possible to change the foot position, throw the weight on the foot closest to the ball.

R H P

S E B S

A B B E

H A E

E P E E

V A A L

O V E R R I S

E

R

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E

D E

S

R E T E

C R O C F R E E L A M

V

A S T I

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S A L A D A T D E

D I

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The receiver should always await the service facing the net, but once the serve is started on the way to court, the receiver should at once attain the position to receive it with the body at right angles to the net.

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A N T E

A G A S

O R A T E D

P I

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A N N

1. The portion of the swing behind the body, which determines the speed of the stroke.

C E D E

H O S E

N E E

2. That portion immediately in front of the body which determines the direction and, in conjunction with weight shift from one foot to the other, the pace of the shot. 3. The portion beyond the body, comparable to the golfer’s “follow through,” determines spin, top or slice, imparted to the ball. All drives should be topped. The slice shot is a totally different stroke. Never allow your opponent to play a shot he likes if you can possibly force him to one he dislikes. I urge that you play your drive: 1. With the body sideways to the net. 2. The swing flat, with long follow through. 3. The weight shifting just as the ball is hit.

www.tennis-simple.com/tennis-articles-free-.html

The forehand drive is made up of one continuous swing of the racquet that, for the purpose of analysis, may be divided into three parts:

T A S A R M A T U R E

Answer to Sudoko

5

1

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Rules of Sudoko

22 THE TURN GOLF MAGAZINE

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The object of game is to fill the other empty cells with numbers between 1 and 9 (1 number only in each cell). The objective is to fill a 9×9 grid with digits so that each column, each row, and each of the nine 3×3 sub-grids that compose the grid (also called “boxes”, “blocks”, “regions”, or “sub-squares”) contains all of the digits from 1 to 9


Official 2012

PGA Tour Schedule Jan. 6-9 Jan. 12-15 Jan. 19-22 Jan. 27-30

Hyundai Tournament of Champions . . . Sony-Hawaii Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Humana Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Farmers Insurance Open . . . . . . . . . . . .

$5.6m $5.5m $5.6m $6m

Jun. 7-10 Jun. 14-12 Jun. 18-19 Jun. 21-24 Jun. 28-Jul. 1

FedEx St. Jude Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . U.S. Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CVS Caremark Charity Classic . . . . . . . . Travelers Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . AT&T National . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$5.6m $6.8m $1.3m $6m $6.5m

Feb. 2-5 Feb. 9-12 Feb. 16-19 Feb. 22-26 Feb. 23-26

Waste Management Phoenix Open . . . . AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am . . . . . . . . . Northern Trust Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WGC-Accenture Match Play . . . . . . . . . . Mayakoba Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$6.1m $6.4m $6.6m $8.5m $3.7m

Jul. 5-8 Jul. 12-15 Jul. 19-22 Jul. 19-22 Jul. 26-29

The Greenbrier Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . John Deere Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . True South Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Open Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . RBC Canadian Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

$6.1m $4.6m $3m $8m $5.1m

Mar. 1-4 Mar. 8-11 Mar. 8-11 Mar. 15-18 Mar. 19-20 Mar. 22-25 Mar. 29-April 1

Honda Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $5.7m Puerto Rico Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.5m World Golf Championships . . . . . . . . . . . . . $3.5m Transitions Championship . . . . . . . . . . . $5.5m Tavistock Cup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.1m Arnold Palmer Invitational . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.1m Shell Houston Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $6m

Aug. 2-5 Aug. 2-5 Aug. 09-12 Aug. 16-19

Reno-Tahoe Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . WGC-Bridgestone Invitational . . . . . . . . PGA Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Wyndham-Greensboro Open . . . . . . . . .

$3m $8.5m $8m $5.2m

Oct. 22-24

PGA Grand Slam of Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . $1.3m

Apr. 5-8 Apr. 12-15 Apr. 19-22 Apr. 26-29

The Masters Tournament . . . . . . . . . . . . RBC Heritage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Valero Texas Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Zurich-New Orleans Open . . . . . . . . . . .

$8m $5.7m $6.2m $6.4m

Nov. 05-06 Nov. 12-14 Nov. 28- Dec. 3 Nov. 29-Dec. 2

Wendy’s 3-Tour Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . ADT Skills Challenge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PGA TOUR Qualifying Tournament . . . . Chevron World Challenge . . . . . . . . . . .

May 3-6 May 10-13 May 17-20 May 24-27 May 31-Jun. 3

Wells Fargo Championship . . . . . . . . . . THE PLAYERS Championship . . . . . . . . HP Byron Nelson Championship . . . . . . Crowne Plaza Invitational at Colonial . . . The Memorial Tournament . . . . . . . . . . .

$6.5m $9.5m $6.5m $6.4m $6.2m

Dec. 7-9

Franklin Templeton Shootout . . . . . . . . . $3m

ACROSSE! L E V I L WE AX.COM WAVEDOGL

$1m $8m $1m $5m


Official 2012 2012 LPGA Tour Schedule Feb. 09-12 Feb. 16-19 Feb. 23-26

ISPS Handa Women’s Australian Open Honda LPGA Thailand 2012 HSBC Women’s Champions 2012

Sept. 6-9 Sept. 13-16 Sept. 20-23

Kingsmill Championship RICOH Women’s British Open Navistar LPGA Classic

Mar. 15-18 Mar. 22-25 Mar. 29-April 01

RR Donnelley LPGA Founders Cup Kia Classic Kraft Nabisco Championship

Oct. 11-14 Oct. 19-21 Oct. 25-28

Sime Darby LPGA Malaysia LPGA HanaBank Championship Sunrise LPGA Taiwan Championship 2012

Apr. 18-21 Apr. 26-29

LPGA LOTTE Championship by J Golf Mobile Bay LPGA Classic

Nov. 02-04 Nov. 08-11 Nov. 15-18

Mizuno Classic Lorena Ochoa Invitational CME Group Titleholders

May 05-06 May 17-20

HSBC LPGA Brasil Cup 2012 Sybase Match Play Championship

Dec. 09

Wendy’s 3-Tour Challenge

Jun. 01-03 Jun. 07-10 Jun. 21-24 Jun. 29- July 01

ShopRite LPGA Classic Wegmans LPGA Championship Manulife Financial LPGA Classic Walmart NW Arkansas Championship by P&G

Jul. 05-08 Jul. 26-29

U.S. Women’s Open Evian Masters Presented by Société Générale

Aug. 1 Aug. 9 Aug. 23-26

Jamie Farr Toledo Classic Safeway Classic Presented by Coca-Cola CN Canadian Women’s Open

Official 2012

Champions Tour Schedule Jan. 20-22 Feb. 10-12 Feb. 17-19 Mar. 16-18 Mar. 23-25 Apr. 13-15 Apr. 20-22 May 04-06 May 24-27 Jun. 01-03 Jun. 07-10 Jun. 22-24 Jun. 28-Jul. 01 Jul. 06-08 Jul. 12-15 Jul. 26-29 Aug. 03-05 Aug. 17-19 Aug. 24-26 Oct. 05-07 Oct. 12-14 Oct. 26-28 Nov. 01-04 Nov. 13-16

Mitsubishi Electric Championship at Hualalai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,800,000 Allianz Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,800,000 ACE Group Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,600,000 Toshiba Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,750,000 Mississippi Gulf Resort Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,600,000 Tampa Bay Pro-Am . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,700,000 Liberty Mutual Legends of Golf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,700,000 Insperity Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,200,000 Senior PGA Championship presented by KitchenAid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000,000 Principal Charity Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,750,000 Regions Tradition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,200,000 Montreal Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,800,000 Constellation Senior Players Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,700,000 Nature Valley First Tee Open at Pebble Beach . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,700,000 U.S. Senior Open Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,600,000 The Senior Open Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,000,000 3M Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,750,000 Dick’s Sporting Goods Open . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,800,000 Boeing Classic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2,000,000 SAS Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,100,000 Greater Hickory Classic at Rock Barn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1,600,000 AT&T Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $1,850,000 Charles Schwab Cup Championship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2,500,000 Champions Tour Q-School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$ 200,000


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