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www.sanluisobispo.com

San

Luis

Obispo

County,

California

Monday, April 26, 1999

Tribune readers sound off on the tragedy in Littleton

Atascadero High sprints to the county track title

The colors of I Madonnari decorate Mission Plaza

Voices, B8

Sports, C1

Local, B1

Worst confirmed: Remains are students ——————————————————

Teresa Mariani

Rachel Newhouse and Aundria Crawford dead; suspect calls himself a ‘monster’

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San Luis Obispo ————————— By Mike Stover

Fear will fade for now, but not forever

The Tribune

T

hank God. Thank God, and I hope it’s the right guy. Those were the first things I thought after a newspaper friend called Thursday to tell me they had a guy in the case of the missing college girls. The sense of relief was physical; like taking a deep breath at the surface after you’ve been underwater for a long time. I wasn’t alone. Thank God; it’s what we were all thinking. Followed by the prayer that it was the right guy. Everyone wanted to be sure. Everyone wanted to know if they could stop worrying when their daughters walk out the door. Then on Saturday, when they identified the bodies of Aundria Crawford and Rachel Newhouse found on the property of a canyon home rented by a paroled rapist named Rex Krebs, the relief turned to anger. Quickly. It’s amazing what a little fear can do to you. Finding the girls’ bodies must have been a terrible blow for their families. But for the rest of us it was a release — a release from the monster we were worried was lurking out there in the night, ready to steal our children. More than a terrible tragedy that claimed their lives, what happened to Aundria Crawford and Rachel Newhouse was a mystery threatening to hold us all hostage here; or at least hold hostage women and girls and the people who love them. We treasure our safety here, our remoteness from the big cities and their graffiti and gangs and crime. We give up things to stay here, make sacrifices so we can raise our children in a place where we think it’s still safe. Where we think our kids won’t be caught in a drive-by shooting like kids are in Los Angeles. Where they won’t be kidnapped from their bedrooms and killed like Polly Klaas in the Bay Area.

TRIBUNE PHOTO BY ROBERT DYER

Frank Smith and other members of the Central Coast Treasure Hunters Association gather their equipment Saturday to help investigators in the search for evidence at Rex Allan Krebs’ Davis Canyon residence.

Atascadero alters sex-offender policy S LO Cou nt y

————————— By María T. García The Tribune

Starting today, Atascadero residents will know when a high-risk sex of fender moves into their neighborhood. Although police are not required to advise residents about the whereabouts of any sex offender on the Megan’s Law list, Atascadero Police Chief Dennis Hegwood said he would begin the optional notification about high-risk offenders.

In the wake of residents’ concerns, “we will gear up our notification procedure to make people aware,” he said. “The residents of Atascadero need to know. I don’t think that’s unreasonable.” Rex Allan Megan’s Law — Krebs named for a 7-year-old New Jersey girl who was raped and murdered by a convicted sex offender — allows law enforcement agencies

to alert neighbors who live near offenders identified by the state Department of Justice as high risks. The law requires that residents of every county have access to a computer database about sex offenders. Information in this county is available at the Sheriff’s Department. Atascadero has 10 of the county’s 21 high-risk sex offenders. A high-risk classification means an offender has been convicted of at least three sexual or violent crimes in the past five years and is likely to Please see NOTIFY, Back Page

The human remains found Friday in a remote canyon near Avila Beach were identified by police Saturday afternoon as Rachel Newhouse and Aundria Crawford, two of the three San Luis Obispo college students to vanish over the past three years. The remains were found near the home of convicted rapist Rex Allan Krebs, who all but confessed Saturday Aundria morning to a Fresno Bee Crawford reporter, calling himself a “monster” who should be put to death, according to a published report. Krebs, a 33-year-old Idaho native, is being held in the San Luis Obispo County Jail in protective custody on a parole violation and has Rachel yet to be arrested for ei- Newhouse ther homicide. “We are absolutely satisfied we have the person responsible for the deaths of Rachel Newhouse and Aundria Crawford,” said police Capt. Bar t Topham during a press conference late Saturday afternoon at the City-County Library. It was the second such gathering in two days. A third will be held this morning at 9:30 with California Attorney General Bill Lockyer expected to attend. Please see STUDENTS, Back Page

MORE COVERAGE ON A6 • Three Strikes: Law would have prevented Krebs’ release. • Reaction: Sense of relief is still laced with lingering fear.

Poly search turns up possible evidence in Smart case San Luis Obispo ————————— Jeff Ballinger

Kristin Smart has been missing since May 25, 1996

Please see FEAR, Back Page

The Tribune

Mother hopes end of latest investigations offers some solace to families ——————————————————

A search and rescue team found items on Cal Poly’s campus Sunday that may turn out to be evidence in the disappearance of Cal Poly student Kristin Smart. Sheriff Pat Hedges would not elab-

A girl lifts a rose skyward as she’s held during Sunday’s memorial service for the victims of Tuesday’s shooting at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo.

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orate on results of the search, which comes almost three years after Smart was last seen walking to her dormitory from an off-campus party. Although the recent disappearances and deaths of two other college

students have overshadowed the Smart investigation, Hedges said effor ts to solve the case have never stopped. Stan and Denise Smart have been waiting since May 25, 1996, to learn

what happened to their 19-year-old daughter, who vanished just a few weeks before the end of her first year at Cal Poly. Two bodies found Friday in the Davis Canyon Road area were confirmed Saturday as those of Rachel Newhouse and Aundria Crawford. Rex Allan Krebs, who is in County Jail on an unrelated parole violation, Please see SMART, Back Page

70,000 mourn Littleton tragedy’s 13 victims By Steven K. Paulson Associated Press

LITTLETON, Colo. — Thirteen white doves fluttered into the slate gray sky Sunday, over the heads of 70,000 people who filled a parking lot to mourn the 12 students and one teacher massacred at Columbine High School. Families, friends and strangers clung to each other during a 75minute memorial ser vice. They clutched flowers, blue and silver balloons and Bibles as they wept and wondered why it happened.

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Gore preaches responsibility at parking lot memorial service ——————————————————

“All of us must change our lives to honor these children,” Vice President Al Gore told the overflow crowd a few blocks from where two teenagers went on a rampage and then killed themselves Tuesday. “More than ever, I realize every one of us is responsible for all of the children. “No society can be perfect, but we know the way things should be,”

Gore said, his voice thundering like a preacher’s. As Gov. Bill Owens read the name of each of the 13 victims, a dove was released. The symbol of peace had a special meaning: Columbine, Colorado’s state flower, derives from a Latin word meaning “like a dove.” “God grant them eternal peace,” Owens said of the victims.

Mourners — twice as many as had been expected — stood in rapt attention as Gore described how children must be raised. He never mentioned by name the two classmates, seniors Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold, who went on the rampage and tried to blow up the high school apparently because they felt like rejected misfits. Investigators have found a diary Please see LITTLETON, A3 The parents: Friends describe them as everyday people. Page A5

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M o n day , A p r i l 2 6 , 1 9 9 9

Three Strikes would have prevented Krebs’ release ——————————————————

Author of law calls case a ‘poignant reminder’ of earlier system’s flaws ——————————————————

San Luis Obispo ————————— By Silas Lyons and David Sneed The Tribune

Under California’s new toughened laws, Rex Allan Krebs would not have been paroled after serving just 10 years for his previous crimes, the author of the Three Strikes bill said Sunday. In 1987, Krebs, the only suspect in the murders of Aundria Crawford and Rachel Newhouse, was

Students

From Page A1

Topham offered no new information about how the two college students died and declined to say if they had been raped. He did say that Krebs is not suspected in any other deaths and that there are no other suspects in either case. He gave no estimate on when Krebs might be arrested or charged. “He’s already in custody. I don’t have to rush out and charge him,” Topham said. No additional information was released Sunday. Krebs was picked up on an alleged parole violation March 20. He was paroled from state prison in September 1997 after serving 10 years of a 20-year sentence for rape, attempted rape, sodomy and burglary. An Atascadero woman who got to know him after he was paroled said Krebs was a regular visitor to her home and often spent the night, sleeping in the bunk above her young child. When Krebs and his girlfriend came to dinner, he was a complete gentleman, she said. “If you were to ask me six months ago, I would have said he seemed to be a nice guy, polite. He never really did anything to me. If you were to ask me now, I would say he’s an animal.” The woman asked that her name not be published out of concern for her safety. She said Krebs’ girlfriend knew nothing about his involvement in the case until Thursday and has been treated poorly by some people over the past few days. “I can tell you she would not have hesitated to turn him in if she knew.” Krebs was a regular customer at Outlaws Bar & Grill in Atascadero. “Rex was a great guy, is a great guy,” said bartender Dan Thompson, who worked with Krebs at the 84 Lumber store in San Luis Obispo until becoming a bartender at Outlaws full-time. “But apparently it seems as though he has a demon.” Thompson said Krebs was involved in a few fights at the bar, adding that it was always because he saw someone in the bar mistreating a woman. According to cour t records, Krebs was convicted in October 1987 of raping and sodomizing an Oceano woman while threatening her with a butcher knife. He was

Notify From Page A1

commit similar crimes. Interest in the Megan’s Law list has escalated since Rex Allan Krebs was identified Thursday as the prime suspect in the disappearances and deaths of two college students living in San Luis Obispo. The bodies of Aundria Crawford and Rachel Newhouse were recovered by police Friday in the Davis Canyon area near Avila Beach. Krebs has been on the list since he was paroled from prison in 1997. Even though Krebs lived on Bajada Avenue in Atascadero for several months last year, state law prohibited police from informing neighbors of his presence. Megan’s Law makes information available about serious offenders. But law enforcement agencies can distribute information only about high-risk offenders. Krebs is one of the 538 serious offenders on the list in the county. Of those, 60 live in Atascadero. “There is a delicate balance between the rights of individuals who have served their time and the public’s right to know,” Hegwood said. A rape conviction doesn’t automatically mean a person will commit that crime again, he said. There is also a risk that neighbors will act as vigilantes, driving sex offenders from their

sentenced to 20 years on six felony counts involving three separate incidents. He served only half the sentence before being paroled. Both the Three Strikes bill and a tougher One Strike law for violent rapists would have applied to Krebs in 1987 if they had been in place at the time, said Mike Reynolds, a Fresno man who authored Three Strikes after his daughter was murdered by repeat offenders in 1992. In either case, Reynolds said, also convicted of attempting to rape an Arroyo Grande woman after breaking into her home for the second time in two weeks. He threatened her with a screwdriver. When she fought him off he bit her hand, severing a tendon. Krebs declined an inter view with The Tribune on Sunday. The day before Krebs expressed disgust with himself and sympathy for the victims’ families. “The two girls are dead,” he told the Fresno Bee. “If I’m not a monster, then what am I?” Krebs said he was not worried about the death penalty. “I hope they give it to me.” The families of both Rachel Newhouse and Aundria Crawford spent the weekend in San Luis Obispo and are preparing to bury their daughters. No funeral arrangements had been made yet. Don Crawford, Aundria’s grandfather, said he expects police to release her body today or Tuesday. Officials believe the 20-year-old Cuesta College student was abducted March 12 from her duplex apartment on Branch Street. She was the daughter of Gail Eberhart of Clovis and Jim Eberhar t of Washington state. “We are a pretty strong family, and we are all Christians,” her grandfather said. “I’ve been expecting the worst after a week but hoping for the best. I think the whole family feels that way.” One of Aundria Crawford’s closest friends was Jamie Rerucha of Fresno. She wasn’t up to talking Sunday. Her husband, Jason, said they have found some relief after six frustrating weeks of not knowing. “I kind of assumed it was going to end like this from the beginning because of the world we live in nowadays,” he said. “I’m glad that they finally found her and can give her a proper burial.” He had known Crawford for about two years. They both drove Mustangs. “She was very outgoing. Always on the move, wanting to do stuff.” He read in the paper that Krebs said he attacked one of the women in 1987 because he felt she had given him a condescending look. Rerucha said he could imagine Crawford doing the same thing if she felt Krebs was trying to pick up on her. “She was a great person. It’s sad that she had to go like this.” Rachel Newhouse was the daughter of Phillip and Montel Newhouse of Irvine. She moved

homes or jobs, or worse, Hegwood said. Deputies in Sonoma County have been known to distribute fliers with a sex offender’s photo, address and a list of crimes to people living within a two-block radius. But felons who have completed jail sentences and paid for their crimes have a right to privacy too, Hegwood said. In Atascadero, neighbors learned that Krebs was Sheriff Pat a registered sex Hedges o f f e n d e r through the Megan’s Law database. A letter-writing campaign to notify neighbors about Krebs’ convictions ensued, promptAtascadero ing him to move Police Chief out. Dennis But Hegwood Hegwood cautioned that Megan’s Law is not intended to run offenders out of their homes. Sheriff Pat Hedges, who has jurisdiction in unincorporated areas such as See Canyon, said his department already notifies residents when a high-risk sex offender moves into a neighbor-

Krebs would have gone to jail for a mandatory sentence of 25 years to life. “(Krebs) is a poignant reminder of the criminal justice system that used to be in place up to 1994 (when Three Strikes became law),” Reynolds said. The Three Strikes bill has been criticized widely for unfairly penalizing minor offenses, since any felony can count as a third strike and stick the of fender with a mandatory sentence of 25 years to life. For the third straight year, legislation to moderate the law has been introduced this year in the state Senate. Reynolds defends its toughness. It’s unfortunate Krebs was not

picked up for a minor felony after being paroled, Reynolds said. “If we had caught him with a gun in his car, they could have pulled his ticket right there,” he said, since the 1987 crimes would count as three separate strikes if Krebs were brought back into cour t. “While he’d have been screaming bloody murder, we would have had two girls who would have been alive.” Under Three Strikes, a criminal charged in a single trial with separate incidents involving violent or serious felonies can get a strike for each of the incidents. Krebs falls within that definition, Reynolds said. Krebs pleaded no contest in 1987 to charges that he raped and sodomized an

Oceano woman in May 1987, broke into an Arroyo Grande woman’s empty home with the intent to rape her in early June, then came back again 10 days later when she was home and attacked her. District Attorney Gerald Shea said he could only talk generally — not specifically about the Krebs case — but explained that under One Strike, anyone convicted today of a sex act in connection with a residential burglar y, kidnapping or causing great bodily injury could be sentenced to an indeterminate term of 25 years to life. That person would have to serve 85 percent of those 25 years before being eligible for parole. Because of the “to

life” in the sentence, a parole board could continue to deny parole for an indeterminate number of years. “You’re darn right it’s going to be a theme,” said former state Assemblyman Tom Bordonaro, when asked whether the issue of Krebs’ early release from prison will be widely discussed in the coming days. Bordonaro, who now sits on the state Board of Prison Terms, was an outspoken supporter of Three Strikes legislation. “I think it reinforces the whole premise behind Three Strikes, where people are given a second chance,” Bordonaro said. “You don’t keep giving them third, fourth, sixth chances.”

County breathing a little easier San Luis Obispo ————————— By Matt Lazier The Tribune

TRIBUNE PHOTO BY ROBERT DYER

SLOPD Capt. Bart Topham confirms Saturday that the two bodies found at the Davis Canyon crime scene are Aundria Crawford and Rachel Newhouse.

‘If you were to ask me six months ago, I would have said he seemed to be a nice guy, polite. He never really did anything to me. If you were to ask me now, I would say he’s an animal.’ — acquaintance of Rex Allan Krebs to San Luis Obispo to attend Cal Poly, where she was a junior majoring in nutrition. She disappeared in November while walking home from a party at Tortilla Flats restaurant. Her blood was found on the Jennifer Street Bridge. Randy Rossi, a teacher at Irvine High School, was Newhouse’s cross country coach and taught her beginning Spanish. “She was an outstanding student,” Rossi told The Orange County Register. “She was bright and active with a good sense of humor. Soccer was her first love. I kept tr ying to talk her into it (running cross country) because of her character — she was a hard worker and very tenacious. She embodied the highest qualities of

‘There is a delicate balance between the rights of individuals who have served their time and the public’s right to know.’ — Dennis Hegwood, Atascadero police chief hood or when an offender settles close to a former victim. Deputies have also notified school of ficials or people with children when a convicted pedophile moves to their neighborhood, he said. See Canyon residents weren’t notified about Krebs moving into the secluded Davis Canyon because he was not a high-risk sex offender. Hedges said it’s virtually impossible to notify people of the more than 600 registered sex offenders living in San Luis Obispo County. “We’re not even required,” he said. “The law says we may notify them.” Like Hegwood, he also warned that Megan’s Law information should not be misused. “I’d hate to see people facing an investigation themselves because they would use the information for something it was not meant for,” he said. “It’s not (available) so you can get a lynch mob together.”

said they told themselves. “We can’t have this. We have to do this.” Investigators worked out from San Luis Obispo conducting thousands of inter views with family, friends, co-workers, people inside Tortilla Flats when Newhouse left and people living along routes she might have walked. They tracked down parolees, registered sex offenders and people on probation. “I’m so proud of them I can’t stand it,” Topham said. The department received assistance from the FBI, the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Department, local police agencies, the state Department of Justice, the San Luis Obispo County District Attorney’s Office and the state parole office. Volunteer search-and-rescue teams worked the case. Even the Central Coast Treasure Hunters Association lent a hand Saturday, scouring the area around Krebs’ rented home in Davis Canyon with metal detectors. Representatives from many of those agencies are planning to attend this morning’s press briefing.

the student athlete. She was a vivacious, attractive, intelligent, terrific young lady. “It was a terrible shock to the school,” Rossi added. “That’s the most horrible scenario, having someone disappear without a trace. We all hoped — that’s the last thing you give up. As time goes on, you become worried that hope is seeping away. But we always hoped there would be a miracle.” Erin Livermore, 21, a student at Cal State Fullerton, had known Newhouse since junior high school. “She was the funniest girl. She always made everyone laugh. She was friends with everyone.” Livermore sang karaoke with Newhouse at a cross country dinner once and has it on video. She says that is what she will always remember about her friend. Confirmation of their deaths was not unexpected, but the news was still difficult to hear Saturday. Topham praised the work of his entire Police Department, including team leaders Detective Jerome Tushbant, Detective Cindy Dunn and FBI agent Vince Otto. The department was committed from the beginning to solving the disappearances, he said. “This is San Luis Obispo,” he

Tribune staff writers David Sneed and Carol Roberts and The Orange County Register contributed to this report.

Smart

Fear

From Page A1

From Page A1

has been identified by San Luis Obispo police as the prime suspect in both young women’s deaths. In a telephone interview from her Stockton home, Denise Smart said the news may offer little solace for their families. “The reality is, I don’t really believe the pain of learning what has happened ... is any easier than the pain of not knowing,” she said. Denise Smart realizes it’s very unlikely her daughter is still alive. However, she said the families of Newhouse and Crawford still had some hope until this week. “In our case, we know the light is out,” she said. “For those families, in that short time, there was always that light out there. “When you learn that somebody has violently taken the life of your child, I don’t think there is any such thing as closure. “Perhaps the only positive thing here is that you’ve got this sorry excuse of a human being off the street,” she said. “That’s the only truly good news.” Smart advised residents to remain on guard, despite the police’s assertion that the killer is in jail. “Every young woman needs to remain alert ... and be ever vigilant,” she said. “We don’t live in the same place where our grandparents lived.”

We work hard to stay here, to stay small, to stay safe. But the realization that someone was out there stalking pretty young girls and making them disappear without a trace into the night took that treasured notion and smashed it into a million pieces. We’ve all been afraid for our daughters for the past few months. It’s been creepy. Too creepy. Worse than wondering what happened to Aundria and Rachel was wondering whether it would happen again. Wondering if it would happen this time to a girl we knew, or worse: to one of our own daughters. I want the worrying to be over. I want to know everything about Rex Allan Krebs. I want to be sure I really can take a deep breath. I want the relief to be complete. I want to believe we’re safe again. Even though deep down, I know it’s only until the next monster drifts into town. At least it looks like we can all breathe easy again for a little while. We’re lucky. Plenty of parents live in places where they have to worr y like this all the time — where monsters may snatch their children’s lives on any night. Now we know what that feels like. It won’t be easy to forget.

As police build a case against suspect Rex Allan Krebs in connection with the deaths of Aundria Crawford and Rachel Newhouse, Central Coast residents said they’re relieved. But the knowledge that there are some 600 sex offenders registered in the county offers new concerns. The vibrant blue sky and rainbow-hued sidewalks at the I Madonnari festival in San Luis Obispo’s Mission Plaza Sunday stood in stark contrast to darker thoughts about the deaths of Crawford and Newhouse. “I’m glad and relieved for the students in the area,” said Sherry Zimmer, a Santa Maria resident who came to town for the festival. “I know a lot of the students are relieved, too.” Pismo Beach resident Ray Gentry agreed and said the double killing is a wake-up call to San Luis Obispo County residents. “This let’s all of us know that things like this can happen here,” Gentry said. “But, this is good in that we can hopefully get some closure in this case.” Cal Poly students and professors at the festival said news of ‘When I the suspect’s got first has capture spread feelings here, it of relief across seemed like their campus. Cuesta Cola quiet lege student Natown. ... talie Smith added that her Now, I’m perception of afraid to the Central Coast has walk from changed since work to my Rachel Newcar at house’s November disappearnight.’ ance. “When I first Natalie Smith, got here, it Cuesta College seemed like a student quiet town,” said Smith, who moved to San Luis Obispo from Grass Valley in August. “We could go out to parties and walk home. Now, I’m afraid to walk from work to my car at night.” The fear that gripped local students and residents reached far outside the county, too, according to Jake Molaro, Smith’s boyfriend from Grass Valley. Molaro said families and friends of Cal Poly and Cuesta students also had sleepless, fretful nights in the past six months. “I was really worried about (Smith),” Molaro said. “I would tell her not to stay home alone and not to walk alone at night.” Still, everyone Sunday said the relief caused by the suspect’s capture has been accompanied by new fears about the safety of Central Coast residents, especially with the knowledge that Krebs is only one of 619 registered sex offenders in San Luis Obispo County. “It’s great that they caught (Krebs’),” Molaro said. “At the same time, its not a reason not to be cautious. I think this will give people a cause to be more careful.” Smith said the knowledge that Krebs is only one of 619 registered sex offenders in San Luis Obispo County may be the most frightening aspect of the whole case.


NATION&WORLD

NationDigest ———————————— Ch icago

Boys falsely accused of killing to get apology ayor Richard Daley says M he will apologize to two young boys who were falsely accused of killing an 11-yearold girl last summer. “I’ll apologize to them personally — to the family, to all of them,” Daley said Saturday. Last week, Cook County prosecutors charged convicted sex offender Floyd Durr, 30, with murder and predatory criminal sexual assault in the slaying of Ryan Harris.

Was h i ngton

IMF OKs new program to avert global crises The International Monetary Fund said Sunday it had given final approval to a major change in procedures that will allow it to make available billions of dollars in resources to countries in hopes of averting future global financial crises. The IMF endorsement represented a major victory for President Clinton. He had put the idea forward last fall, at the height of the economic crisis which has pushed onethird of the globe into recession and sent America’s trade deficit to record levels.

Was h i ngton

Drug prevention linked to parental discussion Children who learn about the risks of drugs at home from their parents are much less likely to fall prey to narcotics than those who do not, according to a nationwide survey released today. “All this data really just screams at parents” to take an active role in their children’s activities, especially in light of the Littleton, Colo., tragedy, said Steve Dnistrian, executive vice president of the nonprofit Partnership for a Drug-Free America, which did the study.

Was h i ngton

Social Security bill dead for ’99, Lott says Congress will not act this year to revitalize the Social Security system because President Clinton has failed to lead the way, Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott said Sunday. Lott, R-Miss., also predicted Congress will add as much as $6 billion to Clinton’s $6.05 billion emergency request to finance the conflict in Yugoslavia. The money will come from Social Security’s surplus. — From Associated Press

Monday,

April

26,

1999

THE TRIBUNE

NATO pledges help for Yugoslav neighbors WASHINGTON (AP) — In a summit-ending show of solidarity, NATO leaders promised military protection and economic aid to Yugoslavia’s neighbors for standing with the West against Slobodan Milosevic. “If Mr. Milosevic threatens them for helping us, we will respond,” President Clinton promised. Before winding up the threeday meeting with his allies in the militar y operation against the Serbs in Yugoslavia, Clinton telephoned Boris Yeltsin on Sunday and urged the Russian leader to press Milosevic to accept a peaceful solution to the crisis. On the central issue of forcing Milosevic’s forces to withdraw from Kosovo and allow hundreds of thousands of ethnic Albanian refugees back to their homes, Clinton said, “The alliance leaves Washington more united even than it was when we came here.” The 19 NATO leaders agreed in their 50th anniversary summit to move toward an oil embargo to hinder Milosevic despite Russian objections and French misgivings over forcibly searching ships at sea. Defense Secretary William Cohen said the allies agreed it was important to cut down the supply of fuel going to Yugoslavia’s “war machine.” He said the NATO leaders expected recommendations from their military officials

Littleton From Page A1

plotting the mayhem in precise detail for more than a year, as well as bomb-making materials and weapons in one of the pair’s bedroom. “We must have the courage not to look away from those who feel despised and rejected,” he said. “If you are a parent, they need your attention. If you are a grandparent, they need your time.” Gore and retired Gen. Colin Powell led an array of dignitaries

President Clinton speaks at the conclusion of the NATO anniversary summit in Washington. He had called Russian President Boris Yeltsin and urged him to pressure Yugoslavia for a peaceful solution.

A3

WorldDigest ———————————— Seoul, South Korea

Korean police attempt to scare off strikers of riot police Thousands marched onto a Seoul university campus Sunday, touching off violent clashes with striking subway workers and sympathizers who fought back with rocks and firebombs. Several workers were injured but none of them seriously, police said. The strikers are protesting government-ordered corporate reforms that are expected to result in mass layoffs.

London

Police fear racist bombing campaign ASSOCIATED PRESS

“in a very short period of time” on the exact steps that might be taken. The NATO leaders agreed to intensify air attacks against Yugoslavia. But there was no agreement — and scant public discussion — of the possibility of introducing ground forces. But in Russia — one of NATO’s nonmember “partners” — Prime Minister Yevgeny Primakov said,

“We will have to pay more attention to defense” if a ground war is launched. Today, NATO warplanes destroyed the last remaining bridge in Yugoslavia’s second-largest city early amid new refugee reports of roaming Serb gunmen butchering villagers by the dozens. In some of the grimmest accounts to emerge so far, Kosovo refugees reaching Macedonia on

Sunday told relief workers of Serb paramilitaries entering villages, ordering residents out of their homes and opening fire on them. Serbian media said a fuel depot was targeted near the central Serbian town of Valjevo early Monday. Nine NATO missiles also hit an airport in Sombor on the border with Hungary in the fifth attack on the area so far, Belgrade’s Studio B radio reported.

on the makeshift stage in the movie theater parking lot. Afterward, they walked slowly to nearby Clement Park to place more flowers at an impromptu memorial that has been growing daily since the massacre. Nick Foss, 18, who was grazed by a bullet and injured while helping teachers and students hide in a closet and overhead air ducts, limped in the processional behind Gore and Owens. He was supported by Columbine High School Principal Frank DeAngelis, and mourners applauded as they passed.

“God Bless you guys!” a man shouted. “You’ve got a reason to live.” The service was punctuated by songs performed by a variety of Christian entertainers, including Amy Grant, and student musicians. At 1:30 p.m., brothers Jonathan and Stephen Cohen opened the ser vice with a simple “Hi,” and sang a song they wrote in tribute to the massacre’s victims. Jonathan Cohen, a junior at Columbine, was trapped in the choir room when gunfire erupted. Stephen, a senior, was in the cafeteria where many students were

shot or hit by shrapnel from pipe bombs. “Can you still hear raging guns ending dreams of precious ones?” they sang. “In God’s son, hope will come, his red stain will take our pain.” Roman Catholic Archbishop Charles Chaput of Denver opened the services with a prayer. “Surely the past weeks is about as much suffering as any community can bear,” Chaput said. “Love is stronger than death. I believe that. Perhaps beyond all this suffering, something good can be achieved.”

Britain’s ethnic minorities may be facing a wave of racially motivated violence, police said Sunday, a day after a neoNazi group claimed responsibility for a nail bomb that injured seven people. The bombing in an area of London heavily populated by immigrants was the second of two attacks in eight days that have injured a total of 46 people, prompting fears of a campaign to terrorize minorities. A neo-Nazi organization, Combat 18, claimed responsibility for Saturday’s afternoon explosion on a busy street in Brick Lane, home to a large Bangladeshi community. — From Associated Press


Worst confirmed: Remains are students