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LAUNCH ISSUE 1

ARTICLES 1 EDITORS NOTE A note from the editor of the Tradesman, Robyn Veckranges. 2BUILD IT YOURSELF Follow the Build It guide to home DIY. REGULAR 3THE BANK BUSINESS SERIES Get your business off to a good start with these helpful business guides. 5BABE AID A quarterly centrefold featuring local beauties. FEATURE 7BLUE COLLAR MILLIONNAIRE An interview with Desmond Gudtzeit documenting his rise from tradie to multi millionaire businessman. 10FACT FILE Everything you need to know about The Tradesman. 11GARY & MALLEY These two local tradies test the limits of the latest tools on the market. 13CONTACT DETAILS Contact us to book your spot in The Tradesman.

CONTENTS


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EDITORS NOTE

AIM: The magazine is a mix of informative articles that aim to aid development and growth within the various tradesmen tribes. Editorial focus will be given to businesses acumen, lifestyle news, product developments, and insider tips. MISSION STATEMENT: The Tradesman is a free specialist magazine targeting all South African men and women who work with their hands. This magazine looks to celebrate the industry and the people who work in it. Our aim is to keep the tradespeople of South Africa in the know by showcasing brand new products, insider tips and insight into setting up and growing your business; all the while, celebrating the unique industries we strive to service, and having a

PAGE 1 - EDITORS NOTE

laugh about our mess ups every now and then.

keep in the bog to keep you entertained.

Each issue focuses on a different aspect of the tradesman business, so this magazine will serve as a collectible, something to refer to every now and then, or just something to

The Tradesman is for the tradespeople so send us your thoughts, stories, tips, and ‘oops’ moments to make this magazine your own. Until next time

THANKS FOR PICKING UP THE FIRST EVER ISSUE OF THE TRADESMAN


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PAGE 2 - BUILD IT


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REGULAR

THE BANK BUSINESS S YOU’VE BEEN BUILDING UP TO THIS FOR YEARS. THE HARD WORK AND LONG HOURS HAVE PAID OFF, YOUR TRAINING IS DONE. IT’S TIME FOR YOU TO GO OUT ON YOUR OWN. But where do you start? The first step is always the hardest – putting together a business plan. Once you have your goals and an outline of your company laid out, there’ll be no stopping you. In fact, studies show that people that write a business plan are twice as likely to actually go into business. Still need convincing? Just who needs a business plan? Well, everyone! If you are going to need finance you will need to show your bank or investors that you have a plan for growth. If you are not in need of financial assistance (lucky you!), a business plan will help you mold your business and give it structure. You can keep your business plan as a reference point and read through it every few months. You’ll be able to tick off goals and add new avenues for growth.

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Writing out a plan might sound incredibly tedious and dull. In the past, long, very detailed documents were put together and lugged off to financial institutions. But these days, entrepreneurs are advised to be as concise as possible as the shorter your document is, the more chance it has of being read. And you want yours to be read, even if it is just by you. Now the fun part starts – once you’ve gotten your head around writing your plan out, you get to actually plan. So what kind of business will yours be? The first, and perhaps the most important part of putting together a business plan is your company description. Here are some things to consider: How will your business be run? What will make it different from all of the

rest? Are you going to strive to always offer the lowest rates? Will you arrive first? Is your customer service going to be so good that you put all your competitors to shame? What specific markets is your business going to service? Is there a certain niche within your industry

that you hope to fulfill? Will you focus on servicing residential or industrial buildings? Will you stick to a specific neighbourhood or are you going global? Making a full list of all of the services you are qualified to offer will help you determine your strong suits. Do you have any


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REGULAR

SERIES your business – even if it does just serve as a ‘To Do’ list for you to follow. If your goal is for your word of mouth referrals, consider having some business cards made up so you can leave a reminder of the great work you’ve done. Some other avenues to consider: Putting an advert in your local newspaper Having flyers printed and put in mailboxes in your neighborhood Setting up a website or blog Setting up a Facebook page Having vinyl stickers made and stuck on your vehicle – just don’t forget your phone number! competitors? Take a look at their companies to see how they’re run, and how you can improve on the services they are providing.

From there it’s on to the finance – what costs will be involved in starting up your business? Some things to consider:

business from? How will your customers reach you? Will you need an email address, cellphone and website?

Your company description can serve as a motto, giving you an easy way to make sure you are staying on track with the business you set out to build.

Do you have transport or will you need finance for a vehicle? What tools do you need to service your trade? Where will you run your

Marketing your business will certainly fall under the budget section of your business plan, but it is a good idea to detail what steps you will take to grow

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Once you have everything laid out on paper, you’re ready to go. Make an appointment with the bank if you need to, put on your game face and get your business going. In the next issue we’ll cover setting up and registering your business.


BABE AID

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PAGE 5 - BABE AID


PAGE 6 - BABE AID

When she’s not enjoying a zumba class, shopping or taking a dip in the warm Indian Ocean, she enjoys a little DIY. In fact, she fitted all the mirrors and frames on her bedroom wall herself.

Meet Tenieke Wilson, our very first Babe Aid model. This 22 year old beauty hails from the shores of La Lucia, Durban, where she is completing a BBA in Marketing and Management.

TENIEKE WILSON

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FEATURE

MICHELLE LEWIS

BLUE COLLAR MILLIONNAIRE

It’s two days before the AutoTrader SupaDrift series in Port Shepstone, and the drifting track at Des Gudtzeit’s farm is slowly filling with racing cars and trailers. Looking out over the expanse of green hills that surround the track and roll towards the South Coast sea, it’s hard to believe it all belongs to a man with a Standard 6. A full drift track, complete with world-class pit lanes, sits on a perfectly manicured lawn. A short drive around the corner reveals yet another track, a Japanese hill-style drift track, which doubles up for gymkhana competitions. A long winding road leading up to an old farmhouse which has been converted in to a hill climb and there are plans to create a full drag strip.

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I find myself a comfortable patch of grass and wait patiently for the owner of this motoring wonderworld to appear. I half expect to see a black Range Rover with tinted windows crest over the new hill climb, and a gold clad gangster to emerge, back slapping the AutoTrader SupaDrift event organisers and bossing around the staff. Instead, what appears

from a small pathway at the back of the building is what looks like a 6ft 1 farmer on a scooter! He leaves one leg dangling off the side, whilst the little doughnut size wheels bump over the tufts of grass as he heads towards me. The sight of this great man on a 60 cc engine, passing supped up drifting cars, tractors and 4x4 bakkies is comical. He looks like a

man with nothing to prove adding to the already intriguing mystique of his enormous success. I find my way to my feet and outstretch my hand in greeting. I’m met with a firm handshake by a strong, rough paw that has clearly been hard at work for many years. Cuts and chunks of missing flesh mark his skin. He’s dressed in holey jeans, a stained t-shirt, and well worn caterpillar shoes. His crystal blue eyes peep out beneath half-closed lids and a grumble of a voice greets me.


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FEATURE

He

spends some time bantering with the AutoTrader SupaDrift crew, who are clearly very fond of him, after which I’m invited to his office for the interview. I hop in my car and follow the dust of his scooter up the hill, all the while trying to unravel my collection of earlier misconceptions. This man is worth millions. His 8,000m3 factory in Port Shepstone designs and manufacturers front end loaders; haulage tractors, 40 ton dump trucks, fork lifts, large graders and harbor equipment. His factory is set up with drawing departments, engineering teams, fabrication and assembly capability, sand blasting, a paint shop and testing tracks. He left school at 15 years old and started off as a motor mechanic. How in 40 years has he managed to amass this fortune? I settle down in his farmhouse-styled office and I prepare to uncover the secret behind his success. Let’s get straight to it. How did you start your business? I left school at 15 years old. The teachers told me I was useless. Maybe I was a bit naughty. My first job was as a motor mechanic at the Ford dealership in Sheppie. My Dad had a brick manufacturing business at the time and he suggested that I buy a truck and drive deliveries instead. I bought a Ford lorry for R300 which I drove for a year. I saved money and then bought a front-end loader. I hired these out, and with the money I made I bought trucks and built up to a plant hire business. I then went into the brick business. My Dad was making burnt bricks and I started a company that made cement bricks. It was a good business that grew and we eventually sold it. This gave us a good cash injection. I then bought property with that cash and my wife Louise suggested we start making

machines – graders etc. And so we did. We now sell over R100m worth of machines a year. What advice would you give to a start up business? No 1 – it’s what you make of it. There are big opportunities in South Africa. You can buy a bakkie, a stepladder, and tools to be a plumber, and you will earn as much as a Standard Bank Manager. That’s if you’re prepared to get your hands dirty and wake up at 6am every day. My advice is to get out there. Select your trade - trade is as good as a university degree. Work physically with your hands. Learn with your eyes. Have common sense - the best gift a man can have is common sense. And the rest will come. My cousin spent 10 years studying to get his LLB and Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science…something like that. I spent those same 10 years building a business

“...A DOCTOR WEARS A WHITE COAT, MILLIONNAIRES WEAR BLUE COATS ...”

PAGE 8 - BLUE COLLAR MILLIONNAIRE

and have a successful business today.

“I HAVE A QBE - QUALIFIED BY EXPERIENCE. I ATTENDED THE UNIVERSITY OF LIFE … AND I WILL FOR THE REST OF MY LIFE.” What about the guys who already have a small business going and want to get to the next level? I never thought of what I wanted to become. I live each day at a time - from light in the morning until dark at night. My Dad always said ‘Give a good deal and they will come back. Give a bad deal and they will never come back.’ And of course look after your pennies, Pounds will come back. It’s all common sense. I have a standard 6 and a certificate. When people ask me what certificate I have, I tell them I have a QBE - Qualified By Experience. I attended the University of Life … and I will for the rest of my life.

So many successful entrepreneurs have little education, like Sir Richard Branson for example. What do you think of these guys? Richard Branson seems a bit arrogant, but he needs to be, to stay at the top. I admire him. He’s a nice guy to listen to. He runs a big operation. But I have a lot of faith and respect in tradesman. Some people come to see me and I’ll be on a tractor outside. They ask me ‘Where’s Desmond’, and I tell them he’s inside the office. So they go and sit in there and wait for me (chuckles). They think someone who looks like me, with dirty nails and clothes, can’t be Desmond Gutzeit. Just like some guys say ‘look at that oak, he’s only a plumber’. Don’t worry about them. They can’t see wood in the trees.

“...TRADE IS AS GOOD AS A UNIVERSITY DEGREE.” (Continues on page 9)


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FEATURE “YOU CAN BUY A BAKKIE, A STEPLADDER, AND TOOLS TO BE A PLUMBER, AND YOU WILL EARN AS MUCH AS A STANDARD BANK MANAGER.” What is your secret to success? I have an inventor brain, a business brain and a financial brain. I am very lucky. I can see something in my mind, draw it and give it to my cad guy to put on the computer. I also know how to watch money. Everyone has the ability to do something – it’s up to

PAGE 9 - BLUE COLLAR MILLIONNAIRE

you what you do with it. And hard work, that’s important. Simon who works for me, came to see me one day because he needed more money. He didn’t ask for more money, or ask for a loan either. He saw that my garden needed work and he asked if he could come on the weekend to work on it. He did a good job, and when

it came to paying, I was so happy that I paid him double. He’s one of my best guys here and I look after him for it. What’s your final word of advice to Tradesman readers? If tradesmen disappear, the future of our country disappears. You have to

persevere, and put in the effort and time. There are big opportunities out there. I say that a doctor wears a white coat, millionaires wear blue coats. Hard work has never killed anyone. It’s only made them a better person.


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FACT FILE 25,000 controlled circulation through Build It stores nationwide 250 Build It stores nationwide in all nine provinces 4 issues in the first year June 2013 is when the first issue will launch Hands are our target audience’s primary tools – people like carpenters, electricians, plumbers LSM 4 – 8 is our focus 4 themes for year 1: Renovations; Residential; Commercial; Technology / Innovations

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Valuable is what our magazine will be to our readers exclusive discounts and value add offers. Entertaining is why they will tell their friends about our magazine - and in doing so, join the tradesman tribe. Timeless is why they will keep their copy – handy reference and inspiring content. 13 Regulars Regulars: Gary & Mally; Business Talk; Cowboy of the Issue; Mythbusters; Tradesman of the Month; On the Road; Babe Aid; Lifestyle Improvements; Weekend Warrior; Health & Fitness; Green Guy; DIY Diva; Tech Talk


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PAGE 11 - GARY & MALLY

GARY & M


MALLEY

These two local lads will be putting new products to the test through their crazy antics. Will the tools be tough enough to pass their test?

PAGE 12 - GARY & MALLY

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CONTACT US MEET THE TRADESMAN TEAM Robyn Veckranges Editor editor@tradesman-sa.com Marc Lewis Designer design@tradesman-sa.com Michelle Lewis Sales and PR marketing@tradesman-sa.com To advertise in the tradesman contact marketing@tradesman-sa.com 072 566 2551 Send your Tradesman Tribe stories and tips to editor@tradesman-sa.com

PAGE 13 - CONTACT US


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