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Towerlight Today

Towson’s campus and community news source

TheTowerlight.com

Dec. 9th, 2014

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File photos by Towerlight staff, illustration by Elizabeth Bonica/The Towerlight


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December 9, 2014

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December 9, 2014

At this point in the year, there’s only one thing on students’ minds: finals week. With classes wrapping up Wednesday, the true grind begins when the final project and test due dates show up on syllabi. Here’s how students are handling and reacting to the situation.

#Finals Week

#Finals Week

Library too crowded? Come study at the Career Center during finals week! http://tutigerstoday.towson. edu/?p=99456

You know it’s finals week when you walk into Towson and 50% of the students are sleeping

@TUCareer

@christinarawr

@_stephgreen_

Shout out to Towson U for allowing students to rent puppies during finals week #youtherealMVP

Hour 3 at Towson and I’m already ripping my hair out #7moretogo #finalsweek

Happy Finals Week! We will be in the library today, tues & thurs from 9am-11:30am w/ free bagels and coffee!

@lena_lilCloser

@daddyshome92

@Towson_PHA

Finals week at Towson: it’s not finals WEEK it’s “lets have 3 days of classes, then 2 days of finals *insert weekend* 3 days of finals” week

To have your Twitter, Instagram and Facebook posts featured in The Towerlight, tag them with #TLtrending

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Opinion

December 9, 2014

Editor-in-Chief Jonathan Munshaw

An open letter about parking and transit

Senior Editor Cody Boteler News Editor Sam Shelton Arts & Life Editor Carley Milligan Assit. Arts & Life Editors Annie Sragner Robert Wood Sports Editor Matt Hamilton Staff Writers Daryllee Hale Payam Agha-Ghassem James Greene Tyler Beard Paige Sudol Jordan Cope Tyler Young Nilo Exar Kristen Zdon Christine LaFrancesca Caitlin Wolfarth Kati Day Devorah Roberts Photo Editor Sarah Hugel Assist. Photo Editors Abby Murphy Patrick Burke Elizabeth Bonica Symone Garvett Staff Photographers Daryllee Hale Glen Banks Mariana Rosado Video Producer Sarah Chmielowiec Staff Videographers Ashley Beall Devorah Roberts Gabby Slocum Joseph Hawkins Patrick Burke Proofreaders Desmond Boyle Laura Antonucci Kira McCall Kayla Baines Kaitlyn McKay Chris Petrides Social Media Staff Adam Butt General Manager Mike Raymond Art Director Kara Bucaro Production Staff Brooke Basta Alison Requa Webmaster Hafiz Aina Circulation Staff Christopher George Glen Banks Ian McIntyre Travis Duppstadt 8000 York Road University Union Room 309 Towson, MD 21252 business: (410) 704-5153 editorial: (410) 704-5141 editor@thetowerlight.com thetowerlight.com The Towerlight print edition is published by students of Towson University on Tuesdays. The Towerlight is owned by nonprofit Baltimore Student Media Inc., BaltimoreStudentMedia.com. The Towerlight’s advertising deadlines are firm:  classified advertising & display — Monday, noon for Thursday; Thursday, noon for Monday. Line classified ads will only be accepted online at www. thetowerlight.com/classifieds. Call (410) 704-5153 for more information. We encourage letters to the editor and online feedback. Commentaries, letters to the editor, editorial cartoons and other editorial content expresses the opinions of their authors and not necessarily the views of the newspaper. The Towerlight does not discriminate based on age, color, condition of handicap, marital status, national origin, race, religion, gender or sexual orientation. ©2014 by The Towerlight, 8000 York Rd, Towson, MD 21252. All rights reserved.

Please Recycle!

I know parking is always an issue on this campus. I know commuters always have it kind of rough Cody Boteler Senior Editor compared to @CodyBoteler on-campus students. Because these two things are always happening, and not really “news” unless something big happens, we tend not to cover these topics at The Towerlight unless something big happens. I’m tired of that narrative. For a large number of students on this campus, there are no issues more pertinent than parking and transportation. If students can’t get here on time, we can’t worry about focusing in class or getting involved with extracurriculars or what’s happening on this campus because we aren’t here when we need to be. What I’m getting at is that parking and transportation are important for a lot of students here, and probably some faculty and staff as well, and we need to stop treating it like a non-issue.

I use the shuttle (Goucher Route) to get to and from campus just about every day that I have class. For the most part, I’m quite the fan. The shuttles save me gas money and let me cram in studying that I forgot to do the night before. But I’ve had some uncomfortable experiences and a couple of dangerous experiences. And I’m sure everyone’s heard horror stories about the shuttles or parking. I’ve been on shuttles where it seems like the driver acts like the bus is invincible and takes turns or makes other decisions that a driver in a normal car might not. I’ve been on shuttles that are so cramped with people standing in the aisle that a handful are in front of the white line with one or two people even standing in the stairwell, next to the door. Now, I’m fairly certain there’s a sign that says standing in front of the white line while the bus is in motion is against the law. And I know for a fact that standing in a stairwell with your back facing a door that you could plausibly fall out of on a busy street is dangerous. I’ve stood and waited for late shuttles (sure, sometimes unavoidable because of traffic) but I’ve heard stories of people who have waited for

over an hour without any notification that their shuttle would be late. The Black Express shuttle route between West Village and core campus had to suspend operation this semester because there’s a shortage of drivers. And once, I was on a shuttle riding to campus when the driver decided to make a phone call. The driver pulled over, opened the door, left it out and then hurried out, cellphone in hand. I couldn’t tell you what the call was about, or how urgent it was. But it did seem like that, when the driver came back on to the shuttle, that they were upset about something. Maybe it was just confirmation bias, but it seemed to me that the driver started driving more angrily. Issues of leaving the shuttle unattended and letting something affect driving performance, I was left wondering how the driver knew to make that phone call at that time. It seems to me that the driver must have been looking at their phone during the route. I can’t say for sure; I wasn’t intently watching the driver the entire time. But how else? Using a handheld phone is bad

We should know what’s going on. If solutions aren’t being discussed, we should start discussing them, and all members of the University community should be a part of the talks. If I’m totally naive and there aren’t any solutions for whatever reason, we should know.

enough when you’re alone in your car, but it’s much, much worse when you’re driving a large bus -- filled with dozens of other people -- that is capable of doing some real damage. And of course, parking is a mess. People tend to forget that there’s plenty of parking up near Unitas Stadium and SECU Arena, or else they’re not willing to add an extra seven minutes to their walk to class. Maybe the solution is better advertising of the parking up on the hill, maybe it’s adding more parking to main campus. I’m not going to pretend that I have every solution for every problem. But isn’t it at least worth starting a discussion? If you’re parking on campus, you’re paying hundreds of dollars to not get fined with a parking ticket. And everyone pays into the shuttles. We should know what’s going on. If solutions haven’t been discussed, we should start discussing them, and all members of the University community should be a part of the talks. If I’m totally naive and there aren’t any solutions for whatever reason, we should know. We should know that someone in the administration is taking seriously the concerns about parking and transportation. And if nobody’s considering them, why not? Again. I don’t know much about what sort of complexities go into planning a parking garage or hiring drivers for a shuttle or purchasing new shuttles or anything like that. But I do know that these are issues that are important to a lot of people and are issues that merit discussion.


Opinion

December 9, 2014

Finding your “individual voice” Word on the Street Every single Assit. Arts&Life Editor day, every step @a_swaggner we take is governed by unspoken social rules. Public life outside the privacy of the home occurs under the microscope of civility. The moment you step outside, you step out of “The Me World” and into “The Real World.” Rules of The Real World are everywhere from the streets, to the office to school. For example, look at restaurants. They operate in complete compliance with social norms. Most restaurants are basically one big room with a bunch of tables in it. When you walk into a restaurant, the “Restaurant Rules” kick in, and you can probably predict what your experience will be like. There’s usually no yelling or loud talk between other tables; you keep your eyes level and your hands on the table. You tip your server at the end of the meal the customary 20 percent, and you walk out happy. Then the next set of rules shows up, and so on. Campus is another place loaded with rules and other social cues. I realize some of these rules are necessary to avoid chaos, but walking from building to building, we exhibit an anthill men-

Annie Sragner

tality where we keep to the right and go about our own way without causing any major inconveniences. Fairly basic, but when you see someone who has broken out of this mold in a bold way, it catches your attention.

One of my favorite bands, The Strokes, has a lyric that goes, “Oh everybody plays the game, and if you don't you're called insane.” Individuals who rebel or step around the rules are deemed “insane,” “mad,” or even worse, “not cool.” Consider how much of your everyday behavior is spent in obedience to these standards. How much of your public persona is based on your authentic urges? In essence, who is your real self and what differentiates you from the others? We live in a society where a college

degree and money are usually needed to live comfortably. The nature vs. nurture dichotomy makes it difficult to discern how much of who we are is based on our real personalities as opposed to the outer ones. We are mostly a product of our external environment. Look around you and notice what real life means. Is it routine where we ignore strangers on the street, or does true living mean abandoning how we’re expected to perform in life? No matter how different we may try to be, we are still slaves to the traditional lifestyle that we collectively agree on. From this perspective, tradition and customs seem arbitrary. Our culture has descended from the beliefs of men who died hundreds of years ago. The world values civilization and a market mentality without room for nonconformity. Try to assess for yourself how many of the decisions you make are based on what you truly want, or what others want for you. Decide who the authentic you is and honor that person before you agree with others by reflex. In the words of The Strokes, “Didn’t you know there was a choice, it’s never yours but someone else’s voice.” Find your individual voice among the chatter of others’.

PHOTO OF THE WEEK

What are you most looking forward to in 2015?

“ LIBERATION... I mean, graduation!”

Theresa Braun

“finally being able to start student teaching!” @LeWhiteGirl_

First clear pictures of Pluto! New Horizons finally reaches it’s destination! Go Space! James Ruth

My birthday! ....also House of Cards

Ben Price

the intramurals on the new field! @JoeyCracked Sarah Hugel/ The Towerlight Photo Editor Sarah Hugel took this photo of The 1975 at Echo Stage in D.C.

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December 9, 2014

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News

December 9, 2014

“Reputation Pro” presents ABCs Talks networking, making connections SARAH KAIDER Contributing Writer @sarah_a_kaider

Certified Contacts Count Trainer and “Reputation Pro” with Reputation COUNTS Marcia Hall visited campus Thursday to teach students how to successfully make connections. “We wanted to do a program specifically for juniors and seniors, and we asked them what are some of the challenges that they face, and the biggest challenges were getting a job and getting into grad school,” Chris Hall, who is in the Masters program for counseling psychology, said. “So we wanted to pick something really specific they can use as they try to find a job or get into grad school.” Hall, who has over 25 years of experience with networking reputational management, defined networking as “forming mutually beneficial relationships.” She mentioned that by following her three steps, students can successfully create those relationships. During her workshop, entitled “The ABCs of Networking,” Hall said that networkers should be proactive. She recommended that networkers know how to join and leave a conversation, teach their names in a way that others are sure to remember and tell others exactly what it is that they do. Hall said that when looking for someone to network with, students should try to start with someone

who is alone. She recommends that students ask politely to join them, and then initiate introductions. If the person cannot talk at the time or is in the middle of a conversation, students can always try again later, she said. Hall also said that students should always keep up with their promises.

Studies show that it takes 6-8 meetings for someone to see your competency, for them to see that you’re going to do what you say you’re going to do. We’re getting into character issues here. Always follow through and do what you said you’ll do when you said you would do it. MARCIA HALL

Certified Contacts Count Trainer

“Studies show that it takes 6-8 meetings for someone to see your competency, for them to see that you’re going to do what you say you are going to do,” Hall said. “We’re getting into character issues here. Always follow through and do what

you said you’ll do when you said you would do it.” The second major piece of advice Hall gave was that students should give their name in a way that others will remember. “People rush through the name to get to the good stuff, and forget that the name is the good stuff,” Hall said. When trying to remember someone else’s name, students should repeat it back to them and try to make a connection to someone or something they know. Her final piece of advice was that students should make sure to tell people exactly what it is that they do, or what their profession is, so that the other person can be of assistance to you. She advised students against saying that they’re willing to take any job. Instead, she said that students should say what they’ve done and how they’ve been helpful in the past. “If you done it, it ain’t bragging,” she said, quoting Walt Whitman. Hall’s workshop helped Towson students in multiple ways. Whether fulfilling a requirement for Business Cornerstone or giving students a chance to meet others, the workshop was deemed successful. “I am trying to network for internships this summer, so I wanted learn a little extra before I contacted [the internship providers],” junior Kyle Warholic said. “I decided to come for a little overview.”

Black express shuttle suspended Both gold routes remain operational SAM SHELTON News Editor @sam_tweets_now

The on-campus Black Express Route shuttle will be suspended through the remainder of the semester due to a lack of drivers, according to Director of Parking and Transportation Services Pam Mooney. “We’re short on drivers, and who we do have, we need to have on the other routes,” Mooney said. “So, since there are already

two gold [shuttles] serving that one, we’re suspending that in the hopes of being able to get people hired before the start of the next semester.” Mooney also said that the department has been operating with approximately 10 open shuttle positions, and that the licensing requirements necessary to operate the shuttles make drivers difficult to come by. The route, which typically runs exclusively between West Village

and core campus, was first introduced at the start of the semester to act as an abbreviated supplement to the other on-campus shuttles. All remaining shuttles, both off and on campus, will continue to run through the end of finals, but only the ParaTransit and off-campus services will operate during the minimester. These buses will run on an abbreviated schedule. Shuttles do not operate when classes are out of session.

Beyond Baltimore India New Delhi bans Uber services New Delhi banned Internet taxi service Uber from operating in the city Monday after one of its drivers, Shiv Kumar Yadav, was accused of raping a 27-year-old passenger when she fell asleep in his vehicle. “Keeping in view the violation and the horrific crime committed by the driver, the transport department has banned all activities relating to providing any transport service by the www.Uber.com with immediate effect,” transport officials said in a statement. Police officials say that Uber failed to perform a sufficient background check on Yadav, who had previously been charged with raping a female passenger in 2011. He spent two years in prison but was later acquitted and released when the woman was deemed to be a hostile witness. Travis Kalanick, CEO of Uber, said the company will do “everything to bring the perpetrator to justice and to support the victim and her family in her recovery.” However, Kalanick also said that, in India, established background checks are “currently absent in their commercial transportation licensing programs.”

United States

New profiling policies announced On Monday, the Obama administration formally announced new regulations pertaining to profiling by federal law enforcement. These policy changes will not apply to local police departments. These new regulations will, however, ban the FBI from considering gender, national origin, religion, sexual orientation and gender identity when deciding whether to open cases. These new rules will stack with existing prohibitions on considering race and ethnicity. State and local law enforcement agencies will only have to follow these rules when they work with federal task forces. In their own communities, police are not required to adhere to these regulations. In these cases, the rules may technically be considered guidelines. According to The Washington Post, “a Justice Department official said the goal is for federal law enforcement agencies to ‘model’ these new policies, proving to state and local authorities that successful policing does not require profiling.”

Cleveland, Ohio Mother of Tamir Rice calls for conviction Samaria Rice, mother of 12-year-old Tamir Rice, who was fatally shot by police in November, said Monday that the officers involved should be criminally convicted. According to Rice, the two officers involved in the shooting, Timothy Loehmann and Frank Garmback, did not attempt to administer first aid after the incident. “I noticed the police ... weren’t doing anything. I arrived the same time the ambulance did,” Rice said. Rice also claims that immediately following the shooting, the police tackled and handcuffed her 14-year-old daughter before putting her in the back of the police cruiser. The family filed a wrongful death lawsuit Friday.

Stories compiled by Sam Shelton Stories from The Daily Beast


News

December 9, 2014

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Freundel Update Course evaluations go live Georgetown student files voyeurism lawsuit CODY BOTELER Senior Editor @codyboteler

A Georgetown Law student filed a lawsuit Dec. 2 against Barry Freundel, the Rabbi and suspended TU professor accused of six counts of voyeurism, as well as the National Capital Mikvah and Georgetown Law School. This comes a day after Freundel had his contract terminated by Kesher Israel, the synagogue where he was working. The case is seeking class action status, which would allow other

parties to join in on the lawsuit. The Towerlight has previously reported that Freundel had invited students of his class to the mikvah, the ritual bath where he had been allegedly filming women as they were changing out of their clothes to prepare for the bath. According to the Baltimore Sun, some Towson University students have told police that, in addition to being invited, some students accepted the invitation to use the bath. Freundel is scheduled for a hearing in D.C. Superior Court on Jan. 16.

Remain available through Dec. 10 NILO EXAR Staff Writer @niloexar

Course evaluations for Fall 2014 classes went live Nov. 27 and will remain open to students until Dec. 10. These course evaluations help professors learn how they are doing with a specific course and what improvements students generally think would enhance the class. Course evaluations are anonymous, and professors will see the results of the survey without any identifying factors attached. Instructors will not even have access to the results of the evaluations until they have submitted their final grades. The evaluations are meant to take about 5-10 minutes, with most taking closer to five minutes. To complete course evaluations, students should go to https://towson. campuslabs.com/courseeval/ and

log in using their Blackboard or PeopleSoft login. Each class will appear on the student’s dashboard once they’ve logged in.

I’m not very likely to fill them out , mostly because I get bored, but they are important so teachers know how to improve. I would [fill them out] if they were shorter. SYDNEY YELITY-PAUL Freshman

After each evaluation is completed, that class title will appear under “completed evaluations.”

Students had mixed responses to course evaluations, in general. “I am very likely to fill out the course evaluations,” freshman mass communications major Alicia Reynolds said. “They need to know my honest opinion in how they are doing as a professor.” Freshman mass communications major Sydney Yelity-Paul said she doesn’t like to fill them out just because she thinks they are too much of a hassle. “I’m not very likely to fill them out, mostly because I get bored, but they are important so teachers know how to improve,” Yelity-Paul said. “I would [fill them out] if they were shorter.” The University encourages students to participate in order to provide comprehensive feedback and to better classes, as these evaluations are one of the only ways professors can gain actual feedback.

November 25: At the Glen Complex, TUPD monitored a peaceful demonstration. November 25: At the Liberal Arts building, TUPD monitored a peaceful demonstration.

Dec. 8

November 25: In Tower A, TUPD is investigating an ongoing issue related to resident student living arrangements. November 25: In Tower A, a resident student was referred for a possible CDS violation. November 26: A TUPD officer had a minor accident while backing near Newell Hall’s loading dock.

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December 1: In Burdick Hall, an unknown person or persons used unknown means to damage the lock on a storage room door. Investigation is ongoing. December 2: At Millenium Hall, a resident reported a robbery, but it was later proven unfounded.

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E. Joppa Road

December 2: At Douglass House, a commuter student was referrred for CDS possession. Investigation is ongoing. December 5: At University Union, a resident student reported her bike stolen. She was later found to have left it on the other side of the building. The Towerlight’s “Police Blotter” is a representative sample of crimes occurring on and off campus. The blotter is not intended to be all inclusive. For a list of all crime reports, visit www.towson.edu/police.

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Year in Preview

December 9, 2014

Towson turns 150 years old in 2015. To celebrate, The Towerlight is going back in time for our presentation. The cover features pictures going back to 1990 to show how far Towson has come, and the fonts used for our headlines date back to the very early days of The Towerlight, showing the evolution of our work through 2014. From news to sports, we look at the best to come in the coming calendar year. For even more Year-in-Preview content, visit TheTowerlight.com.

JONATHAN MUNSHAW Editor-in-Chief @jon_munshaw

For the second time in six months, control of Towson’s president’s office is expected to switch hands in 2015, when Maravene Loeschke returns to the office after taking a semester off for medical and personal reasons. In August, Loeschke announced her leave, with Timothy Chandler, Provost at the time, taking over as acting president. No official date for her return has been set, according to Chandler. “I’m supposed to be in this role until such time that she and the [University System of Maryland] Chancellor says, ‘OK, sign off’ and the president will sign back on again,” he said. “That date has not been determined. As soon as it is, I will know, and then students will know. But that’s between the president and the Chancellor.” Outgoing USM Chancellor William Kirwan is set to leave his position at the

end of 2014, and no replacement has been named for the position yet. Over winter break, the first milestone for Loeschke would be to attend the Maryland general assembly hearings concerning the University’s budget. Looking into the next year, Chandler said he is most excited to see what comes of the 150th anniversary celebrations. “There’ll be a lot of planning that’s being done,” he said. “All of the academic units will look at how they’ll contribute to what is a year-long celebration. That’ll take some serious planning.” If Chandler returns to his position as Provost, he said he’ll have plenty of experiences gained as acting president that he can take back to the office. “There have been times when I’ve wondered, ‘How do I do this?’ In general, I’ve had wonderful help,” he said. “The place is very well-organized and runs pretty well, whether I’m here or not.”

CHRISTINE LAFRANCESCA Staff Writer

As 2014 comes to an end, Towson will begin preparation for the 150th Anniversary Celebration that will commence in May 2015. Louise Miller, the director of integrated marketing services, is assisting in the execution of the event with alums Myrna Cardin (class of ‘65) and Gerry Gaeng (class of ’81) who are co-chairs to the celebration. While Towson won’t officially turn 150 until Jan. 15, 2016, the yearlong event will begin in May 2015 due to Towson’s complex history. “The school was supposed to open in September 1865, and Baltimore City was supposed to provide a building here in this area, but they kept delaying it and the school ended up renting a building and opening its doors officially in Towson in January 1866,” Miller said. “Technically, the first class graduated at the end of the 1865-66 academic year. Back then, at the time, the curriculum was one year long; the first graduating class, most who had already been teaching for years, finished in one semester.” This event is an opportunity to share Towson’s history, achievements and contributions since its founding. It is also a time to bring alumni back into Towson culture and attract new supporters and students. “During the brainstorming sessions from the student involvement committee, someone mentioned having more interaction with alumni. They had an idea to showcase the top 150 alumni

CODY BOTELER Senior Editor @codyboteler

File photo by Abby Murphy/ The Towerlight

University President Maravene Loeschke has been on a leave of absence for medical and personal reasons.

After three community input meetings, the 101 York Road development project is moving into its next stage: hearings under the Hearing Officer. 101 York Road is a proposed offcampus student housing project that would be located off the intersection of York and Burke, next to Starbucks. The project has faced significant community opposition, with residents of Towson who live near the planned site saying that they’re worried that traffic will get worse and students who live in the building will park out in the community.

Courtesy of Towson

as a sort of countdown to Homecoming in 2015. We also had an idea for speed networking with alumni,” Miller said. “It’s a great way to meet with people who not only are involved in the same field that you may be interested in but, also graduated from the school you attended.” A new logo will be presented during the anniversary year, designed by assistant director of creative services and alum David Calkins. During the 150th year celebration, there will be key “signature” events, a combination of academic conferences and lectures, alumni gatherings, stu-

The group behind the project, DMS Development, however, had a parking study done and says that there will be sufficient parking for students. Members of the American Legion, a group which has been very vocal in their opposition to the project, were unable to make it to the second meeting. This is probably why a third meeting was necessary, Project Manager for the Baltimore County Government Department of Permits, Approvals and Inspections Jan Cook said. The hearings for the project will start on Wednesday, Jan. 7 and take place on weekdays until Thursday, Jan. 15 at 10 a.m. in Room 205 of the Jefferson Building on West

dent celebrations, athletic events, performances and exhibitions. “We narrowed it down and are still narrowing it down to five signature events for the year. There will be something happening every month, but [there are] five key events,” Miller said. “Each college and the library will have a week long visiting scholar. So for the arts building, it might be an artist. For CLA it might be an author or a poet, each college will get to decide for themselves.” To get more information as well as follow the 150th celebrations go to https://www.facebook.com/TU150th.

Chesapeake Avenue. The hearings are meant to be an exchange between the developer and county government, not a time for public comment. Following the hearing, the administrative law judge who is overseeing the case will have 15 days to write an order, and there will be a 30-day period in which anyone could appeal the ruling. The currently proposed project will rise 13 stories and house 611 beds for students with 495 parking spaces. The complex would include some spaces set aside for street-level retail and underground parking. The plan could change, however, depending on how the judge writes the order and whether or not there are any appeals.


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Year in Preview

December 9, 2014

CODY BOTELER Senior Editor @codyboteler

Governor-elect Larry Hogan will be sworn in on Jan. 21, making it the first time a Republican has held the state’s highest seat since incumbent Martin O’Malley took the oath of office in 2007. Hogan has never held an elected office before, but served in Governor Bob Ehrlich’s administration from 2003 - 2007. Hogan won the 2014 election with 51 percent of the vote, beating out Lt. Governor Anthony Brown. Hogan has not said much explicitly about what his plans are for higher education. University System of Maryland Student Council President Zac McGee expressed some worry about the incoming governor because of his lack of public policy history. “With Anthony Brown, we had a history and a connection through

Governor O’Malley,” he said. “That being said, I think that this will be an opportunity for the USMSC to

With Anthony Brown, we had a history and a connection through Governor O’Malley.

ZAC MCGEE University System of Maryland Student Council President

prove to the state just how vital higher education is in terms of receiving state funding.” In a previous interview with The Towerlight, Hogan said that he was leading the fight against tuition increases in the state. He also said that young people in Maryland are having difficulty finding jobs and are leaving the state because of it. “My entire focus is on turning the economy around so that we

can create more opportunities and more jobs for students coming out of school,” he said. Leaders in higher education have set a goal to increase the number of adults in Maryland who have a college degree from 45 percent to 55 percent. In an interview with The Baltimore Sun, Hogan said that it would take more than “arbitrary goals” to make Maryland a more competitive state. In that same interview, Hogan said that he would require state-funded institutions to equip students with skills that are “in demand in today’s marketplace.” During the discussion on potential mandatory student fee increases for next school year, Vice President for Student Affairs Deb Moriarty said the University doesn’t have a feel for what policies Hogan’s administration might make regarding tuition increases, because he simply doesn’t have a history in higher education.

Courtesy of Larry Hogan

Governor-elect Larry Hogan has never held public office before, and therefore doesn’t have a track record of higher education policy.

SAM SHELTON News Editor @sam_tweet_snow

File photo by Sarah Hugel/ The Towerlight

The renovation of Burdick Gym is just one of the construction projects slated to start in the near year. CODY BOTELER Senior Editor @codyboteler

2014 saw some big construction projects: The West Village Pedestrian Bridge and the newly-turfed Burdick Field. Also, ground was broken on the new on-campus residencies in West Village. “What you’ll see is the foundations going in almost immediately after the first of the year, then walls going up over the course of the spring, and it’ll go from there,” he said. The connecting walkway between

Newell Hall and Cook Library has been completed, but is left unopened because of an “inadvertently blocked stormwater line,” according to Guckert. Guckert said that he’s been told that the walkway will be open by the first of the year. A bigger project, set to start in June, is the expansion of Burdick Hall. According to Guckert, the plans are for the building to expand “right up against the new turf fields.” The renovations will also include an extension of the West Village

pedestrian bridge. And, while actual work isn’t set to being until 2016, the spring semester will see renovations being designed for Residence Tower. “It’s a total redesign,” Guckert said. “It’s pretty much being stripped down to bare walls and starting over.” He also said that, once it began, the project would last a year. Also coming in 2016 is the construction of a new science building. The building is planned to go in between Stephens Hall and 7800 York Road.

Demolition in preparation for the upcoming $350 million mixed use development, Towson Row, is slated to begin in 2015, according to Executive Director of the Towson Chamber of Commerce, Nancy Hafford. The developer, Caves Valley Partners, will begin by demolishing any vacant buildings within what will become the Towson Row area. The development, which will span five acres within the Downtown Towson area of York Road, Towsontown Boulevard, Washington Avenue and Chesapeake Avenue, is expected to include 350 luxury apartment areas, 300 student housing units and nearly 200 hotel rooms, according to a Nov. 5 Baltimore County press release. The 1-million square foot development will also include a Whole Foods Market, the first in Baltimore County, office units and additional space for stores and restaurants. At this time, no target opening date for the 45,000 square foot Whole

Foods has been set. “A lot of jobs are going to be coming into Towson. A lot,” Hafford said. “So that’s what’s going to make it awesome.” Hafford said that existing Palisades of Towson luxury apartment complex is a “prime example of what this new development is going to look like.” She said that Towson Run will potentially draw a new, sophisticated crowd to the community. “Not just the economy, but the values of the properties that are here will go up,” Hafford said. “It’s going to cause so much more walkability in our community. The more people we can get on the streets after 9 to 5, the better.” In addition, Hafford said that county officials may also be looking to add more green areas to the Towson area in the future. “So, they’re looking at making all of these projects, that are here and those that are coming, eco-friendly where people don’t just have brick and mortar all over the place,” Hafford said. “[Instead] they have nice little parks and green spaces, and that’s really important.”


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Year in Preview

December 9, 2014

JONATHAN MUNSHAW Editor-in-Chief @jon_munshaw

All stats used in this column do not reflect Sunday’s NFL action. Since this is the Year in Preview, after all, I’m dedicating this week’s column (and my last of the semester) to predictions. More specifically, predicting who will win the NFL’s end-of-season awards. These will all be given out before the Super Bowl, but it’s a great way to kick off 2015 (especially if some of the winners aren’t in the playoffs). So, let’s get right to it. Comeback Player of the Year – Jeremy Maclin, Eagles This award has always confused me, and frankly I’m still not really sure of the requirements to receive (or not receive) the award. Most Ravens fans reading this will want to nominate Justin Forsett. No doubt, Forsett has had a great season, but he hasn’t really had anything to come back from. Throughout his career, he’s been just “a guy” and heading into this season with the Ravens, he had just nine total touchdowns in his career. So to me, it doesn’t make any sense

JONATHAN MUNSHAW Editor-in-Chief @MattHamiltonTU

The 2014 season was one that Towson will want to forget, but let’s not forget what happened in early January of this year. Towson made it to the Football Championship Subdivision Championship game in Frisco, Texas, and the program’s profile was raised as a result. After finishing this season with a head-scratching loss to Rhode Island, Head Coach Rob Ambrose immediately began recruiting for the future to make sure his team didn’t finish 4-8 again in 2015. “[This season] was disappointingly inconsistent,” Ambrose said after the Rhode Island game. “And that’s nobody’s fault but mine. I know that will change next year.” Looking to cash in on the 2013 season’s success, Ambrose will look to add a 2015 recruiting class that can compete immediately, much like offensive lineman Jesus Barrio and running back Dontea Ayres did last season. Although most of the 2015 recruiting class is uncertain, Towson has received a commitment from Devin Hannan, a

to say, “Oh, Justin used to be bad, and with this offensive line, he’s good now.” Maclin has actually had to overcome a torn ACL that forced him to miss all of last year. He bet on himself in the offseason, signing a one-year deal with the Eagles in hopes of cashing in this offseason. It’s paid off, catching 71 passes on 119 targets for 1,088 yards and nine touchdowns. Maclin is Pro Football Focus’ tenth highest rated wide receiver this season, even higher than Calvin Johnson, A.J. Green and Julio Jones. He doesn’t have a single drop all season and is 13th in yards per pass route among all receivers who have played at least 50 percent of their team’s snaps (Andrew Hawkins is 14th, just had to get my Browns plug in there). Forsett is my second strongest candidate, but Maclin actually had to overcome an injury and didn’t play a single snap last year, unlike Forsett, who just toiled away in Jacksonville. Coach of the Year – Bruce Arians, Cardinals The Cardinals are unfortunately in danger of missing the playoffs entirely

Odell Beckham and Brandin Cooks, I’m with Drew Stanton at the helm, but taking Beckham first and Evans second. Arians still deserves this. But for the purposes of this award, I Mike Pettine and Doug Marone are can’t give it to a guy who my two other options, but has really only been playthe fact that Arians had this 6879124502476 ing his best football for six team at 9-1 at one point 3923543705457 93759993575985 weeks. gives him the edge. 25576933856202 Evans is averaging more Arizona has had to deal 3475623460017 yards-per reception than with injuries to their starting 72774650309622 TALK NERDY TO ME Beckham, has three more quarterback, Carson Palmer, 545965418347 touchdowns in three more Darnell Dockett, their secgames and has at least four catches in ond best pass rusher, John Abraham, all but one of his games this season. a veteran on defense, linebacker Matt Evans plays on an awful Bucs team, Shaughnessy as well as the suspension but Beckham plays on a potentially of linebacker Daryl Washington. even worse Giants squad. Yet, the Cardinals are fifth in DVOA It’s also worth noting that Evans (defense-adjusted value over average) has the most receptions of any receiver on defense, according to Football on targets that travel 20 yards or more Outsiders. Before Palmer was hurt, down the field, and has six touchdowns Arians had him playing great football. from that distance, just as many as In six starts, Palmer had 11 touchdowns Jordy Nelson. and just three interceptions, a passer Defensive Rookie of the Year – C.J. rating of 96.0 and an accuracy percentMosley, Ravens age (his completion percentage if drops At various points this season, Kyle were counted as receptions) of 75.1. Fuller and Anthony Barr were also in Offense Rookie of the Year – Mike the running for this award. Evans, Buccaneers Right now, Aaron Donald of the This draft class is going to be amazRams and Chris Borland of the 49ers ing for receivers, but if I was re-drafting are Mosley’s biggest competition for the the group of Evans, Kelvin Benjamin,

6-foot-4 offensive lineman from Belle Vernon, Pennsylvania, according to Rivals.com. The rest of the class will be revealed during the spring practice season.Ambrose said that he has no doubt that he can still sell the successes of the 2013 season when recruiting, much like he did last year. Towson will most likely see more contributions from its 17-man recruiting class from 2014 — one that included Ayres, Barrio and quarterback Ellis Knudson. Knudson did not play in 2014, but could compete with Connor Frazier for a starting spot next season. Ambrose said that Frazier will definitely compete for the starting role next year, but “there are no returning starters on this team.” The young and banged up offensive line will return in 2015 with a full year of experience under its belt. Players like sophomore Sam Evans, freshman Antonio Harris, sophomore Shayne Sullivan, junior Jake Schunke and Barrio will compete for starting spots on what should be an improved line. One player that will be happy with improved play along the offensive line is sophomore running back Darius Victor, who will return as the reigning Colonial

Athletic Association rushing leader. Victor will be one of the more dynamic rushers in the FCS next season. On defense, Towson will lose three stalwarts in Ryan Delaire, Drew Cheripko and Tye Smith. Defensive ends Syd Holt and Eddie Releford had some experience last season, combining for 26 total tackles. They will be looked at to replace the production made by Delaire and Cheripko in their four years at Towson. In the secondary, junior Donnell Lewis and sophomore Jahmahl Pardner could end up as starters at cornerback. Alfonso Augustine, who recorded 41 tackles in 2014, will also factor into the secondary. One of the positions to watch will be linebacker, where leading-tackler and freshman James Simms will join a rising start in sophomore Jordan Mynatt. Also returning will be sophomore Bryton Barr, who has missed much of the last two seasons with injury. “We’re still building towards the level of success that a North Dakota State or an Eastern Washington would have, but all those took well over 10 years to build,” Ambrose said after the season finale. “We’re right in the thick of it.”

final four weeks. However, Borland has really only been effective for four weeks now, and was dreadful during the first part of the year. Mosley is PFF’s sixth highest rated inside linebacker, ahead of veterans such as Karlos Dansby, and has been effective both at stopping the run and covering guys on pass plays, something the Ravens have struggled with as a whole this season. He has 41 solo tackles on run plays, and has been targeted 68 times, the most of any inside linebacker, yet has two interceptions and has allowed 1.06 yards per coverage snap. Mosley is the ideal Raven linebacker. Defensive Player of the Year – J.J. Watt, Texans No surprises here. I frankly probably don’t even have to provide an explanation to anyone who watches football but here’s quick one. Watt is the only player in the history of the league, under the age of 26, to have 45 sacks, 11 forced fumbles and 31 passes defended, according to ProFootball-Reference.com. - To read the rest of this column, visit thetowerlight.com

File photo by Sarah Hugel/ The Towerlight

Running back Darius Victor returns next football season as the defending Colonial Athletic Association leading rusher, and will hopefully have a better offensive line to run behind.


Year in Preview

December 9, 2014

RYAN PERMISON Columnist

ROBERT WOOD Assistant Arts & Life Editor

The Department of Theatre Arts is busy preparing for the many shows lined up for the upcoming 2015 spring semester. The first is a play by playwright Aaron Posner called “Stupid Fu*king Bird.” It will be directed by professor Peter Wray and will run from March 4 -12. Towson will be one of the first colleges to ever to put on a production of “Stupid Fu*king Bird.” The second show will be “Festival of New Works.” Curated by David M. White, the show will run from April 9-12. Following this production will be the annual spring musical “Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street.” “Sweeney Todd” has music and lyrics by Stephen Sondheim and a script by Hugh Wheeler and first opened on Broadway in 1979. It will be directed by associate professor Stephen Nunns with musical direction by professor Phillip Collister. The show will be put on in collaboration with the Department of

Music and will run from April 23 - May 2. Also, interspersed with the facultyled theatre shows next semester are several pieces from the MFA program. The first will be “Starling” which was collaboratively written, assembled and directed by Deirde McAllister. The show will run from March 26-29. Next to the stage will be “The Hyacinth Girl” which was created and devised by Leah Brick and will run from April 16 -18. Department Chair of the Theatre Arts, Robyn Quick said that many of the shows were chosen based on a rotating matrix that the faculty members use. The matrix allows professors to choose different shows from various time periods based on what they believe Towson students like to see. “We have a wide array of shows,” Quick said. “Also, even though they haven’t been announced yet, there will also be some undergraduate projects as well.” For more information about the Department of Theatre Arts shows for the spring semester, visit Towson University’s website.

The New Year promises to be one for the record books. Several franchises are being rebooted, sequels are on the way and it’s a good time to be a comic book or novel fan. 1. Vin Diesel and company return for their next ride with “Furious 7,” opening April 3. When the brother of one of their enemies comes seeking vengeance, the team attempts to end it once and for all. This is the first film in the “Fast and Furious” franchise since the death of actor Paul Walker. 2. Marvel gives us one of the most anticipated films of the year with “The Avengers: Age of Ultron,” opening May 1. Ultron (James Spader) attempts to destroy the team and the world with his own brand of justice. Two new characters are introduced to the franchise in this film as well: Quicksilver and Scarlet Witch. 3. Fourteen years after the last film, the park is open with “Jurassic

World,” premiering June 12. Viewers can look for Bryce Dallas Howard and Chris Pratt who were added to the franchise in an attempt to restore it to its former glory. 4. Another anticipated movie would be “Spectre,” the next chapter in the 007 franchise that features Daniel Craig returning to the role of James Bond, opening Nov. 6. 5. The finale of The Hunger Games franchise “The Hunger Games: Mockingjay Part 2,” opens Nov. 20 and is highly anticipated, especially after the recent release of part one this year. 6. One sequel that has been over thirty years in the making that will have everyone talking is “Star Wars: Episode VII: The Force Awakens,” opening Dec. 18. The trio of Mark Hamill, Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher are returning to their iconic roles as Luke Skywalker, Han Solo and Princess Leia. Other past cast members are also returning. The studio is planning a new trilogy and spin-off films as well for the franchise. 7. Tom Cruise is back as Ethan

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Courtesy of Walt Disney Motion Pictures

Hunt for the fifth installment of “Mission: Impossible,” opening Dec. 25 with Ving Rhames, among others, returning. These are just some of the most anticipated films of the year. Believe me when I say this is just the tip of the iceberg. I hope you get a chance to see some of these films in the New Year.


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Arts&Life

December 9, 2014

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One act, four days, two plays CHRISTINE LAFRANCESCA Staff Writer

As the lights fade to black, the murmur of whispers stops as the audience waits for the first play to begin. Seniors and theatre majors Alex Shade and Lexi Hauck each directed a play for the “Evening of Student Directed One Acts” in the Center of the Arts building last Thursday evening. “The Scream” written by D.T Arcieri depicted a difficult three-person relationship scenario between Jane, a gay and miserable bank associate, Fern, a cheery and hopeful bisexual art gallery owner and Bob, a misunderstood artist. With a cast full of vivacious yet, befuddled personalities Alex said it was difficult to find the perfect people to play each role in her play. “We had auditions and we had about 30 people come out to audition for about eight spots, between both plays. Many of the people who came for audi-

tions were crazy talented and then we had to have call backs, we narrowed it down to about 15, so we could see people read for the parts they would potentially be cast as,” Shade said. “The people we ended up getting were perfect for the roles.” “Life Under Water” written by Richard Greenberg is a story about Kip, a young man who, on a booze influenced whim, runs away from his mother’s house in order to chase a dream of making it big. He isn’t sure how he intends to make his fortune but, is determined to do so without the help of his mother. After passing out on the beach, he is found by two young women, Amy-Beth and Amy-Joy, and falls in love with one but lusts for the other. With each character having very specific character traits, Hauck said that it was important to find actors who work well together. “It’s a lot about just finding the right

equation, finding people who are perfect for the roles and also relate to each other,” Hauck said. “When you strike up a really good balance, like we both have with both of these cast then the hard part is over.” Shade added, “I think once you find people, who work well, there’s a lot less to worry about. There is a strong energy in the room and that comes largely in part from who you’re in there with. Once you have the right people, you can play with that energy and mix people.” Since the plays performed were not student written plays, there was a lot of behind-the-scenes work done in order to get the rights to continue with production. “I contacted my playwright directly, asking if I could use his play. He e-mailed me the next day, attaching his script and said he hoped I’d use it. The school wrote up a contract with him about leasing the rights of the play. I

was nervous that I really have to do the play justice because I have been talking with the writer of my play,” Shade said. Junior and theatre major Allie Press played Amy-Beth, Kip’s love interest in “Life Under Water.” Her love for theatre started early, which sparked her interest in auditioning for Towson’s plays. “I knew I wanted to be an actress in third grade. I was in the school show and it was the most amazing feeling,” Press said. Acting has been her passion for years but it has had its difficult moments. “If you’re in a musical, sometimes the most nerve-wracking thing can be hitting that one note, or hitting that pirouette in that one dance,” Press said. “I think right now where I am with ‘Life Under Water,’ the most nerve-wracking thing is not being in character. When I’m backstage and I don’t feel like I’m in character, that’s nerve-wracking because then I won’t be reacting properly and it will just sound

like I’m reading lines.” Shade and Hauck said that directing is their dream. “I think the coolest thing about being a director is seeing those little moments come together. A lot of what you saw tonight is us but, those little moments and things are the actors. Theatre really is a collaborative thing. If you are thinking about going into acting, you have to be able to give and receive different ideas,” Shade said. As student directors they have encountered their ups and down’s but always encourage people who are interested in directing to have an open mind. “Flexibility is crucial. You’ll have a lot of things thrown at you that you won’t expect. And that’s just part of it, you know? Learning not to hold on to an idea too tightly,” Hauck said. “Having that openness and willing to change. You have to be able to be open and change.”

Restaurants of the future Clones for rent Since this is the last edition of The Towerlight for the semester, I decided to give you something different. Since it may be hard for some of you to get through winter break without a weekly GoodEats submission, I am going to clue you all in on some restaurant info. Baltimore is constantly growing and changing in the restaurant industry. Restaurants are closing, new restaurants are opening and new chefs are being appointed with

Taylor Seidel Columnist @GoodEatsMD

Courtesy of William Murphy

An Aromes restaurant location in Dublin, Ireland.

brand new menus. My goal this week is to give you a list of some of the most anticipated restaurant openings in the Baltimore area. Aromes Restaurant is the newest addition to the quaint Hampden neighborhood. With it’s eye on American and French inspired cuisine, Aromes will fit right in. Scheduled to open in early 2015, Aromes will be the newest farm to table spot to hit Baltimore, promising to source ingredients from Maryland farms. Many of you might be familiar with the Bagby Restaurant Group who owns Fleet Street Kitchen, TenTen, Bagby Pizza Company and Towson’s very own Cunninghams. The restaurant group has plans to open a quick-service version of Bagby Pizza Co that will still hold true to their farm to table methods. A location has not been specified but the restaurant is scheduled to open in early 2015. Ristorante Firenze, which plans to open later this winter, will be an upscale Italian eatery in historic Reisterstown off of Hanover Road. Firenze will feature family recipes

paired with the freshest ingredients. Open seven days a week for lunch and dinner, this eatery promises to have some of the best Italian dishes in the area. Main Street Grille is also opening in Reisterstown in the former space of Martha & Mary’s. The restaurant is still under renovation but is planning on opening in early 2015. The family friendly restaurant will offer breakfast, lunch and dinner with special deals. More information is hopefully coming out soon. A few of my favorite restaurants are opening new locations as well. Ryleigh’s Oyster House has plans to open their third location in Mount Vernon this winter. Also, La Tolteca is opening another location in Canton off of Boston Street this winter. I hope you all have a chance to make it out to one of these new Baltimore restaurants this winter break. For more information, keep an eye out for my twitter @ GoodEatsMD. Hope you all have a great break and I look forward to your readership in 2015. Until next time. I wish you GoodEats!

Kaitlyn McKay

threatens her life. “Orphan Black” is a show that is best to watch going in completely blind. The summary above is just a taste of the twists and turns that occur in the show. Other information could be included in the summary, but it would take away a lot of the suspense of the show. The only reason that this review even mentions the fact that Sarah is a clone is because it is impossible to talk about Tatiana Maslany’s breathtaking acting without it. Maslany does not just portray Sarah: she portrays all of the clones that appear on the show. There are four main clones that appear in the first season, and all of them are vastly different. Usually, audiences need to see an actor’s various films or TV shows to see how wide their acting range is and how truly phenomenal they are. With Maslany, you just need to see “Orphan Black.” After a few episodes, the audience can forget that in many scenes, there is just one actor playing multiple parts in one scene. Maslany is not just the star of the show: she is the show. Both seasons are available on at Tiger Reels, and each season is only ten episodes long. “Orphan Black” is a hidden gem. It Courtesy of BBC America is an absolute must-see.

The first season of “Orphan Black” is not a recent release at Tiger Reels, but it still deserves a recommendation in this week’s Renting at the Reels. Sarah Manning (Tatiana Maslany), a con woman avoiding a toxic relationship, witnesses the suicide of a woman, Elizabeth Childs (also Maslany) who looks exactly like her. She steals her identity and plans to clean out her bank account in an attempt to start a new life with her daughter whom she has been separated from. While wrapped up in living her doppelganger’s life, Sarah discovers that she is one of many clones struggling to live a normal life and ultimately becomes tangled in a conspiracy that Columnist


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Arts&Life

December 9, 2014

Syd says cheers to the UK Students on film I have to leave London this week? What? No, that can’t be true. Just yesterday I was jetSydney Adamson strolling lagged through Columnistr @ssydneytaylor the streets of Kensington and now you’re telling me I have to go home? I don’t even know where to begin, really. This experience has been something truly life changing and one of a kind. I got to spend each day with Big Ben practically at my doorstep. I found myself a homey local pub that I just can’t imagine leaving behind. I saw artwork that I never thought I would be able to see in person. I made friends with some one of a kind people. I was actually able to comprehend a really confusing public transportation system. Not only was I lucky enough to live in London, I travelled to other countries too. I was able to climb to the Cliffs of Moher in Ireland, and discovered the history of my family name in Scotland. I also found

myself in Brighton, a coastal town in England, where I could get away from city life for a bit on more than one occasion. It’s definitely a place I can see myself going back to again and again. Along the way I even found a love for film photography. Like I’ve mentioned in previous columns, it’s really been a pleasure to take a step away from digital artwork and to capture breathtaking locations on film. It’s become such a significant part of my life over here and I can’t wait to continue working with the medium when I come home. EYE ON I’d be lying if I said that my few months here were all sunshine and rainbows though. No peaks without valleys, right? There have been times when I desperately wanted to go home and others when I felt just plain unhappy. There have been moments when I felt really lost, too, and I don’t just mean the long list of times when I got off at the wrong tube station. I’ve forgotten what it’s like to

drive my car and to cuddle with my dogs. I long for the taste of my mom’s homemade lasagna and her red velvet cake (my mouth is watering as I type this). I’ve missed the comfort of waking up in the morning and making myself a cup of coffee in an actual mug instead of making myself a tea at the dining hall in a paper take away cup. But all of that was nothing that a stroll through Kensington Gardens or a trip to the pub couldn’t fix. All the rough patches and the good times have really forced me to grow as a person. Traveling has taught LONDON me a lot about myself, too; I feel more well rounded now than I did before and more content about the person that I am and that I’m becoming. I’m pretty familiar with London, but I still want much more time in this beautiful city. I’m incredibly excited to return home to my friends and family, but I’m even more excited about the possibly returning to England in the future.

KRISTIN HELF Contributing Writer

Students of all majors gathered in Van Bokkelen’s auditorium on Friday night to watch the films that students in the electronic media and film major have been working on this semester. “[The festival] was created initially for people to submit things that weren’t necessarily completely finished, halfway through the year, and that’s why it’s called ‘Halfway There,’” Laura Gede, a member of the fraternity Lambda Kappa Tau (who hosted the event), said. This year, students submitted films that ranged in category from documentaries to music videos. Over 45 films were submitted in total, and 22 ended up being screened on Friday: three in each of the seven categories and four in

the “short narrative” category due to a tie. “It’s a good opportunity to see people that you haven’t worked with, the experience to work with other people in your department… to just see who’s around you and be exposed to what they were doing,” junior and member of LKT Eric Wilcox said. Similarly, sophomore Stephanie Buckley said that she attended in order to see what other film majors, like herself, were working on. The festival was open to everyone at Towson, and students came to the event for both entertainment and inspiration. “I hope that people can sit back and watch these films and say, ‘next year I want to make something even better,’” Gede said. “‘Next year I want to win my category,’ or even, ‘I want to submit something.’”

Life Illustrated

Vietnamese tradition at TU ADIYA PERKINSON Contributing Writer

Towson alum Ly Huynh started her Friday night by giving her audience an overview of all things Vietnamese: traditional foods, dances, holidays and pastimes. “We want to promote the Vietnamese culture, let everyone know on campus we have a Vietnamese community here, share our traditions, language [and] food,” Huynh, who helped to found Towson’s Vietnamese Student Association, said. On Dec. 5, VSA held their third annual Vietnamese Culture Night. The event, sponsored by Student Affairs’ Friday Night Live, brought together VSA members and nonmembers alike in Paws for the night. The evening began with a buffet of traditional Vietnamese food, followed by a rap performance by Towson senior Emmanuel Duru, also known as EMan The Heartbreak. Duru delivered lyrics in both English and Vietnamese, and spoke about

Coordinator for VSA Ly Huynh, the elements of finals week—somewho happens to share the name thing relatable to all students regardwith the association’s founder, first less of background. got involved with VSA through The customary lion dance was Facebook. next, which involved Before transfertwo dancers dressed ring to Towson in one extravagant It opens your eyes from a university costume. Their synchronized moveto information about in Vietnam, Huynh contributed her ments brought the various cultures and ideas via cyberlion to life as it allows you to space. moved throughout To stay up to the audience, allowcompare them to date on the latest ing a few members to your own. from the VSA, she place squares of red JE’NEE HAWKINS suggests for stufoil into its mouth for Junior dents to like their good luck. Karaoke Facebook page and concluded the event, look out for event announcements in and a few brave ones took a step up the Towson Tigers Today newsletter. to the mic to show off their vocal Next semester, VSA hopes to hold skills. more social events ranging from iceJunior Je’nee Hawkins, who skating to game nights. attended the event, said that he “Everyone’s welcome, you don’t enjoyed learning about the lion dance have to be Vietnamese, don’t have and other Vietnamese cultures. to be Asian,” Huynh said. “[Come “It opens your eyes to information out if] you want to have fun, make about various cultures and allows new friends and learn about a new you to compare them to your own,” culture.” Hawkins said.

Photos by Liz Bonica/ The Towerlight

Attendees at the Paint your Life Workshop on Friday, Dec. 5 in the University Union took part in one of four workshop sessions. This creative game system helps participants discover their own hidden strengths and aptitudes through a series of artistic exercises. Other upcoming workshop dates include Feb. 20 and March 27. Registration is available online at towson.edu.


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December 9, 2014

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2015 Career Center preview How to make the most of upcoming events SAM SHELTON News Editor @sam_tweets_now

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The annual Maryland Career Consortium (MCC) Career Fair, which was held on the Towson University campus last year, will instead be hosted by Loyola University Maryland this February. Slated for Friday, Feb. 20, “the largest college-focused career fair in the region annually� will allow students to interact with approximately 150 potential employers, according to Director of the Towson Career Center Lorie Logan-Bennett. “You will see some employers at that event that maybe don’t come solely to Towson,� Logan-Bennett said. “It’s a good way to get a different type of employer mix.� On campus, the Career Center will also offer a job fair in the spring. On March 26, the Mega Job Fair will be held in the West Village Commons. Logan-Bennett says that this event typically includes about 100 potential employers. She suggests that students use Career Center resources like Hire@TU to read and get an idea of which employers will be attending prior to the day of the event. “That’s a great way to prep,� Logan-Bennett said. “Take a look at who’s going to be there so you can figure out who you want to connect with and do a little research about the employer so you can make a good first impression.� Open to all students regardless of year, these career fairs may be just as, if not more, beneficial to freshmen or underclassmen as they are to seniors, according to Logan-Bennett. “They can go to a fair and interact with an employer they

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might want to intern with or work for and get a sense of ‘What do you look for in candidates? What should I be doing over the next two, three, four years to make sure I’m a marketable candidate and developing skills and experiences that you’re looking for?’ It’s a great way to get information, do research, build connections early, practice those networking skills,� Logan-Bennett said. Logan-Bennett said that attending students should dress professionally and be prepared with a “Strong, focused [and] reviewed resume.�

9-15-14

â—? Each row and each column must

contain the numbers 1 through 4 (easy) or 1 through 6 (challenging) without repeating.

â—? The numbers within the heavily

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with the number in the top-left corn

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You must be a current e-­cigarette user, current or former cigarette smoker, between the ages of 18-­55, in good health, willing to answer questions, provide biologic samples, and use an e-­cigarette in our lab. HEALTH  WARNING:  For  current  cigarette  smokers,  quitting  smoking   now  greatly  reduces  serious  risks  to  your  health.  Smoking  causes lung  cancer,  heart  disease,  and  emphysema  and  may  complicate   pregnancy.  Smoking  by  pregnant  women  may  result  in  fetal  injury,   premature  birth,  and  low  birth  weight.

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December 9, 2014

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Sports

December 9, 2014

Wardell Turner killed in action

Towerlight Fantasy Football Standings

Former Towson safety was on his last deployment JONATHAN MUNSHAW Editor-in-Chief @Jon_Munshaw

A Towson alum and former football player died in Afghanistan on Nov. 24 in a bomb attack. Army Sgt. Maj. Wardell Turner, who attended Towson on a football scholarship from 1985 through 1988, was killed in the attack during an American-led mission in Kabul that was part of a training exercise for Afghanistan’s soldiers. Turner was 48. Turner’s former coach, Phil Albert, who still teaches at Towson, said “a negative word never came out of [Turner’s] mouth” while he was with the program. For his first three years at Towson, Turner was mainly a special teamer and backup defensive back. In 1986, he led the team in special teams tackles, and recorded two sacks in 1987. By ’88, Turner was the starting strong safety for the Tigers and was seventh on the team in tackles with 65. In the media guide that season, Turner was described as a “hard-

hitting versatile defensive back that is one of the Tigers’ top special teams performers.” Turner graduated with a degree in business administration. He leaves behind five children. It was his second tour in Afghanistan, and it was supposed to be his last overseas deployment, according to DelmarvaNow.

Albert said he wasn’t aware that Turner had joined the military, but he wasn’t surprised. Turner’s personality fit exactly what you’d want in a soldier, he said. “He had a big smile on his face all the time,” Albert said. “He was such an encouraging and hard-working kid. He did whatever he could to make a positive contribution.”

LEADERBOARD

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Michael Pacas

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Dave Imboden

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10

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Kevin Kutner

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Jonathan Munshaw

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Matt Hamilton

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Paul Konopka

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Dan Bennett

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Jesse Jones

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Kyle Wert

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7

Alex Glaze

6

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TJ Sebastian

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Curt Zanelotti

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TEAMS

WEST TEAMS

Courtesy of Facebook

Former Towson football player Wardell Turner died on Nov. 24 in Afghanistan. He played safety for Towson from 1985-1988.

Faculty and Staff Appreciation Night

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All TU faculty and staff will receive two complimentary tickets SATURDAY, DEC 20 · 7 P.M. AT

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Sports

December 9, 2014

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MEN’S BASKETBALL

Tigers go cold against Hoyas Shooting woes lead to 78-46 loss at Georgetown utes, scoring five points and grabSophomore forward John Davis bing five rebounds. was once again a bright spot for Towson will travel again Towson. A game after scoring 23 Wednesday up to Philadelphia, points in 30 minutes against Coppin Pennsylvania to take on the Temple State on Wednesday, he had another After getting out to a 7-1 start Owls. double-double, scoring 10 points to the season following a victoTipoff is scheduled for 8 p.m., and and grabbing 10 boards in 28 minry Wednesday over Coppin State, can be seen on ESPN3 or heard on utes. the Tigers were looking to CBS Sports Radio, 1300 AM. Sophomore center make a statement The Tigers will then host La Salle Walter Foster also in Washington, TOP PERFORMERS on Dec. 20 and travel to Annapolis returned to the D.C. against to face Navy on Dec. 22. team for his the nationTowson: The Colonial Athletic Association first game ally recognized Davis: 10 pts, 10 reb. season will begin Jan. 3 in after a brief Georgetown McGlynn: 10 pts. Harrisonburg, Virginia when Towson time away Hoyas. hosts the James Madison Dukes. Hawkins: 9 pts. with what Head However, The Tigers will look to make their Coach Pat Skerry Towson came out second straight CAA tournament. said was because flat and were outFoster “failed to live up scored 40-17 in the first to some expectations.” half, going on to lose 78-46 to fall Foster was arrested over to 7-2. Thanksgiving break and has been In their four previous games, the charged with several crimes for a Tigers had scored at least 77 points, single incident, including two but they made just five shots in the counts of second-degree assault. first half against the Hoyas (5-2), The big man appeared in 26 minshooting 23.8 percent from the floor and missing all nine of their threepoint shots. Junior guard D’Vauntes SmithRivera had nine points for the Hoyas in the first, as did freshman forward Paul White, who came off the bench. Four McGlynn, Towson’s leading scorer on the year, missed all three of his shots from beyond the arc. In the first half, the Tigers only had one assist, which went to freshman point guard Josh Ivory, compared to Georgetown’s nine. The second half was much kinder to the Tigers, but the deficit was far too much for them to make up. McGlynn made three of his five shots in the second, and power forward Timajh Parker-Rivera missed both of his attempts. As a team, the Tigers shot 56.5 percent from the floor. The Hoyas were able to keep up, though, making 50 percent of their shots in the second half and scoring 38 points to keep Towson at bay. Again, the Tigers struggled to pick up assists, finishing the game with just three in the second half, while Georgetown double its assists. Heading into the game, four Tigers had double-digit assists. Turnovers also plagued Towson once again, finishing the game with 17. Prior to Sunday’s games, Towson FIle photo by Sarah Hugel/The Towerlight was 266th in Division-I in assist-toJunior forward Timajh-Parker Rivera had eight points and two turnover ratio (.78) and were tied rebounds in 29 minutes in Towson’s 78-46 loss to Georgetown. for 210th in turnovers per game (14). JONATHAN MUNSHAW Editor-in-Chief @Jon_Munshaw

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Charlotte Holz Swimming & Diving

The junior competed in and recorded season highs in the 200-yard backstroke, 200yard individual medley, 100-yard backstroke -lifetime best in 200-yard backstroke and 200-yard freestlye at the U.S. Winter Nationals over the weekend. The 200-yard backstroke time was a lifetime best.


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SPORTS

December 9, 2014

SWIMMING & DIVING

Towson sends 12 to Winter Nationals

Holz and Lowe highlight performances in Greensboro, North Carolina

File photos by Symone Garvett and Sarah Hugel/The Towerlight TYLER YOUNG Staff Writer @_TyYoung

The Tigers had five men and seven women compete at the AT&T Winter Nationals over the weekend in Greensboro, North Carolina. For Head Coach Pat Mead, it was important for some of his top swimmers to be thrust into the spotlight. “I think it was a good learning opportunity,” Mead said. “For some of them, it was their first time at a national event. A few performed really well, and others struggled a bit.” The men who made it to Nationals were seniors Jon Burr and Matt Lowe, juniors Sawyer Martin and Matt McKenney and sophomore Nick Breschi. It is the largest group of men that Towson has ever had compete at Winter Nationals under Mead. One of the top performers was Lowe. His 19th-place finish in the 1650-yard freestyle was the highest a Tiger finished all weekend. Burr also competed in the event, coming in 38th place. Other notable swims came from Martin and Breschi. Each set season-best times in their events. For

Martin, it came with a 61st-place finish in the 200-yard freestyle, in which he posted a time of 1:40.72. Breschi came in 54th place in the 100-yard backstroke with a time of 50.34. The 500-yard freestyle saw three Tigers finish in a cluster. McKenney, Burr and Breschi came in 70th, 71st and 74th in the event, respectively. Towson rounded out its meet with McKenney taking 66th place in the 100-yard freestyle and 39th place in the 200-yard butterfly. Burr came in 65th place in the 400-yard individual medley and Breschi took 66th place in the 200yard backstroke. The women sent a slightly bigger, and much more experienced squad to the meet. It was made up of seniors

Victoria Oslund and Amanda Barber, juniors Hannah Snyder, Christine Hammond, Seana Acker and Charlotte Holz, and sophomore Macey Arnold. All of them, apart from Arnold, attended this meet last season. Holz proved to be the standout. She finished in 44th place and posted a lifetime-best 1:59.51 in the 200yard backstroke. Earlier in the meet, she also posted season-best times in three other events, the 200-yard individual medley, 100-yard backstroke and 200yard freestyle. Hammond also swam well, setting a lifetime-best mark in the 500-yard freestyle and a season-best in the 400-yard individual medley, while also competing in the 200-yard backstroke. The final season-best came from

Barber in the 50-yard freestyle. She placed 36th with a time of 23.32. Oslund was the highest woman on the leaderboard. She came in 28th place in the 200-yard butterfly event. She also competed in the 200yard individual medley and 100-yard butterfly. The newcomer, Arnold, had a nice showing, placing 32nd in the 1650yard freestyle and 56th in the 200yard freestyle. Snyder and Acker each competed in the same three events against each other. In the 200-yard breaststroke, Snyder finished 71st and Acker 80th. In the 200-yard individual medley, Snyder came in 89th and Acker in 94th. And in the 400-yard individual medley, Snyder placed 59th and

I think it was a good learning opportunity. For some of them, it was their first time at a national event. A few performed really well, and others struggled a bit. PAT MEAD Head Coach

Acker 61st. “It was a nice meet for some of them,” Mead said. “Charlotte [Holz] was phenomenal. Christine [Hammond] had a nice meet. And for the guys, Matt [Lowe] really stood out. But I was looking for a bit more from some of the others that went. We had a lot of season bests, which was good. I was just looking for more lifetime bests out of this meet.” The Tigers now have nearly a month break before their next competition. It is a time in which Mead said they need to bear down and prepare for the homestretch. “We have got to stay healthy and we need to be very consistent with our training,” Mead said. “If we do those two things, then it will be a good finish to the season.” Towson will be back in the pool on Jan. 2 when they head to the Tennessee Diving Invitational in Knoxville, Tennessee. They’ll be back home Jan. 10 for a meeting with McDaniel. Towson will conclude winter break with a meet at Delaware and a home meet against Johns Hopkins at Burdick Pool.

The Towerlight (Dec. 9, 2014)  
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