Page 1

the

torch volume 3, issue 3

girls to guys

waldorf’s imbalanced ratio Did you meet our Valentine’s Day standards?

Looking to the future: the football team hires a new head coach

Unusual weather provides for a mild winter

What does KCACTF really stand for anyway?!?

Student Confessions


the

torch VOLUME 3, ISSUE 3

Advisor Tiffany Olson Editor Abbie Wibe Design Editors Alexander Horak Jonathan Aguilar Photo Editor Phillip Koolhoven Contributors Andres Ballesteros Eric Bertelsen Faith Cook Airenne Curry Kellie Grunzke Nicholas Lara Claire Lawson Justin Mattingly Molly Rabb Editorial Offices Waldorf College 106 S. Sixth Street Forest City, IA 50436 Colophon The Torch is produced in Adobe InDesign on Apple iMac computers. Body text is set in 10 point Century Gothic. Photo captions are 9 point Century Gothic as well. In Appreciation A special thanks to President Bob Alsop, Student Senate, David Damm and the Lobbyist staff, Barbara Barrows, Riya Anandwala, and Matt Knutson in the Marketing Department.

what’s inside‌ FEATURED STORIES


this winter has been anything but typical, leaving many enjoying the balmy temperatures

Student Life student confessions latest SWAT activities Valentine don'ts Exit to Hope

Sports basketball

17

technology new Comm website

editor's letter

6 26

16

unusual weather

Kent Anderson brings a strong background and varied experience to the Waldorf football team

a unique twist to MLK day

in the search of a festival

the number of males on campus is more than double that of the female population, which makes dating interesting to say the least

the girl to guy imbalance

two men, both minorities, use comedy to discuss prejudice, racism, and the importance of diversity

new head football coach

24

Jonathan Aguilar provides a first person account of the Region V Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival or KCACTF (for short)

Fine Arts writer’s series Pippin musical

5 7 14 18

4

departments

22 20 12 8


4

EDITOR'S LETTER

change is

GOOD Okay, so the Torch is definitely chang-

hard-hitting. Less newsy and more

ing. Obviously, the change is for the

ballsy. In our next issue, look for an

better, starting with the cover. If you

article on body art and a new regu-

have not yet noticed, the title of the

lar column, entitled “Don’t Be that

magazine is written in an entirely

Guy,” where students rant anony-

new font. A small change, but im-

mously about anything that bothers

portant nonetheless. Next, our stories

them. Get ready, because the Torch

, O XOX

are slowly become more edgy and

just got real. Bam.

confessions got a secret you’re dying to share? send it to the torch editor, abbie wibe, at abbie.wibe@waldorf.edu. we’ll print it in the next issue of the torch!


STUDENT LIFE

confessions story by Abbie Wibe

Ever wonder what your classmates are hiding from you? A few Waldorf students decided to share some of their juiciest secrets and cringe-worthy moments. In sixth grade, I threw up all over my teacher, because she was hot, and

I got nervous when she talked to me. –Kevin When I was 16, a little kid decided to ram his bike into my car multiple times. After the last time, I got out of the car, and threw a 32-ounce fountain pop at him. It

During my senior year of high school, I was being announced during a pep rally. They called me out in front of the crowd, while naming all of my honors. When I got to the very last step of the bleachers, I tripped and fell in front of the whole school. –Anonymous Okay, the meanest thing I have ever done was in high school. A girl spilled Powerade on me at lunch,

hit the kid so I slapped her with a slice in the head, and he fell off of pizza. his bike. –Anonymous –Tad

One day, during the summer before my senior year of high school, I had just finished getting my senior pictures taken. I had on a little black dress, and afterwards, I had to carry a tray of flowers to the car for my mom. Suddenly, a gust of wind caught the edge of my dress and flung it up over my head. Needless to say, I did not have the right type of underwear on for this to happen. For the rest of the week,

all of the workers saw my wardrobe malfunction. my mom kept telling me how

–Ariel

A few weeks ago, during a basketball game, I put up a shot after getting a rebound. I made the basket. It was for the other team. –Cameron

friends actually knew the girl in the picture that Nicole was claiming to be. At the same time, Nicole was running for class president against one of my best friends, so we came up with a plan to make Nicole look stupid. We took one of the glamour shots and put it on a poster that said, “Vote 'Nicole' for class pres. She’s the only 'real' option!” We printed a bunch and posted them all over the school. Needless to say, Nicole lost the election. –Anonymous During my cousin’s wedding reception, the wedding party was announced, and we had to walk out in front of everyone to get to the head table. When my name was called, I began strutting down the walkway, feeling good in my dress and heels. When I got to the front of the room, however, my heel caught

So the meanest thing I have ever done to someone was in high school. My worst on the carpet, and friend/enemy, Nicole, would always make up the stupidest stories and lie about things we knew for a fact were not true. One day, she came to school with some glamour shots on her phone, that she claimed she had taken over the weekend. Not only was it obvious that these were not pictures of her, but one of my

I tripped in front of the whole crowd. I was so embarrassed! Plus, everyone gasped, made it even worse. –Anonymous

which

5


6

FINE ARTS

Debra Marquart Writer with Rhythm

Background Debra Marquart, an English professor in the MFA program at Iowa State University and an author, recently visited Waldorf College for the Distinguished Writers Series. Throughout the evening, Marquart read excerpts from her memoir, which is a collection of essays, called The Horizontal World: Growing up in the Middle of Nowhere, which documents what her life was like growing up in rural areas of North Dakota. After this, she sang a Led Zeppelin song, while playing the guitar. Yeah, that’s right. She is also a musician. She even toured on the road before she became a writer and completed her education. In 1977, she went to college at Moorhead State

of their instrumental equipment, worth $60,000, was destroyed. Marquart’s life completely changed after the accident. She realized that it is too easy to lose everything, so, Marquart figured out other ways to fulfill her life. She found her calling when she became compelled to pursue a career in writing. Though she no longer plays in a band, music still influences her writing. “Music still influences what to tell,” Marquart explains. She is so disciplined in her musical training, that she is able hear the sounds of her sentences and rhythms through musical structures. “Music has been the best companion in my life,” Marquart said.

The Reading

Marquart continued by saying, “Creativity is so time-

Creativity is so time-consuming, but it also has a lot of rewards attached to it. Make art a part of your life no matter what you do. University, in Minnesota, but dropped out, because she was unhappy with her chosen major. During that same year, she started touring with various bands. “It was like instinct,” Marquart commented. Her first band was a “bad country band,” which she stayed in for six months. After that, Marquart joined a rock group for a year. With these bands, she oftened performed at bars and wedding receptions. Then, Marquart joined the band “Soloman Kane” for the rest of her touring career. Marquart’s band even opened for Ted Nugent in Rapid City, South Dakota at the Civic Center. Later on, a tragic accident occurred while on the road, when the band’s tour bus caught fire. All

story by Eric Bertelsen photos by Matt Knutson

— Debra Marquart

consuming, but it also has a lot of rewards attached to it. Make art a part of your life no matter what you do.” One student present at the reading, Julie Scott, stated, “She could have been my neighbor because our experiences were the same.” Another student, Colin Morgan, thought her presentation was something many rural Iowans could relate to. He stated, “She broke the mold of what people think of writers.” Professor Alice Lewellen related to Marquart’s presentation, because she grew up on a farm just like Marquart. Another professor commented, “I can relate to loneliness in small towns and feeling that you can’t wait to get out.” Finally, Professor Joe Wilkins stated, “It was a great reading and a great fit for the Midwest, both hilarious and heartbreaking.”


STUDENT LIFE

MOVIES & CANDY Could anything be better?

SWAT kicked off the spring semester with two exciting events to entertain students — a weekly movie and a life-size version of CandyLand. “It was an event that SWAT had never done before,” said Amy Woods, who is in charge of SWAT about why the group implemented a weekly movie night, located in the recital hall. She continued by saying, “the students have not seen movies as much lately because the local theater closed down.” Woods explained that students are able to see a movie for free on campus, as opposed to buying tickets for several dollars at the movie theatre in Mason City. “I think that it would be a lot easier (to attend a movie) in the recital hall, because one, it is free, and two, it’s only a short walk from the dorms,” Woods said. In order for SWAT to get a movie shown on campus and they have to pay a licensing fee through Swank Motion Pictures. They then secure a single copy of the movie to be shown for movie night. For the opening night, members of SWAT voted to show the movie “Real Steel.” Around forty people attended; some were students, while others were simply members of the community. So far, SWAT members believe that movie night will continue to be a success. The other fun-filled event gave students the opportunity to play CandyLand. However, instead of playing Caylee Tennis wins the top prize. Katie Mullaly took on one of the roles of a CanyLand character. Scott Thompson took second place.

story by Molly Rabb | photos by Phil Koolhoven

the typical board game, students became the game pieces themselves. SWAT held the event in the Atrium on February 4. The idea for the life-size version of the game actually development last semester when students participated in a similarity formatted version of Clue. Liz Taylor, SWAT Novelty Chair, stated, "Last semester I was trying to think about how to make game nights more interesting and that’s how I came up with the lifesize game night." "We tried Clue last semester and it was success so we thought about other games we could turn into life size games. We came across CandyLand and decided to try that one," said Taylor The CanyLand event was just as successful as the first, bringing in 33 participants. Caylee Tennis took home first prize, while Scott Thompson and Katie Frush came in second and third place respectively.

7


8

FEATURE

6ix Characters in Search of a Festival story and photos by Jonathan Aguilar

OUR CHARACTERS: Haley Mosley A freshman Theatre Major that acts beyond her years.

Rebecka Troxel Also a freshman Theatre Major, she always keeps moments interesting.

Alex Horak A sophomore. Not to be taken seriously at all times.

Chelesy Shreeve A sophomore. Kind hearted and genuine.

Jon Aguilar Myself. A foolish Junior.

John Ryder A freshman new to the theater scene.

Caleb Stroman

f ort unate

Our unfortunate chaperone


FEATURE Act I Scene 1.

Iowa. Early January.

The scene takes place at Iowa State campus, deep in the heart of the Iowa tundra. A constant clamor of voices is echoing on all sides. Soft carpet under foot does little to dampen the noise now growing louder with cheers around a corner and tears around another. A few rooms away a bottle is being smashed against a professor’s head. In another a “Wild West” bar fight is only beginning . . .

for registration, but the van door delayed us. It took three people an entire hour to shut a door, with several moments of verbal abuse, strange hand gestures, crying, and laughter involved. Once the door was shut we were off to registration and opening ceremony.

This is the scene of the Region V Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival or KCACTF for short – try saying that in one take. And there really is a lot to take in. Every year, for an entire week, theatre students from across these Great Plains flock by bus, by car, or by caravan to reach the festival. According to the Kennedy Center’s web site, the festival exists to: • encourage, recognize, and celebrate…work produced in college and theatre programs • provide opportunities for participants to develop their theater skills and insight • improve the quality of college and university theater in America

The cold weather was not our friend as we waited for shuttles to workshops Act I Scene 2.

The Opening Ceremony

Each festival starts out with the opening ceremony. Imagine a room, five times larger than a typical classroom filled wall to wall with theater students. The opening ceremony allowed all of us to look back at last year and ahead to the coming week. We were all pumped, and some of us had auditions to look forward to the next day. Act 1 Scene 3.

Irene Who?

Before a performance of Anatomy of Grey

Although the festival was in January, our journey to the festival started with a couple of Lost Socks. An original play by Robert E. AuFrance, Lost Socks was submitted for full participation. Although, the show did not go on to the festival, two cast members, Chelsey Shreeve and Haley Mosley went on to compete for Irene Ryan Awards. This year, six Waldorf students were among the many. With luggage crammed everywhere imaginable, our van left Forest City in smoke. After two “Sexy and I Know It”s, a “Poker Face,” 10 bottles of juice, 14 cookies, and endless laughter later we arrived in Ames at our hotel. After quickly unloading, we attempted to leave

Two members of our group, Haley Mosely and Chelsey Shreave, were nominated and auditioned for the Irene Ryan Award. Alex Horak and myself were partners. Auditions are set up in three rounds: preliminary, semi-finals, and final round. Preliminary round auditions were a completely new experience for all of us. Walking into the room I remember staring at a mixture of confident and nervous faces. It was so quiet you could hear a pin drop, an uneasy sort of quiet. Group by group, a scene was performed. When our turn came Mosley and I stepped up in front of the room and performed our scene. Other scenes in the room were enlightening to say the least. Scenes varied from Shakespeare, to one where a pair got very physical in a scene from Unnecessary Farce. Although none of us went on past preliminary auditions, it was a great experience to act in the presence of so much talent. Semi finals were run in a similar fashion, only with fewer people involved.

9


10

FEATURE

Finals were the biggest event of the week. Unlike earlier rounds, finals were open to everyone at the festival to watch and contests were judged by a panel of celebrity judges. Over 200 students were nominated across the region. Sixty-four moved on to semifinals,16 moved on to finals, but only two received scholarships at the end of the week. Irene Ryan was an actress best known as ‘Granny’ in The Beverly Hilbilies. The Irene Ryan Foundation awards scholarships to a select few student performers at each regional festival. Students in participating shows are nominated for a chance to audition for $500 scholarships.

Before a performance of Anatomy of Grey.

Act 1 Scene 4.

Workshops? Will I lose a finger?

Much of the week was spent at workshops. Workshops were available for us to learn about new things or to participate in something exciting. Workshops ranged from mask making, to preparing for an audition, to theatre games, to design intensives in sound, lighting, costuming, and more. They allowed us to experience new things, hands-on, that we might not have otherwise been able to experience at our school. Intermission.

Lets Have a Party!

Every night ended in a party, literally. A theme party was planned for each night. People dressed in costumes and danced the night away. Themes included “back to the 90’s,” “science fiction,” “vampires vs. werewolves” and more. We met several Captain Jack Sparrow look-a-likes (a few members of our group were wooed), a few Rockys, and a Princess Leia that drew a lot of attention. All-in-all

The after party of Six Characters.


FEATURE

11

it was a great time to just be a thespian. It was great to dress up in costume, without having be worry about being the most ridiculous person flaying around the dance floor. Act 2 Scene 1.

Performances

Poster Publicity for Zombie Method.

Performances happened throughout the week. These were performances that were submitted and accepted to the festival, after being reviewed. God of Carnage, Six Characters, Knights on a Couch (an original short play), and Anatomy of Grey. Among the most talked about was Iowa State University’s performance of Six Characters, an adaptation of Six Characters in Search of an Author by Luigi Pirandello. Set in modern day, Six Characters, is a play about six characters longing to share their story. The play collided the physical world with the fictional world as these characters seemed to “fall” into a normal rehearsal. There was laughter, there were tears and there was even a rock musical number with “swooshing” hair. The performance drew an immediate standing ovation, but the show didn’t stop at the curtain. Downstairs outside of the theatre, a dance party started with the cast members. The moment was unforgettable. Act 2 Scene 2.

Design Technologies Expo.

The after party of Six Characters.

Featured shows weren’t the only thing featured at the festival. Students also presented their work at the Design Technologies Expo. The expo allowed people from around the region to display their work in scenic design, costume design, poster publicity and more.


14

STUDENT LIFE

VALENTINE’S

1. 2.

Personal vouchers: Guys, if your girlfriend wants a massage, you’d better just give her one, regardless of whether or not she has a stupid, homemade coupon to cash in.

A picture of you? just plain creepy.

3.

Chocolates: Yeah, because it is always awesome to get a giant box of calories… Even worse, we pretty much have to eat it all, because your feelings would be hurt if we didn’t.

4.

A single red rose: What, you couldn’t afford a full dozen?

5.

Singing cards: If I open it up, and Marvin Gaye starts singing “Let’s Get It On,” I will not be impressed.


STUDENT LIFE

DAY don’ts

story by Abbie Wibe

6. Stuffed animals: Pink bears and red dogs are lame, especially when they are holding stuffed hearts in their paws.

Silk boxers: Ladies, if they are pink with kissy lips all over them, your man is not gonna wear them.

8.

7.

Sexy lingerie: Guys, before you buy something with a lot of snaps and clips and itchy lace, try it on and see how much YOU like wearing it.

9.

Buying a star: This was only cute when Shane West did it for Mandy Moore. Also, if you do not understand this reference, you need to figure your life out.

15

10. Jewelry: OK, everyone loves jewelry. Unless it turns your skin green.


16

SPORTS

story by Faith Cook | design by Andres Ballesteros

Six conference games to go in the season and the Waldorf Warrior men’s basketball team has already surpassed their total conference game wins from last year by two. With this kind of improvement, it is not hard to see why Head Coach Nigel Jenkins describes this year by saying that, “the season has been a very exciting one so far.” Jenkins continues by saying, “we have beat some nationally ranked teams, come from behind to win big games, and we are in the hunt for a conference tournament play-off spot.” The Warriors’ wins have been as different as the teams they’ve played, from a close game with Clarke University that ended in a score of 73-71 to a complete domination of AIB College of Business that ended in a score of 88-58. Another important win for the Warriors was their victory over the number 16 team in the nation from Mount Mercy University, which was a huge win for the team. Team member, Mitchell Barrett-Burrell said,“we continue to practice hard in preparation to play even harder in the last six conference games, so we can earn our spot in the conference tournament.” This diligent attitude seems to be something that all players poss as Jenkins adds, “we have had some growing pains along the way, which is expected, but these guys continue to battle.” “We have eight seniors, and they want to set the bar as high as they can before they leave. It’s been a lot of fun, and the excitement will only get better as we get closer to the conference tournament,” Jenkins says.


TECHNOLOGY

17

new look

Communications hopes to increase enrollment with a story by Phil Koolhoven

The Waldorf Communications department has recently set up a new website in order to help recruit more students into the program. “The main purpose was for recruiting. In the last couple years we have seen our recruiting numbers go down,” said Tiffany Olson, who is an Assistant Communications professor. When creating the new website, the communications faculty did not intend for it to be used by current students; therefore, they don’t plan on advertising the website here on campus. Current students are welcome to view the site, but will find that the information is not geared through them. As for prospective students, the communication professors have talked to marketing about getting a postcard made and sent out to the prospective students, complete with a link to the new communications website. The website is very user friendly with a lot of cool features. Some of the features include links to KZOW’s website (Waldorf’s radio station), Wal-TV’s website (Waldorf’s television station), the Torch’s website (Waldorf’s magazine), and the Lobbyist’s website (Waldorf’s newspaper), as well. The website also provides many photo galleries of all the department’s classrooms and various equipment that the program has to offer, including the radio station, the TV station, the communications lab, and the Master Control room. The communications website

also has a contact area, where you can actually get in touch with the professors in the department for

more information. This site is a great addition to the communication department.

Check out the new website at waldorfcommunications.com


18

STUDENT LIFE — OPINION

EXIT TO HOPE

A HOME-BASE FOR ALL story and photos by Justin Mattingly

“We are not an ‘exclusive club’; we are not a

you; it is open to the individual sitting next to you, to

group of perfect people. We are imperfect, coming

the girl or guy across the room, to your friends, and

together knowing that Christ Jesus is the only

to your enemies. Put aside specific denominations

salvation, that through his grace we are saved,” said

of religion. It is open and encouraging the presence

student and leader of Exit to Hope, Chris Parcher. It

of all, as Jesus Christ came and gave his life to save

is a combination of words brought to us fully in truth,

all. This group is one with an intentional community

one with a competent heart and humility embedded

in mind, desiring to help the Waldorf student body

throughout. With this in mind, as you further read, I

to grow closer through communication, interaction,

urge you to do so without decree.

prayer, worship, and learning. Furthermore, Parcher

expressed that, “The sole focus of Exit to Hope is on

You see, Exit to Hope is open and longing to have

God and his good word, the Bible.” Together, these Left: Small group sessions allow students to share their experience through scripture. Right: Members of Exit to meet every Tuesday evening for worship.

two indispensable and tangible subjects can provide you with a unique and lasting fellowship as well as greatly further your relationship with our creator.

As it declares in scripture, one must never pass

judgment, as Christ and Christ alone will be the judge. If your curiosity inspires you to take a peek, you can find support for this in Matthew 7:1-5 and James 4:1112, among many other verses. I am laying this idea


From top down: Students come together of a time of praise and worship. Chris Parcher, the Exit to Hope Leader takes a moment with his bible. Colten Jensen leads the group in song. A group of students meet for small group discussions and reflection.

before you in sincere requests that as you depart from this article, at least one realization becomes thoroughly clear. That is, Exit to Hope, along with the other incredible ministries that have been established here on campus, are to be of everlasting support and assistance to you, not to be of judgment towards you.

So, indeed, I compel you, even if the interest is

miniscule, to reach out and embrace the amazing opportunities around you. Earnestly, I challenge you to see for yourself how much Exit to Hope has to offer, to leave what you may have heard or what you may think back in your dorm and head on over Tuesday evenings around nine o’clock, right here on campus in the music recital hall. There, you truly may discover that the something which seems to be missing from life is found.


20

FEATURE

The Black-Jew Dialogues: Breaking through prejudice and racism through comedy story by Nicholas Lara | photos by Phil Koolhoven


To honor Martin Luther King, Jr. and celebrate the importance of the day, Larry Jay Tish and Ron Jones presented the Black-Jew Dialogues here on campus. The Black-Jew Dialogues is an informative comedy that touches greatly on racism. The two-actor team of Tish and Jones travel around the United States combining stereotypical comedy with examples of how racism is bad. After several years of asking, Waldorf was lucky enough to have duo finally come to campus on Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday. The performance started at 10:15 and went on for about a good hour where they did multiple skits involving African Americans and Jewish people while both Actors/Comedians continued to act oblivious to why racism was wrong until the end. The one skit that is probably most memorable to the students is the live skit where both men dressed as elderly women from their respective races and proceeded to act out many stereotypes people have about African American women and Jewish women. They repetitively went back to many different ways of showing how racism is bad and tried to drive it home with comedy and a few videos they had prepared. Throughout the course of the show they called on the audience looking for responses. In fact at one point they even asked about individual run ins with racism or stereotypes. Sadly, but not shockingly, many people had experiences with racism. At the end of the show both men stayed to answer students questions. Tish and Jones enjoyed this open forum with students. The whole experience was exciting to see students coming together and ask questions with each student getting involved in their own ways where others would have just brushed it off. The overall the experience was a good one and hopefully there will be a repeat of it next year. Larry Jay Tish (left) and Ron Jones (right) pose with their puppets, which provide comedic relief in "The Black-Jew Dialogues."

Top: President Alsop introduces and welcomes Jones and Tish to campus. The bottom three photos show a variety of the skits Jones and Tish performed.


22

SPORTS FEATURE

“He is very experienced and knowledgeable within the game of football and brings a sense of passion to our program.” — Henry Stone


SPORTS FEATURE

23

Over the past couple of years, Waldorf College and its community have experienced a wide variety of changes, from gaining new faculty to losing students, promoting new athletic programs to building competitive fields. The last couple years saw brand new faces within the faculty staff at Waldorf as well as dismissing international students from its campus. On the athletic side, Waldorf welcomed the addition of new competitive programs such as the Women’s Wrestling and Men’s Hockey, to most recently the inauguration of a multi-use turf field. This spring, it was turn for the Football team to experience a change of their own. On November 17, Greg Youngblood, head football coach, announced his resignation from Waldorf’s athletic staff. Coach Youngblood, after five years of being in charge of the program has stepped down to give the opportunity for another candidate to take over the program. Current Director of Athletics at the college, Michael Scarano,

story by Andres Ballesteros | photo by Phil Koolhooven (headshot provided by Iowa Wesleyan College)

complimented about Youngblood’s time at Waldorf during an interview stating “we are tremendously appreciative of Coach Youngblood’s hard work, dedication and exhibiting tremendous class, devotion and dignity during his time at Waldorf College.” After a two-month, nationwide search for Youngblood’s replacement, a new head coach has been officially named. On January 13, Kent Anderson was announced by the college as the new Head Coach for the program; beginning official duties at the end of the month. Anderson, who is a native Iowan, comes to Waldorf’s community from Iowa Wesleyan College where he coached the Tigers to their most successful season last year (2011). Anderson has also influenced athletics with promoting academic achievement within his athletes. Aside from an impressive run at Iowa Wesleyan; Coach Anderson also has international experience. Holding a few head coaching positions in the GFL in Braunschweig, Germany, Anderson has expanded its talent and appreciation for the game and comes to Waldorf for the 2012-2013 season with the hopes of achieving success.

Upon his arrival to the Warrior family, Coach Anderson mentioned the excitement and familiarity to this new chapter in his life, “I am excited. I saw a commitment to growth and winning at Waldorf. The Forest City community will be a great place for me and my family. I know what it’s like to be a head coach at a small college in a great community.” Other coaches are pleased with the new addition of Coach Anderson to the program. Second year, Special Teams Coordinator, Henry Stone feels the Football program is in a great place with its athletes eager and ready for the upcoming season, all of which he attributed to Coach Anderson’s arrival. “He is a dynamic coach and brings a sense of camaraderie and belonging to our athletes. He is very experienced and knowledgeable within the game of football and brings a sense of passion to our program” stated Stone. As far as next season plans, it is quite clear that changes will be beginning to take effect starting with a recruiting class. As for now, the Warrior community welcomes Anderson and whishes him and the football team the best of luck for the upcoming season.


24

FEATURE

Unusual Weather story and photos by Kellie Grunzke

Walk outside and freeze to death or walk outside and melt? When winter started at Waldorf the weather didn’t change along with the season. There were times in both November and December when students from out of state did not even know that the winter season had begun. There were people all around campus wearing only t-shirts and sometimes, even shorts. In past years, the winter season has been long, cold, and very white. Last year for example, we had plenty of snow and plenty of low temperatures. On December 4, 2010, the temperature was right around 20 degrees Fahrenheit. This year on the same date, it was around 30 degrees. This might not seem like much of a difference, but when you add in the fact that in 2010 there was a wind chill due to 20 mile-per-hour winds, it felt much colder. This year before, students around campus could be found wearing t-shirts and flip-flops. Most years, wearing this type of clothing in the winter is rarely, if never, seen but this year the weather has been so unusual that the summer clothing has become commonplace. The weather these past couple of months has been warmer than usual to say the least. There were more students wearing shirts and light sweatshirts these past couple of weeks than winter jackets. However, on December 3 and 4 the campus had its first real snowfall. What that might was that the snow stayed on the ground without melting. What made this

snowfall hard to deal with was that these were the days of Christmas with Waldorf, the Music Department’s largest concert of the year. The concerts still took place though, but the numbers for the audience were low on the first day of the concerts. Once second semester started it seemed like the weather was finally making up its mind as to what season it really was. There were still a couple of days that were left on the warm side, but we finally got the kind of temperatures and the snowfall that usually makes up the winter season. Students, faculty, and staff have started to feel what it really means to be in Iowa during winter. This includes cold blasts of wind, snow falling in their faces, and wind chills that make the temperature feel like it is way below zero. One of the most popular sayings these days is “brr”. The temperatures were very low when it was getting close to the end of January and it is only supposed to continue. The actual temperatures were not that low, but when you added in a crisp breeze and the wind chill it started to feel very cold. Some nights even got as low as 20 below zero. For some people that was way too cold and for others they were glad it was starting to feel like winter. On Friday January 20 the college got one of its first snowfalls of the season. The college has had snow in the past couple of weeks, but nothing like this. In just one day Forest City got about two and a half inches


FEATURE

of snow. This might not seem like much, but for a town and college that has seen sunnier and warmer days these past couple of weeks, this snowfall was a treat for some and almost like torture to others. One of the first snowstorms happened in the middle of January. What this means is the temperature was six below zero, but if you add in the wind chill it would be 24 below zero. This is very cold and getting to be very dangerous at the same time. Waldorf College sent out a message on Facebook to students and anyone else that said “We are under a wind chill advisory from 3 a.m. until noon on Thursday. Bundle up and ensure that your vehicle has a proper emergency kit in the event that you end up stalled. Stay warm. Stay safe!” The college was trying to keep students and anyone else safe from the dangerous temperatures. Cold temperatures are very dangerous to everyone, which includes frostbite. As stated by http:// medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com frostbite is “Injury or destruction of skin and underlying tissue, most often that of the nose, ears, fingers, or toes, resulting from prolonged exposure to freezing or subfreezing temperatures.” Frostbite needs to be taken just as seriously as any other injury or weather because it is just as dangerous. Since it isn’t like a tornado or a hurricane, low temperatures don’t seem to be taken as serious as what some people call “dangerous weather”. If you see someone that has frostbite here is what you should do: the first step to the treatment of frostbite is either to call 911, if it is severe enough. If it isn’t that severe the first step is to restore warmth to the area. What this means is that you should warm up the area, Top: One of the rare times this winter that Facility Services had to remove snow from campus. Right: The snow melting, another unusual occurrence in February .

25

but don’t do it too fast, and don’t use direct heat from heating pads or fires. One of the ways that you can warm up the area is through the use of warm water. Once the skin appears red and warm you then wrap the area in sterile dressings. The person then should be taken to emergency room to make sure that there aren’t any serious injuries. While temperatures did go up and stay above normal most of January and February, the rest of the winter season, or at least what is left of it, is bound to still be cold and with plenty of snowfall. But then on the other hand, with how winter started it could get warmer too. Who knows what the future will hold.


26

FINE ARTS

Pippin:

Combining the talents of the Theater and Music Departments story by Alexander Horak | photos by Phil Koolhoven

Once again the Waldorf Theater Department continued its tradition of an annual musical, opening "Pippin: The Musical" on Feb. 17 through Feb. 20. When asked about the musical choice, Dr. Robert AuFrance said that he was fond of the show and had wanted to perform "Pippin" for a while. He said that this show presented a number of challenging musical pieces, an interesting message, and a cast size directly compatible with the music and theater departments. This year the production will also welcome Dr. Adam Luebke as the musical director. “He is wonderful to work with,” said AuFrance of Luebke. AuFrance went on to comment that this show presents lots of opportunities to work with many other faculty members, including Luebke, and Paul Secor Morel and Travis Beck, also from the music department. “I wanted to see what the original playwright wanted for the script,” said AuFrance. He said that the show had undergone many changes since the time it was first written, with other writers adding and subtracting various parts throughout the years. AuFrance says he strives to capture the original intent of the show, and present that here at Waldorf.


FINE ARTS

Cast members, Victor Schultz, Kelsey Munson, Cassie Ruud, Haley Mosley, Britt Banks, Braden Falline, Kaylin Tlam, Rebecka Troxel, and Karly Ankarlo surround Pippen (played by William Eilts) in an attempt to dampen his spirit.

Left: Kathrine (played by Cassidy Atchison) sings about her boring life with backup singers Kaylin Tlam, Britt Banks, and Cassie Ruud. Middle: The male members of the royal family (William Eilts, Braden Felline, and Jon Aguilar) sing while saluting. Right: Prince Pippin, played by William Eilts, searches for the meaning of life.

27


FOR YOUR ENTERTAINMENT

T

F

S

R

X

T

F

H

S

C E R

X O S P M Y

T

A U A U L

R

Z O S Z

C K

P

A

I L

S

K O O M X

P C R

C B

I

A R

T

H

T

P O W E

H O W P G

E

R A

A M W P

C M V N W F H

E

A

L

L

G

V O E

T

A

L

R A

A U A U

I

A

E

C E

I

N H

T

N

T

S

L

E

H

R C O E

E

E

T

O

I

D

T

D C

Z

B

Y W

N

K

L

Q Q S

R

H D

X

L M C

Z

N Q Q M R M K O

P G J

M C

L

L

A

B

E

S

A

B Q U

B

L

L

U Q

I

P

K

S

CHOCOLATE COMPUTER DENTIST HEART

W Q

P O W E

T

APPLE BASEBALL BILL BOOK

Mr. Rogers was an ordained minister.

P C R

S W D

I

I

T H

E

R

S W D

L

P

L

D A

S

T

T

D

W Q

N

I

I

T

Z

D C

D A

N H

O

A M W P

T

Z O S

R

E

S

I

P G J

F

E

S

S

H D

R

C K

R C O E

Z

Y W

J

N Q Q M R M K O

X O S

B

U V

X

R

J

T

K

S

B Q U

K O O M X

Q Q S

K A

P M Y

L

S

F

N

P

H

G

Z

I E

L

L M C

B

H O W P G

X

U Q

V O E

A

L

L

H

L

C M V N W F

C B

L

T

L

A R

I

E

B

H

M C

I

J

The shortest 5 syllable word in the English language is ideology.

The longest word in the English language is “Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis”

J

U V

IMPORTANT RADIO THEATER

Almonds are a member of the peach family

Peanuts are one of the ingredients of dynamite


The Torch 3:3  

Waldorf College student magazine

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you