Page 1

September|October 2014

Alex Hall

Gainesville musician talks about Nashville and his musical icon, Elvis


PLAN YOUR FALL

GETAWAY

Enjoy a weekend getaway at Legacy Lodge with one of our Fall Foliage Packages. Experience the Islands as the season begins to change. Our Staycation Package is affordable and great for families! Starting at only $199.

GOLF AT ITS BEST

Spend $100 or more* on merchandise at Legacy on Lanier Golf Shop during September and your golf fees that day are on us! Valid Monday - Sunday | Not valid with any other offer | Comp Round valid same day only| *$100 before tax | Must present ad at check in

LAKE LANIER AUTO SHOW

WHEN: Saturday, October 11th TIME: Starting at 10 am WHERE: Peachtree Pointe WHAT: Car show with awards, live music, great food, family fun & more! BENEFITTING: Active military, veterans and their families!

Discover the Difference at LakeLanierIslands.com


What’s Inside

36 From the Editor

Business

Calendar

8

Around Town

These childhood friends began sifting through DIY redecorating magazines in their early teens. Now, Pam England and Shelia Jones have opened a second location to sell their unique take on upcycled furniture and décor.

On the Cover

4

12

12

Inside Every Issue 6 38 44

September | October 2014

September | October 2014

Lifestyle 20-year-old Country artist Alex Hall explained he only just arrived back home to Gainesville for a visit. Hall moved to Nashville in the spring to pursue his dreams of country music stardom, and so far, he’s met some pretty powerful players and performed alongside a few Country music legends. Photo by Chris Campbell

12

 ortheast Georgia wineries continue N to expand, making this area the next Napa. Learn how to taste wine and find a list of area vineyards.

Get to Know 14

Former announcer for the Gainesville High School football team retired last season. Now he heads into the first football season in the stands instead of the pressbox. HOME Living

In North Georgia


14

32 24 8

28 Charity 28 The Junior League of

Gainesville/Hall County provides multiple area charities with help and funds to give our community a boost.

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Taste of Home

Recreation

32

36

G  ainesville resident Lyn Froehlich combined her love of cooking with her strong faith to turn out a vegetarian cookbook, “Sweeter Roots.�

 uail and pheasant season Q is nearly upon us. Check out Etowah Valley Game Preserve in Dawsonville for a rustic hunting getaway. September | October 2014

5


From the Editor Festivals, football and art What was supposed to be a picture of myself with a lovely piece of sculpture by local artist Jane Hemmer turned into a bust (no pun intended). I can’t blame Quinlan executive director Amanda McClure; she’s got her hands full organizing shows and a brand new bundle of joy to boot. So she can’t be expected to keep tabs on her husband, Jeff, every minute. But thanks Jeff for keeping it classy. If you love art as much as I do, then this fall will be full of art-o-tunities. (I just made that up). In fact, even if you aren’t a fan of art, fall offers a bevy of festivals from beer to wine to apples and hot air balloons. So check out the calendar listing on page 40 to plan your next 2 months — football fanatics excused. Speaking of football, find out what longtime voice of Gainesville High Football games will be doing with his first season as a retiree. And let’s not forget that fall is full of soothing foods. Our Taste of HOME story will have your mouth watering. Of course there is no shortage of talent and musical concerts in our area, which is why we have chosen Gainesville’s up and coming Country star Alex Hall as our cover feature. I hope you enjoy this issue, and as always, follow us on Twitter and Facebook and offer your ideas for stories.

M

J

ichelle ameson

Michelle Boaen Jameson editor@homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Editor Michelle Boaen Jameson Advertising Director Sherrie Jones Advertising Sales Trent Sexton Melisa Sizemore Elizabeth Brumbelow Debra Purvis Graphic Design Michelle Boaen Jameson Chris Campbell Production Support Katherine Hake April Seymour Kerri Ivie Dana Erwin Betty Thompson Contributing Photographers The Times staff

HOME Magazine, a division of: The Times Gainesville, GA The Paper Hoschton, GA A Morris Multimedia Inc. property 345 Green St. | Gainesville, GA 30501 | 770-718-3421

www.homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

HOME: Living in North Georgia reserves the right to refuse advertisements for any reason. Acceptance of advertising does not mean or imply the services or product is endorsed or recommended by HOME: Living in North Georgia. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by an information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from Morris Multimedia Inc. Although every precaution is taken to ensure accuracy of published materials, Morris Multimedia cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by its authors. Manuscripts, artwork, photography, inquiries and submitted materials are welcome.

6

September | October 2014


homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

7


home business

Repurpose with Panaché Childhood friends make a business out of their passion for décor Story by Sandra Warwick Photos by Michelle Boaen Jameson At Rust & Roses, Gainesville’s new antique shop and boutique, the saying “everything old is new again” rings a beautiful tune. If you have ever visited the unique boutique, you might also be inclined to add that “everything dusty and tired is beautiful again.” Pam England and Shelia Jones put their creative heads together and opened the store in June 2014. Pam and Shelia, friends since they were six years old, both use their talents to the max when refurbishing, recycling and repurposing furniture. Pam, a local business owner for more than two decades, also owns Chic or Shabby located next to Green’s Grocery in Gainesville. A rustic blue chest, a refurbished-to-perfection white dresser, a glass table with red colorful flowers to add a pop of color, a lamp jazzed up with pink and white fabric and homespun wreaths to add a cozy demeanor are just a few of the many talents showcased in every nook and cranny at Rust & Roses. The delightful boutique sits nestled on the corner of the bustling Dawsonville Highway. The charming cottage-type exterior hints at the goodies housed inside. Pam says, “I always loved this little white cottage.” The little white cottage tucked away on the shady corner ranks as a local delight. A display of homemade vegan organic soap, made by a local artist, is displayed just as you walk in the door. The clean savory aroma fills the air while rummaging for anything from the practical to the whimsical. Pam and Shelia’s boutique includes a few talented local creations. One local artist designs wooden wall crosses. Some of the crosses are imprinted with Audubon designs. Pam notes that “bird and Audubon prints are big now.” Even the blue rustic front desk where Pam and Shelia ring up sales and greet incoming customers with their Southern warmth, has a story 8

September | October 2014

Above: Pam England and Shelia Jones recently opened Rust & Roses in Gainesville. Opposite page clockwise: A refurbished vanity set, sconces and decor are examples of the business owners’ style. A coat rack mixes utilitarian items like the faucet handle with reclaimed wood. The baby section of the store offers decorative items for any nursery. A screen door rescreened with a delicate lace fabric is their latest creation.

of its own. “This desk is 100 years old. And the shutters and doors are from Paris,” said Pam. Shelia and Pam occasionally visit estate sales for furniture and goods to refurbish. People will call or bring things to them, too. One day not long ago, Shelia says someone brought a truckload of things to the shop. Pam remembers one vacation when she rented a UHaul while traveling and loaded up on things to refurbish. (Of course, her husband was on hand to do the heavy lifting). If something catches their eye while roaming the countryside, they have no problem stopping and enquiring. Imagine “American Pickers,” Southern gal style. HOME Living

In North Georgia


The excitement about their new venture can hardly be contained. Rust & Roses is more than a job for them, it’s a passion. With passion that radiates from within, Pam says she would love to come upon a church pew sitting on a porch. “A church pew looks great with old farm tables.”

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Inside the rooms of Rust ‘n’ Roses, the ladies decorating skills combine with their refurbishing talents. A little girl’s bedroom suite, complete with a dainty pink vanity with an oval mirror, a lamp jazzed up in pink and a pink dresser showcase passionate talent. If there’s a color or shade of furniture that doesn’t suit a customer’s fancy, the ladies will repaint to the desire of the customer. Pam will also come into your home and paint. Shelia confides, “The only thing I won’t

paint are cabinets.” She has plenty of other things to keep her busy. One of the first items to sell at Rust & Roses was a pink doggie bed with a white bone painted on the head board. Shelia marvels how “I used the bottom of a door to make the dog bed.” Pam also says her husband, Andy, has the “best boss now.” He retired after working 38 years for UPS and now he does some of the

September | October 2014

9


Pam admits there is an artistry to what they do. There is more to repurposing a piece of furniture than taking a can of spray paint to it. It has taken the women several years of trial and error, “lot’s of error” added Shelia, to get the rustic look down perfect. Beautiful refurbished furniture may be the focal point of Rust & Roses. But there’s plenty more to goodies to ogle. The boutique can satisfy any jewelry cravings — beads and bangles, necklaces and bracelets, to complete any outfit, from retro relics to your Sunday best, can be found mingling with monogrammed purses. A baby boutique offers cute outfits for your bundle of joy. A ladies boutique features a white flowing blouse that would go great with a Rust & Roses turquoise bracelet. Add a monogrammed purse and you’re in vogue. There’s something for everyone in the little white cottage. And the ladies don’t let much go to waste. From doggie beds, cabinets, old screen doors, desks, mirrors and just about anything dusty and tired, Pam and Shelia make the old new again. And more beautiful than ever.

Far left: a shelf made of reclaimed wood and a window frame. Top: Several artists contribute works, such as the setting above. Left: Pam and Susan refinished an old bedroom suit to give it a chic, yet, country feel.

10

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

11


home lifestyles

Northeast Georgia

The new wine country Story by Savannah King Photos by Chris Campbell

The next time you’re driving through the mountains in North Georgia, take a look around. You’re likely to see fields of grapes growing on the vine and you could be driving past your new favorite wine. The wine industry in the North Georgia Mountains is bursting with potential and the recognitions are stacking up. In July, 690-square miles in the Upper Hiawassee Highlands was established as a viticulture area by the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau. The designation adds to the quality and reputation of wines made from grapes grown in the region. While the distinction covers the areas of and Towns, Union, and Fannin counties, in Georgia, and Cherokee and Clay counties, in North Carolina, plenty of Georgia winemakers are mak-

ing a name for themselves in regions well known for fine wine. Emily DeFoor, general manager of Habersham Vineyards and Winery, said Georgia wineries are seeing a dramatic increase in visits in recent years. “There are lots of new wineries popping up in recent years and that’s promoting tourism,” DeFoor said. “People are definitely coming for the wineries and we’re getting recognition, not just for being here but for having good wine.” DeFoor said some visitors are surprised to learn that Georgia vineyards produce more than just the traditional sweet, muscadine wine. Many vineyards grow multiple varieties of grapes and produce wines for all palates. “Each winery has its own personality,” DeFoor said. “There are large wineries, there are small boutique wineries and each

How to taste wine properly 1. Smell the wine’s bouquet 2. Keep glass on bar top and swirl 3. Smell bouquet again 4. Taste the wine and pay attention to flavors 5. Swirl wine in the glass to reveal “legs.” Legs show alcohol content.

12

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


one has its own special something, its own personality. That’s what we find so wonderful, in the Georgia Wine Growers Association, it’s the diversity. Everyone can find a winery that they identify with and has a wine they like and personality they like in a winery.” Even southern Hall County has picked up an award for some interesting wine. Recently, Château Elan was awarded for its muscadine wine. Wine­maker Simone Bergese picked up two bronze, three silver and one double gold at the 2014 Indy Inter­na­tional Wine Competition for the Château. Bergese, orig­i­nally from Italy, holds a degree in oenol­ogy and viti­cul­ture from the Turin Uni­ver­sity in North­ern Italy. He moved to the United States in 2008 and joined Château Elan in 2013. Château Elan soon pulled up all its diseases non-native grapes in favor of the more hardy and native muscadine. The result is Muscadry, a sweet yet musky wine. And more wineries are hopping into the 21st century. In August, the White County Chamber of Commerce announced the launch of Georgia’s first ever Wine Trail App. This free travel application (app) for iPhone, iTouch, and Android devices allows users to have information on The Unicoi Trail wineries, tasting rooms, transportation, The Unicoi Wine Festival, events and new releases at the wineries.

Wineries in Northeast Georgia Beca Farms & Vineyard, 402 Caldwell Drive, Cleveland, 706348-1529 Castell Vineyards & Winery, 121 Julian Farm Road, Dawsonville, www.castellwinery.com Cavendar Creek Vineyards, Cavendar Creek Road, Dahlonega Chateau Elan, 100 Tour de France, Braselton, 678-425-0900, www.chateauelanatlanta.com/winery Crane Creek Vineyards, 916 Crane Creek Road, Young Harris, 706-379-1236, www.cranecreekvineyards.com Curahhee Vineyard and Winery, 3301 West Currahee Street Toccoa, 706-768-5383, curraheevineyards.com Frogtown Cellars, 3300 Damascus Church Road, Dahlonega, 706-865-0687, www.frogtownwine.com Habersham Vineyards & Winery, 7025 S. Main St., Helen, 706878-9463, www.habershamwinery.com Hightower Creek Vineyards, 7150 Canaan Drive, Hiawassee, 706-896-6827, www.hightowercreekvineyards.com Hillside Orchards Farm, 105 Mitcham Circle, Tiger, 866-7824995, www.hillsideorchard.com Montaluce Estates and Vineyard, 501 Hightower Church Road, Dahlonega, 866-991-8466. 706-867-4060, www.montaluce.com homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

The Unicoi Wine Trail APP places the user in the driver seat to plan the perfect Wine Country getaway. To plan a wine country trip on-the-fly or in advance, the app’s interactive, locationaware capabilities features continually updated information on events and new releases. Users can also book their unique and memorable experience touring the Unicoi Wine Trail with VIP Southern Tours via the app. The user can plan an escape to indulge in fine wine tours, peaceful views and unique experiences. With the live interactive map, the user can drive off the beaten path and discover hidden treasures and still find their way to wineries and vineyards in White County. To download the free app visit www. whitecountychamber.org or Apple Store or Google Play. For more on Georgia wineries, visit www.georgiawinecountry. com. Mars Hill Vineyards, 3770 Mars Hill Road, Cumming, 770-7818841 Paradise Hills Vineyards, 366 Paradise Road, Blairsville, 877745-7483, www.paradisehillsvineyard.com Persimmon Creek Vineyards, 81 Vineyard Lane, Clayton, 706546-4884, www.persimmoncreekwine.com Sautee Nacoochee Vineyards, 1299 Ga. 17, Sautee, 706-8781056, www.sauteenacoocheevineyards.com Serenity Cellars, 303 Laurel Ridge Road, Sautee-Nacoochee, 706-219-4213 Sharp Mountain Vineyards, 110 Rathgeb Trail, Jasper, 770-7351210, www.sharpmountainvineyards.net Stack Vineyards, Tiger, 706-782-9946 Stonewall Creek Vineyard, Tiger, stonewallcreek.com Three Sisters Vineyards, Dahlonega, 439 Vineyard Way, 706865-9463, www.threesistersvineyards.com Tiger Mountain Vineyards & Winery, 2592 Old Highway 441, Tiger, 706-782-9256, www.tigerwine.com Wolf Mountain Vineyards & Winery, 180 Wolf Mountain Trail, Dahlonega, 706-867-9862, wolfmountainvineyards.com Yonah Mountain Vineyards, 2454-B Ga. 17, Sautee-Nacoochee, 706-878-5522, www.yonahmountainvineyards.com September | October 2014

13


home get to know

Walt Snelling

Longtime GHS football announcer heads into his first season outside of the press box Story by Chelsea Abercrombie Photos by Times staff

One Gainesville man literally kept cheering for the Red Elephants until he couldn’t. “I’m 77 years old. I simply cannot get up the steps anymore,” said Walt Snelling, the longtime stadium announcer for Gainesville High School athletics. “To make a long story short, it’s time for the young folks to take over and do a much better job than I ever thought of doing.” A 1955 graduate of Gainesville High School, Snelling, who also worked for many years in the Gainesville Parks and Rec Department, first began announcing for Gainesville football games in the early 1980s after a “heathen Bulldawg by the name of Abbott Hayes” turned down the position and recommended Snelling, a diehard Tech fan. Since then, Snelling became a staple at City Park. It began with football, but at the end of his run, Snelling was announcing basketball, baseball, volleyball and other events. While he will be officially stepping down this year, Snelling’s life dedicated to Gainesville sports is full of enough stories to fill a lifetime. After a career spanning two decades, Snelling’s best memories came from some unexpected places. “A lot of (my favorite memories) occurred during the Park and Rec leagues, when I was doing the midget football,” Snelling said. “I could be a little bit looser there than I could in Red Elephant Country.” Snelling’s most recent favorite game took place in 2011. On November 25, Gainesville High School played Sandy Creek High School in the state quarterfinals for Class AAA. “Sandy Creek came in on a 46 game winning streak and we beat the stew out of them, thanks to a young fellow by the name of Deshaun Watson,” Snelling said. “I’ve been playing or watching Gainesville football since 1942. I have seen all of the great quarterbacks and players come through the system and through the program, and 14

September | October 2014

Deshaun Watson is No. 1.” In the past few years, Snelling became a fan of Watson, who is playing his first season for Clemson this year, on and off the field “He’s as fine a young man as I’ve ever had the privilege of knowing,” Snelling said. “When I watched him on the sidelines in some of the blowout games we had, and we had a bunch of them, with the young people coming up to him, 8, 9, 10-years-old, he had time for every one of them. That’s a rare talent.” Since 1942, Snelling’s favorite game was one he didn’t announce. “It was Avondale and Gainesville, 12-7, in late October 1959, and it was a war,” Snelling said. Avondale High School and Gainesville were ranked No. 1 and No. 2 respectively. As the associate director of Gainesvile Parks and Rec, Snelling was sitting in the press box. Two of Gainesville’s graduates who would go on to the NFL, Billy Lothridge and Billy Martin, were on the team, but Gainesville fans were worried. Martin had recently had an appendectomy and been told he wouldn’t be able to play against their rival state champions. HOME Living

In North Georgia


“Being a very small part of the lives of the young people in this city, and also in this area, meant an awful lot to an old man.” “Late in the fourth quarter, I saw Billy Martin jumping up and down on the sidelines,” Snelling said. “I finally saw his daddy Jake come out of the stands, went over to PK Dixon, who was the doctor at the time, and I knew something was up.” Martin went into the game and helped Lothridge score a fourthquarter touchdown that won the game for the Red Elephants. But Snelling is not just an avid fan. He’s kept in contact with many of the players he’s watched and announced for over the years, some of whom he still speaks with every day. “Lothridge has gone on to be with the Lord now, and Martin I’m afraid is close,” Snelling said. “He’s got dementia. I stay in constant contact with him. He’s one of the dearest friends I’ve ever had.” If Snelling was ever unpopular during his three-plus decades of service, it was because he was determined to give anyone who wasn’t a Red Elephant a fair shake, as well. “The thing that I’m noted for is being fair to all players, whether they’re wearing red or not,” Snelling said. “I believe in that very strongly. It was even to the point where I got my own people upset, saying ‘Whose side are you on?’ I’m on the child’s side. If they’re wearing red that’s even better. I was born a Red Elephant, I will die a Red Elephant, but I love all the other children just as well.” A lifelong fan of Georgia Tech, Snelling still keeps several posters and memorabilia of Georgia Tech’s players around his office. A set of tickets to the Georgia Tech game against Duke rests on his desk. “In my life, Jesus Christ is first, family is second, Gainesville High School is third, Georgia Tech is fourth, and friends and family are part of that,” Snelling said. “I thank the good Lord for every day. He gives me on this earth, and hope to be around for a few more years, but if I’m not I’m not, we’re all going to go sometime.” “I don’t really know how to describe it, but there’s just something mystic about it,” Snelling said. “When I was growing up, kids from Chicopee, Gainesville Mill all of those that wanted to play football went to Gainesville High School. Everybody wanted to be a Red Elephant.” While Parkinson’s disease and macular degeneration have caused the 77-year-old to step down from the announcing podium, he hopes to continue attending games as long as possible. “My vision has gone bad, but being a part of it is very important to my family,” Snelling said. “I’ve got a beautiful wife who has put up with me for 57 years, when I was spending more time at City Park than I was at home, three beautiful children, and seven wonderful grandchildren. It just don’t get no better than that.” While his booming voice and commentary was one of the biggest parts of the Gainesville sports experience, it meant the most to him to have been involved with its smallest members. “Being a very small part of the lives of the young people in this city and also in this area meant an awful lot to an old man,” Snelling said. “I love them all.”

Smiles

from start to finish

FIND YOUR SMILE AT WILSON ORTHODONTICS

WilsonBraces.com

Gainesville | Flowery Branch | Cleveland

(770) 536-0882

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

15


Budding Gainesville musician takes his act to Nashville for a chance at stardom

16

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


Photo by Chris Campbell

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

17


Story by Savannah King

Alex Hall hides his striking blue eyes behind sunglasses. As he walks up smiling, he sets his guitar case on the ground in front of him, opens it and plays a few chords. The 20-year-old country artist explained he only just arrived back home to Gainesville the night before. Hall moved to Nashville in the spring to pursue his dreams of country music stardom. 14.

Gainesville musician Alex Hall is now living in Nashville trying to make it in the music industry. Photo courtesy Alex Hall

)

)

“I want to make music and make people feel good through my music, and the more people that hear that, the better my life will be.”

18

September | October 2014

It’s a dream Hall has been chasing since the tender age of

“I played my first show May 25, 2009,” Hall said. “I was 14 about to turn 15. It’s hard to get into a bar when you’re that old. That was always really hard, just trying to find places to play. But once I got into places they would always want me to come back.” Hall’s perseverance has paved the way to opportunities to play with country artist legend Charlie Daniels and Scotty McCreery. Hall said he expects to spend most of the remaining year traveling around the country playing shows with a few scheduled locally. He sat down with Home: Living in North Georgia to talk about what it’s like to go come from a small town and move to the big city. Q: How are you adjusting since your move from Gainesville to Nashville? A: “I didn’t really want to move because I love being around my family, and this is where I’ve always lived. But I knew I needed to because anyone who is doing anything in the Country music industry is in Nashville. If you’re doing pop or hip hop you’d need to be in LA or New York but Nashville was where I needed to go. I moved and luckily it’s only like four and a half hours away. I’ve been up there about 6 months now and a lot of stuff is happening and things are going on that are really good.” Q: Do you feel like you’re starting to see some success with your career? A: “We’re traveling all over the country playing with people like Scotty McCreery ... It’s really crazy. I feel like I’ve been doing it a lot longer than I have. I’ve only been playing, doing this

HOME Living

In North Georgia


Photos courtesy Alex Hall

)

for 5 years or so I guess. That’s really how I got started, people just believing in me and in what I’m doing. It’s really just them helping me anyway they could because I didn’t know what I was doing. I still don’t know what I’m doing. (Laughing) It seems to be working all right at the moment.” Q: Making it into the music scene takes more than just talent. What’s your approach to the business? A: “As far as the business stuff goes, I was 15 when all of this started and obviously I didn’t know anything about business. My dad is a small-business owner in Gainesville and so he’s very business savvy. I learned a lot from him. Both of my parents helped me out as much as they could. I finally got my own font and got my trademark done. So now I have my ‘Alex Hall’ logo trademarked. But as far as business stuff, there was a lot of trial and error. Like this doesn’t work, this does. Switching and changing styles, clothes, and hair and songs and music and everything. There’s a lot of stuff that goes into this that people don’t

)

really see. That’s part of it. But I guess anything worth doing that’s just kind of part of it.” Q: How do you measure success? What direction do you want your career to go? A: “To me I’m not going to think I’m successful until I’m selling out Wembley Arena in Europe or Madison Square Garden, that’s successful to me. It would be awesome to sell out some coliseums or big amphitheaters but an arena would be awesome for me. That’s what I’m shooting for. It’s a long shot but that’s what I’m going for. “I don’t like to settle for anything. I won’t settle for not being successful. I mean, success is what you make it. Some people are happy with whatever, but I’m not. Not that material things are everything, they’re not. But I want to have a nice house, I want to have a ton of nice cars. If I want to fly to Paris tomorrow that’s what I want to do. I want to make music and make people feel good through my music and the

“I get more nervous going to pick up a girl than I do walking on stage.”

20

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


Opposite Page: One of Alex’s promotional photos from his website, www. musicbyalexhall. com. Left: Alex plays at a recent Singer/ Songwriter event for the John Jarrard Foundation. Below right: Alex with music legend George Strait and at left with Charlie Daniels after playing a show together.

Me and Ge

orge Strait

more people that hear that the better my life will be.” Q: What kinds of music do you like to listen to? A: “I’m a country artist, but I listen to a lot of different stuff. Elvis is my biggest idol. But I love ’50s and ’80s music, those are the greatest eras. But I wasn’t alive. I love Prince and Michael Jackson and Johnny Cash. But John Mayer is one of my influences. I listen to a lot of different styles of music and I feel like you can probably hear that in my style too. I’m not narrow minded in my music as a fan. I like all types.”

ls

d

Me an

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

ie n a D e i Charl

September | October 2014

21


Q: What do you want people to get out of listening to your music? A: “Music for me is a way to express how I feel. I’m not an outgoing person. I’m just a little reserved I guess. I’ve gotten a lot better as I’ve gotten older. But I used to be extremely shy. But I could always speak through my music. ... I worked really hard to become better at it. I still do work really hard to be better. I’m a strong believer in working hard to be the greatest and I really do want to be the greatest. And I feel like I can do that with music. It’s just the way I’m able to express myself. That’s why I work so hard to do it. I want people to hear how I express myself.” Q: You’ve had to work very hard over the years to get to where you are now. How did you manage your time as an aspiring musician and student? A: “No sleep. (Laughing) I don’t sleep very much. Normally I’m asleep by 4 o’clock in the morning and then up by 9. But back then I was having to do the same thing but waking up at 7. I was Left: Gainesville musician Alex Hall stands with singer and songwriter Rivers Rutherford. Photo courtesy Alex Hall. Below: Alex stands outside the Dawsonville racing museum. Photo by Chris Campbell

22

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


getting about 2-3- hours of sleep every night but that’s what I had to do. So I just got used to it.” Q: How do you handle trying to make a name for yourself in such a competitive industry? A: “When the door gets slammed in your face 50 times, like it does in the music industry, in any industry I guess. The music industry is a very hard industry to break into and the door will be slammed. But the thing is when it does you’ve got to break that door down and say ‘No. I’m going to keep on going and not give up.’ Anything you’re doing that’s great is going to be the hardest thing you ever have to do. I feel like if I really want to do this as bad as I think I do, nothing will stop me.”

)

)

“The music industry is a very hard industry to break into and the door will be slammed. But the thing is when it does you’ve got to break that door down and say ‘No. I’m going to keep on going and not give up.”


24

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


“I’m most proud of the people I’m around and the people I work with. With anything you do, it’s all about who you work with and how much they believe in you and how much they can do and you can do with them. I’ve got a really good team.” Q: Do you ever get nervous playing in front of people? A: “I played with Charlie Daniels and he’s a legend. I played with him last Memorial Day at Stone Mountain in front of about 18,000 people I think. That was pretty nerve-wracking. Other than that, I really don’t get that nervous anymore. I’ve played the songs a million times, I’ve played hundreds of shows. I don’t really get nervous anymore. I get more nervous going to pick up a girl than I do walking on stage.” Q: Working such long hours must be difficult on your social life. How do you find balance? A: “It’s not too bad. Any job is going to take your life over really. It’s like a 24-hour job because you never get any sleep and you’re always gone or working. And so that does make it hard to hang out with friends because you’re not ever really around. When you are, you’re pretty exhausted. It’s hard. I’ve lost a lot of friends from doing this because I couldn’t go to the football games on Friday nights. I couldn’t do whatever on Saturday because I was always gone, doing this. It’s just what I did. Without the support of my family it wouldn’t be possible.” Q: What are you most proud of so far? A: “I’m most proud of the people I’m around and the people I work with. With anything you do, it’s all about who you work with and how much they believe in you and how much they can do and you can do with them. I’ve got a really good team. “I’m proud of how far I’ve come playing in a restaurant where no one knew who I was, to selling out some places now. I’m not selling out arenas or anything but I’m selling out some small clubs and stuff. I guess I couldn’t do that with just anyone.” Photo by Chris Campbell homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

25


ABOUT MOORE’S WEALTH MANAGEMENT Moore’s Wealth Management is a family owned firm specializing in conservative investments with non-conservative returns. Scott Moore founded Moore’s Wealth Management with the goal of helping retirees and pre-retirees protect their financial future through independent and conservative financial planning solutions.

“We help our clients protect their financial future through a fiduciary standard of care that always puts their interests first.” - Scott Moore

It is this commitment to a higher standard of care, the Moore level of care, that has earned us the distinction of our founder Scott Moore being named advisor of the year three years running.

Advisor of the Year 2011-2013

Investment advice is offered by Horter Investment Management, LLC, a Registered Investment Adviser. Insurance and annuity products are sold separately through Moore’s Wealth Management. Securities transactions for Horter Investment Management clients are placed through Pershing Advisor Solutions, Trust Company of America, Jefferson National Monument Advisor, Fidelity, Security Benefit Life, FC Stone, and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

“Protecting Your Future” 210 Washington St. SE, Suite # 106 • Gainesville, GA 30501 • 770-535-5000 12600 Deerfield Parkway, Suite # 100 • Alpharetta, Georgia 30004 • 678-566-3590 www.MooresWealthManagement.com


Supporting The Community

“Protecting Your Future”


home charity

Junior League of Gainesville/Hall Helping kids, women and the community Story by Brandee A. Thomas Photos by Times staff The Junior League of Gainesville-Hall County is probably your favorite charity’s favorite organization. With hundreds of members and back-up through its affiliation with Junior Leagues International, the club has the woman-power to lend lots of support, fiscal and physical, to area nonprofits. “The Junior League of Gainesville-Hall County is an organization of women volunteer

28

September | October 2014

leaders who for the past 64 years have been dedicated to making a positive impact in our community,” says current president Callie Flack. “Today, our organization remains committed to promoting volunteerism, developing the potential of women and improving our community. Our members contribute countless volunteer hours each year to projects and programs reflecting our mission of improv-

ing the lives of women and children in Hall County.” The League has used its “done in a day” program to provide volunteer hours to a number of area nonprofits like: Challenged Child and Friends, Boys & Girls Clubs of Hall County and the Edmondson Telford Center for Children. The group’s members also regularly devote time to their own League-sponsored

HOME Living

In North Georgia


home charity

projects. Those projects, like the annual Healthy Kids Expo and Feeding Our Future — where the group distributes food to families in need through the Gainesville City and Hall County schools systems — are designed to help strengthen families. The local chapter was also a founding organizer of WomenSource, a 7-year-old nonprofit whose mission is to help create “personal and professional success for women of all ages and backgrounds in Northeast Georgia.” Every five years, the Gainesville-Hall league awards a Signature Grant to a local nonprofit to help further that group’s mission. The group awarded its first Signature Grant of $30,000 to the Boys & Girls Clubs of Hall County during the 2000-2001 funding cycle. The other beneficiaries were Sonrise Camp and Gateway Domestic Violence Center. Both of those groups received $50,000 to help improve the lives of local children and families, a League mission. Funds for the grants and other projects are generated through the organization’s two annual fundraisers — the Charity Ball and Thrift Sale.

The Junior League now distributes food for its “Feeding the Future” initiative at 1547 Riverside Drive in Gainesville. homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

The Junior League of Gainesville Hall County annual Thrift Sale will be Saturday, Oct. 4, at the Gainesville Civic Center. Opposite page: University of North Georgia student, Alicia Rutzinski, right, volunteering with the Longstreet Clinic, plays a spin the wheel game with 6-year old Willem, left, and his 4-year old brother Joshua Zavala. The game, “teaches kids about allergies and how to combat them,” Said Rutzinski at the annual Child and Family Wellness Expo presented by the Junior League of Gainesville/Hall County at the headquarters of Interactive Neighborhood for Kids in Gainesville.

September | October 2014

29


home charity

This year’s Thrift Sale, which is open to the public, will be held on Saturday, Oct. 4 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Gainesville Civic Center. Admission to the sale is $1. Attendees will have the opportunity to purchase gently-used, low-priced household items and clothing for the entire family. Membership into the League is open to women who are at least 22 years old and who have lived in Hall or a surrounding county for at least six months. For more information, visit www. gainesvillehalljuniorleague.org or call the office at 770-535-1951.

30

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


home charity

Opposite page top: Junior League of Gainesville-Hall County members enjoy snacks inside the Elks Lodge of Riverside Drive. The organization held an open house for members to see the building as the Junior League of Gainesville-Hall County was set to purchase the property. Opposite page bottom: The annual thrift sale brings in a huge crowd each year. Left: Junior League of Gainesville-Hall County member Julia Greene, right, shows member Lisa Geyer one of the rooms at the Elks Lodge on Riverside Drive.

Celebrating Over

Years of Service 1983-2014

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

31


home taste

Rooted in faith Lyn Froehlich’s new cookbook stays grounded in the simplicity of life

32

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


Opposite page: Lyn Froehlich of Gainesville recently released a vegetarian cookbook, “Sweeter Roots.” Left: Her Goat Cheese Tart cools on a plate. Below: A chocolate cake garnished with raspberries and powdered sugar is ready for slicing.

Story by Shannan Finke Photos by Michelle Boaen Jameson The freshness of a tomato picked straight off the vine. Friends and family appearing on your doorstep for visits throughout the afternoon. The homegrown taste of fruits and vegetables farmed in your local community. For Lyn Froehlich, these ingredients are not only the components that make up a good time of fellowship, but also much of the inspiration behind her recently-released inaugural cookbook, “Sweeter Roots.” With the perfect mix of beloved recipes, such as chocolate chip cookies and banana bread, and her own personal twists on these tried-and-true dishes, Froehlich’s “Sweeter Roots” cookbook highlights fresh ingredients and locally sourced fruits and vegetables to create a variety of mealtime favorites. She says her love of being in the kitchen started early in her childhood. A Michigan native who was transplanted to the South, Froehlich remembers experimenting with homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

cake-decorating when her mother would bring home boxes of Jiffy cake mix to bake after cooking classes. While never formally trained, her mother had a habit of being creative in the kitchen, frequently cooking at home and inviting friends and relatives over for family meals. “I found a lot of joy being in the kitchen,” Froehlich says. “There was a sense of community, gathering around the table where we would talk and laugh with our neighbors.” Once she started her own career in the corporate world, Froehlich found herself in the kitchen every spare minute she had. And although her love of cooking had been engrained since childhood, she found her philosophy on food begin to evolve as she obtained more culinary experience. “I loved the whole creativity of combining ingredients. But as I got older, I was going to the grocery store for this produce and not

knowing where it was coming from. I want to eat locally sourced fruits and vegetables, and I always really make an effort to have fruits and vegetables plentiful in my home.” As a result, Froehlich is a frequent visitor to farmers markets everywhere from Gainesville to Athens. She purchases many of her cooking products from local dairy farmers. And in many ways, she acts as a farmer herself, growing her own basil, tomato vines and blueberry plants at her home. It’s this idea of “eating from the Earth” that inspired both the title name and many of the recipes in “Sweeter Roots.” While some of the eats were inspired by friends, every recipe featured in the book was either created or adapted by Froehlich, including her sweet potato cinnamon rolls (one of the author’s personal favorites), herb cheesecake (a twist on the traditional), and quinoa salad, a recipe

“One of my goals of this book is to help people get back to their roots.”

September | October 2014

33


Right: Lyn Froehlich presses a crust into a tart pan. Far right: Lyn holds a rich chocolate cake she garnished with berries. Below: Gazpacho is served up with fresh avocado dip.

Froehlich came up with when experimenting in her kitchen. “One of my goals of this book is to help people get back to their roots,” Froehlich explains of “Sweeter Roots.” “This is something that a lot of our grandmothers did. I love the idea of sitting around the table and looking in people’s eyes, especially in this age of texting. It’s about getting back to our roots and eating good food.” Froehlich’s overseas travels have also influenced her cooking style, placing an international flare on her kitchen here in Gainesville. After taking a pastry class in Paris, a pasta-making course in the Tuscan region of Italy, and a class on edible rice paper in Vietnam, Froehlich has had a world of experience in trying her hand at different cuisines. “Having friends around the world gives me the opportunity to experience different flavors. This summer, we had a lady from Vietnam stay with us for a while, and we enjoyed getting the opportunity to cook together and make curry,” she says. For those who are new to cooking or looking to try their hand at some unique recipes, Froehlich says there are a few tips and tricks to prepping 34

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


successful dishes. First, use real ingredients — if you can’t pronounce something from your ingredient list, substitute it with a food you recognize. Additionally, make sure that you have the right equipment. A cast iron skillet and sharp knife are musthaves. And finally, in case you haven’t already noticed, Froehlich is big on freshness — she suggests picking only the freshest ingredients according to what’s in season and doing your best to eat locally-sourced produce and other products. Of course, picking up a copy of the “Sweeter Roots” cookbook is another way to get the creative juices flowing. “Sweeter Roots” is available through Froehlich’s website, www. sweeterroots.com, on Amazon or in select stores in the Gainesville area. You can expect pages chocked full of colorful illustrations and delicious recipes for every mealtime occasion, promised to “get you back to your roots and eating good food.”

Goat Cheese Tart Crust 3 cups flour 1 teaspoon apple cider 1 egg 1/2 teaspoon sea salt 1/2 cup butter, chilled and cut in small pieces 3 tablespoons ice water Filling 1/2 cup olive oil 1/4 cup real butter 1/2 cup white wine 1 clove crushed garlic 2 large Vidalia onions, chopped 1/2 cup red or yellow sweet peppers, chopped 1 bunch asparagus, chopped into 1/2 inch pieces 12 large eggs 1/2 cup heavy cream 1 tablespoon fresh tarragon, minced 1/2 teaspoon sea salt 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper 8 ounces goat cheese in bite-sized pieces

6 green onions chopped 1/2 cup fresh Parmesan cheese, shredded For crust, add flour, cider, egg and salt and butter in food processor and pulse 3-4 times. Add water and process again. Remove dough and shape into a disk. Wrap in plastic and refrigerate. For filling, heat oil, butter, wine, garlic and Vidalia onions in large skillet over medium heat. Once onions begin to brown, turn heat to low and cook for 15 minutes until onions caramelize.Toss in asparagus and stir frequently. Cook for about two more minutes. Let cool. In a large bowl, whisk eggs, sea salt, cream, tarragon and pepper. Add goat cheese and set aside. Remove dough from refrigerator and press into tart or pie pan.Trim edges. Spoon veggie mixture over crust and pour egg mixture over top. Sprinkle with Parmesan and green onions. Bake for 20 minutes or until golden brown. Garnish with sun-dried tomatoes. Serve warm.

Highly skilled medical professionals offering the most advanced spinal treatments available

Specialty Clinics Spine Intervention, PC, is a premier medical practice that provides targeted care to patients with pain syndromes, specifically spinal-based pain disorders.

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Braxton B. Turner III, MD Steve R. Crider, Jr., MD H. Keith Robinson, MD April J. Bussoletti, APRN, NP-C Becky Caverzasi, APRN, NP-C Tiffany Richey, APRN, NP-C

COMING SOON: OFFICES IN BRASELTON! 2695 Old Winder Hwy, Suite 150 Braselton, GA 30548

September | October 2014

35


home recreation

Hunting for a retreat Top: A hunter takes aim as his dogs await their moment. Photos courtesy Etowah Valley Game Preserve. Above: The inside of the lodge of EVGP. Opposite page: Dogs pose with a hunter’s kill outside of the lodge. Top: A unique and rustic tree house can accommodate two hunters.

36

September | October 2014

Looking for a way to be one with nature while nurturing your hunter gatherer instincts? Head to Dawsonville for a hunting excursion on a 650 acre bird preserve. Etowah Valley Game Preserve is taking reservations for hunting trips, both guided and not. October opens pheasant season and the preserve offers quail and partridge as well. And even if you don’t shoot a thing, the scenery alone is worth the trip. If you plan to stay overnight, check out the lodge and especially the rustic tree house cabin.

According to EVGP, guided flush hunts are their most popular option, but self guided hunts are available if you want to bring your own dog. The group flush hunts are popular for corporate team-building, but the preserve is all about building family traditions, too. Hoping for just a little solitude? They offer solo hunts as well. If you feel like you need a little more of a challenge and are a fairly experienced hunter, check out the British hunts. The British Hunt is exclusively for pheasants and is an adaptation of an HOME Living

In North Georgia


authentic British-style hunt where the pheasants are pressed to fly over the hunters and provide challenging shots. This unique hunt is laid out in a semicircle with seven stations with two hunters at each station. There are seven pheasants released per hunter and 14 released at each rotation, where you advance to a different station to your left so that each hunter rotates through all of the stations. Not sure how to clean your kill? They can do that for you, too. But maybe you just are looking to polish your shooting skills without bringing home any game. Try your hand at clay and feathers, done in cooperation with Etowah

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Valley Sporting Clays located at 619 Sporting Hill Drive in Dawsonville. In fact, this may be where first-timers want to start. Pull! EVGP reminds hunters that a shooting preserve license is now required. The 2 year shooting preserve license is $12. Anyone holding a sportsman license is exempt from having to purchase this license. If you have trouble obtaining a shooting preserve license, EVGP will have them for sale at the lodge. Additionally, Georgia dove season opens at noon on Saturday, Sept. 6, and while EVGP does not offer dove hunts, you can check with the Department of Natural Resources to locate a wildlife

management area. Many WMA public dove fields are reserved solely for quota hunts on opening day, so be sure to review dove hunting rules and regulations to ensure the availabil-

ity of the field you plan to visit. For more information on EVGP, visit etowahvalleygame. com or call 678-410-0983. For more info on dove hunting, visit www.georgiawildlife.org.

September | October 2014

37


home calendar

September Sept. 1 Angela Kelly Art Exhibit 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 1 through Oct. 31. Reception at 5 p.m. Sept. 18. Piedmont College MasonScharfenstein Museum of Art, 567 Georgia St., Demorest. A mixed media exploration of the nature of personal photography and cultural memory. Free. 706-778-8500 ext. 1011, dwhite@piedmont.edu. Sept. 2 Brenau Faculty Recital 7:30. Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Join Priscilla and Keith Jefcoat for an evening of four-hand piano music dedicated to the memory of Dr. Wayne Dempsey. $25 suggested donation to the AllSteinway Initiative. 770-534-6263, amurphy2@brenau.edu. Sept. 4-28 “Mama Won’t Fly” 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St.,

Cumming. 770-781-9178, www. playhousecumming.com. Sept. 5 Lake Chatuge Classic Golf Tournament 8 a.m. to sign in, 9 a.m. to tee off. Brasstown Valley Resort and Spa, 6321 Ga. 76, Young Harris. $80. 706-896-4966, www. mountaintopga.com. Sept. 6 Northeast Georgia Swap Meet Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. 706-335-2301, www.atlantadragway.com. Sept. 6 Buffalo Wild Wings Kick off for Kids 5K 9 a.m. Buffalo Wild Wings Parking lot, 1185 Dawsonville Highway, Gainesville. Proceeds benefit the Gainesville Parks and Recreation Children At Play Fund. $20 preregistration and $25 on race day. Sept. 6 Fiber Arts Workshop: Stitching Together Past and Present 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Brenau University Sellars Gallery, 500 Washington

St. SE, Gainesville. Free. Limited to 12 participants. 770-534-6263, amurphy2@brenau.edu. Sept. 6-7, 12-14 “Mulan Jr.” 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. The Historic Holly Theater, 69 West Main St., Dahlonega. Adults $14, children and students $10. 706-864-3759, hollytheater. com. Sept. 6 Hiawassee Music on the Square 6:30-8:30 p.m. The Square in Downtown Hiawassee Park. Free. www.mountaintopga.com. Sept. 6-Oct. 12 Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association National Show Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, 420 W Main St., Blue Ridge. www.blueridgearts.net. Sept. 7 Times and Places of the Cherokee People 2 p.m. Sautee Nacoochee Center, 283 Ga. 255 N, Sautee Nacoochee. Donations requested. 706-8783300, snca.org.

Sept. 8 Mountain Community Chorus Auditions 6-8:30 p.m. Clegg Recital Hall at Young Harris College, 1 College St., Young Harris. $20. 828-557-9187, www.mountaincommunitychorus. org. Sept. 8 Taste of the Mountains 5-10 p.m. Rabun County Civic Center, 201 West Savannah St., Clayton. Dinner provided by area restaurants, a silent auction, live auction and live entertainment. $50 and up. www.explorerabun.com. Sept. 9 The Sofa Sessions 6 p.m. Second Tuesday of each month. Brenau University Jacobs Building Lobby, 340 Green St., Gainesville. Free. 615-218-6958, bburch@brenau.edu. Sept. 9 Northeast Georgia History Center Forums 7 p.m. Second Tuesday of each month through December. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St NE, Gainesville. Theme differs each month. Admission free for members, $3 for nonmembers. 770-297-5900, www.negahc.org. Sept. 10 Lunch and Learn (Fall Foliage with Posey) 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Jefferson Library, 1000 Washington St., Jefferson. $5 lunch available with preregistration. 706-367-5307, www. crawfordlong.org. Sept. 19-20 The 13th Annual John Jarrard Foundation Concert and Songwriter Festival 6 p.m. Downtown Gainesville Square. Free and open to the public. 770-710-9191, jjackson@ johnjarrardconcert.com, www. johnjarrardfoundation.com.

38

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


home calendar Sept. 11 Patriot Day at Paradise Hills Paradise Hills Resort, 366 Paradise Road, Blairsville. Free. www. paradisehillsresort.com. Sept. 11-15, Sept. 18-Nov. 2 44th Annual Oktoberfest Fridays; 6 p.m. to Midnight Saturdays; 1-7 p.m. Sundays. Helen Festhalle, 1074 Edelweiss Strasse, Helen. 6-10:30 p.m. Fridays $8 per person; Saturdays $10 per person; Sundays free. 706-878-1908, www. helenchamber.com. Sept. 12-14 Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association’s “Fall Plein Air” Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, 420 W. Main St., Blue Ridge. 706-632-2144, www. blueridgearts.net. Through Sept. 12. “Ring Road” art exhibit. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Wednesday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday; and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday, Roy C. Moore Art Gallery, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. 678-717-3707. Through Sept. 12 “Women’s Work” fiber arts exhibit Brenau University Sellars Gallery, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Free. 770-534-6263, amurphy2@ brenau.edu. Sept. 13 Mountain Music and Arts and Crafts Festival 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Vogel State Park, 405 Vogel State Park Road, Blairsville. Appalachian, bluegrass and gospel music; arts and crafts, demonstrations on spinning, blacksmithing and bowl carving; food. 706-745-2628, www. gastateparks.org. Sept. 13-14 WANNAGOFAST.COM 1/2 Mile Shootout and Heavens Landing 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Heaven’s Landing Fly In Community Airstrip, 1271 Little Creek Road, Clayton. $15 per homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Sept. 7 Soggy Doggy Pool Party 1 p.m. dogs under 35 lbs; 3 p.m. dogs 36-70 lbs; 5 p.m. dogs over 70 lbs. Frances Meadows Aquatic Center, 1545 Community Way, Gainesville. $10 per dog, people free. 770531-2680, www.gainesville.org/ recreation. day or $25 for two day pass. 706212-0241, www.skyvalleyevents. com. Sept. 14 Northeast Georgia History Center Family Days 1-4 p.m. Second Sunday of each month through December. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Free. 770-297-5900, www.negahc. org. Sept. 15 Dr. Jerico Vasquez, Guest Pianist 7:30 p.m. John Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Hosch Theatre, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. 770534-4764, www.brenau.edu/music. Sept. 16 Stage Tour: “Sleeping Beauty” 6 p.m. Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Join Director Gay Hammond for a sneak peek at how we create the magic of this classic fairy tale. Free. Through Sept. 18. “Outdoor Lifeworks” exhibit by Didi Dunphy 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday; 3-7 p.m. on Sunday. Bob Owens Art Gallery, 82 College Circle, Dahlonega. Free. 706-8641400, ung.edu. Sept. 18 GMFB’s Annual Empty Bowl Lunch 11a.m to 1 p.m (drop-in)First Baptist Church Gainesville Banquet Hall. $25. 770-534-4111 or email kay@gamountainfoodbank.org.

Sept. 19 POW MIA Day 6 p.m., Veteran’s Memorial Park, Dawsonville. Veterans Affairs of Dawson County, 706-265-6278. Sept. 19-21 NOPI Nationals 6-11 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday. Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. $15 general admission Friday, $25 general admission Saturday and Sunday. 706-335-2301, www. atlantadragway.com. Sept. 20 6th annual Clermont Cupcake Challenge 5K and 1K Road Race 1K Road Race at 7:45 a.m., 5K Road Race at 8 a.m. Concord Baptist Church Parking Lot, 640 Main St., Clermont. $20 for 5K Run/Walk, $15 for 1K Fun Run. Register at runnersfit.com/cupcake. 770-536-5509, Sarge30506@ bellsouth.net. Sept. 20 Fall is HERE! Braselton Gallery 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. At Braselton Gallery, artists are bringing in autumn creations: seasonal pottery, scarves and wraps, new jewelry and painting. Customer who makes the 20th purchase of the day will win a gift basket of fall treats. 678-

960.8977, BraseltonGallery.com. Sept. 20 Victorian Tea (Naughty Women/Lovely Tea with Sloan Meyers) 4-6 p.m. Crawford Long Museum, 28 College St., Jefferson. $20 for members, $25 for non-members. Space is limited. 706-367-5307, www.crawfordlong.org. Sept. 20 Movie Under the Stars Dusk. Braselton Park. Sept. 20 2014 YearOne Braselton Bash Noon to 7 p.m. YearOne, 1001 Cherry Drive, Braselton. Foose select & Participant Vote Car Show. $25 minimum donation for Car show entry or $100 Foose Select 100 group. Spectators free, donation requested. Shows benefit the Hot Rodders Children’s Charity. www. hotrodderschildrenscharity.org. Sept. 20-21 2nd Annual Celebrate Autumn Arts and Crafts Show 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 20; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 21. North Georgia Technical College, 121 Meeks Ave., Blairsville. Juried arts and crafts show with food, inside and outside booths. Free. 706-896-0932, www. artguildstore.com.

September | October 2014

39


home calendar Sept. 21 SuperNova Organ Series with Katie Minion 4 p.m. Piedmont College Chapel, 992 Central Ave., Demorest. Organist Katie Minion is a doctoral student in organ performance at Indiana University. Free. 706778-8500 ext. 1211, whinson@ piedmont.edu. Sept. 20 “What is Voice – REALLY!?” 7:30 p.m. Brenau University John Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Hosch Theatre, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. An evening of fun for celebrating the voice with high school chorus singers from the Brenau area. 770-538-4764, www. brenau.edu/music. Sept. 22 “Belongings Once Were” art exhibit 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Wednesday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday; and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday through Sept. 12. Roy C. Moore Art Gallery, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. 678717-3707. Sept.24 Educators’ Open House. 3:30-6:30 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Drop-in reception showcasing the History Center’s in-house and outreach programs. Free. 770-297-5900, www.negahc. org. Sept. 25 “All Creatures Great and Small” exhibit Brenau University Sellars Gallery, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Free. 770-534-6263, amurphy2@ brenau.edu. Sept. 25 Masters in the Art of Nursing: Healers Among Us Awards Ceremony 8:30 a.m. to noon. Whalen Auditorium at Featherbone Communiversity, 1001 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. Celebrating the careers of some of the top health 40

September | October 2014

Sept. 20 Art in the Square 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Historic Gainesville Square, Gainesville. Free. Artists, vendors and more.

care providers in the community. Free. 770-534-6206, jcollier@ brenau.edu. Sept. 25 “Outsiders” exhibit by Terry Rowlett 8 a.m. to 8 p.m., Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturday; 3-7 p.m. on Sunday. Through Oct. 30. Bob Owens Art Gallery, 82 College Circle, Dahlonega. Free. 706-864-1400, ung.edu. Sept. 26 WonderQuest:Theater for Young Audiences presents “Sleeping Beauty,” adapted by Gay Hammond 7:30 p.m. through Oct. 4. Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Prices vary. 678-7173624, gta.ung.edu. Sept. 26-27 HCMG Fall Garden Expo Chicopee Woods Agricultural Center, 1855 Calvary Church Road, Gainesville. $2 admission per adult. Plant and garden goods vendors, plus garden art, photography, and food vendors. www.hallmastergardeners.com. Sept. 26-28 St. Francis of Assisi Festival. Noon to midnight. St. Francis of Assissi, 3717 Ga. 515, Blairsville. www.mountaintopga.com.678717-3624. Sept. 27 Agrifest & Pottery Comes to Town 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Freedom Park, Downtown Cleveland. 706-8653225, www.whitecountychamber. org.

Sept. 27 Gear Jam Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. 706-335-2301, www.atlantadragway.com. Sept. 27 Run the Point 5K 8 a.m. Lanier Point Park, 1579 Lee Waldrip Drive, Gainesville. $20 pre-registration and $25 on race day. 770-531-2680, www. gainesville.org/recreation, www. active.com. Sept. 28 2nd Annual Emergency Preparedness Fair 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Interactive Neighborhood for Kids, 999 Chestnut St. SE, Gainesville. Enjoy activities and games as well as preparedness tips and close-up looks at several emergency preparedness vehicles. Free emergency backpacks while supplies last. Free. 770-536-1900, inkfun.org. Sept. 30 Manhattan Piano Trio 7:30 p.m. Piedmont College Chapel, 992 Central Ave., Demorest. Tickets are available at the door. $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Piedmont faculty, staff, and students free. 706-

778-8500 ext. 1211, whinson@ piedmont.edu.

October

Oct. 1 “Woven Together:Tapestry Weavers South” exhibit Open during library hours. Library and Technology Center, Georgia Circle, Dahlonega. Free. 866-5970002. Oct. 1 Northeast Georgia Writers Memoir Interactive Workshop 1-3 p.m. Peach State Bank and Trust, 325 Washington St., Gainesville. Led by Georgia Author of the Year Martha Ezzard. Free. www.negawriters.org. Oct. 2 Symphonic Band Concert. 7-8 p.m. Ed Cabell Theater, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. 678-717-3624. Oct. 2-5 “Sweet Charity” 7:30 p.m. Oct. 2-4; 2 p.m. Oct. 5. Piedmont College Swanson Center Mainstage, 365 College Drive, Demorest. Bright and sophisticated musical comedy by Cy Coleman HOME Living

In North Georgia


home calendar and Neil Simon. $10 for adults and $5 for students and seniors. Piedmont faculty, staff, and students admitted free. 706-778-8500 ext. 1355, reservations@piedmont.edu. Oct. 2-12 Cumming County Fair and Festival 4-10 p.m. Monday through Thursday; 4 p.m. to midnight Friday; 10 a.m. to Midnight Saturday; 12:30-9 p.m. Sunday. Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming. Adults $7, children $3, children younger than 4 free. Parking $3. 770-781-3491, www. cummingfair.net. Oct. 3 The Oak Ridge Boys in Concert 8 p.m. Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming. 770781-3491, www.cummingfair.net. Oct. 4 Downtown Clayton Sidewalk Art Show and Sale 10 a.m. 4 p.m. Downtown Clayton. 706-212-0241, skyvalleyevents.com. Oct. 4 Mountain Music Medicine Show

8 p.m. The Historic Holly Theater, 69 West Main St., Dahlonega. $1825. 706-864-3759, hollytheater.com. Oct. 4 Northeast Georgia Swap Meet Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. 706-335-2301, www.atlantadragway.com. Oct. 4 Sautee Jamboree. Noon to midnight Sautee Nacoochee Center, 283 Ga. 255 N, Sautee Nacoochee. Free. 706-878-3300, snca.org. Oct. 4 Foxfire Mountaineer Festival 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Rabun County Civic Center/Clayton City Hall Complex, Ga. 76 W, Clayton. The 20th annual event will feature old-fashioned fun, food, crafts, and music. $5 per person; up to 5 children per family free. 706746-5828, foxfiremountaineer.org, foxfire.org. Oct. 4 Animals and ART! 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Braselton Gallery, 36 Frances St., Braselton.

Professional photographer will be on hand to take pet portraits. Adoption center, health and safety tips for your pets, plenty of animal-themed paintings and art, pet dishes, and door prizes. 678960.8977, BraseltonGallery.com, Facebook.com/BraseltonGallery. Oct. 4-5 Indian Summer Festival 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Woody Gap School, 2331 Ga. 60, Suches. Arts and crafts, antiques, pottery, folk art, food. Free. 706-747-2401, www.indiansummerfestival.org. Oct. 5 The Run Above the Clouds 10K Road Race 2331 Ga. 60, Suches. 706-7472401, www.indiansummerfestival. org. Oct. 7 Colt Ford in Concert 8 p.m. Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming. 770781-3491, www.cummingfair.net. Oct. 9 The Charlie Daniels Band in Concert 8 p.m. Cumming Fairgrounds, 235

Castleberry Road, Cumming. 770781-3491, www.cummingfair.net. Oct. 9 2nd Annual Night of the Mountain Lion Reserve Raffle 6 p.m. Young Harris College Recreation and Fitness Center, 1 College St., Young Harris. Fundraiser for women’s basketball team. www.mountaintopga.com. Through Oct. 10 Downtown Braselton Farmers Market 4-7 p.m. . Harrison St. DowntownBraselton.com. Oct. 10 Jazz Band concert 8-9:30 p.m. Gloria Shott Performance Hall, 322 Georgia Circle, Dahlonega. Free. 706-8641423. Oct. 10-12, 24-26, 31, Nov. 1-2 “Macbeth.” 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. The Historic Holly Theater, 69 West Main St., Dahlonega. Adults $18, children and students $12. 706-864-3759, hollytheater. com. Oct. 10-11 The Atlanta $10,000 Nostalgia Race Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. 706-335-2301, www.atlantadragway.com. Oct. 10-11 Brenau University 12th Annual Mock Mediation Invitational Tournament Brenau University John Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Banks Recital Hall, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. 770-534-6297, kfrank@brenau.edu. Oct. 4 Taste of Gainesville 6-9 p.m. Lake Lanier Olympic Venue at Clarks Bridge Park, 3105 Clarks Bridge Road, Gainesville. $25 in advance; $30 at the door. 770-287-0077, www.lakelanierrowing.org.

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

41


home calendar

Oct. 10-18 Georgia Mountain Fall Festival Georgia Mountain Fairgrounds, 1311 Music Hall Road, Hiawassee. Music, Food and Crafts. 706-8964191, www.mountaintopga.com. Through Oct. 11 Atlanta Collage Society Exhibition Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St., Gainesville. quinlanartscenter.org, 770-5362575. Oct. 11 Choices Pregnancy Care Center Inaugural 5K Run/ Walk 11:30 a.m. Lakeview Academy, 796 Lakeview Drive, Gainesville. $25 per person or $75 for a family of 4 through Oct. 2. $30 on race day. 678-928-4360, www. choicespregnancypartners.org. Oct. 11 27th annual Big Red Apple Festival 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Downtown Cornelia, Cornelia. Free. 770778-8585 ext. 280, bht@ corneliageorgia.org, www. explorecornelia.com. Oct. 11 Great ARTdoors Festival at Hambidge The Hambidge Center, 105 Hambidge Court, Rabun Gap. Free. www.hambidge.org. Oct. 11 Sorghum Parade 11 a.m. Downtown on the Square, Blairsville. Hundreds of people line the streets to see the floats, bands and other crowd pleasers. Free. 706-745-4745, www. blairsvillesorghumfestival.com. Oct. 11-12, 18-19 Blairsville Sorghum Festival 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Meeks Park, 490 Meeks Park Road, Blairsville. Celebrate the art of sourghum syrup making while enjoying arts and crafts, live music and other fall activities. Free. 706-745-5789, 42

September | October 2014

www.blairsvillesorghumfestival.com. Oct. 11 and 18 Traditional Square Dance 8 p.m. Old Middle School Gym, School Circle, Blairsville. 706-7455789. Oct. 13 “I Get By with a Little Help from My Friends” faculty recital Brenau Downtown Center, Theatre on the Square, 301 Main St. SW, Gainesville. Free. $25 suggested donation to the All-Steinway Initiative. 770-538-4764, www. brenau.edu/music. Oct. 14 Jazz Band concert 7:30 p.m. Ed Cabell Theater, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. 678-717-3624. Oct. 14-19 Fall Classic Tennis Tournament Longwood Tennis Center, 20 Pearl Nix Parkway, NW Gainesville. City Resident Singles $15; non-resident singles $20; city resident doubles split $12.50; non-resident doubles split $17.50. 770-531-2680 to register by Oct. 9. Oct. 17-Nov. 9 “Gypsy” 8 p.m. Thursday through Saturday; 3 p.m. Sunday. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming. 770-781-9178, www. playhousecumming.com. Oct. 18 Symphonic Band concert 7-8 p.m. Ed Cabell Theater, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. 678-717-3624. Oct. 18 Piano concert by Benjamin Burrell 7:30 p.m. Piedmont College Chapel, 992 Central Ave., Demorest. Benjamin Burrell, a native of Cornelia, has performed in Europe, Asia, and throughout the United States. 706-778-8500 ext. 1211, whinson@piedmont.edu.

Oct. 18 Nightfall Family Festival Sunset. Elachee Nature Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $5. Elachee members and children younger than two free. 770-5351976, www.elachee.org. Oct. 18 1st annual Fall Festival at Sky Valley 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sky Valley. Free. www.explorerabun.com. Oct. 18 Good Neighbors Car Show 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. United Community Bank Parking Lot, 125 Ga. 515, Blairsville. More than 200 cars 828837-8539, 706-745-3985. Oct. 18 Fall Hoedown at Vogel State Park Noon to 8:30 p.m. Vogel State Park, 405 Vogel State Park Road, Blairsville. Celebrate Autumn’s arrival with a cake walk, hayrides, chili and drinks, camfire and dancing, and a professional storyteller around a bonfire. $3 per person for hayrides. $5 parking. 706-745-2628, www.gastateparks. org. Oct. 18 Art-Oberfest 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. The Helen Arts and Heritage Center, 25 Chattahoochee Strasse, Helen. Free. 706-878-3933, helenarts.org. Oct. 18-19 5th annual Harvest Balloon Festival 7004 Lake Sterling Blvd., Flowery Branch, 770-967-9777 jlanders@ newlandco.com Oct. 19 Lillies of the Valley Concert 2 p.m. Sautee Nacoochee Center, 283 Ga. 255 N, Sautee Nacoochee. 706-878-3300, snca.org. Oct. 18-19 Gold Rush Days All-day event. Historic Dahlonega Square, Dahlonega. Food, crafts and entertainment. Parade featuring

Golden Eagle Band and UNG Corps of Cadets. Free. 706-8643513. Oct. 18-Nov. 15 SAAG National Show Blue Ridge Mountains Arts Association, 420 West Main St., Blue Ridge. 706-632-2144, www. blueridgearts.net. Oct. 20 Il Portale Musicale Honors 7:30 p.m. Brenau University Pearce Auditorium, 202 Boulevard, Gainesville. Free. 770-538-4764, www.brenau.edu/music. Oct. 21 Stage Tour: “Oklahoma!” 6 p.m. Brenau University Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Join GTA Artistic Director Jim Hammond for a peek behind the scenes at GTA’s 35th season with Rodgers & Hammerstein’s landmark American musical. Free. 678-717-3624, www. gainesvilleTHEATREalliance.org. Oct. 23 Symphonic Band concert 8 p.m. Hoag Auditorium, 82 College Circle, Dahlonega. Free. 706-864-1423. Oct. 23 Taste of History:The First Ladies of Georgia 11:30 a.m. First Baptist Church, 751 Green St. NW, Gainesville. Sandra Deal will be one of the keynote speakers. 770-297-5900. Oct. 23 Terri Dilling art exhibit 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Wednesday; 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Thursday; and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday through Nov. 20. Roy C. Moore Art Gallery, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. 678717-3707. Oct. 23 Mother-Son Halloween Dance 5:30-8:30 p.m. Gainesville Civic Center, 830 Green St. NE, Gainesville. Catered dinner, dancing and costume contest. City HOME Living

In North Georgia


home calendar residents $50 per couple; nonresidents $60. Sibling discounts available. Must preregister by Oct. 18. 770-531-2680, www.gainesville. org/recreation.

Oct. 25 Riverkeepers Clean Up Day Braselton Community Room & Braselton Riverwalk. Ywise@ braselton.net.

Through Oct. 24 YearOne Fast Friday “Legal” Street Racing Fridays, Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. 706335-2301, www.atlantadragway. com.

Oct. 25 Trick or Treat Noon to 1 p.m. Main St., Clayton. Free. www.explorerabun.com.

Oct. 24-25 5th Annual Hillbilly Hog BBQ Throwdown and Fall Leaf Festival Babyland General Hospital, 300 N.O.K. Drive, Cleveland. Benefits United Way of White County. Free. 706-778-8585 ext. 280, www. hillbillyhogbbq.com. Oct. 24-25 Ghost Walk 6-8 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Departures scheduled every 20 minutes. Stops at seven ghostly locations on and near the Brenau campus. Must be 10 years of age or older. $10 for members, $12 for non-members. 770-297-5900, www.negahc.org. Oct. 24-26 11th Semi-Annual Braselton Antique and Holiday Festival Noon to 7 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Downtown Braselton. Featuring more than 120 booths of antiques, furniture, vintage jewelry, folk pottery, local artists and holiday décor. Free parking and admission. Facebook.com/ BraseltonAntiqueFestival. Oct. 24-26 Haints and Saints Cemetery Tour 6:30-10 p.m. Friday; 5-10 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday. Downtown Jefferson and Woodbine Cemetery, Jefferson. $15 adults ages 13 and up, $10 children ages 6-12, and $15 for all on Sunday. 706-367-5307, crawfordlong.org.

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Oct. 25 Southeast Charity Challenge Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. 706-335-2301, www.atlantadragway.com. Oct. 25 Harvest Festival At Crane Creek Vineyards 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Cranecreek Vineyards, 916 Crane Creek Road, Young Harris. 706-379-1236. Oct. 25-26 47th Annual Moonshine Festival 8 a.m. to 6 p.m., downtown Dawsonville. Moonshine run Oct. 25 at 10 a.m. Cars, parade, live entertainment, artists, food. Free. www.kareforkids.us/festival.html, 706-216-5273.

Oct. 30 Piedmont Cantabile Fall Concert 5 p.m. Brooks Hall, Center for Worship and Music, 992 Central Ave., Demorest. Free. 706778-8500 ext. 1211, whinson@ piedmont.edu. Oct. 31 Hometown Halloween On The Square 5:30-7:30 p.m. Downtown Blairsville. Games, costume contests and trick-or-treating. Free. 706-9944837, www.downtownblairsville. com.

Research and Education Center, 195 Georgia Mountain Experiment Station Road, Blairsville. www.caes. uga.edu. Through October Burt’s Pumpkin Farm 5 Burt’s Farm Road, Dawsonville. 770-265-3701, www.burtsfarm. com. Through October Buck’s Corn Maze 1923 New Hope Road, Dawsonville. $7-$8. 706-344-8834, www.buckscornmaze.com.

Oct. 31 Trunk-or-Treat 4-7 p.m. Rock Creek Park, 445 Martin Road, Dawsonville. Free. bhamil@dawsoncounty.org

Through October Bradley’s Pumpkin Patch and Christmas Trees 25 Lawrence Drive, Dawsonville. 770-380-3636, www. bradleypumpkinpatch.com.

Oct. 31 Cool Season Gardening Seminar 10 a.m. Georgia Mountain

Through October Uncle Shuck’s Corn Maze 525 Ga. 53, Dawsonville. 770-7726223, www.uncleshucks.com.

Oct. 26 Violin concert by Rachael Fisher 4 p.m. Piedmont College Chapel, 992 Central Ave., Demorest. Free. 706-778-8500 ext. 1211, whinson@piedmont.edu. Oct. 27 In Praise of Music 7:30 p.m. Brenau University John Burd Center for the Performing Arts, Atrium, 429 Academy St., Gainesville. Vocal Chamber Ensemble and Director Bobby Ivey perform songs from Baroque and beyond. 770-538-4764, www. brenau.edu/music. Oct. 25 Trick or Treating on the Trail 3-5 p.m. Midtown Greenway, 682 Grove St., Gainesville. For children ages 12 and under. Free.

September | October 2014

43


home around town Atlanta Collage Society exhibition and reception Aug. 21, 2014

A large crowd gathered at the Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St., Gainesville, for the opening of the show which also featured several local artists in the smaller galleries. The show will remain open until Oct. 11.

44

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


home around town

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

45


home around town

BULLI Ice Cream Social Aug. 12, 2014 Braselton’s Brenau University Learning & Leisure Institute (BULLI) fall term registration kicked off on Aug. 12 at Mayfield Dairy. Braselton Town Manager Jennifer Dees welcomed those who were in attendance to register and gain more information about BULLI.

46

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


home around town

Celebrate Braselton July 4, 2014 Braselton’s Fourth of July celebration also included a festival in Braselton Park with music, face painting and train rides for the kids, booths of merchandise and lots of food vendors offering snow cones to cool you off and funnel cakes as well as fireworks and a parade through town.

A new chapter begins...

The Waterford at Oakwood is an Assisted Living and Memory Care community that offers services including: • 24-hour staffing • Medication management • Exercise programs • Recreation and entertainment programming

• Bathing, dressing and grooming assistance • 24-hour access to licensed nurses • Spacious floor plans with full sized kitchenettes

• Spacious bathrooms and walk-in showers • Emergency response system • Individual climate control • All utilities, except basic cable and telephone

4251 Hudson Drive, Oakwood, GA 30566 • 770-297-6900 • www.capitalsenior.com/waterfordatoakwood homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

47


home around town

Stepping Out for Stepping Stones benefit concert Aug. 17, 2014 Hosted by Family Promise of Hall County and Flowery Branch United Methodist Church, the Stepping Out for Stepping Stones benefit concert featured multiple Christian-based music performances to raise funds for the Stepping Stones Transitional House, located in downtown Flowery Branch near the church.

48

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


home around town

Sandy Beaver Entrepreneurial Awards Aug. 15 2014 Frank Norton Sr. posed with Riverside Military Academy President James Benson after being awarded the first Sandy Beaver Entrepreneurial Award. Carrie McClain Hatfield received the Sandy Beaver Entrepreneurial Leadershiip Award presented posthumously to her late husband Joe S. Hatfield at Riverside Military Academy. Her son, Joe M. Hatfield, left, accepted the first of the two awards for his father.

ALS Ice Bucket Brenau Challenge Aug .18, 2014 The ALS ice bucket challenge has arrived in Gainesville. The nationally ranked Brenau University competitive cheerleading squad was challenged on Facebook by Chestatee High junior varsity cheerleader Kaylee Grace Lucas to take the ALS ice bucket challenge. The challenge is raising funds for research on amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

September | October 2014

49


home around town

2014 Hero’s Ball Aug. 16, 2014 The Hero’s Ball is a night to show support for the men and women who risk their lives every day to keep our community safe as well as support for Operation One Voice, an organization that benefits families of wounded and fallen soldiers. The annual Hero’s Ball, which recognizes the West Jackson Fire Department, Braselton Police Department and the Jackson County Sheriff ’s Office, took place at the Braselton-Stover House.

50

September | October 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


Introducing

r iver S tone meDical

comPleX

Braselton, Georgia

MEDICAL OFFICE • GENERAL OFFICE • MEDICAL TIME SHARE LEASES

Opportunity to participate and locate your practice in the fastest growing locations in North Georgia.

NOW PRE-LEASING

LOCATED AT THE INTERSECTION OF HWY 211 & STATE ROUTE 347. ADJACENT TO THE NEW NORTHEAST GEORGIA MEDICAL CENTER

FUNARI REALTY

6323 Grand Hickory Drive, 100G Braselton, GA 30517

Office: 770.967.9889

www.Funari

realty.com

Tony Funari 404-271-3710

Brenda Branch 770-654-5838

Tracy Jordan 706-540-8096


Home Living in North Georgia  

September/October 2014

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you