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The Art of Brenau University collection includes pieces by modern masters

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Free Can Ope cer n Sem Mic in July ar 17

Open House & Cancer Open Mic Seminar Comprehensive chemotheraphy and infusion services available in Medical Plaza 1 Dr. Timothy Carey, a member of Longstreet Cancer Center, and Dr. Christina Saurel, a member of Northeast Georgia Diagnostic Clinic, provide comprehensive care to patients with cancer or blood disorders, including chemotherapy and infusion services, at our new location in Medical Plaza 1.

Stop by to enjoy hors d’oeuvres and tour the new medical oncology suite. Then, join us for our cancer open mic seminar – a great time to ask our physicians any cancerrelated questions you have!

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Longstreet Cancer Center 770-297-5700

Christina A. Saurel, MD

Northeast Georgia Diagnostic Clinic 770-536-9864

Thursday, July 17, 5 - 7 p.m. Medical Plaza 1, Suite 150 Open House and Meet and Greet: 5 - 6 p.m. Cancer Open Mic Seminar: 6 - 7 p.m. Expert physician panel includes: *Timothy Carey, MD - medical oncologist, Longstreet Cancer Center **Casey Graybeal, MD - general surgeon, NGPG Surgical Associates *Christina Saurel, MD - medical oncologist, Northeast Georgia Diagnostic Clinic Geoffrey Weidner, MD - radiation oncologist, Northeast Georgia Cancer Specialists

Register online at nghs.com/cancer-open-mic or by calling 770-219-3840. *Seeing patients in Medical Plaza 1 **Seeing patients in Thompson Mill Medical Offices 3

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Medical Plaza 1 5875 Thompson Mill Road Suite 150 Hoschton, GA 30548 nghs.com/cancer-braselton

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What’s Inside

July |August 2014

16 Inside Every Issue

Business

6 40 44

8

From the Editor Calendar Around Town

On the Cover

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34

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S isters Britney Vickery and Ivy Hall left lives as stay-at-home moms and put their monograms on a new venture: Initials, Inc., a handbag and home organization success story.

Brenau University in Gainesville has gathered a collection of fine art that would make any cosmopolitan university proud. The gallery was built largely by donations from New York art collectors Herbert and Dorothy Vogel. It features paintings, photographs and other media, many created by female artists, depicting several modern periods of American art history.

Charity 12 The American Legion is more than

a group of former service members waving flags in parades. The local chapter supports numerous organizations and events that celebrate its patriotic spirit.

Recreation 28

 vid hunter Russell Vandiver provides A tips on bagging a prize gobbler during turkey season. His key advice? Patience. HOME Living

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30 24 12 Taste of Home

Home & Garden

30

34  The North Georgia Daylily Society gathers lovers of the sun-worshipping bloom

A  ntebellum, Chef Nick St. Clair’s homage to Southern food and hospitality, welcomes diners to Flowery Branch with a warmth that extends from the plate to the atmosphere.

to share tips, ideas and fellowship.

Lifestyle 36

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

A  n annual car show held by the Vietnam Veterans of Gainesville celebrated the classic styling of retro rides built for a space-age future. July | August 2014

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From the Editor Summer fun in North Georgia Being from South Georgia, I find one of the best things about Hall and the surrounding counties is the weather. No annoying gnats gnawing at your face and relatively low humidity make for pleasant outdoor activities. And North Georgia is full of things to do, see and explore. Whether you are a classic car enthusiast (check out page 36) or you prefer to take in a show at The Cumming Playhouse (page 10), you will never be left sitting on the porch melting between the floorboards to the tune of hundreds of deafening cicadas. (Not that I hated my childhood, mind you.) Turn to page 30 for a taste of summer with our Taste of HOME or to page 34 to learn about the North Georgia Daylily Society. And you can always stay in the air-conditioned galleries of Brenau University to see some of the best modern art around. And as always, send us your story ideas and pictures from your events to be featured in the Around Town section.

M

J

ichelle ameson

Michelle Boaen Jameson editor@homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Editor Michelle Boaen Jameson Advertising Director Sherrie Jones Advertising Sales Trent Sexton Melissa Sizemore Elizabeth Brumbelow Graphic Design Michelle Boaen Jameson Chris Campbell Chelsea Tench Production Support Katherine Hake April Seymour Kerri Ivie Dana Erwin Betty Thompson Contributing Photographers The Times staff

HOME Magazine, a division of: The Times Gainesville, GA The Paper Hoschton, GA A Morris Multimedia Inc. property 345 Green St. | Gainesville, GA 30501 | 770-718-3421

www.homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

HOME: Living in North Georgia reserves the right to refuse advertisements for any reason. Acceptance of advertising does not mean or imply the services or product is endorsed or recommended by HOME: Living in North Georgia. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by an information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from Morris Multimedia Inc. Although every precaution is taken to ensure accuracy of published materials, Morris Multimedia cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by its authors. Manuscripts, artwork, photography, inquiries and submitted materials are welcome.

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home business

Money in monograms

North Georgia home to Initials, Inc. Story by Brandee A. Thomas Photos courtesy Initials, Inc. On their individual journeys to personal fulfillment, sisters and business partners Britney Vickery and Ivy Hall found themselves at a crossroads that would ultimately change the course of their lives and the lives of thousands of others. The road to the left would eventually lead them back to the lives they’d enjoyed as fulltime stay-at-home moms and part-time crafters. In the opposite direction was a brand new adventure with their names initialed all over it. After a little deliberation, they chose to go the way of the unknown — one of many shrewd decisions that has helped build Initials, Inc. into the multimillion-dollar handbag and home organization powerhouse that it is today. “We officially launched Initials, Inc. in February in 2005,” recalls chief creative officer Ivy Hall, from the company’s headquarters in Clarkesville. “As a company, we evolved from fulfilling a personal need to having 14,000 consultants nationwide and being represented in all 50 states.” The direct-sales company was born from independent business ventures that each of the sisters launched on their own. “We both had our first children within 3 months of each other. I was living in Texas at the time and Brit was in Georgia. We loved being at home with our kids, but also realized that in order to pour into our kids and to be good moms, we needed a little something for ourselves so we started home-based businesses,” Hall recalls. “I started wanting things for my daughter that I couldn’t find in the marketplace, so I 8

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The founders of Initials, Inc., Britney Vickery and Ivy Hall at a national conference.

started developing products, sewing them and eventually started selling my designs to boutiques in Houston.” “My business was doing embroidery on handbags,” adds chief executive officer Britney Vickery. “Both our children have very unique names and we couldn’t find their names on anything. That’s how the concept of Initials, Inc. was born. We actually named the company on a giant Post-It in my dining room.” Although they had an idea of the products they wanted to sell, they weren’t exactly sure how they would get their merchandise to buyers. “Brit and I always talk about direct selling finding us,” Hall says. “We weren’t really aware of the model

early on, but we knew as new moms that we needed to create something to put our family first but that would also allow us to have our wells filled, too We had women come up to us and say they wanted to participate but they didn’t want to sew, so they said, ‘What if I sell it for you and you pay me a commission?’ “We ignored that for a year and then we decided to give it a try to see if it worked. And it did.” Direct-selling “embodies the American dream,” Hall says. “It meets you where you are. The plan is laid out for you and you get to decide where you want to be in that plan,” she explains. “The harder you work and the more time you devote to it, the more you can make. We have some consultants who are just looking HOME Living

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home business

to make a couple of hundred dollars a month, while there are others who are earning well into six-figure incomes. “Direct selling allows you to have a career on your own terms.” Direct sells not only allows their consultants more flexibility in setting their own schedules, it also provides Vickery and Hall the capability to pour more of their resources into their employees since there’s no brickand - mortar store to maintain. “The core of our business is about supporting women to really find and live their purpose,” Hall says. “Because we don’t have a store to take care of, we’re able to focus more on building relationships and people. We always say that we’re not in the bag business, we’re in the people business. Bags are just what we sell.” Although some of those sales come through their website, www.initials-inc.com, after the first purchase, the company introduces consumers to a consultant in their area. “We want to get them tied in with a consultant who’s actually in their community,” Vickery says. “Our company is built on relationships.” The Initials, Inc. Boot Camp, leadership homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

retreats and the annual conference are just a few of the opportunities that the founders use to help build relationships with their consultants and thus consumers as well. Their team-building methods have helped Initials, Inc. earn recognition as one of America’s Fastest Growing Companies according to Inc. Magazine. Last year, Initials moved up more than 700 slots on the publication’s list of 5,000 top companies. In 2013, with revenue topping more than $12 million, Initials landed in the No. 762 slot. “The first year we made the list we were ranked at 1,555, so for us to make such a big jump, it says that as a company what we’re doing is leaps and bounds above what others are doing. It says we’re growing in a healthy way,” Vickery says. That healthy growth has increased to include everything from clutch purses to rolling coolers and weekender bags. “We design our own products and prints in-house. Inspiration is all around,” Hall says. “We’re constantly looking at what people are expecting in product and experiences. Having a beautiful bag is great, but it has to be functional, too.” Although they have a few male consultants, for the most part, the Initials, Inc. sales force is primarily women. Just as the design team must find a harmonious marriage between function and fashion, Vickery also encourages their workforce to look for that same sort of harmony in their business and personal lives. “As women, mothers, sisters and all the other roles we play, there’s a lot of talk about balance,” Vickery says. “Remove the word from your vocabulary and replace it with harmony. Harmony is a more realistic goal to strive toward. Harmony doesn’t mean that everything is equally weighted at all times. There will be times when your family needs more of your attention than work does and vice versa. And that’s OK.

“Harmony is fluid. We’re fooling ourselves if we’re striving for a constant 50/50 balance.” Through their iCare Foundation, Vickery and Hall are able to balance their desires to make their business a success with their need to give back. “We designate a product out of each catalog to raise funds for the foundation. A portion of those sales goes directly into iCare and 100 percent of those funds goes to a designated recipient,” Hall says. For the first year of this initiative, the company partnered with a group in Africa that was building a training center for disabled adults. Most recently, they’ve partnered with Bethany Christian Services. “Five dollars from every $20 YBL case goes into funding an adoption through Bethany. Since August, we’ve fully funded 10 adoptions,” Hall says. “As we got to the close of 2012, we hit a big growth curve, which gave us a huge platform to help others,” Vickery added. “We still do small things on the side to support nonprofits in our community. It’s nice to have a big nationwide rally cry that our entire team can get behind, but it’s also nice to feel like we’re making an impact locally, too.” Undoubtedly, the sisters’ legacy will be forever linked with their successes as the founders of Initials, Inc., but they also hope their names are mentioned for the connections they’ve built and the people they’ve helped along the way. “Sometimes, I lay in bed and think about those people who have been matched for an adoption with Bethany,” Vickery says. “Who knows what impact that has made on those little human beings who now have someone to call mom and dad?” “Our grandmother was abandoned in a park bathroom at age of 3,” Hall says. “Eventually, she was adopted by Mrs. Brinson and that literally changed everything about our family.” July | August 2014

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home entertainment

A cultural hot spot

Cumming Playhouse brings top-notch theater to North Georgia They say there is no business like show business, and no one knows that like the hard working people at The Cumming Play-

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house. The Cumming Playhouse is home to several theatre companies that perform numerous

productions a year as well as serving as venue for local concerts, school plays and Christmas pageants. The playhouse is located at 101 School Street within the 1923 Cumming Public School, a structure named to the National Register in 2000. A property of the city of Cumming, it also houses “The Historical Society

of Forsyth” County and “The Col. Hiram Parks Bell Center for Southern History and Genealogical Research.” As a performing arts venue, The Cumming Playhouse provides quality entertainment throughout the season offering plays, musicals, concerts, with fine dining provided by Tam’s Backstage Food and Spirits.

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home entertainment

From “Steel Magnolias” to “Tarzan,” the Playhouse offers entertainment to fit almost any taste. And the historic setting, from velvet seats to the wooden stage, adds a touch of elegance. The Playhouse also caters to all generations. The “Senior Follies” draws a huge crowd year after year and the Mardi Gras show is presented each year in support of Age Well Forsyth, a nonprofit serving the senior population of Forsyth County. For more information on The Cumming Playhouse, visit www. playhousecumming.com or call 770-781-9178.

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July | August 2014

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home charity

The American Legion

Supporting and honoring veterans of all wars Story by Brandee A. Thomas Photos by Times staff What exactly is the American Legion? Depending on whom you ask, you may get a variety of answers. Some folks may be familiar with it as owners of a facility on Riverside Drive in Gainesville that can be rented out for wedding receptions and other events. Others may be more familiar with it as host of the annual Fourth of July celebration at Laurel Park. While both of those scenarios are true, they’re just single facets of the total package that is the Paul E. Bolding post of the American Legion in Gainesville. The American Legion is made up of active - duty military members, as well as former

service members who served during World War I, World War II, the Korean War, the Vietnam War, Lebanon/Grenada from 19821984, Panama from 1989-1990 and the war on terrorism from 1990 to present day. In addition to the Memorial Day parade and Fourth of July celebration, the local post also hosts fun activities like weekly bingo nights, dances with live music and occasional sporting events. The group also supports local chapters of the Boy Scouts of America and provides scholarships and oratorical contest opportunities for students. Annual dues to join the Paul E. Bolding

post are $35. which includes the $25 membership fee to join the national American Legion. Active membership is crucial to the post’s ability to fulfill the national chapter’s goal of mentoring youth, being advocates of patriotism, promoting national security and being supportive of all active service members and veterans. Membership is open to both men and women. For more information about joining the post, upcoming activities or facility rentals, visit the group’s website at www.gainesville legion.org or call 770-534-7091.

“On any given night, more than 300,000 veterans are living on the streets or in shelters in the U.S.”

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home charity

“Percentage of all military personnel represented by women: approximately 20%� homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

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home charity

“The number of homeless Vietnam-era veterans, male and female, is greater than the number of soldiers who died during the war.” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

“45% of homeless veterans suffer from mental illness including PostTraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).” U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs 14

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an acquisition A Brenau University gallery worker carefully unpacks artwork to hang in one the campus galleries. Opposite page: An oil painting of a figure by Giuseppe Napoli donated by avid art collectors Dorothy and the late Hubert Vogel.

amazing

Brenau University’s art collection is a cultural wellspring in North Georgia Story by Savannah King Photos courtesy Brenau University homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

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An undated photo of Hubert and Dorothy Vogel with some of the many pieces of modern art collected by the New York couple over many years. Opposite page: Water color by Hank Virgona are part of the permanent collection at Brenau University.

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The sounds of rush-hour traffic can be heard from inside The Manhattan Gallery. The constant swoosh of passing cars creates an appropriate ambiance for the metropolitan-inspired art exhibit. The mood is occasionally punctuated by the honk of a passing chicken truck. Though the Big Apple and Brenau University in Gainesville may be more than 800 miles apart, the two are linked by a network of personal connections to the art world. Works by world-renowned artists Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns and Robert Rauschenberg hang on the gallery’s walls, representing the New York City art scene in the small private university in Northeast Georgia. When John S. Burd arrived on campus as Brenau’s president nearly 30 years ago, he felt the students needed more fine art displayed

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around the school. At the time, the college had only a few pieces on campus. “When I came here we had no art at all,” said Burd, now president emeritus. “So I put an ad in the New York Times and the Wall Street Journal saying that an elite women’s college in the South wished to develop an art collection, and if people were interested to please call.” The ads led to a few donations from art collectors and artists. Burd continued reaching out to the art community at-large. Not long after he began his search, Burd learned the school had a connection to Johns, one of America’s most valuable artists. Johns was born in Augusta in 1930 and raised alongside his aunts, who were Brenau alumnae, by his grandmother in South Carolina. So Burd called Johns, a well-known pop

and abstract expressionist in New York with a reputation for being aloof. Burd attempted to reach Johns several times to see if he would be interested in donating a piece to the university’s budding collection in honor of his aunts. “I knew he knew about this place and so I called him and finally after three calls he told his secretary that ‘He didn’t do that kind of thing,’” Burd said, smiling. Instead, his secretary told Burd to contact Johns’ agent. “His agent was Leo Castelli, who was the father of pop art,” Burd said. “He was the one who gave Johns notoriety and Rauschenberg and (Roy) Lichtenstein and Warhol and several others. So he agreed to see me and I went up to New York to see him about helping us do this.” When Burd told the school’s art depart-

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ment faculty of his plans, they quickly brought him up to speed on Castelli’s work and importance in the art world. “I do look back now and think ‘You know, you should have been a little bit embarrassed,’” Burd said, laughing. “But I wasn’t embarrassed at all because I wanted him to help this institution with art. So we met several times and he said he didn’t have money but he did have art connections.”

Castelli, who died in 1999, must have admired Burd’s gumption because he accepted an offer to serve on the Brenau Board of Trustees. Burd said Castelli took his role as board member seriously. His presence provided the small school with an opportunity to build a solid reputation and fine art collection. A portrait of Castelli, painted by Georgia artist Steve Penley, hangs outside of the Leo Castelli Art Gallery in the university’s John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts building on the main campus. By the time Burd retired from his post as president in 2004, the school had a collection of more than 1,200 pieces, some of which bore the names of artists like Renoir and Lichtenstein. Today, the collection includes more than 6,500 pieces of fine art and continues to grow, much of it displayed in galleries around campus. “That’s what it was meant to do,” Burd said. “I can’t tell you honestly that I dreamed the world would one day say ‘Let’s see what Brenau is doing.’ That was never it. But I wanted students to participate in having art around them and in a liberal arts institution I thought that was valuable to have. That’s what drove me to do it.” The school’s newest permanent art collection is located inside the Brenau Downtown Center in Gainesville. The new gallery is anchored by a donation of art by another connection to the New York art scene of the last century. More

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The new gallery is anchored by a donation of art by another connection to the New York art scene of the last century. More than 100 works donated by well-known New York art collectors Dorothy Vogel and her late husband Herbert were donated to the university. More than 80 of the pieces are on permanent display in the Manhattan Gallery. The Vogels began collecting art soon after they were married in 1962 and, over the years, collected more than 5,000 pieces. “They were basically civil servants,” said Melissa Morgan, former gallery director. “He was a postman and she was a librarian. They lived in rent-controlled housing and basically took his salary and bought art and she supported him. She’s very open about saying that. … They amassed a tremendous amount of art.” The couple provided artwork for a featured exhibition of female artists at the school in 1996 and continued the relationship with the university over the years. Earlier this year, the university received an additional 26 pieces from the collection through the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., custodian of the entire Vogel collection. The additional pieces included a piece by Giuseppe Napoli, an abstract expressionist, and several others by Herbert Vogel himself. As Morgan walked down the gallery corridor that holds the Vogel collection, she remarked on what it must have been like for the couple to fill such an active role in preserving art of the last several decades.

Above: An undated photo of Hubert and Dorothy Vogel with some of the many pieces of modern art collected by the New York couple over many years. Right: A 1955 oil painting, “Still Life with Black Bottle,” by Giuseppe Napoli is part of Brenau’s permanent collection. Opposite page: Water colors by Hank Virgona are part of the permanent collection at Brenau University.

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“What makes them so incredible is they lived the life of New York in the ’60s and ’70s,” Morgan said. Imagining the art scene during that time isn’t difficult to do inside the Manhattan Gallery. An adjacent hallway in the gallery also provides visitors with a glimpse into the iconic era of art history with a series of photos taken by Warhol, a prolific pop artist. The photos are a part of the Photographic Legacy program begun in 1997 by the Andy Warhol Foundation. Brenau received 155 photographs from the foundation through the program featuring iconic personalities like Truman Capote, Lillian Carter and Valentino. The photos were often used by Warhol as references for his many silkscreen portraits. In 2013, the foundation provided Brenau with an additional seven screen prints to go along with the collection of photographs. More contemporary works created by artists like Margaret Evangeline, Hunt Slonem, Kiki Smith and Sarah Lamb, a graduate of the university, also are featured. In keeping with the school’s history, many pieces were created by female artists. “It’s always wonderful to add women artists to the collection because of the school being a women’s college,” Burd said. “We’ve had some very good contemporary artists, Helen Frankenthaler, Louise Nevelson and Kiki Smith. Those are just some … They’re all big names in the art world.” The idea behind the gallery is to represent the modern periods of American art history through the gallery. “New York basically became the center of the art scene after World War II, mostly because Paris was dealing with issues like getting bombed,” Morgan said. “So New York, after the war, became the center of the art scene and a lot of the artists flew Europe and came here. homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

home cover story

“It’s always wonderful to add women artists to the collection because of the school being a women’s college. We’ve had some very good contemporary artists, Helen Frankenthaler, Louise Nevelson and Kiki Smith. Those are just some …” July | August 2014

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home cover story Brenau gallery workers unpack works to hang in one of the many galleries on the university’s campus.

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So what we set up here was having those artists from the decades after World War II, so each of the decades of art history is represented.” Morgan said the campus and its galleries are set up to be a “living museum.” Many pieces are displayed along halls where classes are held, giving students daily exposure to fine art. “That’s what a museum art gallery really does,” Morgan said. “It gives you that relationship. That one-on-one to a work that you can’t get on a computer screen. You can look at the Mona Lisa all you want to but unless you’re standing in front of her it’s a whole other concept. … Educationally, I hope our students are walking by and saying ‘Wow, that’s different.’” The collection continues to grow. In addition to showcasing student and local artists at exhibitions throughout the year, the college is adding to its collection through donations and providing both students and the public with opportunities to learn about art through the ages.

Dorothy Vogel, sitting, gets a look at some the donated artwork on display during the Brenau University 135th anniversary gala.

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Several large glass collages by Los Angeles-based-artist Marnie Weber lean against the walls inside of the Brenau Trustee Library waiting to be hung. A box of 2,000-yearold Egyptian and Roman oil lamps and coins are waiting to be unpacked inside the rare books collection in the library. “When (people) find out what’s in the collection, they have a much greater respect for this institution,” Burd said. “When things are credible, it does then to build on itself. Especially when people are (donating), knowing they’re doing it for people learn more about art. It will be generations after generations that will have this opportunity. I think that makes a big impact on a lot of donors. “I think it would be great if it was an institution in this area that could not only talk about the periods of art, but to also have examples of it, that would be unusual. A lot of people would have to do it with digital photos or books or whatever, but these students are able to see it firsthand and I think that makes an impact on them when they want to do something for themselves.”

“You can look at the Mona Lisa all you want to but unless you’re standing in front of her it’s a whole other concept. … I hope our students are walking by and saying ‘Wow, that’s different.’” 24

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This 1955 landscape in oil by Giuseppe Napoli is part of the permanent collection at Brenau University.

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home recreation

On the Hunt with Russell Vandiver

Talking Turkey Story by Michelle Boaen Jameson

Russell and his grandson, Jackson.

HM: When exactly is turkey hunting season? RV: It opens the third Saturday in March before trout season opens the last Saturday in March. This allows us to hunt opening day of turkey season as well as fish the trout tournament in Helen every year. The season is open through the middle of May with a bag limit of three gobblers per licensed hunter. HM: How long have you been hunting gobblers? RV: I’ve been chasing them for 25 plus years with my son Josh, and the last two years my 9-year-old grandson Jackson has started hunting with us. 28

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For most people thinking about turkey brings about the smells of fall leaves, giblet gravy and kids dressed like pilgrims. But anyone who knows hunting, knows that turkey season is no where near Thanksgiving. Avid hunter Russell Vandiver tells us all about hunting Tom T. and what you should know if you want to take a shot at it yourself. HM: Where do you go to hunt turkey each year? RV: Most years, we hunt on our deer leases in Banks, Oglethorpe and Wilkes counties; however, we’ve traveled to Ohio a few times to hunt as well. HM: Tell me what a typical day on the hunt is like, starting from when you guys get up and get moving. RV: Depending on where we’re going, we’ll typically get started a couple hours before daylight so we can travel to the property and arrive before sun rise. Once we’re there, we typically walk to a high point on our property so we can use a locator call, i.e. owl hooter or crow call. If we hear the turkeys gobbling on the roost and can

pin-point them, then we sneak through the woods or on the edge of a field within 80-100 yards depending on the terrain. Next, we place our decoys about 30-40 yards from our blinds, and we’ll start making some soft hen calls to get the gobblers attention. If all goes well, the gobbler will fly down and come to the calls. But more times than not, they’ll go a different direction following other turkeys. If this happens, we’ll try to circle around the turkeys to get in front of them and use our decoys and light calling to hopefully get a shot. Later in the morning, we go to more aggressive calls if needed and try to separate them from the hens in hopes of getting a shot. HOME Living

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home recreation

HM: How is hunting turkey different from hunting duck or deer? RV: The big difference in hunting deer is you typically get in a stand well before daylight and sit for several hours. Turkey hunting, you hear the gobblers and you can be more aggressive both going after them and calling them. I find myself being too aggressive, but that’s part of the enjoyment of turkey hunting for me. Turkey hunting is similar to elk hunting in that there is a lot of action as you listen for bugling of the bull elk and try to call. And if that does not work, you try to get a shot by getting in front of them. I get Jackson bagged his the same thrill from a turkey gobbling as turkey limit this year. I did listening to a bull elk’s bugle in New Mexico last fall. HM: Tip for the novice hunter who may want to bag a big one? When we hunt in the afternoon we do a lot RV: The best advice I could give someone of walking and if we can’t get a shot we typiis know the property you’re hunting (on) and cally try to roost them for the next morning’s spend time in the woods listening and watchhunt. Roosting them is watching them fly up into the trees from a distance so we will know ing what the birds are doing. We utilize trail cameras quite a bit huntwhere to set up the next day.

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

ing turkeys and deer, it’s proven to be a useful tool for us. Once you have an idea of the birds tendencies, then you can put together a game plan. For example, if the birds like to feed in a certain field in the mornings, then you can set up on them before daylight and wait. The best advice is practice shooting at 40 yards, get some quality decoys, get a comfortable turkey vest, practice calling and above all, have patience. I have ruined several hunts by not waiting another 30 minutes before repositioning. Those hunts always ended with me spooking a bird headed straight to me which never gobbled to let me know it was coming. Our family had a wonderful successful turkey season. My son Josh harvested a huge gobbler that had three beards and my grandson Jackson harvested his bag limit of three gobblers and was able to shoot two of them with one shot! I also harvested a nice gobbler late in the season. Since the season closed on May 15, we have gotten some trail camera pictures of gobblers larger than we took this year. Can’t wait until next turkey season.

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home taste

Antebellum:

Where food and art are one and the same

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HOME Living

In North Georgia


home taste

Flowery Branch restaurant boasts delicious food, warm atmosphere Story by Sandra Warwick Photos by Nat Gurley Chef Nick St. Clair may hail from California, but Southern hospitality ain’t got nothing on him. The cordial chef of Flowery Branch’s Antebellum bustles around signing for deliveries, checking on the kitchen, answering calls and getting ready for a busy night. “I’ve always liked food,” he said. “But I wanted to be an artist.” Chef Nick grew up in a single parent home where he spent hours of his time cooking for his mother and sisters. He was also perfecting his art — he believes “food and art are one and the same.” Two years ago, he combined his love of food and art into a tasty masterpiece. Nick and his wife, Alison, first opened doors and welcomed Southern cuisine-loving customers into Antebellum in early 2012. Antebellum sits nestled in the historic district of Flowery Branch. It’s complete with a charming, old-fashioned porch with black iron tables and chairs for outdoor beverages and dining. Chef Nick brings 14 years of restaurant experience with him to the Antebellum kitchen. And unlike the popular TV hit “Hell’s Kitchen,” the Antebellum kitchen is a “drama-free zone” he insists. homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Chef Nick St. Clair stands outside of his Flowery Branch restaurant, Antelbellum, which take Southern cuisine to an art form.

As fate, the alignment of the stars or just pure coincidence would have it, Nick and Alison met while both were working in a restaurant. But it wasn’t just an ordinary restaurant. “We were working at a cafe and bar in California, where scenes from the movie ‘Sideways’ were filmed,” Nick said. Since Nick has always admired the Southern way of life, he and Alison packed up and headed South after tying the knot. Nick, a high honors graduate of Le Cordon Bleu in Pasadena, California, believes in “expressing himself creatively” through food. The farm-to-table way of restaurant life also appeals to the chef ’s creative way of life. “I try to buy from the local

Farmer’s Market,” he says. He uses Clermont’s Mountain Fresh Creamery milk and milk products in the Antebellum kitchen and buys fresh garden fruits and vegetables from other local farmers. From the taste of the scrumptious cooking, the farm-to-table Antebellum way of life outranks scores of restaurants around North Georgia. Among other awards, Antebellum takes the coveted OpenTable award in four categories, including service and food. Chef Nick’s original dessert recipe — cherry wood-smoked vanilla icecream with buttermilk waffle, pecan-whipped cream and bourbon maple syrup — might well be a little bit of manna from

heaven in a dessert dish. The flavors blend and complement each other like yin and yang. A hint of the smoked cherry wood flavor blends a unique sweet-savory spin with the vanilla ice cream. The creamy ice cream makes its delicious home atop a mouthwatering buttermilk waffle. Fresh pecan whipped cream, made with local Mountain Fresh Creamery cream, and a shot of bourbon maple syrup showcases Chef Nick’s talent for taste perfection. The great food doesn’t just include dessert — the fried green tomatoes with bacon jam, brioche, fried egg, hot sauce and mimosa ice ranks as a favorite at Antebellum. “Go right into the mimosa ice after taking a bite of the fried July | August 2014

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green tomatoes,” Nick said. The fried green tomatoes fill the palate with a savory and rich combination. The champagne-laden mimosa ice cleanses the palate, and adds a sweet contrast to the richness of the fried green tomatoes. The grilled leg of lamb with carrot puree, curried cauliflower, roasted grapes, almonds and baby cilantro probably ranks as the most requested entrée, Nick said. An hour or so before opening time, a hearty and savory Southern cooking aroma wafts from the kitchen into the dining area. It will soon be filled with music to please the ears and serenade the soul. The candlelit tables will fill with folks hungry for Antebellum’s delicious Southern cooking . “The atmosphere is mostly romantic,” Nick said. But Antebellum is also kid-friendly. Coloring books and crayons are provided to keep kids happy

while waiting on food to fill their tummies. Wednesday night is jazz and wine night. Thursday is fried chicken night — there’s more of a family-type atmosphere filling the Antebellum dining room, Nick said. And as one Antebellum reviewer remarked on the Antebellum webpage, fried chicken night also includes “some of the best mashed potatoes I‘ve ever ate.” Chef Nick and wife Alison are also opening a casual Mexican restaurant called Maverick’s, 35 minutes from Antebellum. Julia Child famously quoted, “People who love to eat are always the best people.” If you’re one of Chef Julia’s proclaimed “best people,” head out to the delicious award-winning Antebellum. And come prepared to enjoy Chef Nick St. Clair‘s succulent creative take on Southern cuisine. To learn more about Antebellum visit www. antebellumrestuarant.com.

Bacon Jam • 2 lbs diced bacon 8 cloves garlic, minced • 2 onions • ½ cup brown sugar • 2 cups coffee • ½ cup apple cider vinegar • ½ cup maple syrup Sautee bacon on low until crispy. Add chopped onion, continue to cook until lightly caramelized. Add garlic, cook a little longer. Add rest of ingredients, simmer 2-3 hours, until reduced and syrupy. Stick in food processor. And pulse until jam like consistency. Bacon Jam tops Antebellum’s signature Fried Green Tomato appetizer. It’s also delicious on burgers, with pimento cheese, etc.

An Antebellum signature dish, fried green tomatoes with bacon jam, brioche, fried egg, hot sauce and mimosa ice - $12.

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home taste

Antebellum’s grilled leg of lamb with carrot puree, curried cauliflower, roasted grapes, almonds and baby cilantro for $25.

Celebrating Over

Years of Service 1983-2014

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home home & garden

Daylily delight Story by Sandra Warwick Photos by Michelle Boaen Jameson The daylily ranks as an Asian native, but daylily lovers — and green thumbs everywhere — can thank their lucky perennial stars that the delightful daylily found a welcoming home in the United States, and here in North Georgia. Since the 1930s, hybridizers have helped make the daylily a delight. The hearty perennial can easily boast not only “Most Beautiful Perennial,” but also “Most Likely to Succeed Perennial.” The daylily thrives easier than most of its perennial cousins. The daylily likes the sun and could be called a sunworshiper. Which is why this time of year sees roadsides in bloom with the tawny-orange daylily. But the “Most Beautiful” daylily will take a shade break from time to time, if needed. The daylily makes itself at home 34

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wherever it goes and thrives well in most climates. Its colors span the rainbow — pastels, crimson, vivid blues, and almost any color you can find in a Crayola crayon box — and paints the canvases of gardens and yards of many. In 1990, daylily lovers Elaine and Luther Beck of Commerce decided that North Georgia daylily fans needed a place to meet to share their expertise and spread the daylily love. Elaine remembers the first meeting of The North Georgia Daylily Society taking place in her home. She said “Atlanta and bigger towns” all have their organizations of likeminded gardeners. And she thought it only fair that the smaller communities share their tips, hints and knowledge of the popular daylily. HOME Living

In North Georgia


home home & garden

The North Georgia Daylily Society started with 35 charter members. More than two decades later, membership has doubled. Elaine’s husband, Luther, hybridizes the hearty perennials, so the couple have plenty of experience and expertise to go around. You can read about the hybridizing process and much more on The North Georgia Daylily Society web page, www.northgeorgiadaylilysociety. com. The group meets at 2 p.m. the first Sunday of every month at Gainesville’s First Baptist Church in the Family Life center. A $7 fee is required to join. A $10 fee is required for daylily-loving couples. After each North Georgia Daylily Society meeting, a covered dish dinner is served. So if daylilies are one of your summertime or anytime delights, head to the First Baptist Church on the first Sunday of the month. And be sure to bring your appetite along with your green thumb. homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Summer in North Georgia is a great time for daylilies, like this Vino DiNotte. They make a wonderful addition to any landscape and will eventually need to be thinned, which makes for wonderful gifts for friends and family.

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home lifestyle

DreamCars Photo by Nat Gurley

(Above) Kris Fuller, of Dahlonega, and his customized 1954 Ford at a June 14th car show in Gainesville (Right) Cars range from a Model T, to classic ‘50s and ‘60s muscle, to late-model Corvettes at the car show sponsored by the Gainesville chapter of Vietnam Verterans of America.

Story by Savannah King A quick glance down the rows of parked antique automobiles reveals how styles change over time. Each vehicle is uniquely designed for both art and function. It’s a concept Kris Fuller, of Dahlonega had thought a lot about. After 7 years, he recently completed building his custom 1954 Ford. “My wife and I enjoy vintage stuff and I have a knack for working with my hands and turning things into art,” Fuller said. Fuller said he’s always been intrigued by the work of customizers for the 1950s and often attends car shows to see what others are creat36

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at Gur ley

Photo by N

HOME Living

In North Georgia


ing, how vehicles look and to get feedback on his own efforts. He showed off his hard work at the annual Vietnam Veterans of America Chapter 772 Car and Truck show in Gainesville. Occasionally, people walk by and ask him about the different parts on the car, which he’s more than happy to talk about. Fuller said he enjoys the “look of progress” from the vehicles built in the 1950s specifically. “It’s the whole style for the ‘50s when everything was futuristic,” Fuller said. “The whole thing with these styles of cars was the rocket era.” Fuller gestures down the row of parked cars and points out futuristic shapes, sharp fins, rounded bumpers, vents along the sides and the rocket-shaped taillights. “It’s progress, look at people who grew up in the ‘50s and imagine all the things that have changed in their lifetimes, prop-driven engines on airplanes, the interstates, the cell phone,” Fuller said. “How much progress came after (World War II)? Everything stopped during the war but afterwards imaginations went wild and each model year of these cars changed.” While some of the cars parked near Fuller are other customs and reproductions of older models, a few are still holding on to most of

home lifestyle

Photo by Nat Gurley (Below) “Miss Pinky” a 1956 Ford Victoria, sits in the shade at the “Remember Our Verterans” car show and fundraiser. (Above) Traci Brown, John Hyde and Linda Richardson,left to right, sit in shade near “Miss Pinky”.

Photo by Nat Gurley homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

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Images of concept cars from the High Museum of Art’s exibit “Dream Cars: Innovative Design,Visionary Ideas.”

1956 Buick Centurion

1935 Bugatti Aerolithe 1954 Firebird I

1955 Ghia Gilda

their original parts. John Hyde, of Gainesville, sat in the shade near his award-winning 1956 Ford Victoria. Hyde nicknamed the car “Miss Pinky” because of its color. “That’s pretty much all original car,” Hyde said, smiling affectionately at the vehicle. “It’s been painted one time from the windows down and that was in 1988.” Hyde has owned the car since 2005 and drives it “all over” to car shows regularly. He also takes his 1966 Ford Fairlane. Hyde’s cousin, Tracie Brown, of Gainesville, helps him drive the cars to shows. “We get thumbs up wherever we go,” she said, laughing. It’s easy to fall under the nostalgic spell of the old cars at car shows. The same sense of automotive wonder can also be found this summer at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. The museum is offering a major exhibition of concept vehicles with “Dream Cars: Innovative Design, Visionary Ideas.” 38

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The exhibit features 17 concept cars from across Europe and the U.S., designed by companies like Ferrari, Bugatti, General Motors and Porsche. Some of the highlights of the exhibit include a never before seen in the US 1942 electric bubble car and the beginning of the present-day minivan created in 1936. Concept cars are rarely used in series production but rather as a way for designers to showcase and demonstrate more progressive designs. They’re built to help automakers explore and experiment with technology and style. “The concept cars presented in’ Dream Cars’ demonstrates how design can transcend the present and offer new paths and opportunities for the future,” said Sarah Schleuning, exhibition curator and curator of decorative arts and design at the High. “While these cars were never mass produced, they shaped the future of the automotive industry by challenging the notion of what is possible, technologically and stylistically.” HOME Living

In North Georgia


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home calendar

July July 1 Spectrum Winds Concert Gainesville. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St. SE, Gainesville. Free. 770-538-4764. Through July 3 President’s Summer Arts Center 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Reception 5:30-7 p.m. May 13. Brenau University Simmons Visual Arts Center Sellars Gallery, 200 Boulevard, Gainesville. 770-534-6263, www.brenau.edu/ about/brenau-university-galleries/. July 3 The Northwinds Symphonic Band 8 p.m. The Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center, 331 Spring St., Gainesville. Adults $18, seniors and students $15, tables of eight $200. 770-534-2787, www.theartscouncil. net. July 4 Independence Day Car Show 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Lumpkin County Administration Building and Library complex, East Main Street, Dahlonega. Entrants $20, spectators free. 770 843-6477. July 4 Fireworks at Brasstown Valley Resort & Spa 7:30-10 p.m. www.brasstownvalley. com. July 4 Independence Day 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Vogel State Park, U.S. 19/129 S., 11 miles south of Blairsville. $5. 706-745-2628, www. gastateparks.org July 5 45th Annual Cracker Fly In Gainesville. 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. . Lee Gilmer Memorial Airport, 1137 Aviation Way, Gainesville. Walk ins $3, fly ins free. 611.eaachapter.org, scrider@bellsouth.net, 770-5409614. 40

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July 5-6 Peach State Mounted Shooters Gainesville, Chicopee Woods Agricultural Center, 1855 Calvary Church Road, Gainesville, 770-5316855, lmturner@hallcounty.org. July 5 Elachee Nature Science Center-First Saturday Hike Gainesville. 10:00–11:30 a.m. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. Guided hike through the Chicopee Woods Nature Preserve. Adults $5, children ages 2-12 $3. Children under 2 and Elachee members free. 770-535-1976, www.elachee. org. July 8 History Forum “Mule and Wagon to Automobile.” 7 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. $3 for nonmembers. 770-2975900, www.negahc.org, jcarson@ brenau.edu. July 9-12 “Catch Me if You Can.” 7:30 p.m. Gainesville High School Pam Ware Performing Arts Theatre, 830 Century Plaza, Gainesville. Adults $17; children, students and seniors $12. Purchase tickets at Gainesville Parks and Recreation office in Gainesville Civic Center or at door. July 10 Introduction to Minecraft for Parents 6 p.m. North Hall Tech Center, 4175 Nopone Road Suite B, Gainesville. hallcountylibrary.org, 770-532-3311 ext. 181. July 10-Aug. 3 “Oklahoma” Tuesday, Friday, Saturday: 8 p.m.; Sunday matinée: 3 p.m. The Cumming Playhouse. 101 School Street Cumming, Georgia 30040. 770-781-9178. July 10-27 “Driving Miss Daisy” Buford. 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, Buford Community Cent-

July 3 Lake Lanier Islands Resort celebration Wylie Street Coyotes on the Big Beach Floating Stage 3-7pm and Johnny Summers at Sunset Cove from 5-9pm. Lakelanierislands.com July 4 Red,White & Blue 4th of July Party hosted by Kicks 101.5 Sunset Cove from 11 am to 10 pm. Entertainment includes a live remote from Kicks 101.5 from 4-7 pm. Second Hand Swagger takes the stage from 3-4:15 pm, followed by Convoy performing live from 6:30-9 pm. Fireworks light up the skies over the lake beginning at 10 p.m. July 5 Wylie Street Coyotes on the Big Beach Floating Stage from 1-5 p.m., Gray Sartin at Gianni’s from 5-9 p.m., and a full day of performances at Sunset Cove with Ashley Rivera taking the stage from 1-5 p.m. and Bama Gamblers from 6-10 p.m.. After dark, Paramount Pictures’ “Captain America” lights up the screen as the weekend’s Beach Flick on Big Beach.

er, 2200 Buford Highway, Buford. $17-$25. bufordcommunitycenter. com, 770-945-6762. July 11-20 “Annie” 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. William Duncan Martin Performing Arts Center, 575 Washington St., Jefferson. $5-$15. www. jeffersoncommunitytheatre.com. July 11-27

Monty Python’s “Spamalot” 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays, 2 p.m. Sundays. The Holly Theatre, 69 W. Main St., Dahlonega. Adults $18, children and students $12. www. hollytheater.com, 706-864-3759. July 12 Appalachian Evening featuring Sweet Sunny South and Mary Raymer Sautee Nacoochee. 7:30 p.m. SauHOME Living

In North Georgia


home calendar July 18 Friday Night Flicks “E.T.” 7 p.m., movie starts at dusk. Cornelia Depot, 102 Clarkesville St., Cornelia. Free. 706-778-8585, ext. 280, www.explorecornelia.com. July 19 Summer Songwriters’ Series Jim McBride and Gary Nicholson concert Brenau Downtown Center, 301 Main St., Gainesville. Advance $15, otherwise $20 per show or $50 for all concerts in series. 770-5313186, bburch@brenau.edu.

tee Nacoochee Center, 283 Ga. 255, Sautee Nacoochee. Free. snca.org, 706-878-3300. July 12 North Georgia Zoo Sunset Tour 7-9 p.m. North Georgia Zoo & Petting Farm, 2912 Paradise Valley Road, Cleveland. 706-348-7279. July 12 Sunset Jazz Atlanta Delta Classic Chastain Park Amphitheater, 4469 Stella Drive, Atlanta. classicchastain.com, 404733-5012. July 12 Fly Betty Band concert 7-11 p.m. Lake Lanier Islands Resort Sunset Cove, 7000 Lanier Islands Parkway, Buford. 770-945-8787, www.lakelanierislands.com. July 12-13 Sports Car Club of America double race Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 770-967-6143, www. roadatlanta.com.

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July 13 Family Day “In the Good Old Summertime: An Old-fashioned Picnic and Games.” 1-4 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. Free. 770-297-5900, www.negahc. org, jcarson@brenau.edu. July 17-Sept. 12 Women’s Work Art Exhibit 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Reception at 5:307:30 p.m. July 17. Brenau University Simmons Visual Arts Center Sellars Gallery, 200 Boulevard, Gainesville. Free. 770-534-6263, www.brenau. edu/about/brenau-university-galleries/. July 17 “There’s an App for That!” 6 p.m. Spout Springs Library, 6488 Spout Springs Road, Flowery Branch. hallcountylibrary.org, 770-532-3311 ext. 191. July 17 Merlot, Museums and Masterpieces 7-9 p.m. Crawford W. Long Museum, 28 College St., Jefferson. www.crawfordlong.org, 706-367-5307.

July 20 Benefit motorcycle ride and day at the Zoo Registration 10-11:30 a.m., ride starts at 11:45 a.m. . Ride starts at Appalachian Biker Gear, Suite 200, 4320 Settendown Village Road, Cumming. Adults $10, Children 11 and under $5. ronc@cdsinc3d.com, info@ chestateewildlife.com, 678-951-3058, 678-316-0473, 678-859-6820.

July 20-22 Southern Cruisers Charity Ride for St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital Howard Johnson’s Inn & Suites, Commerce. 706-335-5581. July 21-25 Fifth Row Center’s Summer Theater Camp 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sterling on the Lake, 7004 Lake Sterling Boulevard, Flowery Branch. $245 for nonresidents of Sterling on the Lake, $225 for residents. 678570-3481, www.fifthrowcenter. com, info@fifthrowcenter.com. July 25 Joe Hall, Cornelia Depot concerts 8 p.m. 102 Clarkesville St., Cornelia. Free. 706-778-8585 ext. 280, bht@corneliageorgia.org, www. explorecornelia.com.

Gainesville neuroloGy Group, llc Over 31 Years of Service to Northeast Georgia

Clinton E. Branch, Jr., M.D., FAAN; Michael S. Baugh, M.D. and Daniel L. Cobb, M.D.

• ALL physicians board certified in Neurology • ALL physicians dedicated to providing compassionate and comprehensive neurological care • ALL physicians hold academic appointments at Medical College of Georgia • ALL physicians dedicated to the teaching and training of future physicians

Leading Board Certified Neurologists in Northeast Georgia Since 1979

Since 1979 Gainesville Neurology Group has helped patients in Northeast Georgia with neurologic problems: • Migraine • Vertigo • Dementia • Seizures

• Sleep Disorders • Neuropathy/Radiculopathy • Parkinson’s Disease • Myasthenia Gravis

If you need a neurologic evaluation, ask your physician for a referral to Gainesville Neurology Group or call our office at 770-534-7885 for information and appointments.

Gainesville neuroloGy Group, llc

1240 Jesse Jewell Parkway Suite 400 Gainesville, GA 30501 p: 770-534-1117 f: 770-503-7285 www.gainesvilleneurology.com

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home calendar Through July 25 Planetarium show 8 p.m. Fridays, except for July 4. University of North Georgia Coleman Planetarium, 82 College Circle, Dahlonega. jjones@ung.edu. July 25-26 Show and Shine for Cystic Fibrosis Open Car Show 5-7 p.m. July 25, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. July 26. 639 Edelweiss Strasse, Helen. All proceeds will be donated to the Cystic Fibrosis Foundation. 706-795-2264, 706-296-6896. July 26-27 Folk Life Festival All day. Unicoi State Park, 1788 Ga. 356, Helen. 706-878-2201. July 27 National Dragster Challenge Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. www.atlantadragway.com, 706-335-2301. July 28 and 30 “Macbeth” Auditions 6 p.m.. The Holly Theatre, 69 W. Main St., Dahlonega. hollytheatre. com, 706-864-3759. July 31 2014 Canoe/Kayak National Championships 8:30 a.m. . Lake Lanier Olympic Venue, 3105 Clarks Bridge Road, Gainesville. Free for spectators. 770-287-7888 or lckc.org. July 31-Aug. 10 “The King and I” Habersham Community Theatre, 1370 Washington St., Clarkesville. 706-839-1315, www.habershamtheater.org. July 4: Fireworks Celebration, Banks County High School, Homer. 706-677-3510.

August Aug. 1 Nat Osborn Band 6-10 p.m. Downtown Gainesville. gainesville.org/main-street-gainesville. 42

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Aug. 1-3 Manufacturers Cup Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. www.atlantadragway.com, 706-335-2301. Aug. 1- Sept. 7 “Out of the Earth and Through the Fire” art exhibit Sautee Nacoochee Center, 283 Ga. 255, Sautee Nacoochee. www.snca. org, 706-878-3300. Aug 2 James Gregory Comedy Concert 7:30-10:30 p.m. John S. Burd Center for Performing Arts, 429 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Ticket prices to be determined. Visit www.funniestman.com for further information. Aug. 2 Atlanta Ballet “Wabi Sabi” 7:30 p.m. Sautee Nacoochee Center, 283 Ga. 255, Sautee Nacoochee. Members $20, nonmembers $24, 16 years old and under $5. snca. org, 706-878-3300. Aug. 2 Back to School Bash 3-6 p.m. Ruby C. Fulbright Aquatic Center, 120 Paul Franklin Road, Clarkesville. Free. 706-778-8585, ext. 280, 706-754-2220, www. explorecornelia.com. Aug. 2 Big E Elvis festival Grant Reeves VFW Post 7720, Cornelia. $15-$20. bigefest.com, 706-499-1370. Aug. 6-8 “Spin!” 7 p.m. The Cumming Playhouse. 101 School St., Cumming. www. playhousecumming.com, 770-7819178. Aug. 9 New West Guitar concert 8 p.m. The Cumming Playhouse. 101 School St., Cumming. www. playhousecumming.com, 770-7819178.

Aug. 9 Bob Dipiero, Chuck Cannon and Lari White Brenau Downtown Center, 301 Main St., Gainesville. Advance $15, at gate $20, series tickets $50. johnjarrardfoundation.com, bburch@brenau.edu, 770-5313186. Aug. 12 History Forum “Railroads of Northeast Georgia” 7 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St., Gainesville. Nonmembers $3, members free. negahc.org, jcarson@brenau. edu, 770-297-5900. Aug. 14-17 Destination Helen Bike Rally All day. Helen. www.destinationhelen.com, 706-878-0076. Aug. 16-17 Bob Russell Singers and Jazz concert 8 p.m., The Cumming Playhouse. 101 School St., Cumming. www. playhousecumming.com, 770-7819178. Aug. 18-Sept. 12 “Ring Road” Exhibit 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. . Roy C. Moore Art Gallery, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. Free. 678-717-3707, gallery@ung.edu. Aug. 21-Sept. 18 “Outdoor Life: Works by Didi Dunphy” 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Bob Owens Art Gallery, 315 Hoag Student Center, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, Georgia. 706-867-2746, gallery@ung.edu. Aug. 22-24 Atlanta Motorcycle Rally Atlanta Dragway, 500 E. Ridgeway Road, Commerce. www.atlantadragway.com, 706-335-2301. Aug. 23 Stan Estes and Friends concert 8 p.m.; The Cumming Playhouse. 101 School St., Cumming. www.playhousecumming.com, 770-781-9178.

Aug. 24 “Johnny Cash Now”concert 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. The Cumming Playhouse. 101 School St., Cumming. www.playhousecumming. com, 770-781-9178. Aug. 23 Sunset on the Square Concert Series 7-10 p.m. Downtown Jefferson. Free. www.mainstreetjefferson.com. Aug. 23 Gold Fever and Golden Memories 9 a.m. to noon. Smithgall Woods State Park, 61 Tsalaki Trail, Helen. Register in advance. 706-878-3087. Aug. 23 Garlicfest 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Loganberry Heritage Farm, 2660 Adair Mill Road, Cleveland. www.loganberryheritagefarm.com, 706-348-6068. Aug. 28 to Oct. 18 Judged Art Competition exhibit 5:30-7:30 p.m. Helen Arts & Heritage Center, 25 Chattahoochee Strasse, Helen. www.helenarts.org, 706-878-3933. Aug. 29-31 World Championship Rodeo 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday, 7 p.m. Sunday. Cumming Fairgrounds, 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming. Adults $15, seniors $12, Children ages 5 to 12 $10, children under 4 years old free. www.cummingfair. net, 770-781-3491. Aug. 30 Folk Pottery Show and Sale Folk Pottery Museum of Northeast Georgia, 283 Ga. 255, Sautee Nacoochee. Free. folkpotterymuseum. com, 706-878-3300. Aug. 30 CrushFest All day. Yonah Mountain Vineyards, 2454 Ga. 17, Sautee Nacoochee. www.yonahmountainvineyards.com, 706-878-5522.

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home around town Greater Hall Chamber of Commerce 2014 Gala May 15, 2014 Gov. Nathan Deal addresses a crowded banquet hall at the Greater Hall Chamber of Commerce’s 106th annual meeting and gala at the Chattahoochee Country Club in Gainesville. One of the gala’s highlights was its annual awards program, which recognized top businesses, volunteers and community servants.

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home around town

Gainesville Memorial Day Parade May 26, 2014 Veterans, their friends and family members, residents and excited children lined Gainesville’s Green Street for the 2014 Memorial Day parade. The 12th annual event, presented by the American Legion Paul E. Bolding Post 7, featured servicemen and women from World War II and Korea all the way up through current enlisted soldiers.

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home around town

Hall County Relay for Life May 3, 2014 The annual event, held at Road Atlanta in Braselton, raises money for cancer research. Now in its 21st year in Hall, the relay is the American Cancer Society’s biggest single fundraiser.

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Relay for Life Braselton-Hoschton April 25, 2014 Relay For Life of Braselton-Hoschton has raised $58,394.32 toward its $60,000 goal for 2014. Relay was held at Hoschton Park. The opening ceremonies were preceded by Lisa Martin singing several songs including “Georgia on My Mind” in honor of one of the honorary chairs, Georgia Saunders, who lost her battle with cancer.

A new chapter begins...

The Waterford at Oakwood is an Assisted Living and Memory Care community that offers services including: • 24-hour staffing • Medication management • Exercise programs • Recreation and entertainment programming

• Bathing, dressing and grooming assistance • 24-hour access to licensed nurses • Spacious floor plans with full sized kitchenettes

• Spacious bathrooms and walk-in showers • Emergency response system • Individual climate control • All utilities, except basic cable and telephone

4251 Hudson Drive, Oakwood, GA 30566 • 770-297-6900 • www.capitalsenior.com/waterfordatoakwood homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

July | August 2014

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Brenau University President’s Summer Art Series May 8, 2014 This year’s President’s Summer Arts Series at Brenau University exhibited paintings and sculptural work by four renowned Georgia artists: John Hemmer, Bob White, Andrew Crawford and Gregory Johnson.

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Tug of Love April 26, 2014 The Jackson County Area Chamber of Commerce’s Leadership Jackson 2014 class hosted the “Tug of Love” event at Crow’s Lake. Funds raised from the event will benefit Wellspring Camp, a special needs camp located in Jefferson. The event featured many teams competing over a mud pit in a tug of war which kept everyone laughing as each losing team was pulled into the mud.

Boys and Girls Clubs of Jackson County auction May 2014 Hundreds of people cowboyed up for a night of yeehaws and fun to help raise money for the local Boys and Girls Clubs. Food, fun and liveentertainment kept the crowds feeling generous.

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

July | August 2014

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Panoz LLC 25th Anniversary unveiling April 4, 2014 The patriarch, Don Panoz, PhD, lightly pressed the starter button, and within moments the deep rumble of the Esperante Spyder GT rendered silence. Then there was a burst of applause from guests at the unveiling by Panoz LLC of its newest and 25th anniversary edition luxury sports car. Well wishers, public and private leaders, and enamored auto aficionados alike filled the new 10,000-square-foot showroom and racing museum.

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In North Georgia


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July | August 2014

HOME Living

In North Georgia


Home Living in North Georgia  

July/August 2014

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