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Living in North Georgia

John Hopkins of Zac Brown Band Zac Brown

John Hopkins


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What’s Inside

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Zac Brown Band has enjoyed much success in recent years, thanks in part to bassist John Hopkins.

Inside Every Issue 6 34 40

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28 Taste of HOME

Home & Garden

8 As winter turns to spring, the hillsides at Gibbs Gardens come alive with every shade of yellow

From the Editor

imaginable. Thousands upon thousands of daffodil blooms create a wonderland that could rival a Disney movie.

Calendar Around Town

Health 10 The new year has everyone focused on eating March | April 2014

Living in North Georgia

John Hopkins of Zac Brown Band

On the Cover Gainesville’s own John Hopkins has been enjoying the life of a Grammywinning rock star with Zac Brown Band over the last few years. He’s played on stage at some of the music industry’s biggest events, but deep down, he’s still a small-town guy with a love of family. Photo courtesy Zac Brown Band

Zac Brown

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better and getting rid of that spare tire, but don’t forget about working out that mental muscle we use every moment of the day. Find out what you can do to keep your brain healthy and your mind sharp.

Charity 12 WomenSource is a nonprofit on a mission to inform and empower women and young girls through forums, civic events and motivational speakers. Oh, and maybe a fashion show, too!

John Hopkins

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32 Recreation 24

Fashion

8

Home & Garden

12 Charity

Get to Know

Fashion

14 Justin Ellis rode into town on a bicycle, but now he spends

24 Get out your bonnet with all the frills upon it; it’s Easter

Taste of HOME

Recreation

28 With Mardi Gras just around the corner, it’s easy to get

32 Hoofing it around Northeast Georgia is what the members

most of his time floating down the river as the executive director of the Soque River Watershed Association.

into the spirit. Experience a taste of New Orleans with the Shrimp ‘n’ Grits from Natalie Jane’s Tavern in Clarkesville.

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once again. We take a look at the latest in Easter hats and fancy hair accessories and where you can get them.

of the Chattahoochee Trail Horse Association love most. And with the increase in horse lovers, there comes an increase in trails and folks to keep those trails ready to ride.

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From the Editor Publisher Dennis Stockton Editor Michelle Boaen Jameson Advertising Director Sherrie Jones Advertising Sales Trent Sexton Melisa Sizemore Graphic Design Michelle Boaen Jameson Katherine Hake April Seymour Kerri Ivie Production Support Chris Campbell Dana Erwin Betty Thompson The road in front of my house on Feb. 12, 2014.

Contributing Photographers The Times staff

Find your way HOME Hard to believe just a few weeks ago, most of North Georgia was quietly buried under snow and ice. Nothing much was stirring except for the birds it seemed. Hopefully, we’ve seen the last of that until next winter and we can continue our thaw. Some signs of spring have already emerged. Although my camellias took a hard hit, I can still look forward to the daffodils. If you love them as much as I do, check out page 8 for a peek at Gibbs Gardens and the upcoming Daffodil Festival. With spring comes the excitement of several events, including Mardi Gras and Easter Sunday. On page 28, we check out the flavor of New Orleans in Clarkesville and on page 24, we explore the iconic and classic Easter hat. Also in this issue we get to know the excutive director of the Soque River Watershed Association, WomenSource and oh, of course, our cover story — John Hopkins of Zac Brown Band. More of our local talent making a big name. If it snows again, you can curl up with this issue of HOME and get cozy. And if it doesnt snow, read it anyway. It will still leave you feeling warm and fuzzy!

M

J

ichelle ameson

Michelle Boaen Jameson mjameson@homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

HOME Magazine, a division of: The Times Gainesville, GA The Paper Hoschton, GA A Morris Multimedia Inc. property 345 Green St. | Gainesville, GA 30501 | 770-718-3421

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HOME: Living in North Georgia reserves the right to refuse advertisements for any reason. Acceptance of advertising does not mean or imply the services or product is endorsed or recommended by HOME: Living in North Georgia. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by an information storage and retrieval system, without permission in writing from Morris Multimedia Inc. Although every precaution is taken to ensure accuracy of published materials, Morris Multimedia cannot be held responsible for opinions expressed or facts supplied by its authors. Manuscripts, artwork, photography, inquiries and submitted materials are welcome.

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We’re honored to serve you It’s an honor to be recognized as the nation’s leading hospital for maternity and newborn care. Look a little closer and you’ll discover that Northside performs more surgeries and diagnoses and treats more breast and gynecologic cancer than any other hospital in Georgia. While people choose Northside for our expertise, they also know us for our exceptional compassionate care. Visit us online at www.northside.com

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home home & garden

Delight in delicate daffodils

Gibbs Gardens boasts acres of blooms in several varieties Nothing chases away the dreary gray of winter like fresh, colorful blossoms bursting from the ground and dangling from tree branches in spring. Gibbs Gardens, located in Ball Ground, marks the occasion with its annual Daffodil Festival from March 1 to April 15. The gardens offer the largest display of daffodils in the country, with more than 20 million daffodil blossoms blanketing 50 acres of rolling hillsides and fields. Jim Gibbs, the garden’s owner, designer and developer, is the founder of Gibbs Landscape Co. in Atlanta. He and his company have received more than 250 awards for landscape design excellence and two national awards presented at White House receptions. Gibbs said it’s been his dream to create a world-class garden in the Atlanta area for more than 40 years. The gardens opened to the public in March 2012. “After spending six years finding just the right property and another 30-plus years designing and developing Gibbs Gardens, that dream came true when we opened.” Gibbs began planting daffodils — his mother’s favorite — on the property in 1987. Gibbs chooses bulbs that are naturalized for the South, which allows the bulbs to divide each season and double in number every year. The garden promises to grow more spectacular as time goes on. “We’ve planted nearly 4 million bulbs of more than 60 varieties over the years,” Gibbs said. Gibbs said he often plants more than 250,000 bulbs a year. The daffodil blossoms range in color from sunburst yellow to

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HOME Living

In North Georgia

Photos courtesy Gibbs Gardens

Story by Savannah King


home garden

pink and white, and range in bloom time, allowing the gardens to be covered in daffodils throughout the spring season. The walking paths are bordered by fragrant lateblooming varieties. Thousands of flowering dogwoods and cherry blossoms also bloom during the season. The 220-acre garden in Cherokee County offers visitors the opportunity to experience 16 artistically designed garden venues and four feature gardens. Visitors can either walk along garden paths or ride a tram through the rolling hillsides. The 16 garden venues and four feature gardens promise to inspire and delight visitors and take their senses around the world. In addition to Daffodil Gardens, which are reminiscent of the flower fields in Holland, the gardens boast a 40-acre Japanese garden — the largest in the country. The Arbor Crest Manor House Gardens provide a view of the North Georgia Mountains and seven flowering terraces that flow 150 feet down into the Valley Gardens. The Monet Waterlily Gardens feature 140 varieties of lilies and a replica of the bridge made famous through artist Claude Monet’s paintings at Monet’s Garden at Giverny, France. Throughout the gardens, hundreds of cherry trees, forsythia, spirea, quince and thousands of dogwoods also come into bloom during the six-week festival. The Gardens are located off Yellow Creek Road in Cherokee County, at 1998 Gibbs Drive in Ball Ground. General admission to the gardens is $20; children and seniors are $18. For more information about your visit, go to www.gibbsgardens.com or call 770-893-1880.

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Gibbs Gardens Bloom Calendar Daffodil Festival: March 1 to April 14 Cherry Blossom Festival: March, lasts two weeks Fern Dell Festival: April through November Dogwood Festival: April, lasts three weeks Azalea Festival: April through Fall Rhododendron Festival: May, lasts two to three weeks Rose Festival: May through November Hydrangea Festival: May through October

Waterlily Festival: May through November Daylily Festival: June through August Annual and Perennials Festival: July through November Crape Myrtle Festival: July through August Wildflower festival: September through November Oktoberfest: October through November Japanese Maples Festival: October 15 through November 15

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home health

Remember when you could remember? Keeping your brain sharp starts with healthy habits and staying socially active Story by Michelle Boaen Jameson We’ve all done it. You open a cabinet only to forget what you were looking for in the first place. Or you pick up the phone but can’t recall the number you were about to dial. So does this mean we are headed for dementia, or are we just plain forgetful? While no one can stop the aging process (that we know of) there are some things we can do to prevent further damage to our abilities to reason and remember. Dr. James Mullin, a board certified neuropsychologist with The Rehabilitation Institute at Northeast Georgia Medical Center in Gainesville, answers our questions about the mind and cognitive health. Question: How do you know if you are experiencing age-related memory loss (“I can’t find my keys”) versus a neurodegenerative disease (wandering off and getting lost)? Answer: It is really a matter of degree. Everyone forgets things from time to time, and we all lose our keys and other objects occasionally. The memory loss in (Alzheimer’s)AD is more constant, and progresses over time rather than being occasional. Memory loss in AD is likely to affect the ability to continue to work, find the way home when driving or carry out day-to-day tasks. Normal forgetfulness might include walking into the kitchen and forgetting what you went in there for, or misplacing the car keys. A person with dementia, on the other hand, might lose the car keys and then forget what they are used for. Question: What can people of any age do to help maintain cognitive function to prevent, if that’s possible, memory loss and the onset of Alzheimer’s? Answer: Modifiable risk factors for AD are becoming more clear with research. These include smoking, hypertension, type 2 diabetes/ insulin resistance, high cholesterol and obesity. More and more research is suggesting that treatment of these risk factors may reduce risk for AD, including adding exercise, quitting smoking and treating diabetes and high cholesterol. Exercise, even walking regularly, is suggested to have a particularly strong effect on dementia prevention and well-being in general. Question: Are there foods we should avoid that may “gum up” the works? What foods should we be sure to eat? 10

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Answer: Staying away from processed foods, added sugars and other dietary choices which lead to obesity and diabetes is one key toward prevention. Some dietary measures, such as high intake of fish, fruits and vegetables, have some support, suggesting a positive role for omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidants (like vitamin E) and B group vitamins such as folate, B6 and B12. Question: Are crossword puzzles, Sudoku and sites like Lumosity really helpful? Can’t I just play chess or video games? Answer: At the current time there does not appear to be clear or consistent research to support one approach or another. Any activity that involves the use of memory, reasoning or speed of thinking seems to be somewhat helpful. What I have found most helpful with my patients is keeping them involved in some type of social activity and being around others who care about them. Also, I often recommend staying involved in household activities to a degree that someone feels that they are contributing to the household and that they are needed by others. Regarding advertised programs or books, there does not appear to be clear literature suggesting that any of these programs are better than other approaches. I always encourage patients to do their homework and look for supportive findings that come from a variety of clinics and researchers. If numerous studies appear to have led to consistent findings, you can have more confidence in the effectiveness of a treatment. The most important take-home message is that a low-intensity cognitive training program can result in cognitive, as well as some real-life benefits. These are sustained for up to five years afterward and may be enhanced with booster training. HOME Living

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home charity

WomenSource Story by Brandee A. Thomas Photos by Times staff Turkey sandwiches and financial literacy workshops may not change the world, but they’ve definitely helped improve the lives of women in the greater Hall County community over the last seven years thanks to WomenSource. “WomenSource was created after a 2007 needs assessment revealed a need to coordinate and expand upon the available support systems to help women in our community,” says Michelle Piucci, WomenSource Board of Directors chairwoman. “I believe that the community looks to

WomenSource as a valuable resource for information and programming to address many needs and general information to improve quality of life.” The nonprofit was originally created through a partnership with the Junior League of Gainesville-Hall County, the North Georgia Community Foundation and the United Way of Hall County. The organization is governed by its board of directors, which is made up of a variety of community leaders, including: chair-elect Valerie Simmons-Walston, treasurer Kingsley Peeples and secretary Dixie Truelove. The group hosts many empowering events

Jim Haynes, JH Photography

Advancing the gender with the power of knowledge

throughout the year. The monthly Brown Bag Lunch and annual financial series are two of the group’s signature gatherings. “Our monthly Brown Bag Lunch provides programs covering topics ranging from the film industry in Georgia to women’s health issues,” Piucci says. “Our Evening Series has provided Above: Girl Scouts attend a Girl Power workshop presented by WomenSource. Left: Women veterans talk and take questions from the public and WomenSource members. Bridgette McCoy, second from left, was one of the seven women featured in the movie “Service: When Women Come Marching Home.”

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information relating to finance, health, wellness and other topics. We even offered one session about car maintenance. Later this year we will be offering an interactive wellness series to get women moving. “We just hosted a free screening of the movie ‘Miss Representation’ and will host a screening of the movie ‘Iron Jawed Angels’ in August.” The group’s annual Power of the Purse fundraiser helps them continue offering all of their low- to no-cost events. “We try to offer many different events, so that we can target a variety of audiences,” Piucci says. “We continually survey our audiences to find out what programs they would like to see presented. We structure our programming to help meet those needs.” “Girl Power” — a program for girls and the women who love them — was one of those needs uncovered by the feedback surveys. “This will be our fourth year of ‘Girl Power.’ Our next one is on March 22,” says Laura Haynes, WomenSource program coordinator. “Someone wrote on one of our surveys that

they would like for us to do a program that they could attend with their daughter. Robyn Lynch, one of our board members, took that information and ran with it. “That first year, we were hoping to get 100 people to come. When we reached that number, we were very excited. Every year, we’ve had to move the location because the event continues to attract more women and girls and we outgrow the facility. It’s a great problem to have. This year, we’re at the Brenau University Downtown Center, so we’ll have the capacity to

accommodate everyone who’d like to attend.” For the first two years, the free program was only open to high school students and their supporters. Last year, WomenSource decided to open up the half-day program to middle school girls as well. “Girl Power is all about getting the girls to explore ways to enhance their self-esteem, encourage them to lead confident and healthy lives and empower them to take charge of their future,” Haynes says. “We expanded the event to include younger girls, because we want to be proactive in reaching out to them. We want them to have these tools early on.” No matter their background or economic standing, WomenSource’s goal is to help women of all ages to become their best selves. Women can get involved by attending one of the group’s many programs and also by joining the organization. Membership opportunities range from $35-$500. These fees also help to support programming. “We are a true resource for the women and girls in our community,” Piucci says. “Our programming will continue to grow and expand to meet the growing demand for information and solutions for the women in our community.” For more information about WomenSource and its events, visit www.womensource.info or call 770-503-9060.

Top: Best-selling author Fawn Germer, left, shows Dixie Truelove, center, and Amanda McClure an app on her iPad prior to a WomenSource meeting. Germer was the guest speaker. Right: Craig Dominey, Camera Ready program manager at the Georgia Film, Music and Digital Entertainment Office, speaks during the WomenSource Brown Bag Lunch series. homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

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home get to know

Justin Ellis:

Protecting our water one river at a time Story by Brandee Thomas Photo by Michelle Boaen Jameson Some people like to go on camping trips so they can get in touch with nature, but Justin Ellis has devoted his entire career — and a good bit of his personal time — to the pursuit. As the executive director of the Soque River Watershed Association in Clarkesville, much of Ellis’ time is focused on protecting the health of the river. However, that means doing more than taking water samples and posting “no dumping” signs near the body of water. “When I came on board, we quickly realized that the only way to protect the Soque River watershed was if everyone realized they were a part of it,” says Ellis, who has been executive director of the association for nearly a decade. “It takes all of us working together to have a pristine watershed. To do that, we have to partner with everyone. That can be a daunting task, but that became our major mission.” Preparing for the large task at hand took as much preparation and creativity on Ellis’ part as did finding a career that encompassed his environmentally-minded aspirations. “I always knew that I wanted to do something related to protecting nature and the environment, but going through school, there wasn’t a real path to careers like that unless you wanted to be a research 14

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scientist,” Ellis says. “Luckily, in the late ’90s there was this phenomena happening around the country, where little groups were organizing to protect rivers. There was a boom in that arena for about 15 years. Initially, people would organize around a cause, fight the problem and then go away. People’s mindsets began to change and they realized that they shouldn’t go away. Instead, they stuck around to protect natural resources.” That movement became a gateway to Ellis’ dream job with the Soque association. “Prior to moving to Georgia, I worked in a similar vein for the Alabama Rivers Alliance as the statewide watershed leadership director,” says Ellis, a 1997 graduate of Birmingham Southern College. “I traveled around the state working with smaller groups — there were about 75 then — doing grassroots organizing and policy work. “Although I enjoyed what I was doing, I was always envious of groups that just focused on one river. I thought it would be nice to focus on one discreet place and really assess what the challenges are to protect that river. If you really applied yourself, you could really make a significant difference in that area.” After looking around, Ellis

Justin Ellis, executive director of the Soque River Watershed Association, at his Clarkesville office.

ended up with an ideal position in 2002 as the first executive director of the Soque association. In this position, Ellis’ goal is to work with the nonprofit’s volunteers and staff to help protect and restore the Soque, which “is a major headwater tributary to the Chattahoochee River which serves as the primary drinking water supply for Atlanta.” “What struck me about this area and the Soque River is that it is all contained in one county. That is very unique,” Ellis said. “And its headwaters begin in national forestlands, which is ideal. If the headwaters are protected, you’re really starting out on the good foot.” After working for a few years, Ellis decided to take a very

interesting leave of absence in 2006. “I got on a bicycle and I visited 50 farms in 12 different states. I spent time on each farm — sometimes a day or two or a week — working and learning everything that I could,” Ellis said. “There is an incredible overlap between rivershed protection and agriculture, especially in rural environments. I realized that in order to really understand agriculture, I needed to see as many different types of farms as possible.” His two-wheeled trip was inspired by a book he read by a female Buddhist monk who rode a bike into the communities she would serve. “If you come into a community HOME Living

In North Georgia


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on a bicycle, it demonstrates a different level of commitment to the place,” Ellis says. “In trying to really get to know people quickly, anything you can do to establish mutual respect early on is great. Arriving by bicycle also helps you understand the context of a community better. I very much value the gift that a bike provides. That trip was as valuable as my formal education.” He’s turned information gathered from that trip and during his doctoral program at the University of Georgia into a number of solutionsbased programs like the Northeast Georgia Locally Grown network, a cooperative of regional farmers and producers. “One of my goals was to help create sustainable, land-based businesses. We live in a primarily rural area, so it is extremely important that we learn how to use that land to generate food and income, in a way that is sustainable for years to come,” Ellis said. “When I first moved up here, local food was hard to find. The main challenge in a rural area is moving food around without using too many fossil fuels. Over time, we’ve been creating a collaborative where many, many small farms pool their food together, in order to be able to achieve distribution efficiencies regionally and to buyers in Atlanta. “There’s no reason why the food you’re eating in Atlanta has to come from California or China.” The network also has market pick-up locations in Habersham and Rabun counties for individuals looking to supplement their diets with locally grown products. Later this year, the market will expand to include a pick-up location in Gainesville as well. “I’m proud that the collaboration amongst farms is creating an identity for North Georgia farms. I think it creates a great vibrancy, new business homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

opportunities and an interesting cultural element,” Ellis says. “It’s the kind of thing that all rural areas should be crafting identities around.” These days, Ellis is working on crafting another identity for himself — father. He and his wife, Ching-Yu Huang, are looking forward to the birth of their first child later this year. By the time the baby arrives, who knows what environmentally sound ideas the two will have cooked up. “We met in graduate school in Athens. She’s an ecologist and teaches at the University of North Georgia,” says Ellis, who earned a doctorate degree in agro-ecology from UGA in 2013. “She’s actually a soil ecologist. Originally she was doing research about earthworms, but I’ve slowly converted her into doing research that (relates to agriculture). It’s nice that we can share information and ideas.” Over the years, Ellis has had great success implementing ideas through the Soque association. Projects like the Greenway Garden, Rainwater Capture and Reuse Program and the Rain Garden and Stormwater Infiltration Project have helped unite an entire community. And from the looks of things, he won’t be slowing down anytime soon. “Initially, the thought was that in order to protect the river, we should only focus on things near the water. But as time has gone one, we’ve all realized that every piece of land has an impact on the health of our waterways,” Ellis said. “In many ways, I’m feeling more ambitious than ever. We’ve now reached such a high level of collaboration with so many people that sometimes we come up with more ideas than we can implement at that time. That’s a good thing. I look forward to seeing how we can grow and what positive impacts we can have in the future.”

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A rockstar, a family man and a love for music Story by Savannah King

The guitar was just collecting dust under a bed until John Driskell Hopkins found it in the late 1970s. Before Hopkins became a vocalist and bassist with the Zac Brown Band, a three-time Grammy winning and multiplatinum Northeast Georgia-based group, he was just a small-town kid with a desire to learn. The young Hopkins, now 42, had been taking piano lessons and singing in the choir at Grace Episcopal and First Baptist churches in Gainesville for years, but finding the old guitar paved the way for something new.

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His lessons in music theory allowed him to figure out how to play a few chords and how to tune the guitar using a small pitch pipe he found in its case. The guitar had belonged to his father, Dr. Ralph Hopkins, who purchased the guitar shortly after moving to Gainesville in 1973 when John was 2 years old. Ralph Hopkins said he had quit trying to learn how to play the instrument because John, the oldest of his four sons, couldn’t contain his curiosity whenever he tried to practice. “John was always hanging on my frets,” Ralph Hopkins said, laughing. “He wanted to be in my lap. He wanted to hold the guitar. He wanted to pick on it and play with it. His story is he found it under the bed and that may be the way it was, because I wasn’t having much luck having time to practice on it with him in my lap. I do have a clear memory of trying to practice but he was more interested in it than I was.” It didn’t take long for John’s parents Ralph and Joan, both of Gainesville, to understand their son had a profound interest in music. Ralph laughed while recalling the time 3-year-old John took the microphone away from a piano player named Jimmy at a beachside South Carolina restaurant and sang “Let a Smile be your Umbrella” for the families eating their meals. Then there was the first time John “made a song.” The fifth-grade class performed the first song John wrote in the auditorium at Fair Street Elementary School. Ralph said he still has a video recording of the performance in which John’s younger brother David sang the lyrics along with the choir while John played music on a small recorder. “We were thinking ‘Lord have mercy. He’s in the fifth grade and he’s writing music. That’s kind of crazy,’” Ralph said. “We never thought all that much about it. Music is what you do after work. It’s important because it’s fun, it’s stimulating and it’s relaxing and all that. But it’s not something you do for a living. That’s crazy. “But he never gave up on his music. He was always playing something. He always had a band, some group of kids. They’d go down into the basement and play their songs.” John’s early experience with music in his family basement laid the foundation for his career as a musician. He was 15 when he got his first bass, a white Yamaha RBX 300. “I used to sneak into the attic to play it when my parents were out of the house,” John said. “I couldn’t wait for Christmas to come and it was in the attic. They got it right after Thanksgiving and it was in there for a month. I had to go see it. I couldn’t stand it. My band was trying to put together songs and stuff and I was putting together all the bass parts on keyboard. I was really excited to have that bass.” As a teenager, John played in a band called Only for Tomorrow. The high school musicians primarily covered songs by U2 and REM. “We were horrible but we had a good time,” John said, laughing. “We played at the civic center with other bands on stage and we’d all put shows on together. There’d be three or four other bands playing, other bands from Gainesville High.” John spent a lot of his time on stage while in high school. He was heavily involved in the theater program lead by Pam Ware. 18

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John Hopkins backstage at a Zac Brown Band performance.

John Hopkins, 4, at left, and his little brother David, 2.

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“I’m so proud of him just like he were my own son,” Ware said. “He definitely had a dream and he followed that dream to fulfillment, or at least to where it is right now. It’s going quite strongly with the Zac Brown Band and his own music.” Ware said she remembers John jumping “full force” into the program’s plays and musicals when he was a sophomore. John was involved in nearly every aspect of the theater program by playing music, singing, dancing, acting and designing sets. Ware keeps photos of her former student on display in her classroom. “Even after he became successful as a musician he would come back and give back to his high school theater program by becoming the band for our shows,” Ware said. Ware praised John as being a natural leader and a “multitalented individual.” His long list of extracurricular activities included swim team, Eagle Scout and student government leader. But while he often found success in his endeavors, John’s abilities shined brightest onstage. “He’s a very intelligent individual. And he’s definitely an individual,” Ware said. “He knows I don’t care for those ‘pork chop’ sideburns one bit. He’s got what I call a ‘Jim Carrey.’ You know that animated, elastic, rubberized face where he can just make all kinds of faces. He’s just got a wonderful sense of humor and a great caring for mankind.” After high school, John attended business school at the University of Georgia for two years. He eventually decided to go after his dream of show business and transferred to Florida State University, where he graduated in 1993 with a degree in theater. Ralph said it’s been fun to watch his son grow up pursuing his passion and finding success in it. “We’ve been there for the whole trip,” Ralph said. “When he was in high school he was playing what I would call rock ‘n’ roll and even hard rock ‘n’ roll. You know, where the music is so loud you couldn’t hear what anybody was singing. That wasn’t our style. We didn’t care for that music so much but we tried to be supportive. I’d take my ear plugs and go sit and listen and try to come up with some positive stuff. We were trying to understand it.”

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Photos courtesy John Hopkins

Top: John in a high school rendition of “The Wiz.” Middle: John as a Boy Scout. John Hopkins, his wife Jennifer and daughters Grace, Faith and Hope.

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Ralph said it wasn’t until John’s college years that he began to fully enjoy the fruits of John’s musical talents. “We could start to see breakthroughs, where you could actually understand the words, where the lyrics were good and made sense and were heartfelt and said something important,” Ralph said. “It started to jell. We liked the country songs that he did whenever we would go see him playing in some bar, some place you’d be afraid to go in, and he’d be there playing. So we’d go in and listen.” After playing in Tallahassee for a few years, John moved to Atlanta in 1995. He now lives in Marietta with his wife and three daughters. Not long after moving to Atlanta, John formed his band Brighter Shade, which continues to make music. The band has released two records on iTunes. He also opened a small recording studio in his home. “Then I got set up in downtown Atlanta over off Cheshire Bridge Road for the next five years,” John said. “That’s where we did the Zac Brown Band Homegrown record. It was in 2005 when Zac came in to record ‘Toes,’ or at least to demo it. Then I joined the band and actually moved out of that studio later that year and into another studio in the Highlands and started playing with Zac full time.” John laughed and said it’s been a “whirlwind” ever since. ---Q. What is it that makes the Zac Brown Band so popular? A. Up until 2008, we had all been playing the same kinds of venues and shows that all of our friends had been playing. I played a show — my band (Brighter Shade) played with Zac’s band at the Dark Horse. ... We played the Dark Horse together in early 2000s. We used to play Smiths, all of the bars around Atlanta. And that’s how we started with Zac, too. We just continued with that, except Zac had a good way of reaching the crowd. He was very personable and it was almost like he knew they were there, they were listening and they were being involved in the show, but he kind of made his show even on small scales like the big shows. He wanted it to be exciting and vibrant even when there weren’t that many people in the audience. So that enthusiasm that Zac brought to those smaller shows is pretty much what makes the difference in what he does and what this band does and what the other bands do. It’s the difference between enthusiasm and the authenticity. That’s the difference. A lot of bands are trying really hard to make a splash and make a dent and it comes off that way, that they’re trying too hard. There’s something about Zac that’s unique and that translated into big radio and that has made all the difference. Q. Your songs and music videos are everywhere these days. What does it feel like now that you’ve achieved this level of fame? A. You dream about it when you’re a kid but it’s the kind of excitement that’s indescribable. I truly still kind of wrestle with the question of whether or not I’m actually famous. I don’t feel that I am in most situations. But it’s those situations where the band is all together and we’re on stage or doing some PR or some press, those are the times when we start to feel like, “Wow we’re really a big deal in certain circles. This is really cool.” But most of the time we’re the same people; we feel like the same people we’ve always been. Some of the time we feel famous, we feel special, but most of the time we feel like Georgia boys. Zac can’t go to a restaurant without calling ahead and making sure homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

he’s got a private room. People just walk up and you don’t get the personal experience when you’re that recognized, that well-known. We can go anywhere we want and maybe one person all night will say something. Q. Well, your distinctive facial hair probably gives you away more than you think. How do you maintain the “chops?” A. These last couple of years it’s a little easier to look at me and see I’m in a crazy rock band I guess. … They do go through changes once in a while. I’ll take off the mustache once in a while and then it grows back in a month. I have to kind of trim them sometimes; they don’t feel even so I’ll trim one side more than the other. It’s just like cutting your own hair. But the good thing is you can see it all. I like having the chin exposed because you can still see my face. I’m not totally covered up like a Grizzly Adams. It sort of reminds me of playing a character in theater. It’s starting to become something of a trademark; I may be stuck with it for a while. Q. Do you have a favorite song that you like to play? A. I’m a big fan of bluegrass. When I was playing the bass, my favorite song to play was “Goodbye in Her Eyes” because I was playing with a pick and I’d wear the strap lower. It’s more of a mid-tempo, U2 rocker ballad. It’s just an emotional roller coaster and I really enjoyed playing that on the bass. And then when I switched to guitar. I’m enjoying more of the things like “The Wind” and “Whiskey’s Gone” and even playing “Chicken Fried” on the guitar, which I’ve never done in my life except for the last six months. The faster tunes, the ones that are more bluegrass-oriented, are the ones I really enjoy on the guitar. Q. What’s it like touring with the band? A. We’re pretty much rolling in a luxury submarine. It can feel a little cramped sometimes but most of the time it’s pretty cool. We’ve got a different way of touring than some bands. Like these jam bands that never stop and just keep going and going and going. We take like three days off a week or a whole week off so that way we get to see our families every week and we’re not gone for three months at a time. The disconnect on that much time away would be pretty staggering. In order for us to keep salaries and keep a constant business thriving, we want to always be working on it and always be thriving so we just stay on the road. That also gives us about 100 dates a year where lots of bands would go past that on a single tour. Q. You’ve got a wife and three young daughters. How do you maintain your family life while you’re on the road? A. We’ve got it good and we know it. We’re very appreciative of where we are and thankful to have the opportunities that we do. It’s a crazy, timeconsuming life and it’s a very blessed life. We’re grateful to have families that are excited about our careers and are fans of the music. Not just fans of Daddy but fans of the band. So that’s really exciting. It would be tough to do a gig that our families didn’t like. If we were this big aggressive band that scared the kids, it’d be more difficult to be a part of. The twins are 20 months and they’re starting to recognize whenever we do something on TV with the band they’ll say “Daddy!” you know. Grace is 5 and she’s all over. She’s been to lots of shows. We bring our kids to shows whenever we can. Q. Where was your favorite place to hang out in Gainesville growing up? A. My big summer, my 16th year, I had my license and was working in the stock room at Belk at Lakeshore Mall. In the evenings when I wasn’t March | April 2014

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Photo by Southern Reel courtesy Zac Brown Band. Zac Brown Band onstage in 2013. Below; John Hopkins plays a song he wrote for his daughter.

working, I would take my folks’ boat and put it on the truck and take it out and go skiing. I felt like me and my friends were living on the lake for a long time, like we skied a lot. My dad instilled a love of a lot of traditional spots and nostalgic places. I always think of that Collegiate Grill. That was a great place to hang out and get a milkshake and a burger. Other than that,

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we’d just hang out at my house, or swim at the Elks Club pool, which was near my house. We’d go on the lake. We were pretty active. Q. What were you like in high school? A. I really, really wanted to be involved in leadership positions. I was in the student council. I was an Eagle Scout in Troop 26 that met over at First Baptist (Church). I was always really driven to be a leader and be a part of the groups that made things happen and put together the activities and stuff. That got me into student government. It was tough. I ran in seven elections before I ever got a position or anything. When I won student council representative, it was because I threw a bunch of hubcaps out in the audience and screamed at everybody. (Laughing) It was because of more of my dramatic, waking people up, yelling at them sort of character that I embrace that kind of jump-started me into that thing. It’s hard to think about that now but that’s what it was. I was always wearing a tie to student government speeches and whatnot. But this one day I was just fed up with it and I wore what everybody else wore and my speeches became a plea to the group: “Can’t you see I want to work hard?” People were laughing and then they voted for me. Q. What do you think your classmates thought of you? A. People in high school may not know all the details. I think people knew I was involved in singing and played piano and had a very creative

HOME Living

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Zac Brown Band Photo by Cole Cassell for Southern Reel.

thing. Subsequently they voted me in as Most Talented every year. Sometimes I felt like that was without knowing what was going on or what I was doing or what other people were doing because there were lots of people who were very talented. I think that’s the spot where junior year I was able to continue with my creative pursuits but also get into some leadership roles. I sometimes come off abrasive and don’t mean to come off that way. It’s been a challenge my whole life to communicate with people and to actually let them know exactly what I’m trying to say without being so blunt and abrasive. Those experiences throughout high school and trying to be involved in government were very teaching, a very good learning experience for me. Q. If you could go back to tell your younger self one thing, what would it be? A. I think I could have probably learned a lot more from my environment and the people around me than I was willing to listen to, from my parents, my teachers, my friends, everybody. I’m one of those people that has to make my own mistakes. I might have listened to myself or I might have not listened to myself if I were to go back in time. Odds are I probably would have not listened to myself and still make the same mistakes. A lot of that just comes with me being stubborn. As I get older, I realize that and it’s something I’m trying to work on. I think that’s a good general thing to say to a young John Hopkins, “Don’t be so stubborn.” Q. How has your hometown influenced you? A. There are a bunch of people in Gainesville who are still playing and never really stopped being musicians. It’s something you can do for life. There’s something in the water in Gainesville that really brings out a lot of performers. The list is really large of people who have gone on to continue in the arts. I think that’s because people in Gainesville are accepting of different musical genres and to be such a small community it’s got such an artistic sense about it.

homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

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home fashion

Ain’t it fascinatin’

Big hats, lots of frills and delicate hair pieces are all the rage for this Easter holiday Story by Brandee Thomas Ladies, the world at-large is finally accepting what Southern women have known all along — a beautiful hat is the cherry on top of a perfectly pulled together ensemble. “Hats are traditional wear that can reflect culture and the experience of a people, but at the same time, hats are hot,” concludes Constance White, style expert and consulting editor of Ozy.com. White — who has covered all aspects of the fashion industry from her time as a reporter to “Elle” magazine executive fashion director and television fashion consultant for programs like “Oprah,” “Project Runway” — was recently in Atlanta for an in-store discussion on fashion at Macy’s Lenox Square. Even though southern belles have been donning hats with their Sunday’s best for generations, there are some among us who aren’t sure how to go about choosing just the right piece. “You want to think about hats that flatter your face. You don’t want something that overpowers the beauty of your face,” White says. “When choosing a hat, you want to think about it as part of a total look. Many times we see someone in a great hat (paired with) an outfit that doesn’t work. “You don’t want to wear a really skinny, body-conscious suit with a very big hat. The proportions aren’t right. The same is true with a really full dress and very small hat. You don’t want to pair the two together.” This season, color choices are just as vast — and relevant — as the size of your headwear. “Look for hats that are in beautiful pastel colors of blues, pinks, corals and mint. Also, bone is a hot neutral for spring,” White says. Over the years, fashion rules have relaxed a bit, so you can match your hat to your outfit for a monotone look or use it as a contrasting detail. Whatever your color choice, be sure to stick with the same tone from top to bottom for the most fashion-forward look. If you opt for a pastel hued outfit, don’t reach for that jewel-toned hat, White warns. “Keep cool colors with cool colors and hot colors with hot colors,” she says. August Hats Lisette Down Brim Hat, Macy’s, $90 On page 5 and opposite center: Eric Javits ‘Marisa’ Hat, Nordstrom, $375 24

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“Contrast is fine, but the key is to make sure that the tonality is the same.” Although classic fedora, pillbox and derby styles continue to grow in popularity, there’s a mini but mighty fashion statement that is gaining popularity among a younger generation of millinery mavens. Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge — better known as “Princess Kate” on this side of the pond — rightly receives credit as the ringleader in this group. Princess Kate’s chosen headgear is often referred to simply as “fascinators,” again, an appropriate title considering the intrigue surrounding the tiny confections of feathers, ribbons and other delicate materials. Sometimes better described as a fancy headband in some cases, these fascinators are still definitely a gateway to more traditional head wear. “I love fascinators,” White says. “They can be very whimsical.” Fascinators aren’t just for ladies headed to Sunday school, they have also gained popularity among modern brides who are looking for something a little more personal than cookie-cutter veils. “Somewhere along the line, I began making bridal headpieces,” says Lisa Innis, owner of the Ruby and Cordelia online boutique hosted by etsy. com. “The wonderful thing about being a milliner is that ladies are able to order a custom headpiece for their special event. It might be a small request such as ordering a headpiece I’ve already made in a different color to match a dress or as vague as showing me a picture of their dress and asking me to create what I feel would complement their dress in the best way.” Although her business is based out of Lincoln, Nebraska where she lives with her family, Innis says women’s appreciation for interesting headwear isn’t limited by geography. “I have been very fortunate that through my online shop I am selling items all around the world. Places such as Paris, Sweden, Singapore,

Ruby & Cordelia’s Millinery, etsy.com Photo by Leahrachel.com homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Germany, Canada, Saudi Arabia and around the United States — many go to Georgia,” Innis says. “If I were to pinpoint where the majority of my headpieces are shipped, I would have to say Australia.” Although popular among younger buyers, the whimsical headpieces are really a universal accessory, White says. “They work for any age. For the younger woman in the millennial age group, it’s a new hot look for church or daytime events whenever you want to dress up a bit,” White says. “For the baby boomer age, it’s a look they’re very familiar with because maybe they’ve worn it before. Turbans, head wraps and hats in general are back as an accessory among all age groups. “They’re beautiful just because, but they’re also a wonderful way to work with a bad hair day.”

Flower trim Derby Hat, Nordstrom, $58

Ruby & Cordelia’s Millinery, etsy.com Photo by Leahrachel.com March | April 2014

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Three Years in a Row

Moore’s Wealth Management adds 5t

Planning for a healthy and prosperous retirement that might last 20, 25 or even 30 years into the future can be a daunting task. You want to make your financial resources last for the rest of your life -- no matter how long you live -- and you don’t want to be wiped out by down markets, poor tax planning, or long-term care expenses. That being said, it makes sense to seek guidance from trained professionals for these most important financial decisions. Brokers, Registered Representatives, Insurance Agents and Registered Investment Advisors all claim to have the best advice and commitment to serve their clients. However, did you realize only Registered Investment Advisors under the SEC and Investment Advisor Representatives with a Series 65 license have a fiduciary duty to always act in the best interest of their clients? A Fiduciary Advisor is required to put their client’s interests above their own and declare any conflicts of interest that may arise.

The “suitability standard” which Brokers, Registered Representatives and Insurance Agents are held to means that the broker must reasonably believe that their recommendation is suitable given the client’s circumstances, needs and objectives. In this case, the broker is not referred to as a fiduciary and does not need to put their client’s interests before their own or the interests of their financial institution. Brokerdealers presently have no fiduciary duty. The suitability standard required of a traditional broker does not require a broker to always act in the best interests of their client. In fact, since the brokers do not have to adhere to the Fiduciary Standard, and are relegated to selling commission based broker/dealer products, they cannot comply with the Fiduciary Standard. At Moore’s Wealth Management “We help our clients protect their financial future through a Fiduciary Standard of Care that puts their interests First.” The

Firm has been built on this standard and continues to grow in the community due to its commitment to this principle. Moore’s Wealth Management just added it’s 5th Fiduciary Advisor at the beginning of January (Kyle Moore joined Christopher Moore, Brian Moore, Mark Peterson, and Scott Moore) showing a continued commitment to grow and serve the North Georgia region. For more information on the ongoing educational seminars and college retirement planning courses that the firm offers, and how Scott, or one of the other fiduciary advisors in the office may be able to serve you and your family, please call one of their offices at 770-535-5000 or 678-566-3590. You can also learn more about the firm at www. mooreswealthmanagement.com. Drew K. Horter, founder and Chief Investment Strategist of Horter Investment Management said, “As the fastest growing Registered Investment Advisor Firm out of 130 firms with Trust Company of America, the 7th largest Custodian in the United States, Horter Investment Management believes in a “Fee for Service” model and

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“Protecting Moore’s Wealth Management Staff include: Scott & Carla Moore pictured in the center, from left to right Michelle Moore, Karly Moore, Kyle Moore, 26 Brian Moore, Chris Moore, and Liz & Mark Peterson.

“We help our client future through a HOME Living In North Georgia care that puts t


w!

SCOTT MOORE AWARDED 2013 ADVISOR OF THE YEAR th Fiduciary Advisor to their Practice

oing what is in the best interest of the lient. At Horter Investment Management we are very proud to work with Scott Moore nd his tremendous group of Fiduciary Advisors at Moore’s Wealth Management. They represent the Fiduciary Standard to the ighest degree in everything they do for their lients. Under Scott’s leadership, the firm ontinues to increase its number of clients nd level of client satisfaction, now ranking Moore’s Wealth Management as a National Top 5 Fiduciary Advisory Firm within Horter nvestment Management.” Call to get more information on ow Scott Moore and his team of Fiduciary Advisors can assist you in planning and reparing for retirement. They can be reached t either their Gainesville office at 770-535000 or their Alpharetta office at 678-566590. You can also learn more about the firm t www.mooreswealthmanagement.com.

vestment advice is offered by Horter Investment anagement, LLC, a Registered Investment Adviser. surance and annuity products are sold separately through oore’s Wealth Management. Securities transactions for orter Investment Management clients are placed through ershing Advisor Solutions, Trust Company of America, fferson National Monument Advisor, Fidelity, Security enefit Life, and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A.

ORE’S

Moore’s Wealth Management Fiduciary Advisors include: Scott Moore Founder/ Sr. Advisor pictured in the center, from left to right Mark Peterson, Chris Moore, Brian Moore, and Kyle Moore.

MANAGEMENT

Your Future”

ts protect their financial fiduciary standard of their interests first”

210 Washington St NW, Suite 106 Gainesville, GA 30501 770-535-5000

12600 Deerfield Parkway, Suite 100 Alpharetta, Georgia 30004 27 678-566-3590


home taste

A little NOLA in

North Georgia

Celebrate Mardi Gras with Shrimp ‘n’ Grits from Natalie Jane’s Tavern Story by Savannah King Photos by Michelle Boaen Jameson

If you can’t make it to New Orleans for Mardi Gras don’t let that stop you from enjoying the festive fare. Natalie Jane Tavern on the Square in Clarkesville has just what you’re looking for in Cajun delicacy with its signature style Shrimp ‘n’ Grits. The southern favorite is one of the most popular dishes on the tavern’s menu. “I just cook food the way I like to eat it,” Natalie Jane Heisley, owner and chef, said. “I like my grits cheesy and wanted a little bit of a kick. I like it to be wellseasoned so you don’t have to add anything.” The secret to Heisley’s southern shrimp dish is in the spice. The grits are loaded with jalapeno Havarti cheese “to give it kind of a kick” and then topped with spicy Cajun style shrimp sautéed in a butter wine gravy and drizzled over the top of the dish. Describing the dish doesn’t do it justice. Heisley said the shrimp and grits are just “one of those things you have to try.” If Cajun cooking isn’t exactly your thing,

Right: Chef Josh VanSciver prepares the Shrimp ‘n’ Grits at Natalie Jane’s Tavern in Clarkesville. VanSciver had to practice making the dish for months before he got it to Natalie’s standards. Now, it takes only a few minutes for VanSciver to whip up. Top: Garnished with a slice of lemon, the Shrimp ‘n’ Grits is loaded with flavor. VanSciver uses plenty of butter, garlic and white wine in just the right combination to achieve a subtle, yet robust flavor.

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HOME Living

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home taste

the tavern has a breakfast, lunch or dinner menu with plenty of other unique options. The restaurant, which opened in Aug. 2009, has a number of popular dishes ranging from prime rib to the Natalie Jane burger, a feta cheese loaded burger topped with cheddar and a slice of ham. Heisley laughed and said it’s her signature burger that actually got the restaurant started. After graduating from La Cordon Blue in Orlando, Fla., Heisley went to work for Disney World in the kitchen at Cinderella’s Castle. Heisley was injured by a broken dinner plate and moved back home to Clarkesville to recuperate. After two years of catering at Blackstock winery she decided to open her own restaurant in downtown Clarkesville. At first the restaurant just served lunch but the demand for additional meals allowed Heisley to create new dishes for every meal of the day. Each dish Heisley prepares offers diners a unique flavor experience with a side of Southern charm. “It’s one of those places where everybody knows your name,” Heisley said, laughing. “It’s that feel good home away from home where you’re always welcome.” For more info, visit www.nataliejanestavern.com.

“There’s three main ingredients in French cooking: butter, butter and butter.” Chef Josh VanSciver, Natalie Jane’s Tavern homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Left: Shrimp get a coating of spices before being cooked. Above: The Shrimp ‘n’ Grits are so popular, grits must always be on tap and ready.

Deciding Where to Retire? Discover The HolbrookTM of Gainesville, Georgia... Small Town Delights. Big City Sights.

CHANGE YOUR LIVING ENVIRONMENT... CHANGE YOUR LIFE.

Where is the best place to live? Lots of folks, including national news sources, will tell you that place is Gainesville, Georgia. Gainesville is small enough to know your neighbors, yet large enough to offer the services, medical facilities and cultural experiences more typically found in larger cities. Home to Georgia’s leading hospital for cardiac care, gastrointestinal care and pulmonary care; one of the state’s leading arts, civic, and recreational communities, Gainesville is hailed by Barron’s Magazine, AARP and others as one of the best places to retire in America. Located in the foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains surrounded by Lake Sidney Lanier, The Holbrook independent living community offers retirees the choice to have it all...small town delights and big city sights. Best yet, our living environments were created with all of the details proven to produce outcomes in the health and lives of seniors. Come by and meet your new neighbors. Let them tell you how The Holbrook is more than a great place to live...it is the place where they can live life, even better than before.

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March | April 2014

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home taste Left: A hot plate of cajun-spiced Shrimp ‘n’ Grits at Natalie Jane’s Tavern in Clarkesville. Don’t count calories in this dish; the grits are loaded with havarti and cheddar, plus a few other ingriedents to give it that creamy, melt-in-your-mouth texture. Bottom: If grits doesn’t make your mouth water, the tavern offers numerous other dishes and appetizers like this Tuna Tar Tar. Each dish has been tested by the tavern’s chef until it hits perfection.

If you are in need of a neurological evaluation, ask your physician for a referral to Gainesville Neurology Group or call our office at 770-534-7885 for information and appointments

Common neurological conditions treated: *Headaches/Migraines *Neuromuscular Disorders *Epilepsy/Seizures *Sleep Disorders *Dizziness/Vertigo *Memory loss/Dementia *Movement Disorders *Parkinson’s Disease

Gainesville Neurology Group Serving Northeast Georgia since 1979

Photo courtesy Natalie Jane’s Tavern

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1240 Jesse Jewell Parkway SE Suite 400Gainesville, GA 30501 770-534-1117|770-503-7285 (fax) www.gainesvilleneurology.com Supporting Your Pathway to Excellence HOME Living

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home recreation

Horsin’ Around Horseback riders

Photos courtesy CTHA

Equestrians help maintain trails to keep riders safe Story by Michelle Boaen Jameson Lake Lanier and the North Georgia mountains have long been a destination for outdoor enthusiasts. But more recently, the area has become a popular draw with horseback riders. The Chattachoochee National Forest has several trails, including the near-by Jake and Bull Mountain Trails in Dawson Forest, that allow equestrians to get up close with Mother Nature. The newest trail system currently in the funding process will be here in Hall County at the recently opened Don Carter State Park. Vivki Holland of the Chattachoochee Trail Horse Association said in 32

March | April 2014

the past few years more and more riders have relocated to the area, partly because of the proximity to the Blue Ridge Mountains and partly because land is more accessible. “More and more stables and farms have opened and the equestrian community has really increased quite a bit. It has a great impact on the economy.” The CTHA works tirelessly along with numerous other groups such as the Cherokee County Saddle Club, to maintain the network of trails for use HOME Living

In North Georgia


home recreation

Photos courtesy CTHA

Photo by Times staff

by all enthusiasts. Holland, who is on the committee overseeing the creation of the horse trails at Don Carter State Park, said the trails are in the design phase, with a new landscaper and certified trail planners working to suit everyone’s needs. But once the trails become reality, they will still take lots of work to maintain. Volunteers spend countless hours clearing undergrowth and making the ground suitable for sometimes tender horse hooves. A recent rain can make a wet trail susceptible to damage from horses slogging through the mud. But all the work is worth the ride. There’s no better way to experience oneness with the great outdoors than winding through the woods on the back of good trail horse, as long as you don’t mind getting a little saddle sore. homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

Above: Horseback riding enthusiasts meet at Don Carter State Park to discuss the proposed trails. Left and below: Volunteers and members of Chattahoochee Trail Horse Association maintain the horse trails around Dawson Forest. For more information on places to ride, visit www.ride-ctha.com or http://www.fs.usda.gov.

The staff at

WEST JACKSON MEDICINE CENTER can take care of you!

Come in today and let us check to see if your plan can be transferred to a locally owned and operated Pharmacy. We accept most preferred prescription insurance plans Locally Owned & Operated 3845 Hwy. 53, Hoschton

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John 3:16 For God so loved the world, that he gave his only begotten Son, that whosoever believeth in him should not perish but have everlasting life. March | April 2014

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home calendar

March

Through March Imaginary Worlds: Plants Larger Than Life 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. Atlanta Botanical Garden, 1345 Piedmont Ave. NE, Atlanta. $18.95 adults, $12.95 children 3-12, free to children 3 and younger and to Garden members. 404-8765859, atlantabotanicalgarden.org March 1-29 Chestatee Artists: Inspirations Bowen Center for the Arts, 334 Ga. 9 N., Dawsonville. 706-2162787, www.dawsonarts.org, info@ dawsonarts.org. March 1 Dirty Spokes: 5th annual Off-road Duathlon 7 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fort Yargo State Park, Winder. Fee plus $5 parking. 404-310-3628, www.dirtyspokes. com March 1 First-Visit Tour 10-11:30 a.m., Smithgall Woods State Park, Helen. Learn more about the park on a tour of the Visitor Center area and a van tour. See the covered bridge, the famous Dukes Creek and cottages. $5 parking. 706-878-3087. March 1 Quinlan’s 36th Annual Gala Fine Art Auction 6 p.m., Quinlan Visual Arts Center, 514 Green St. NE, Gainesville. qvac. org. March 2 ASO Presents welcomes Pink Martini with special guest The von Trapps 7p.m., Atlanta Symphony Hall. 800745-3000 March 2 Challenged Child and Friends 5K 1 p.m. Riverside Military Academy, 2001 Riverside Drive, Gainesville. $25. 770-535-8372 ext. 115, 34

March | April 2014

April 4-5 Hall County Master Gardener Spring Expo 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Chicopee Woods Agricultural Center, 1855 Calvary Church Road, Gainesville. Adults $2, children free. Crafts, plants, drawings and hardware. gardenexpo@ hallmastergardens.com www.challengedchild.org, lmiller@ challengedchild.org. March 4 Gospel Choir Concert Brenau University’s Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. Free. 770-534-4764, www.brenau.edu/fineartshumanities/music. March 6 “Simply Spring” art exhibit Reception 5-7 p.m., Helen Arts & Heritage Center 25 Chattahoochee St., Helen. 706-878-3933, www.helenarts.org March 6-16 “The Black Mountain College Experience” art exhibit. Reception 5:30-7 p.m. John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, 429 Academy St. NE, Gainesville. Free. 770-534-6263, amurphy2@

brenau.edu March 7-8 2014 Big Band Show 7-9 p.m. Continuing Education Performing Arts Center Theater, University of North Georgia, Gainesville campus. www.ung.edu March 6 “Finding Hillywood” 7 p.m. University of North Georgia Dahlonega campus Hoag Student Center. The Arts Council, Inc. and The University of North Georgia present the independent feature film “Finding Hillywood” with director and producer Leah Warshawski as part of the South Arts Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers. Ticket price includes movie and Meet the Filmmaker Q&A session following the film screening. Tickets: $7 adult, $5 students, $5

seniors (65+); 770-534-2787 or www.TheArtsCouncil.net March 8 Evenings of Intimate Jazz series: Bonaventure Quartet 8 p.m., The Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center, Gainesville. $30. 770534-2787, www.theartscouncil.net March 8 Spring Into March Card Party and Luncheon 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Bowen Center for the Arts, 334 Ga. 9 N., Dawsonville. 706-216-2787, www.dawsonarts. org, info@dawsonarts.org. $25$100 March 8-9 Dahlonega Literary Festival Downtown Dahlonega square. Free. Author discussions, book signings. dahlonegaliteraryfestival.org HOME Living

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home calendar Through March 9 “On Golden Pond” 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sundays. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming. 770-781-9178, www.playhousecumming.com March 9 ProMusica Concert Series 4 p.m. First Presbyterian Church of Gainesville, 800 S. Enota Drive, Gainesville. 770-531-7776, www. promusicaconcertseries.com. March 7-9 Folk to Fine Arts Festival & Expo An indoor arts show featuring both fine artists and folk artists from the Southeastern United

States. Commerce Civic Center, 110 State Street Commerce. 706334-2954 March 11 Girl Scouts of Historic Georgia 2014 Gainesville Woman of Distinction 11:30 a.m., Gainesville First United Methodist Church 770-536-8656 March 11 Northeast Georgia History Center History Forum 7 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. N.E., Gainesville. War of 1812. $3 for nonmembers. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org, jcarson@brenau.edu. March 13

Choices Pregnancy Care Center Gala Fundraiser 6:45 p.m. First Baptist Church, 751 Green St., Gainesville. $30. choicespregnancypartners.org/2014gala-fundraiser, jessicahart@choicespregnancy.org, 678-928-4360. March 14-16 Gainesville Ballet Company Spring Show 7:30 p.m. March 14 and 15, 2 p.m. March 15 and 16. Brenau University Pearce Auditorium, Gainesville. www.gainesvilleballet.org March 14-16 Dahlonega Trail Fest An annual celebration of Dahlonega’s Appalachian Trail Community designation. Hancock Park, North Park Street & Warwick St., Dahlonega. 706-867-9742 March 14-16 National Auto Sport Association races Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 800-849-RACE, 770-967-6143, www.roadatlanta. com March 15 Flies and Fly Water 9:30 a.m. to noon, Smithgall Woods State Park, Helen. Show and tell, helpful hints, and “how to” on fly tying, stream reading, casting and more. Hear a presentation on Stream Entomology (aka stream critters) by Wildlife Interpretive Specialist Sheila Humphrey. Register in advance. $5. Kids under 12 free. $5 parking. 706-878-3087. March 15 Denim & Diamonds fundraiser Benefiting Chelsey Park Health & Rehabilitation. Cottrell Ranch, 630

Porter Springs Road, Dahlonega. Cocktail hour and silent auction 5 p.m., dinner and dancing 6:3010:30 p.m. Live music. Tickets: $250 per person; 100 percent goes to technology, furnishing of patient rooms. Purchase tickets online at Chelseyparkhealth.com, events. chelseyparkhealth.org. Chelseyparkhealth.com. 478-319-3752 March 15-21 Rockin’ the Streets Week 5K run, sidewalk chalk art contest, ribbon cutting, rock ‘n roll concert. www.downtownbraselton.com March 15-21 Downtown Braselton Grand Reopening Braselton DDA, www.downtownbraselton.com March 17 “Celebrating Women Composers” 7:30 p.m. John S. Burd Center for the Performing Arts, 429 Academy St. N.E., Gainesville. Free. 770-5344764, www.brenau.edu/fineartshumanities/music. March 21 Beyond 135: Women’s Leadership Colloquium 2-5 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. N.E., Gainesville. Leaders from the community and Brenau University Women’s College gather for a conference capping the university’s 135th anniversary celebration. Free and open to the public. Limited seating available. 770-534-6179, wfauscett@brenau.edu. March 21-23 SCCA Double National Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highway, Braselton. 800-849-RACE,

April 26 10th annual Spring Chicken Festival and Chicken Cook-Off 10 a.m.–4 p.m., downtown Gainesville. Prizes in professional and Backyard Bar-B-Q divisions. Prizes will be awarded in both categories. Chicken City Parade with vintage cars, live entertainment, art market, quilt show, kids zone. 770-297-1141, www.gainesville.org/springchicken-festival.

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home calendar emy, Gainesville. Cost is $25 and $30 afterMarch 15. Register online through March 21. In person registration is available at the chamber office through March 26. All participants will receive a complimentary race shirt. www. chamberchase5k.com March 27-April 19 “Oliver” 8 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sundays. The Cumming Playhouse, 101 School St., Cumming. 770-781-9178, www.playhousecumming.com

March 26 Neil Berg’s 101 Years of Broadway 8-10 p.m., Brenau University Pearce Auditorium, Gainesville. The Arts Council Pearce Series, now in its 29th season, features performing artists that would otherwise not be available without traveling to a major metropolitan city. The series is comprised of three performances each year. Tickets: $35 Adult; $32 Senior; $28 Student; $80 Series. 770-534-2787, www.TheArtsCouncil.net

770-967-6143, www.roadatlanta. com Through March 21 Fragile:The Delicate Balance between Women and the World 7 p.m. Simmons Visual Arts Center, Presidents Gallery, 500 Washington St. SE Gainesville. Through two and three dimensional works, Brenau University alumni Heather Hanline, Karina Taylor, Jennifer Prince, and Veronica Martin, explore themes of body image, change, and fear while drawing inspiration from the dichotomy of the perceived fragility of women and their incredible strength and resilience. Free and open to the public. 770-534-6263. March 22 Lula Bridge Race Lake Lanier Olympic Venue, 3105 Clarks Bridge Rd., Gainesville. Races for all ages in canoes, kayaks and SUP will be offered in distances homemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

from 4.3-25.8K. Registration and athlete check-in open 8-9 a.m. Athlete meeting at 9:30, race time 10 a.m. www.lckc.org, 770-287-7888. March 22 “Make a Gourd-eous Birdhouse” 10 a.m. to noon, Smithgall Woods, Helen. Learn to clean and prepare gourds for use as birdhouses. Gourds and all equipment provided. Register in advance. 706878-3087, www.gastateparks.org/ smithgallwoods March 22-24 Spring Wine Highway Weekend Various venues in Northeast Georgia. Check www.georgiawine.com for locations, more information. March 22, 29 Survival Preparation and Skills Course at Buck Shoals 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., Smithgall

Woods State Park, Helen. This course will consist of classroom instruction and outside exercises. The course will include the psychology, planning, and equipment necessary for survival; venomous snakes, spiders and insects endemic to Georgia; survival medicine; field expedient weapons and tools; water procurement; edible wild plants; wildlife food; shelter and fire building; and signaling. $50. $5 parking. 706-878-3087. March 26 Neil Berg’s 101 Years of Broadway 8-10 p.m., Brenau University Pearce Auditorium, Gainesville. Tickets: $35 Adult; $32 Senior; $28 Student; $80 Series. 770-534-2787, www. TheArtsCouncil.net March 27 Greater Hall Chamber’s 7th annual Chamber Chase 5K & 2 Mile Wellness Walk 6-8 p.m. Riverside Military Acad-

March 28 Humane Society of Jackson County Fur Ball 2014 7 p.m. Braselton-Stover House. Champagne reception with hors d’oervres, gourmet dining, dancing to a live jazz band as well as silent auction, raffles and prizes. The bar will feature Prohibition-era cocktails. Commerce School of Dance and Jefferson Community Theatre Group will present a “Roaring ’20s” review. Tickets are $60 per person. 706-367-1111, www.hsjc.com March 28-30 Fort Yargo Colonial Market Faire During this 18th century living-history event, tradesmen and artisans will demonstrate crafts and knowledge of the time. 210 S. Broad Street, Winder. 770-867-4632 Through March 29 “The Taming of the Shrew” New American Shakespeare Tavern, 499 Peachtree St., Atlanta. $15-$36. shakespearetavern.com, 404-874-5299. March 29 Brenau University’s 135th Gala:The Art & Science of Brenau 6 p.m., Brenau Downtown Center, Gainesville. Live and silent art auctions, tour of doctorate of physical therapy space and viewing of Brenau’s newest artwork acquisitions followed by dinner and dancing. Tickets $100 per person. 770-7185309 or mthomas@brenau.edu. March | April 2014

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home calendar March 29 Helen Chamber of Commerce 25th Annual Trout Tournament 6 a.m. to 2 p.m. Register at the Festhalle (1074 Edelweiss Strasse, Helen) from 4-7 p.m. Friday, March 28, 4 p.m. and 7:00 p.m., or 6-9 a.m. Saturday, March 29. $15 entry fee, open to all ages. To win prizes, anglers must catch a tagged trout. All participants must have a Georgia fishing license and trout stamp. All Georgia state fishing rules and regulations apply. Rules on lures and bait used during the tournament are the Department of Natural Resources rules of fishing in the Chattahoochee River. March 29 28th annual John Hunter Regatta 7 a.m. to 7 p.m., Lake Lanier Olympic Rowing Center, 3105 Clarks Bridge Road, Gainesville. 770-2870077 April 6 Trillium Trek 5K, 10K, halfmarathon and kid’s fun run Registration 1 p.m., fun run at 2 p.m. and other races start at 2:30 p.m. Elachee Nature Science Center, 2125 Elachee Drive, Gainesville. $25-$40. Runners will receive a T-shirt and goodie bag for participation. 770-535-1976, elachee@elachee.org, www.active. com/gainesville-ga/running/races/ trillium-trek-trail-5k-10k-and-halfmarathon-2014. April 4-5 Hall County Master Gardener Spring Expo 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday and 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday. Chicopee Woods Agricultural Center, 1855 Calvary Church Road, Gainesville. Adults $2, children free. Crafts, plants, drawings and hardware. gardenexpo@hallmastergardens.com April 7-8 “Knightly News” Produced by The Atlanta Opera 10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., The Cumming Playhouse,101 School St., Cumming. 770-781-9178, www. playhousecumming.com 38

March | April 2014

April 8-19 “Sense & Sensibility” 7:30 p.m., April 8-12 and 15-19; 2:30Pm, April 13 and 19, University of North Georgia Gainesville’s Ed Cabell Theater, 3820 Mundy Mill Road, Oakwood. 678-717-3624, www.gainesvilleTHEATREalliance. org April 10-13 Georgia Nature Photographers Annual Expo Unicoi State Park Lodge. Keynote speaker George Lepp, a Canon Explorer of Light. $125-$165 plus $5 parking. 770-514-0875, www. gnpa.org. April 11-12 Forsyth County Master Gardener Spring Plant Sale 8 am to 5 pm 235 Castleberry Road, Cumming. Vendors will offer annuals, perennials, trees, shrubs and vegetables for sale. There will be presentations throughout the day. Master Gardeners will be available to answer garden questions. Free to the public, rain or shine. Covered venue. For more information call 770.887.2418 or go to fcmg.sharepoint.com. 770887-2418 April 12 The Brenau Student Fashion Show 4:30 p.m. Brenau University’s Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. Free. 770-5346263, amurphy2@brenau.edu. April 12 Springfest 6-11 p.m. Helen Chamber of Commerce Festhalle, 10741 Edelweiss Strasse, Helen. a celebration of new life returning to the mountains of Northeast Georgia. Enjoy music, dancing, food and beverages in the Festhalle. Admission $7 per person, food and drinks extra. 706878-1908, www.helenchamber.com April 12 “The Brenau Collaborative” Reception 5:30-7 p.m. Brenau University’s Simmons Visual Arts Center, Sellars and Presidents

April 26-27 Bear on the Square Dahlonega. Live Bluegrass music, auction, food, juried artists market, workshops. Peformances free. www.bearonthesquare.org

galleries, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. Free. 770-534-6263, amurphy2@brenau.edu. April 12 Evenings of Intimate Jazz: Steve Cunningham Trio 8 p.m., The Arts Council Smithgall Arts Center, Gainesville. $30. 770-534-2787, www.thearts council.net April 13 Annual History Center Volunteer Appreciation and Recognition Reception 1-3 p.m. Northeast Georgia History Center, 322 Academy St. N.E., Gainesville. 770-297-5900, www. negahc.org, jcarson@brenau.edu. April 14 “All the World’s a Stage: From Shakespeare to Broadway.” Brenau University’s Pearce Auditorium, 500 Washington St., Gainesville. Free. 770-534-4764, www.brenau.edu/fineartshumani ties/music.

April 14 “The New Public” 7 p.m., University of North Georgia Gainesville campus Martha T. Nesbitt Academic Building. Part of the South Arts Southern Circuit Tour of Independent Filmmakers. Ticket price includes movie and Meet the Filmmaker Q&A session following the film screening. Tickets: $7 Adult, $5 Students, $5 Seniors (65+); 770-534-2787 or www. TheArtsCouncil.net April 15-16 2014 White County Celebrity Golf Tournament 5:30 p.m. Innsbruck Golf Club, Helen. April 18 Gateway to Hope 6 p.m. Chattahoochee Country Club, 3000 Club Drive, Gainesville. $75. An evening to benefit Gateway Domestic Violence Center. 770-536-5860.

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In North Georgia


home calendar way, Braselton. 800-849-RACE, 770967-6143, www.roadatlanta.com April 25-26 Braselton-Hoschton Relay for Life 6 p.m. to 7 a.m. Braselton Fields at the Hoschton Park. www.facebook. com/pages/Relay-For-Life-of-Braselton-Hoschton-Georgia April 25-27 Braselton Antique and Gardening Festival Noon-6 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. Downtown Braselton. Plants, art, food. Free parking and admission. www.facebook.com/Braselton AntiqueFestival

April 18 Hal B. Rhodes Student Exhibition Reception 5-6:30 p.m., Bob Owens Art Gallery University of North Georgia Dahlonega Campus, 82 College Circle, Dahlonega. Free. gallery@ung.edu, 706-864-1400. April 18-19 Cornelia Apple Blossom BBQ Festival Beer garden, cooking contests and demonstrations, tastings, beer garden, car show, live entertainment, kids’ activities, Big Apple Soapbox Derby. Friday night movie at Depot. Free admission. 706-778-8585, bht@corneliageorgia.org, www. explorecornelia.com April 19 Wildflower Walk (Earth Day Event) Vogel State Park, Blairsville. This guided wildflower walk through the Appalachian forest will highlight Jack-in-the pulpits, trilliums, wild azaleas and many other flowering plants. $3 plus $5 parking. 706-7452628. April 24-27 The Mitty vintage car races Road Atlanta, 5300 Winder Highhomemagazinenorthgeorgia.com

April 25 35th annual Hackers Holiday Golf Tournament 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., Legacy on Lanier Golf Club at Lake Lanier Islands Resort. April 26 10th annual Spring Chicken Festival and Chicken Cook-Off 10 a.m.–4 p.m., downtown Gainesville. Prizes in professional and Backyard Bar-B-Q divisions. Prizes will be awarded in both categories. Chicken City Parade with vintage cars, live entertainment, art market, quilt show, kids zone. 770-297-1141, www.gainesville.org/spring-chickenfestival. April 26 Rock in the Spring: “Mid-Life Crisis.” Brenau University’s Amphitheater, 102 Prior St., Gainesville. Advance tickets $25, at gate $25. www. challengedchild.org. April 26-27 Gone Riding Mountain Biking Event: Georgia State Championship Series 7:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fort Yargo State Park, Winder. www.goneriding.com $5 parking. 352-873-9279.

HIGHLY SKILLED MEDICAL PROFESSIONALS OFFERING THE MOST ADVANCED TREATMENTS AVAILABLE Braxton B. Turner III, MD Medical Degree: Medical College of Georgia Residency: Anesthesiology - Emory University Fellowship: Pain Medicine - Emory University Board Certifications: American Board of Anesthesiology, American Board of Anesthesiology: Subspecialty Certified in Pain Medicine

Steve R. Crider, Jr., MD Medical Degree: Medical College of Georgia Residency: Carraway Methodist Medical Center; Anesthesiology - Northwestern University Fellowship: Pain Medicine - Texas Tech University Board Certifications: American Board of Anesthesiology, American Board of Anesthesiology: Subspecialty Certified in Pain Medicine

H. Keith Robinson, MD Medical Degree: Medical College of Georgia Residency: Anesthesiology - University of Alabama: Birmingham, AL Fellowship: Pain Management - Wake Forest University, Bowman Gray School of Medicine: Winston-Salem, NC Board Certifications: American Board of Anesthesiology, American Board of Anesthesiology: Subspecialty Certified in Pain Medicine

Becky Caverzasi, APRN, NP-C Education: Valdosta State University - BSN North Georgia College & State Univ - MSN Board Certifications: American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, Georgia Board of Nursing

April J. Bussoletti, APRN, NP-C Education: Georgia Southern University - BSN Brenau University - MSN Board Certifications: American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, American Nurses Credentialing Center, Georgia Board of Nursing

LOCATIONS 1250 Jesse Jewell Pkwy Ste. 200 Gainesville, GA 30501

5005 Friendship Road Buford, GA 30518

770-297-7277 • www.scgpain.com March | April 2014

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home around town The Arts Council second annual Red Carpet Gala Casino Night fundraiser Jan. 25, 2014 The Arts Council held its second annual Red Carpet Gala Casino Night fundraiser at the Smithgall Arts Center. The theme was “Great Gatsby� and the evening was filled with food, fun, auctions, live music and of course, casino games.

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Rotary Club of Gainesville’s Man and Woman of the Year Feb. 10, 2014 The Rotary Club of Gainesville honored several community leaders for their contributions to the area’s people and organizations at its annual awards banquet. The club presented community leaders John Burd and Jane Hemmer its Man and Woman of the Year awards at the Chattahoochee Country Club in Gainesville. The awards are presented annually to men and women for their achievements, leadership and service to the Gainesville and Hall County areas. Also recognized by the Rotary Club: Doug Carter received the Sidney O. Smith Fellowship Award; Don Carter received the Guardian of Ethics Award; and Merrianne Dyer received the W. Lee Arrendale Vocational Excellence Award. Rotarian LaTrell Simpson announced Burd, former president of Brenau University in Gainesville, as the recipient of the man of the year award. Martha Nesbitt, Rotarian and former president of Gainesville State College, recognized the 2014 Woman of the Year, Hemmer, for her many years of service to the county.

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Humane Society of Northeast Georgia’s annual Art with Heart fundraiser Feb. 8 2014 The Humane Society of Northeast Georgia helds its fifth annual Art with Heart benefit art auction, with all proceeds benefiting HSNEGA’s mission and the rescued, homeless animals in its care. Held at the Chattahoochee Country Club in Gainesville, the event featured fine art, folk art, pottery, woodworking, sculpture and other types of artwork donated by renowned national and regional artists including Amanda Carder Lovett, Pat Burd, Lydia Ferguson, Janet Cornett, and S.D. Meadows. Live entertainment was provided by “The Voice” contestant and soon-to-be national recording artist Connor Pledger. More than 225 people attended and more than $30,000 was raised.

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HeART for Chocolate: Heart for Children Gala Feb. 8, 2014 The HeART for Chocolate, Heart for Children Gala was held at the Braselton-Stover House was the biggest Gala yet with nearly 200 people attending the fundraiser for Piedmont Court Appointed Special Advocates. There were chocolate displays from Ferranti’s Cakery, Cream and Shuga, Publix Bakery, Savory Spoon, Just Desserts and Nix Confectionery. Best Taste Chocolatier went to Cream and Shuga. The Best Presentation Chocolatier went to Nix Confectionery and the Best Over-All Chocolatier went to Ferranti’s Cakery. An auction, live music and dancing brought the evening to a close.

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Greater Hall Chamber of Commerce From top right: Atlanta Automotive Group, Cadillac & Mazda of Lake Lanier Ribbon Cutting (L-R): Randall Frost, Stewart Melvin & Frost; Kit Dunlap, Chamber; dealership owners Tacy and Marty Pecora and their children; Billy Powell, Hall County Commission. Small Business Seminar at the Greater Hall Chamber – (L-R): Amanda Lewis, Chamber Project Manager; Program presenter Robert Mallon; Chamber President & CEO Kit Dunlap and Lane Jones (event sponsor), Highland Mountain Beverage. Youth Leadership Hall Class at the Georgia State Capitol meeting Gov. Nathan Deal. An Oakwood Occasions employee offers food to attendees of the Buy Local Expo at the Gainesville Civic Center. Chamber January Small Business of the Month (L-R): Henry Evans, Steve Murray, Josh Everett of New Leaf Landscape Services.

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Dancing With The Stars — Jackson County Style! Jan. 30, 2014 The inaugural Dancing With The Stars – Jackson County Style! was a win-win situation thanks to the talented dancers, charming Master of Ceremony and judges, generous sponsors and eager spectators who donated to not only the Jackson County Arts Council but also to Main Street Jefferson, Habitat for Humanity, Jefferson High School Marching Band, Jefferson Community Theater, Jefferson Lions Club and the Jackson County Boys and Girls Clubs. Bruce Yates and Tammy Babb were the People’s Choice winners while Ashley Ware and Lou Solis were the winners according to the judges.

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Jackson County Area Chamber’s Roll Out the Red Carpet banquet Jan. 23, 2014 DiAna Kunz Huckins, who will be serving as Chairwoman of the Jackson County Area Chamber of Commerce for 2014, was honored as the organization’s Volunteer of the Year at the Jan. 23 “Roll Out the Red Carpet” awards banquet. Former Jefferson Mayor Jim Joiner received the William H. Booth Achievement Award. The event was held at the Jefferson Civic Center with Buhler Quality Yarns as presenting sponsor.

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OFFICE: 770-967-9889

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Name: TOWN OF BRASELTON - HOME; Width: 8.5 in; Depth: 11 in; Color: Process color; Ad Number: 14245_1

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