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ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT TEMPLE ALUMNUS CRAFTS CHEESE ART

MOUNT AIRY HOSTED NIGHT FESTIVAL

Mike Geno, an alumnus and adjunct professor, got involved in Philly’s cheese community when he was searching for a new painting subject. PAGE 10

On Sept. 17, the neighborhood held an event with music, art and food along Germantown Ave. Popular food trucks like Undrgrnd Donuts and stalls from Trolley Car Diner were also in attendance. PAGE 12

TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 2015

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MUSIC

Widening the reach of classical music Aurora Classical, a new arts company dedicated to making classical music accessible, debuted at Fringe Arts.

S

By SAMI RAHMAN The Temple News

usan Weinman always thought classical music was haughty and pretentious—until she attended a party and saw people doing shots to the Brandenburg Concerto. “I came from a blue-collar background,” Weinman said.

“Where I was from, classical music was for the wealthy.” In college, Weinman began studying classical music and realized her notions about the art form might be wrong. “When I got to college, I realized that Broadway was changing to more of a rock style," Weinman said. “So my teachers started pushing me towards classical music, and I tried it.” It wasn’t that the music was snobby, Weinman realized, just the perception. Now, Weinman seeks to bridge the gap between these perceived ideas of classical music with her new arts company, Aurora Classical. Weinman's goal is to expose classical music to people who would not otherwise experience it. The company was inspired by the Philadelphia Aurora, a newspaper started by Benjamin Franklin’s grandson, which

stood for the rights of the “plain folk.” “The Philadelphia Aurora really fought hard to allow people to have access to government,” Weinman said. "I want to fight hard to make sure everyone has access to classical music.” For Weinman, the company is also an opportunity to give local musicians a place to perform. “I know musicians who are amazing in their field,” Weinman said. “But sometimes they don’t have an outlet to play what they want to play.” One of Weinman’s solutions to this issue is classical music open mic nights. Interested musicians can perform any classical piece for five to ten minutes. The event is meant to be

CLASSICAL | PAGE 11

THE ART OF LABOR | PAGE 11

MARGO REED TTN

“Blood and Sweat,” a conceptual exhibit with work by Brian Wagner and Steven Earl Weber, is currently on display at Philadelphia Sculpture Gym in Kensington. The exhibit opened Sept. 4, a tribute to Labor Day weekend. Featuring articles of clothing worn by various laborers across the United States like boots, shirts and helmets, the exhibit calls upon its viewers to appreciate the blue collar workers who are often forgotten. Though Wagner and director Abbey Gates focused on laborers, not fine artists, Gates said a link exists between the two different kinds of craftsmen.

EXHIBIT

With paper, artist creates worlds The Art Dept. opened an exhibit with Philly-born artist Alex Eckman-Lawn.

A stageworthy evolution

Actress Anna Lou Hearn, a theater alumna, portrays resilient women at a new production in Fringe Arts.

By MADISON HALL The Temple News

In an intimate gallery space, Alex Eckman-Lawn's cutpaper work, “Neighborhood Watch,” stood out—layers of brightly colored flowers with a solemn owl in the center, the barest suggestions of skulls peeking around the corners, all teeth, jawbone and emptiness. The Art Dept., a small gallery on Berks Street near Tulip in Fishtown, displayed “Neighborhood Watch” during a new exhibit opening with Eckman-Lawn Sept. 11, showcasing his aggressively-styled paper-cut work. The event, Eckman-Lawn's second exhibit with the Art Dept., was “casual and comfortable,” according to the gallery's exhibits director, Kate Glasheen. Eckman-Lawn said he spent the night shaking hands and talking with guests. “This is a relatively new way of working for me,” Eckman-Lawn wrote in an email. “Openings tend to be a blur.” Eckman-Lawn is a 2007 University of the Arts graduate with a degree in illustration. He said his professors “really

A&E DESK 215-204-7416

Theater

By GRACE MAIORANO The Temple News

PATRICK CLARK TTN

Sara Pindexter and Doug Woods view Eckman-Lawn’s work.

helped me find my voice as an illustrator.” The university also taught him to make pictures that tell a story, instead of just looking pretty. “I’ve been making art since I was a little kid,” EckmanLawn said. “I decided early on I wanted this to be the thing I wasted my life pursuing.” As a child, Eckman-Lawn was inspired by comics,

PAPER | PAGE 14

Standing in front of the entire Temple theater department, Anna Lou Hearn nearly blacked out from nervousness. Switching rapidly between English and French, Hearn voiced her fury about her childhood home's idea that being good at acting meant making a fool of herself. While delivering this mandatory personal statement for a freshman acting course, Hearn found herself upon a great precipice in her life—on the brink of developing a new practice of her craft. As she transitioned from York County to Philadelphia, Hearn was emerging from a time and place where she felt she couldn't

ARTSandENTERTAINMENT@TEMPLE-NEWS.COM

HEARN | PAGE 14

Volume 94 Issue 5  

Issue for Tuesday September 22 2015