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THE TEMPLE NEWS

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

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THEY’VE

GOT TO PLAY

SOMEWHERE The clock is ticking for the Owls to find a home — and Temple knows it.

VOL 97 // ISSUE 9 OCTOBER 23, 2018 temple-news.com @thetemplenews

NEWS, PAGE 3

A professor found lifetime earnings of college graduates are narrowly higher than non-graduates.

OPINION, PAGE 10

An off-campus coffee shop will remove its controversial sign amid student backlash.

FEATURES, PAGE 14 An alumna’s accident off campus inspired her brother to design a collapsible solution.

SPORTS, PAGE 24

Temple football is atop the conference after a dramatic overtime win against Cincinnati.


NEWS PAGE 2

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

THE TEMPLE NEWS A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Gillian McGoldrick Editor in Chief Kelly Brennan Managing Editor Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor Evan Easterling Chief Copy Editor Greta Anderson News Editor Alyssa Biederman Deputy Campus Editor Will Bleier Deputy City Editor Jayna Schaffer Opinion Editor Laura Smythe Features Editor Zari Tarazona Deputy Features Editor Khanya Brann Deputy Features Editor Michael Zingrone Co-Sports Editor Sam Neumann Co-Sports Editor Claire Wolters Intersection Editor Shefa Ahsan Multimedia Editor Maria Ribeiro Director of Engagement Siani Colon Asst. Director of Engagement Hannah Burns Photography Editor Luke Smith Deputy Photography Editor Madison Seitchik Web Editor Ian Walker Visuals Editor Myra Mirza Visuals Specialist Claire Halloran Design Editor Jeremiah Reardon Designer Phuong Tran Advertising Manager Kelsey McGill Advertising Manager Daniel Magras Business Manager

Groups continue to aid immigrant family

many things going on outside of

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

ON THE COVER CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

CORRECTIONS Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick at editor@temple-news.com or 215-204-6736.

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

COMMUNITY

The family has been staying our community, and Carmela is a at the Church of the Advo- few blocks away.” cate for about 10 months. On Oct. 10, Hernandez risked BY JACK TALLMAN For The Temple News Undocumented immigrant Carmela Apolonio Hernandez and her family, who have been in sanctuary at the Church of the Advocate for about 10 months, are receiving support from several student and city organizations. Hernandez, a native of Mexico, has lived at the church on Diamond Street near Gratz with her four children to avoid deportation orders from the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement. ICE policy considers places of worship sensitive locations and avoids taking enforcement actions there. The Hernandez family risks deportation if they leave the church. Philadelphia restaurant chefs prepared a meal for the family at the church on Friday to bring awareness to Hernandez’s status situation, in partnership with the Popular Alliance for Undocumented Workers’ Rights and the Sanctuary Advocate Coalition, two immigrants’ rights groups. For Thanksgiving in 2017, la Asociación de Estudiantes Latinos, AdEL, a Latinx student organization on campus, went to the church to bring the Hernandez family food, said Gail Vivar, AdEL’s director of external communication. “Temple students need to be in solidarity for everyone, not just certain things that are happening to them,” she said. “There are so

detainment to protest in the lobby of U.S. Sen. Bob Casey’s Philadelphia office, attempting to get the senator to sponsor a private bill to secure protections for her family. “As long as I have life, I will keep on fighting,” Hernandez said at the protest on Oct. 11, through her interpreter, Yared Portillo. “Someday I will be free.” A representative from Casey’s office wrote in a statement to The Temple News that the senator “will continue to advocate for measures that will provide them the protections they are due under our laws.” Jennifer Lee, a Temple University law professor who specializes in immigration law, said attaining asylum status takes years and is slowed by President Donald Trump’s crackdown on illegal immigration. “I assume this is one of many, many cases that we have in the immigration system where it is really hard for immigrants to be able to get immigration release in the U.S.,” Lee said. “For most people, it’s not an option, unless if you have a close family member. And even then, you may have to wait in line for 10 years, or you’ve gotten in through employment, such as someone with a Ph.D.” jack.tallman@temple.edu Editor’s note: Gail Vivar was previously a freelance reporter for The Temple News. She played no part in the reporting and editing of this story.

temple-news.com


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

RESEARCH

College is a financial risk, says Temple economist

@TheTempleNews

College increases median lifetime earnings The average STEM or business students will earn more in their lifetimes than college students who study other disciplines, according to economics professor Douglas Webber’s research.

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Students who spend $50,000 each year to attend college have a little more than a 50 percent chance to earn more than the high school graduates throughout their lifetimes, according to a Temple University economist’s report. Douglas Webber, an economics professor and director of the department’s undergraduate studies, wrote “Is College Worth It? Going Beyond Averages,” for the left-leaning think tank Third Way. The report examines the financial risks and rewards associated with attending a four-year college, in terms of individual lifetime earnings. Webber said going to college is risky. “College is, on average, a very good investment,” Webber said. “The returns to college for the average person are very big, and it is very likely that it’s going to pay off over a lifetime. But, like any kind of return on investment, it’s not a sure thing.” Webber analyzed data from the American Community Survey, the National Survey of College Graduates and the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to reach his conclusions. His findings corroborated the well-documented “Sheepskin Effect,” which suggests that the financial value of college concentrates on the degree itself rather than time spent in school. Four in 10 students never graduate college, according to the report, and the lifetime earnings for non-graduates are only narrowly higher than those who never attended college, Webber said. Sociology professor Joshua Klugman, who teaches “The Sociology of Higher Education,” said graduation rates are critical for working-class students. “A huge concern is that a lot of the big state public universities are just not set up to facilitate a working-class kid’s chances of even getting that degree,”

Klugman said. “Temple has tried to take some steps, like Fly in Four, but that’s probably not sufficient and we need to step up our game.” Temple reported a six-year graduation rate of 71 percent, which is 11 points higher than the National Center for Education Statistics’ national average for 2017. Temple’s average tuition and room and board costs are $28,232 for in-state students and $39,992 for out-ofstate students, according to the U.S. News & World Report. Webber said it’s important to examine costs, graduation rates and support systems at each school before making a college decision. But there is also non-monetary value in getting a degree, Klugman said. “There’s a whole constellation of meanings that students attribute to going to college, and finances are probably more predominant,” Klugman said. “For working-class students, they have other meaning that they attribute to it as well.” Webber said his report focuses on financial returns, and does not address important factors in making decisions about college, like career happiness. “If I were income maximizing, I wouldn’t have gotten a Ph.D. and wouldn’t be working at Temple,” Webber said. “But I love my job. And that matters quite a bit.” Once a student settles on a college and is intent on graduating, deciding on a major is the next most important factor in determining lifetime earnings, according to Webber’s report. There is a potential $2 million difference in lifetime earnings between top-earning majors and bottom-earning majors, Webber’s report noted. “Students should not make their decision about what to major in entirely based on earnings,” Webber said. “I would say it shouldn’t even be in the top three characteristics. But, it should be part of the equation because it’s so important.” Top-earning majors include STEM

Median expected lifetime earnings

An economics professor analyzed the financial risks associated with college. BY COLIN EVANS For The Temple News

Education level or specialization IAN WALKER & MYRA MIRZA / THE TEMPLE NEWS Source: Economics of Education Review

fields like chemical engineering and computer science, while most of the lowest-earning majors, like studio arts and theology, fall under arts and humanities, according to data published on Webber’s personal website. Max Klemmer, a junior journalism major, said the President’s Scholar Award from Temple made it possible for him to attend, but he still wrestles with the final choice he made. “One school I applied to was [New York University], and they gave me a scholarship, but I still would have been paying a lot of money,” Klemmer said. “Sometimes I consider, ‘Maybe I should have gone there and just gone into debt.’” “I would have graduated from a more prestigious school and probably made better connections,” he added. Ross Weisman, a 2018 media studies and production alumnus, began working

as a social media director in September. He said that the value of college is equal parts the degree itself and the connections and skills acquired in school. “The value of college has definitely changed,” Weisman said. “I don’t think it’s as much, ‘You go to college, you’re going to get a great job.’ ...So I think college is worth it, but at the same time, if you are struggling with money, and you just want to work for a couple years and come back to it, I know a bunch of people that have done it, and it ends up working out for them.” “A big part is getting out of your head that you get into college at 18, you graduate at 22,” he added. “And...if you deviate from that, you’re not going to be successful.” colin.evans@temple.edu @colinpaulevans

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

COVER STORY

TEMPLE TO RETURN TO TALKS WITH EAGLES

The university will have to seek a lease extension with the Eagles and rocky community relations are to blame. BY WILL BLEIER & KELLY BRENNAN For The Temple News Time is running out on Temple University’s extended lease with the Philadelphia Eagles to play at Lincoln Financial Field, and its plan for an on-campus stadium has been delayed, forcing Temple to seek another extension with the Eagles. The university also found a group of community residents who would be interested in sitting on the board of a potential special services district, which is essential to the university’s proposed on-campus stadium project. The Temple News spoke with Vice President for Public Affairs Bill Bergman and City Council President and 5th District Councilman Darrell Clarke, whose district encompasses Main Campus, about the status of the stadium project, Temple’s community relations and the next steps for the university and the city.

THE EAGLES

A team of people from the university will be in talks with the Eagles about a potential lease extension by the end of this year, Bergman said. This was echoed by Board of Trustees Chairman Patrick O’Connor and incoming chair Mitchell Morgan, in interviews with The Temple News last week. The university already added contract extensions so the Owls could play their home games at the Linc during the 2018 and 2019 seasons. Its 15-year lease with the Eagles was set to expire in 2017. The 35,000-seat, proposed on-campus stadium is projected to cost $130 million and take 20 months to two years to complete, university officials told The News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

Temple News in March. The university expected to have the proposal filed with the City Planning Commission this past June so it could begin construction on the multipurpose facility, but it missed its self-imposed deadline this summer while it continued to work on winning over community residents. With a two-year project completion timeline, no city approvals and an expiring contract with the Eagles, Temple has to find a place to play home games during the 2020 season. It’s likely the Linc will be that place, and will remain so for the next several years. The university has cited the Eagles’ proposed rent increase at the Linc as its reason to explore the idea of an on-cam-

until community relations improve. “It would be great to have an on-campus stadium,” Morgan told The Temple News last week. “But if it’s not in the cards, then we will find another place to play football, but it’s out of our control.” “We got to go somewhere,” Bergman said.

SPECIAL DISTRICT

SERVICES

Bergman and other university officials have said on several occasions that the university intends to establish a special services district in the neighborhood near Main Campus.

“I think doing the special services district now, whether there’s ever a stadium or not, is where the university is headed." - Bill Bergman, Vice President of Public Afairs

pus facility in 2015. Temple President Richard Englert said on several occasions that the university would save at least $2 million annually if it has an on-campus stadium. Temple officials have maintained that an on-campus stadium would be beneficial for both the university and community since the stadium proposal was reignited in January. A spokesperson for the Eagles declined to comment Monday on any potential contract negotiations with Temple. The university is not considering alternative stadium locations outside of the Linc to play football at this time, Bergman said. Recent statements from university officials show Temple is accepting it will not have a stadium in the near future,

A special services district is an area identified by a city government that could utilize additional maintenance and other support because of its unique developments. Temple, because of its expansive student population and history of student misconduct and trash in the neighborhood, would be a likely candidate for this type of designation. A special services district is preferred for a project of the proposed stadium’s size because of its increased needs and impact on the area around it. In 2002, the South Philly Review reported that a special services district promised by former Mayor John Street helped convince local civic associations to allow the construction of the Linc and Citizens Bank Park. Bergman said the university has

identified a group of community residents “that would be very interested in serving” on the special services district’s Board of Directors, which would likely consist of five community residents and four Temple officials, Bergman said. “The neighborhood always has the ability to control the board,” he added. Establishing this district would increase support for the area around the site of the stadium, which is bounded by Norris Street to the north, Broad to the east, Berks to the south and 16th to the west. The area would likely receive extra trash days and increased funding, mostly from private donors, to fund trash pickup and other maintenance concerns that a stadium would exacerbate. “Doing the special services district now, whether there’s ever a stadium or not, is where the university is headed,” Bergman said. In West Philadelphia, the University City District is a special services district surrounding the University of Pennsylvania and Drexel University, established in 1997. Both schools contributed more than $500,000 last year to assist in funding the district, according to the University City District’s website. Englert said during his remarks at a stadium town hall meeting in March that “the facility would be the linchpin for a special services district.” Six months later during the 2018 State of the University address, Englert said Temple is “moving aggressively” to create the district. “If there’s been substantial progress, then it’s not clear to me, and I’m not sure it’s clear to the residents,” Clarke said last week. In his prepared remarks for the town hall, Englert said the university is committed to establishing a community benefits agreement with residents living near the proposed stadium. This is a signed agreement between the university and the community on what issues Temple will take responsibility for, whereas the special services district is a temple-news.com


NEWS

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

classification that allows the neighborhood to have greater access to city resources. Bergman told The Temple News in March the benefits agreement could include elements like holding the university accountable for controlling trash and noise. Temple and the community have not formally established this agreement, nor do they have a timeline to complete it. Clarke told The Temple News the university did not foster long-term community relations with local residents prior to ratcheting up its stadium plans. “Temple has indicated since the stadium discussion started that they’re going to create their own special services district, and I’m saying my position has been, ‘You need to do it,’” Clarke said. “It should have been done 10 [to] 15 years ago, but it should not be tied directly to the stadium. “Just don’t...say you want to do the right thing because you want a stadium,” he added. In August, the university hired JDog Junk Removal & Hauling, a street sweeping company, and One Day At A Time, a North Philly-based nonprofit, to help support community maintenance during what Bergman refers to as “the move out,” or the period when students leave their off-campus apartments in July, of-

ten ditching trash and old furniture on sidewalks. Bergman said Temple’s recent work with JDog and ODAAT is not tied to the stadium, but is a result of “what [he] saw last summer” during “the move out.”

IMPACT ON PROJECTS

OTHER

The university has also faced intense scrutiny for other proposed capital projects, which some local residents have @TheTempleNews

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS.

linked to the stadium. Clarke and City Council withdrew a zoning change necessary for the Alpha Center — a proposed daycare, dental clinic and counseling center for community residents — from further consideration at an Oct. 11 meeting, following months of heated public comment sessions that often referred to the center as a “bribe” to

convince community residents to accept the stadium. “The Alpha Center is perfectly aligned with both the history of the university and the social justice mission of the college,” College of Education Dean Gregory Anderson told the Temple News in April. “Whether the stadium happens or not has nothing to do with the fact that we should be meeting this critical need.” Bergman said much of the dissidence

surrounding the Alpha Center has been stirred by the Stadium Stompers, a group of community residents, faculty and students who oppose the stadium and have fought the university at every step of the project. “The problem is when you’re on one side pushing a relatively unpopular proposal, people can’t get beyond that,” Clarke said. “People think there’s some relationship and really there’s not.” Clarke said the issues Temple is facing with both the stadium and the Alpha Center have to do with a project-first mentality it has developed throughout the years. “[Temple] put together a plan and they said, ‘This is what [we’re] going to do,” Clarke said. “We hear complaints, we move forward and we will adjust our strategies,” Bergman said in response. Clarke said it is Temple’s responsibility, not his, to fix the tense relationship between the university and the surrounding community. “I represent the 22nd Police District, which is always either ranked No. 1 or No. 2 in terms of homicides or shootings,” Clarke said. “I need to focus on that, and if Temple wants to help that

then they can provide more educational opportunities and more job possibilities for people that find themselves in the position where they feel there’s no hope.” The university’s talks with the Linc, attempts to find common ground on the stadium — including steps like the special services district and a community benefits agreement — and the Alpha Center, Clarke said, are outside his purview. When he attempts to propose new legislation, it’s part of Clarke’s position to solicit support from his constituents. For Temple’s plans, the responsibility to garner support is theirs, he said. “I don’t work for Temple, thank God, and I’m not some consultant for Temple,” Clarke said. “But Temple should have ongoing relationships with that local community that’s not directly related to any project or proposal that they have on the table.” “That’s why they have a problem with getting the appropriate audience,” he added. “They got to figure that out.” news@temple-news.com @TheTempleNews

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

SUSTAINABILITY

Morgan Dining Hall returns to reusable dishware The dining hall offered singleuse dishware for more than a year after its dishwasher broke. BY HAL CONTE For The Temple News Morgan Dining Hall is using reusable dishware, after a broken dishwasher caused the cafeteria to use disposable dishes and utensils last academic year. The dishwasher broke more than a year ago, and the dining hall began using single-use plates, bowls, cups and utensils, which angered many environmentally conscious students. “Last year, there was just a lot of backlash from single-use plastic,” said Sarah Kuchan, Temple Student Government’s director of grounds and sustainability. “I know the Office of Sustainability was really invested, but they didn’t do much besides talk with [Aramark]. It was a student push that was needed to make the switch.” The dishwasher was replaced over the summer. Kasey Marsicano, a spokesperson for Aramark, wrote in an email to The Temple News that single-use dishware will not be used on a regular basis, as long as the dishwasher is functioning. “We will be using the reusable dinnerware at all times possible,” she wrote. “There may be instances beyond our control if the machine requires maintenance that a temporary switch to paper products would occur.” In March, an Aramark representative told The Temple News that Aramark planned on fixing the dishwasher in Fall 2018. Marsicano added that the new dishwasher will save about 45 cases of paper plates each week. In March, Students for Environ-

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS Stacked plates sit at a station in Morgan Dining Hall on Monday. The dining hall returned to using reusable dishware at the beginning of October.

mental Action garnered more than 1,000 signatures for its petition to bring back reusable dishware. Kuchan said the group exceeded its signature goal in just a few days. TSG and SEA teamed up for a “Bring Your Own” campaign in April, where students were given reusable plates by the organizations to use at the dining hall. “A lot of people when they saw it, they were like, ‘Are we allowed to use these? I thought we weren’t allowed to use our own stuff,’” Kuchan said. “It was a huge success.” Hannah Gomez, a senior advertising major who lives in Morgan Hall, said that she’s happy the dining hall is using reusable dishes again.

“There was so much trash [in the dining hall] before,” she added. Temple was awarded a silver rating in August for sustainability from the Sustainability Tracking Assessment and Rating System, an upgrade from its bronze rating in 2015. The agency assesses the university’s buildings, waste, water and energy use and transportation. It also considers the university’s investment in research about environmental issues. Marsicano wrote in an email that Temple Culinary Services has a Green Thread platform that focuses on responsible food sourcing, waste minimization, efficient operations and transportation management to lessen waste. “The platform represents Aramark’s

commitment to reduce our ecological impact on the environment through practices that enrich and support the natural environment,” she added. “We’re excited about the new dishwasher and excited about the fact that students will have the reusable dishes,” said Kathleen Grady, Temple’s director of sustainability. “It models what we have in [Johnson & Hardwick cafeteria] and what we consistently have now across the board,” Grady added. “[It’s] a really great gesture, and we’re thrilled.” hal.conte@temple.edu

temple-news.com


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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

COMMUNITY

Residents see value in Alpha Center development The proposed center for childcare and health services was withdrawn from City Council. BY ALEX MARK For The Temple News Philadelphia City Council withdrew the proposal to build Temple University’s Alpha Center, a multipurpose community center on Diamond Street near 13th, at a recent meeting. The decision effectively halts City Council’s deliberations on the university’s plans to build the center, which would provide dental care, behavioral health and childcare services through the College of Education. The bill to alter the university’s master plan must now be reintroduced in City Council to move forward. Some community residents and leaders believe the Alpha Center could bring economic development and needed services to North Philadelphia. Jamorrow Roberts, who lives on Sydenham and York streets, said the Alpha Center has the potential to employ Temple community members. “I think a lot of people think the Alpha Center wouldn’t help the community, but I think it would really create jobs,” Roberts said. “Some people think about the traffic and the trash but I think it’s a win because it creates jobs.” City Council President and 5th District Councilman Darrell Clarke said in an interview with The Temple News that the university needs to rework its relationship with the community before reintroducing the bill. North Philadelphia community residents have expressed distrust in the university to do proper outreach before moving forward on development of the center. Some residents believe this facility is connected to the university’s proposed on-campus stadium, too. “Temple had a proposal, the Alpha Center, that conceptually I think is noteworthy in terms of its proposed services,” Clarke said. “Again, [it’s] Temple’s inability to have a community-re@TheTempleNews

VIA THE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA The Alpha Center, proposed to be built on Diamond Street near 13th, was withdrawn from City Council on Oct. 11.

lated approach to dealing with the people in the local community. “[Temple is] driven based on need, not on long-term relationships,” he added. However, Donna Richardson, president of the Norris Community Resident Council, which serves residents of the housing community near Main Campus, said the Alpha Center proposal has good intentions. “No one does everything right, but I do believe that Temple is trying to make a difference,” Richardson said. “It may not be that well planned until you put it up, but then you tweak it. You don’t know for sure it will work, but you have to try it out.” Among the many services the Alpha Center would offer, Richardson emphasized the necessity of a dental facility in the community. “Show me the nearest dentist office,” she said. “Temple is offering a dental facility that would help people...right here where you can walk to the dental office instead of trying to lug two, three, four children all that way.” Gregory Bonaparte, a trustee at Berean Presbyterian Church at Broad and Diamond streets and a general me-

chanic for University Housing and Residential Life, is a longtime resident of North Philadelphia. He said the Alpha Center could bring benefits to the community. “I believe the Alpha Center could help and partner with my church,” Bonaparte said. “We used to have a daycare, but that’s been gone years ago.” North Philadelphia currently lacks enough childcare facilities for its children. According to the 2017 update to the Fund for Reinvestment’s childcare report for the city, the Temple community east of Broad Street where the Alpha Center was proposed saw “no meaningful change” or a “modest decline” in its supply of high-quality, certified childcare facilities since 2014. For Richardson, this makes the Alpha Center all the more necessary to North Philadelphia, and would not lead to the closure of existing daycare centers. “I don’t see daycare centers closing unless people stop having kids,” Richardson said. “Kids will always come and we’ll always need space to put them. Temple has not always done enough for the community, but now they’re opening up and trying to reach different avenues that they felt they have been weaker in

so that people can get the same opportunities as everyone else.” In April, Gregory Anderson, the dean of the College of Education, said the Alpha Center would not affect existing childcare facilities. Still, many residents see the construction of the Alpha Center as part of the larger issue of gentrification in the area around Main Campus. Bonaparte said much of the resistance to the Alpha Center is part of a broader lack of communication between the university and the community. “The university could reach out to more people in the community,” Bonaparte said. “Temple has to show them that they are a good neighbor to North Philadelphia. When you can offer this neighborhood something monumental, you have to get our trust back.” “I don’t see gentrification coming, I see it here,” Richardson said. “So, now that it’s here, how do you make sure that the people in this community are able to sustain and be able to function and live in it without having to be moved out?” Bonaparte believes that in order to thrive, residents will need to consider the options Temple gives them. For him, a good place to start is the Alpha Center. “When Temple says they want to build something with resources and opportunities for young people, then we need to take a look at that,” Bonaparte said. “We need to stop being against whatever Temple does.” With projects like the on-campus stadium, many community residents distrust the university’s development in North Philadelphia, but Richardson said there is a way to navigate the currents of development. “If we do right, we’ll climb that ladder,” she said. “That makes it so we’re able to survive and swim in the deep waters too, and not just keep getting our feet wet.” alex.mark@temple.edu

Editor’s note: Alex Mark is secretary for Temple Student Government.


OPINION PAGE 8

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018 EDITORIAL

Back to the basics on relations By the end of the year, Temple University officials will likely approach the Eagles to negotiate a contract for the football team to continue playing at Lincoln Financial Field. Plans for an on-campus stadium have been delayed due to the university’s lack of relationship with community residents. City Council President Darrell Clarke went even further to say “there’s not a relationship at all” between North Philadelphia and the university. We recognize that the university provides for North Philadelphia residents, it’s the largest employer in several surrounding ZIP codes. There are many little-known projects we’ll never hear about that are run by Temple community members and making a huge impact. However, officials failed time and time again to address residents’ com-

plaints about trash and noise. For years, these issues plagued Temple’s relationship with residents who live near Main Campus. We hope the university and Clarke move quickly to create a special services district near Main Campus to address these continuous problems that affect the quality of life for community residents. And as Vice President for Public Affairs Bill Bergman said, the university should do this whether there’s an on-campus stadium or not. The Editorial Board hopes that Temple uses a special services district to reintroduce itself to North Philadelphia and uses this time to rewrite itself as an institution that’s here to both engage and uplift the community in whatever ways residents request. Forget the stadium, and get back to the basics of our mission.

EDITORIAL

Single-issue voters: Be informed Environmental protection advocacy nonprofit Defend Our Future and other organizers who hone their focuses on single issues are encouraging voters to heavily consider choosing officials on Nov. 6 with those topics in mind. Naturally, voters are passionate about some topics more than others, and therefore may make their decisions based on single issues like education and health care. If you are a single-issue voter, however, take the time to understand all aspects of each candidate’s platform before casting your ballot. A single-issue vote should still be fully informed. If a candidate pledges to improve public transportation, for example, but will fund the project by making cuts to education, is that worth supporting? If you believe so, exercise your right to select the person you deem most fit for office, but be aware letters@temple-news.com

of the potential consequences. In the United States, though, the electorate lacks knowledge of basic information, much less complex issues. Before the 2014 midterm elections, less than half of people could correctly identify which parties controlled the House of Representatives and Senate, according to the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. On this upcoming Election Day and on ones beyond, we urge you to vote for candidates who reflect your values and beliefs. After all, the people we elect serve us, their constituents who vote them into office and demand they uphold their campaign promises. But while doing so, be fully aware of how a candidate could affect your district, state or the country.

A LETTER TO THE EDITOR The leaders of Temple University’s chapter of It’s On Us, a nationwide campaign, wrote a Letter to the Editor to encourage survivors to take care of themselves after Justice Brett Kavanaugh’s confirmation. A topic that has shown up far too often in the media recently is sexual misconduct. It can be encouraging and hopeful to hear of so many people having the courage to come forward with stories of their assaults. With more reports, however, comes the inability to avoid how much of an issue sexual violence is in our society. Unfortunately, there are always going to be people who may doubt and delegitimize the stories of survivors. This can be seen in overt ways like crude comments and questions of validity, or in more obscure ways, like asking why a person waited to share their story. With the courageous stories we heard in the past few weeks in reference to the accusations made against Justice Brett Kavanaugh by Christine Blasey Ford, Deborah Ramirez and Julie Swetnick, emotions have been high. Watching Ford stand up against everyone who doubted her story and her credibility was both inspiring and disheartening. Ford held her composure through the intense questioning raised against her. Through her story, every survivor could see themselves, their assailant and their worst nightmare come to life. Media coverage throughout the Kavanaugh hearings steadily fed us stories focusing on every aspect of the trial. It seemed as though no matter what channel you flipped to, you could not escape the stress and anxiety that comes with watching some members of the U.S. Senate endlessly question Ford on her memories of that night, on why she waited to tell anyone and every minute detail about her assault. The resulting physical and mental emotions that come as a response to the hearings are what is known as triggering.

There has been a recent stigma against the idea of triggering, but it is important to recognize that it is highly prevalent. Feeling triggered is a legitimate, valid reaction. Every person has their own personal triggers and some people may not have any. It is important that as much respect as possible is given to those who may react to certain stimuli. Throughout the hearing, social media was flooded with individuals stating that some of the things said during the Kavanaugh trial were extremely triggering. If you encounter something that you find to be triggering, it is important that you take care of yourself. This may be in the form of logging off social media for the night, going to the gym or whatever helps you personally. No matter what it is that you decide to do, ensure that you put yourself first. Your overall well-being and sense of self should be your greatest priority. It’s On Us TU will remain committed to preventing and addressing issues of sexual misconduct both on and off campus. We hope to eventually change the culture surrounding sexual violence and will continue to serve as a resource for the community. It stops with us. Shira Freiman, a junior psychology and criminal justice major, is the president of It’s On Us TU and can be reached at shira.freiman@temple.edu. Katherine Desrochers, a junior strategic communication and political science major, is the vice president of It’s On Us TU and can be reached at katherine.desrochers@temple.edu.

temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 9

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

IMMIGRATION

Temple: Support Philadelphia refugee centers As more refugee centers shut down, the university should contribute to Philadelphia locations. Last month, President Donald Trump’s administration announced it plans to reduce the cap for refugees entering the United States. Next year, only 30,000 people will be allowed in the country, which is 15,000 people less than the 2018 cap. This would be the lowest implemented by any president since the refugee program’s TYLER PEREZ LEAD COLUMNIST inception in 1980. This decision threatens pro-refugee legislation for decades to come, as the decrease in refugees entering the country reduces the demand for refugee resettlement centers. Nine nonprofit organizations across the country were forced to close refugee resettlement centers and cut staff due to the declining number of refugees entering the country, The Atlantic reported in September. The university should help finance these struggling resettlement centers, and if the university doesn’t have the funds, students should raise some. There are 68.5 million people who have been displaced worldwide, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. And only about one percent of these people will get the opportunity to be resettled and begin a new life in a new country. Resettlement centers are crucial, as they provide refugees with resources they need to become unified members of society. If we don’t act, Trump’s cap could be detrimental to refugee centers in Philadelphia. Temple University, which prides itself in its dedication to community and diversity, should make a concentrated effort to ensure that this doesn’t happen. @TheTempleNews

“As a country that preaches ‘Liberty and justice for all,’ and taking in the tired and huddled masses, we should be more encouraging of entrance into the United States,” said Olivia O’Donnell, a freshman political science and economics major. “There are so many people wanting to seek asylum or find a better life in the United States, and to not even grant them the opportunity is so wrong,” O’Donnell added. “It’s entirely against what our country should stand for.” Refugee arrivals in Pennsylvania decreased by nearly two-thirds between April 1 to Oct. 1, 2016 and the same period in 2017, WHYY reported. And in most cases, this sharp decline means refugee centers will have to lay off employees and shut down entire resettlement centers. As a result, there will be less stable transitions for those seeking asylum, which will only exacerbate their struggles. It also means politicians can see the lack of resettlement centers as a way to

write off the refugee crisis as unsolvable, therefore affecting refugee legislation in our city, even after Trump leaves office. “If the number of centers is declining, there may be a kind of circular logic that emerges where the people who aim to reduce the number of refugees entering the country might be able to point to the declining number of centers as a rationale for reducing the number of individuals allowed into the country,” said Michael Hagen, a political science professor. It’s an unfortunate case of supply and demand, and the Trump administration is exploiting that to have the last word in the debate over refugees entering the U.S. That is of course, unless we fight against it. Temple, as one of the largest universities in Philadelphia, has a moral responsibility to its community to ensure people seeking asylum have the security of critical resources, like resettlement centers. Monetary help isn’t enough, however. Temple faculty, administrators and

EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

students — especially those working or studying disciplines like political science or law — should volunteer at these organizations. This would provide free labor to financially struggling institutions that help the community. Student organizations like the Temple Refugee Outreach have made significant efforts to aid refugee centers in Philadelphia like hosting fundraisers and actions for refugee communities in the U.S. Although the organization could not be reached for comment on this story, I applaud them for their advocacy work to protect this vulnerable population. But I haven’t seen any legitimate efforts by the university’s administration to match this drive for community involvement. As a university that’s made a significant mark on Philadelphia, Temple needs to embrace its role in the community and fight against the injustice the presidential administration’s refugee plan places on Temple community members, students and families. tyler.perez@temple.edu @perezodent

letters@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 10

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

Common Grounds’ sign should never have went up ran the shop’s Instagram page has been

Although the new coffeeshop fired. will take down the sign this “We didn’t mean to offend anyone,” week, it wrongly downplayed he said. “It was poor judgment on our part.” prescription drug misuse. Last week, the coffee shop Common Grounds came under fire for its pink neon sign that reads, “Up All Night on Adderall.” People took to Twitter and the shop’s Instagram page to voice their criticisms of the sign for trivializing substance use disorder. In response, the employee running KELLY BRENNAN the page fired back, MANAGING EDITOR calling people ignorant bullies. Stephen Yaeger, who is one of the shop’s owners, assured me on Friday the sign will be taken down this week and be replaced by a new temporary piece that will likely read, “Up All Night on Coffee.” He added that the employee who

I commend Common Grounds, a shop on Cecil B. Moore Avenue near 16th Street, for listening to its critics and coming to the decision to remove the word “Adderall,” but the sign shouldn’t have gone up in the first place. The phrase glorifies prescription drug misuse, something that is extremely prevalent on college campuses. Adderall is an amphetamine and dextroamphetamine, a stimulant, that is typically prescribed to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. It can increase the ability to focus on tasks, control behavioral problems and become a better listener, according to WebMD. But young adults, ages 18 to 25, are the biggest abusers of prescription opioid pain relievers, ADHD stimulants and anti-anxiety drugs, according to the National Institute on Drug Abuse. It also reported that in 2016, college

students misused amphetamine at higher rates than non-college students. These numbers are deeply troubling, and to take this issue, and glamorize it with a trendy pink sign for your coffee shop is irresponsible and will perpetuate the stigma surrounding substance use disorder. “Substance misuse and substance use disorder are realities that have deeply affected the lives of students, staff, and faculty here on Temple’s campus, as well as campuses and communities across the country,” Alison McKee, the director of the Wellness Resource Center, wrote in an email. “Efforts to minimize or trivialize those realities do real harm to hard-working members of our campus community and our neighbors in North Philadelphia.” “We are glad this discussion is being had and grateful to Temple students, fellow staff, and faculty who are voicing concerns,” she wrote. In one week in December 2017, the Temple community lost two students to drug overdoses. The city is experiencing

one of the worst drug epidemics. Last year, 1,217 people died from drug-related overdoses in Philadelphia. The United States Drug Enforcement Agency announced in August that medical examiners and coroners reported 5,456 people died of drug-related overdoses in Pennsylvania, which marked a 64 percent increase from 2015. This is reality, and it can’t be summed up in a superficial one-liner to be used as a backdrop for Instagram photos. But I think some good came out of this situation, despite the many people whom the sign offended. Students, faculty and others voiced their concerns about the sign, resulting in it being changed. I’m proud of these people who educated others about the problematic culture of drug misuse that still persists. We need to continue talking about this issue, and in turn, reduce the stigma surrounding drug misuse. kelly.brennan@temple.edu @_kellybrennan

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OPINION PAGE 11

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

THE ESSAYIST

‘To Pimp’ a confused college student an obstacle. Knowing I loved to write

“For Free? (Interlude)” and “For Sale

and finding the same joy Kendrick Lamar

the more I studied, the more I found journalistic writing to be incredibly rigid and objective, with little room for opinion or interpretation. While specializing in opinion pieces placated me, I still felt my creativity and love of critical analysis were going to waste. The idea of listening to a rap album as if it were a story or poem excited me so much, and I felt my journalism classmates and professors didn’t adhere to the same sense of imagination. The first hip-hop album I ever truly fell in love with was “To Pimp A Butterfly,” a 2015 jazz rap record by Compton, California, rapper Kendrick Lamar. Through diverse character perspectives, complex poetic schemes and an overarching narrative, the album tells the story of young Lamar fighting against the music industry, an unjust political system, sin and his own inner demons on his pathway to fame. Each time I listened to the album, I saw it more as a complicated, interesting and beautiful work of literature. I found parallelism and repetition in songs like

of my favorite tracks, “u.” As “To Pimp A Butterfly” quickly became my favorite album ever. I found myself talking about it and other albums I loved more and more with my friends. They quickly began to point out how I talked about my favorite records with such critical detail using the tools I learned in English class. A good friend of mine, knowing I was struggling to stick with my major, casually said maybe one day I could teach a class about analyzing music and poetry. I took the comment with a grain of salt. As much as I loved writing, I never imagined a future teaching it. But as the days went on, I found that a future in English education is a tangible possibility for me. Like my English teachers in high school, I am passionate about literary analysis, especially with poetry and music. I had already talked about “To Pimp A Butterfly” with my friends, as if I were teaching them a lesson on it. I found myself returning to the books and poems I read in high school

enamored by the euphoria I got from work so rich in literary significance, and the only thing that could make me happier is helping at least one other person find that joy. Last month, with a shuffle of Lamar’s songs setting the score, I walked into the College of Education and officially became a double major in secondary education and English with a concentration in creative writing. My goal is to create a classroom environment where students are welcome to use literary analysis to look at any form of media that interest them, including film, art, theater and in my case, music. I had always been told that music and art have transformative powers in people’s lives, and I didn’t understand that until it shifted my entire future. I can’t wait until one of my future students finds a passion for English in the least likely of places.

A student describes how his love and had passion for social justice, I (Interlude),” multiple shifts in point of gave me in the pages of the written of hip-hop caused him to change came to Temple as a journalism major view in “Institutionalized” and “Wesley’s works of authors Zora Neale Hurston, and later added political science. But Theory” and emotional catharsis on one Pablo Neruda and Frank McCourt. I was his academic path. BY TYLER PEREZ Lead Columnist To say hip-hop made me realize I wanted to be an English teacher sounds unbelievable, but that’s just how it happened. Around the time I applied to Temple University, I began falling in love with hip-hop. I was enthralled by the complex use of rhyme, the interesting poetic devices and the themes presented by some of my favorite songs and albums. I saw rap music as a form of spokenword poetry more than a genre of music. And as someone who has written poetry for years, I analyzed rap songs as if they were works of literature. Finding a hidden symbol or a thematic development in a song or album brought me unmatched joy and a sense of bliss I knew I wanted to carry into my career. But this poetic passion turned into

@TheTempleNews

tyler.perez@temple.edu @perezodent

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OPINION PAGE 12

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

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Answers from Tuesday, October 16: 1. Fresh Prince, 2. Rocky, 3. Jawn, 4. Questlove, 5. William Penn, 6. Phanatic, 7. Hall and Oates, 8. Wawa, 9.Cheesesteak, 10. Hoagie, 11. Eagles, 12. Broad, 13. Gritty, 14.Shore

temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 13

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

FACULTY

Professor writes book about Revolutionary War era History professor Gregory Urwin partnered with the Museum of the American Revolution while writing his new book. BY EMMA PADNER For The Temple News

G

regory Urwin isn’t trying to knock the Founding Fathers off their historical pedestal with his new book. But he is trying to tell the stories of everyday people during the Revolutionary War. “We tend to give the founders the benefit of the doubt,” said Urwin, a Temple University history professor and military historian. “They were the perfect politicians, they were completely altruistic, they had no other concerns but to make America free.” Urwin is taking a sabbatical this semester to write his book, “When Freedom Wore a Red Coat: The British Invasions of Virginia, 1781.” The book, which he hopes to complete in Spring 2019, will discuss how the British Army protected enslaved Africans, who fled from their owners and were promised freedom by the British during the Revolutionary War. During the war, around 20,000 runaway slaves joined the British forces to try to secure their independence. Lord Dunmore, the last royal governor of Virginia, offered freedom to slaves willing to fight for the British. Urwin said most scholars who study the war often discuss the Siege of Yorktown, the final battle of the Revolutionary War, and celebrate George Washington’s military strategy that ended the war. He added that during the Revolutionary War, Founding Fathers from the South like Washington and Thomas Jefferson had other priorities than just military strategies, including protecting the institution of slavery. Both Washington @TheTempleNews

SLYVAIN BATUT / THE TEMPLE NEWS Gregory Urwin, a history professor, sits at his desk in his home in Doylestown, Pa. on Friday. He works on his book from his personal office at home.

and Jefferson kept slaves in their homes. In his writing, Urwin’s goal is to focus on the internal struggles Americans went through when deciding which side of the war to be on — especially the struggles of African American slaves to make this decision. “The fact remains that a lot of African-Americans believed they would find freedom at British hands, not the hands of slave owners,” Urwin said. While researching, Urwin discovered the story of London Pleasants, a slave who fled to the British side and became a trumpeter when the British Army invaded Virginia. Urwin said he discussed stories like Pleasants’s with representatives at the Museum of the American Revolution, which is in Old City on 3rd Street near Chestnut. The partnership created the “Sometimes freedom wore a red coat”

gallery in the “A Revolutionary War” historical exhibit at the museum. Philip Mead, the director of curatorial affairs and chief historian at the museum, said the institution wanted to reflect the complex problems African-Americans faced when deciding who to fight for during the revolution. “On the one hand, you have Congress and its supporters talking about liberty, on the other hand, you have a British Army that after 1779 was offering protection [for] enslaved people who had fled their masters,” Mead said. He added African-Americans who joined the British usually weren’t enlisted into the army and were put into groups to do field labor. Jacob Brown, a history Ph.D. student, said he thinks Urwin’s style of putting military history into a broader social context makes the subject more

interesting. Brown took Urwin’s Rise of the American Military Profession course in Fall 2017. “It seems there’s a lot of layers to military history that people don’t think of immediately and that he’s interested in exploring,” Brown said. As a military historian who has authored more than four books, Urwin said he wants his book to include the social context of the American Revolution instead of just solely focusing on military tactics. “That kind of mindset, just looking at where armies go and what battle they fight, who gets killed and wounded, is one reason why military historians and military professionals continually misunderstand the nature of war,” Urwin said. sylvain.batut@temple.edu

features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 14

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

TECHNOLOGY

Former athlete’s family builds collapsible helmet Rachel Hall suffered a traumatic brain injury after being hit by a car off campus, so her brother took action. BY BIBIANA CORREA For The Temple News A month before Rachel Hall was supposed to graduate, she was hit by a car while riding her bike off campus. The driver fled the scene at Park Avenue and Diamond Street, but Hall would just begin a fight for her life. It took a year until she was able to walk at graduation after suffering a traumatic brain injury from the accident that left her in a coma for four months. “It knocked me off my life course, but every day I’m working hard to improve and create my new life path,” said Rachel Hall, a 2015 criminal justice and sociology alumna and former Division I lacrosse player. The experience inspired her brother David Hall and Jordan Klein, who were both engineering students at Virginia Tech at the time of the hit-and-run, to create bicycle helmet company Park & Diamond. The company specializes in portable, fashionable helmets designed to be folded away in their water bottle-sized case or a backpack to encourage people to wear them. After Rachel Hall’s accident, Klein and David Hall learned that she was one of 85,000 Americans to suffer a traumatic brain injury from cycling-related accidents in that year. “After seeing first-hand [what] the consequences of not wearing a helmet are, we sat down and rethought what a helmet should be from the ground up,” David Hall said. The two set out to understand why more cyclists weren’t wearing helmets. Through focus groups of young professionals and college students — their target demographic — they discovered that discomfort, presentation and their limited portability deterred helmet use. The Park & Diamond helmet looks features@temple-news.com

COURTESY / PARK & DIAMOND David Hall (left) and Jordan Klein created bicycle helmet company Park & Diamond after David Hall’s sister, Rachel Hall, was hit by a car while riding her bike, which left her in a comma for four months.

and feels like a baseball hat, but is as safe as a traditional helmet and will meet United States and European cycling safety standards, according to the company’s website. Users can customize the outer skins so the helmet can reflect their look, David Hall said. Park & Diamond funded most of its efforts through Indiegogo, a crowd-sourcing website. In less than a month, Park & Diamond raised more than $900,000, surpassing its original $50,000 goal. David Hall and Klein understood conventional helmet materials wouldn’t allow them to change helmet wear. So they created their own impact-absorbing material that allows the helmets to fold and look different than conventional helmets. Through Virginia Tech’s entrepreneurship program, the team also found funding opportunities. The university’s Apex Center for Entrepreneurs formed a community of advisers, mentors and potential clients for them to work with, David Hall said. “The professors who were teaching us entrepreneurship classes while

we were sophomores saw us to where we are today,” he added. “They have a unique perspective because they’ve seen the company before it started.” Rachel Hall said she is proud of her brother’s achievements and his ability to not only target a large problem, but create a product consumers want to wear. “It will prevent so many deaths and traumatic brain injuries,” she said. “People don’t wear helmets because they are ugly and annoying to carry around. Now with his helmet, there are no excuses.” Ricky Coyne, the coordinator of the Bike Temple program that operates out of the Office of Sustainability, said many people think they’re above wearing a helmet and believe they won’t get hurt. “They don’t think they’ll get into an accident,” added Coyne, a sophomore economics major. “They’re overconfident in their riding abilities and think they’re above getting in a crash.” The fundraising campaign ends on Oct. 31. Pre-ordered helmets are available starting at $84 and will ship in February 2019. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, millions of Americans ride bicycles, but only about

half wear helmets. According to the Bicycle Coalition of Greater Philadelphia, pedestrians and cyclists represented 45 percent of deaths from traffic accidents in 2017. A current $3 million project along Market Street from 2nd to 6th streets will add protected bike lanes on each side of the street in Spring 2019, PhillyVoice reported. Coyne said Park & Diamond has the ability to make a helmet that is not only safe, but compatible and stylish. “I don’t always wear my helmet as much as I should, mostly because it’s cumbersome,” he said. “It doesn’t seem worth it all the time, but if it’s compactible then you can just store it and not worry about it.” Ultimately, David Hall and Klein hope to put helmets on as many heads as possible, David Hall said. “Seeing someone wear the helmet and knowing that we could prevent them from being in a similar situation as Rachel makes all of the work worth it,” he added. bibiana.correa@temple.edu

temple-news.com


FEATURES TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

PAGE 15

LIVE IN PHILLY

HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Eighth annual YèShì Night Market fills Chinatown streets with entertainment

The smell of sparklers filled the air at the eighth annual Chinatown YèShì Night Market on Thursday. The Philadelphia Chinatown Development Corporation hosted the event, which took place on 10th Street between Arch and Vine on Race Street between 9th and 11th. Thousands of people packed together in Chinatown to enjoy a night of entertainment and appreciation of Chinese culture. The event included karaoke, food trucks, restaurants, musicians and other performers. “The Night Market is when all different people have fun every year,” said Jimmy Shen, the owner of Yakitori Boy, a Japanese karaoke bar that offered outdoor karaoke at the event. Northeast Philadelphia resident Carol Hawkins, 27, attended the event with her 16-year-old sister Kyana Hawkins. The two spent their time walking around trying new foods. “We’re walking around to see what to try,” Hawkins said. “It’s been pretty fun.” @TheTempleNews

features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 16

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

FACULTY

Professor curates exhibit on LGBTQ video games “Rainbow Arcade” will feature well-known LGBTQ video games and run for five months in Berlin. BY WILL STICKNEY For The Temple News A professor is bringing more than 30 years worth of LGBTQ-themed video games, fan-written game modifications and game developer interviews to a German museum. Media studies and production professor Adrienne Shaw is co-curating “Rainbow Arcade,” an interactive exhibit showcasing the history of LGBTQ video games. The exhibit will open in December in Berlin at the Schwules Museum, a museum that has highlighted LGBTQ history and culture around the world since it opened in 1985. “This will not only be the first time they are doing a video game exhibit, but this will also be the first time any museum will do a history of LGBTQ video games exhibit,” said Shaw, who came out as a lesbian in the 1990s. “Rainbow Arcade” will feature several prominent LGBTQ video games, like mystery video game “Caper in The Castro,” which is recognized as the first LGBTQ-themed video game. The exhibit will be split into six sections, each exploring a different aspect of LGBTQ representation in video games. The sections will mainly focus on the history of these games and different milestones, like when various game companies included queer characters for the first time. The exhibit will also explore how game studios and developers cover queer topics in their narratives and games. There will be a section on the community of fans and queer gamers and their experiences of discrimination in gaming spaces. Attendees can learn about the stories and histories behind the development

features@temple-news.com

DAN CHUA / THE TEMPLE NEWS Adrienne Shaw, a media studies and production professor, co-curated the world’s first LGBTQ video game exhibit, which will open in Berlin in December.

and narratives of the games through interviews from the games’ designers and developers. Shaw has studied the representation of marginalized groups in video games for 13 years, with a specific focus on LGBTQ representation. “When I started back in 2005, it was an area of game studies that nobody was really working on,” Shaw said. “There had been a lot of work done on LGBTQ representation in other media, but just not in games.” In May 2015, Shaw created The LGBTQ Game Archive, an online curated collection of LGBTQ video games. The archive covers everything from queer characters in games to overt and subtle references embedded in games’

landscapes and stories. Christopher Persaud, a 2017 sociology and French alumnus, started working as a research assistant for the LGBTQ Game Archive his junior year. Persaud’s job involved everything from posting in the archive, maintaining the site, referencing and cross-referencing other sources online and verifying the archive’s accuracy. He also watched video game playthroughs and tracked down and read old game manuals. “It’s just kind of a lot of digging and any game could take anywhere from two hours to 50 hours depending on how complex it was,” Persaud said. Shaw also published the book “Gaming at the Edge: Sexuality and Gender at the Margins of Gamer Culture,” in 2014.

It focuses on marginalized people and groups within the gaming community. It also examines how LGBTQ gamers create spaces outside of the toxic online communities that exist in some gaming subcultures. Shaw’s commitment to telling these stories and highlighting these games extends into her classes. Junior sociology major Kenny Thach took Shaw’s Spring 2018 LGBT Media Representation class, which inspired them to create the Queer Nerd Association. QNA is a student organization dedicated to queer students who like video games, comic books and other “nerd” hobbies. Thach, who came out their junior year and identifies as non-binary, said they could always express themself in video games and used them to discover their identity at a young age. “Whenever I would play a game, I always played as the female character,” they said. “Or I would make my male character look a lot more ‘girly,’ I guess a lot more gender-fluid.” For gamers who can’t make it to Berlin for “Rainbow Arcade,” Shaw plans to publish the catalog around March 2019 documenting the exhibit. It will chronicle her work and help gamers learn about LGBTQ representation in video games. To fund the catalog, Shaw and the Schwules Museum launched a $28,700 ($25,000 euros) fundraising campaign on the crowd-funding website Kickstarter to print and distribute the book. The campaign reached its goal this past week after launching on Sept. 18. Some of Shaw’s students are excited about the exhibit’s potential. “It’s validating because it shows that gaming is a valid art form and queer people are allowed to express themselves through gaming,” Thach said. william.stickney@temple.edu

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FEATURES PAGE 17

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

POLITICS

Lawyer looks to shake up conservative Texas court Judges are elected through partisan Demond, who specializes in civil Alessandra Phillips, a 2007 law A 2007 law alumna is the elections, which means the candidate’s rights litigation and research, said Hasalumna who knew Hassan while at TemDemocratic judgeship candidate party is listed on the ballot. san’s constitutional law experience and ple, said Hassan has always championed for an all-Republican Texas court.

BY COLIN EVANS For The Temple News Phillip Turner was filming a Fort Worth, Texas, police station from a public sidewalk when officers handcuffed him and put him in a police cruiser. Turner sued them in the case Turner v. Driver, which helped establish the right to film police. His attorney Meagan Hassan helped bring the 2015 case to the 5th United States Circuit Court of Appeals. The landmark case put Hassan, a 2007 Temple University law alumna, on the map of legal experts in Houston. Now, she’s campaigning to be elected as a judge on Texas’s 14th Court of Appeals. Hassan currently works as an attorney specializing in constitutional law with Houston-based firm Demond & Hassan, PLLC. She is running to replace Bill Boyce, a Republican incumbent who has served since December 2007. Boyce could not be reached for comment.

“The judges tend to favor corporations over individuals,” said Hassan, who is running as a Democrat. “They tend to favor the state over individuals and criminal cases. That needs to change.” If Hassan is elected, her jurisdiction will cover about 5.5 million people, according to the Texas Ethics Commission. The 1st and 14th district courts of appeals hear cases from the same 10 counties. Every sitting judge on the 1st and 14th district benches is a Republican, according to Ballotpedia. Hassan said only one Democrat has been elected to either the 1st or the 14th districts since 1994. “There needs to be a systemic change in the way the court approaches their view of the law,” she added. “They don’t run as a check on the legislature or the administrative branch right now. It feels more like a rubber stamp on the laws that come out of Austin.” With five places on the 14th District court up for re-election this year, Hassan’s law partner William Demond encouraged her to run.

commitment to due process make her a good candidate. “We see a lot [of cases] where due process violations are routinely indicated by governmental conduct,” he added. “Government actors typically don’t really care, and that’s really dangerous.” Hassan and Demond have worked together since 2011. The pair got their start in Lesher v. Topix, a landmark cyber defamation lawsuit in which a jury awarded their clients more than $13 million. Commenters on an online forum accused Mark and Rhonda Lesher of being drug dealers and committing sexual misconduct before they were indicted on charges for which a jury later found them not guilty. Demond, who also assists with running Hassan’s campaign, said it was the highest cyber defamation verdict in the country at the time. Because of the case, Demond and Hassan were inducted into the Texas Lawyer Verdicts Hall of Fame and gained credibility throughout Houston.

EMA VUCKOVIC Freshman biology major

VOICES

Would you be more likely to wear a helmet while biking if it was collapsible and looked like a baseball hat?

[I would wear it], especially if you could fold it up going to class and I could just put it in my backpack.

ASHLEA FLOWERS Senior public relations major I would be more inclined to wear a helmet if it were more fashionable and you couldn’t tell it was a helmet.

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equality. “I have absolute faith that she would understand that her role is to take a look at the law, take a look at the reason underpinning it and apply that in a particular situation,” Phillips said. Judges on the appeals court serve six-year terms. “That’s a long time to be represented by one party in a state where you elect judges and you elect judges by party, and you have this large urban county in the middle of the district,” Hassan said. She added the 14th Court of Appeals tends to get the law wrong more often than people think. “They are not as fair and balanced as we would want court to be,” Hassan said. “I believe that with my experience, I’m qualified to serve on the court. In a lot of ways, it says, ‘If not me, who?’” colin.evans@temple.edu @colinpaulevans

ESTEFAN CARRILLO Junior psychology major Helmets are bulky and hard to carry around. Having a small hat that you can put on easily would be convenient.

MOHAMMED ALKHYAILY Junior management information systems major

My bike is my main way of transportation around the city and I normally don’t wear a helmet.... If I could fold it easily and put it away, that would make a difference.

features@temple-news.com


INTERSECTION PAGE 18

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

REPORT

HALLOWEEN: AVOIDING CULTURAL APPROPRIATION

JEREMIAH REARDON / THE TEMPLE NEWS

Students and faculty discuss how cultural appropriation hurts marginalized communities. STAFF REPORT For The Temple News

S

ynthetic dreadlocks sprouting from a flimsily-made wig, colorful assortments of sombreros, rhinestones strung from chains on foreheads — these are just some of the culturally appropriated costumes taken from marginalized groups during Halloween. Some students from these groups defined cultural appropriation as a conscious, false or disrespectful portrayal of a culture other than one’s own. They feel hurt or mocked when they see others imitating their cultures at parties or on Halloween. Raquel Pérez, a doctoral student and teaching assistant in the Department of Sociology, said when outsiders in positions of power culturally appropriate these lost identities, they take ownership of a culture that was not permitted to own itself. “When those things are then borrowed by the people who have told you, ‘You can’t use this, but we can,’ that really becomes the core of where the offense is,” Pérez said. Ari Gutierrez-Sanchez, a junior secondary English education major, is

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of Mexican descent. Gutierrez-Sanchez said it was painful to see a non-Mexican male student wearing a sombrero this month. “He can take off my culture, and I can’t,” Gutierrez-Sanchez said. They were born on Cinco de Mayo, which celebrates Mexico’s military victory over the French in 1862, and they often see people appropriating their culture on that holiday. “I really didn’t get to savor my birthday very much because people were making jokes about it all the time [because of] this idea I’m this Mexican person born on Cinco de Mayo,” they added. Sadé Williams, a doctoral student in the Department of Sociology, said people outside marginalized groups can remove their costume at the end of the night, but people who have faced oppression cannot remove their culture. “Not everybody gets to take off a costume, and not everyone gets to put one on,” she added. Williams said fundamental genetics like hair texture or skin color can bar Black people from corporate success. Hairstyles are not protected under anti-discrimination laws. It is legal to fire a Black man or woman because of dreadlocks or other hairstyles. Williams added that when celebrities like Kylie Jenner and Kim and Khloe Kardashian appropriate Black hairstyles,

they draw attention to Black culture for the wrong reasons. “That presentation is respected more than actual Black women,” Williams said. “That’s the issue. Now we can wear cornrows because Kim and Kylie do it, right? No. It’s actually appropriation. We should never fire people for wearing cornrows.” Aaron Smith, an African American Studies and Africology professor whose research focuses on how African people were stripped of their cultures during the Transatlantic slave trade, said recognizing cultural appropriation is “not rocket science.” “If that’s your only interaction with the culture, then that’s a pretty telltale sign that you’re potentially on the road toward appropriation,” he said. Tara Ticconi, a sophomore political science major, said she planned on dressing up as a G--sy, a slur used to describe the Roma people, for Halloween before she learned more about cultural appropriation. The slur was first imposed on the Roma by Europeans who believed they originated from Egypt due to their dark physical features. Roma, who are Europe’s largest ethnic minority group, originate from northwest India. Ticconi first saw that these costumes were considered cultural appropriations in a Twitter thread. “I was confused when it said you shouldn’t dress like a G--sy,” Ticconi

said. “I Googled it and read about how the Romani population in Europe is really ostracized and persecuted by the government. You don’t really think of it as a bad word because there are so many TV shows, songs and shirts with the word ‘G--sy’ in it, but it is.” Romani have experienced severe persecution, including more than 500 years of slavery, according to the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights. Despite this, there are more than 2,000 results on Amazon for “g--sy costume,” many of which will be purchased by people who do not know about this history. To be more aware of cultural appropriation, Williams said the first step is recognizing when people use another person’s culture for gain in their lives. “Checking ourselves, checking some of the behaviors that we might be doing to contribute to systems of oppression, and then checking the people who we directly surround ourselves with and identifying it…” Williams said. “If everybody did that, that would probably be half the battle.” intersection@temple-news.com @TheTempleNews Alexis Rogers, Kate Newdeck, Emma Goldhaber and Claire Wolters contributed reporting.

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INTERSECTION PAGE 19

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

CULTURE

Indigenous regalia: more than feathers and beads Many Halloween costume stores appropriate Native American ceremonial garb. BY CLAIRE WOLTERS For The Temple News Ashton Dunkley is a member of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenape, an indigenous tribe in Bridgeton, New Jersey. But that does not mean she wears feathers, leather or tribal beading on a daily basis. “There’s still [Native] people today that don’t dress like that at all,” said Dunkley, a senior history and anthropology major. “I’m in jeans. I’m not wearing any leather. That’s not the image of native people that should be perpetuated.” “It’s really demeaning to have your culture squished into this little box that really just includes feathers, fringe and plastic beads.

LAUREN REMY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

ASHTON DUNKLEY Member of the Nanticoke Lenni-Lenap Senior history and anthropology major

Dunkley, who also runs on the cross country team, said when outsiders clothe themselves in imitations of indigenous outfits for Halloween or music festivals, they both misrepresent her culture and undermine the historical significance behind the traditional garb. “It’s really demeaning to have your culture squished into this little box that really just includes feathers, fringe and plastic beads,” Dunkley said. “It’s weird being depicted, in terms of Halloween costumes, as a character instead of a people.” But leading up to Halloween, stores and websites market indigenous cultures as just that — characters. Many of these characters are hypersexualized indigenous women with names like “Sexy Native American” and “Pocahottie,” which can be bought from

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Amazon, Poshmark and other retailers. These costumes are controversial because of the high rates of sexual violence committed against indigenous women. More than 56 percent of American Indian or Alaska Native women experienced sexual violence in their lifetime, according to a 2016 study by the National Institute of Justice. “Knowing that, and then having costumes that perpetuate sexual images and fetishize Indigenous women… they’re not indigenous with those costumes,” Dunkley said. Yandy, an online Halloween costume merchant, has 44 Native American costumes and accessories. Yandy received backlash from both news outlets and social media for its lack of cultural respect, and protesters took to Twitter in September with the hashtag, #CancelYandy. Adam DePaul, an English instructor and member of the Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania, said he is less concerned about cultural appropriation in relation

to skimpy costumes or Halloween than he is when his culture is misrepresented at museums or formal events. “There is an extent to which imitation is a sign of flattery,” DePaul said. “Children who want to dress up as Native Americans for Halloween are obviously interested in Native American culture.” DePaul added he is speaking for himself and not for the entire Lenape Nation. Still, some said because of the long history of oppression of Native Americans, no form of indigenous costume-wearing or cultural appropriation is ever acceptable. “This is a population that we as Americans through our history actually pushed out of their land,” said Raquel Pérez, a doctoral student and a sociology teaching assistant. “We literally, not just figuratively, literally, robbed [them] of their cultural markers and their identity and their homes. To borrow from them and to play up stereotypes really

downplays the reality of the plight that is still going on.” Another problem is that outsiders may not be able to distinguish if they’re “borrowing” a culture, or simply making one up. Accessories like tribal headdresses, turquoise jewelry and white sage come predominantly from the natives in the Great Plains, not from the Lenape, DePaul said. He added that the Lenape are known for wearing animal skins like deer, beaver and prairie dog as casual wear. For larger ceremonies, members dress in fur or elaborate beadwork. “A lot of people don’t understand that there’s a very large difference between different clans,” DePaul said. “The Lenape aren’t the Iroquois, they aren’t the Mohican, we aren’t the Sioux. Every Native American tribe is as individual as a European country.” Dunkley said she is unsure if a peer would know how to accurately represent her tribe through costume — though she added she prefers they not try. Dunkley added that a key component to understanding the history of indigenous people is understanding their present. In a blog written for the American Philosophical Society this August, Dunkley referenced a 2015 study that found 87 percent of references to Native Americans in K-12 education standards in all 50 states are from a pre-1900 context. This could, in turn, influence the lack of empathy felt by outsiders appropriating Native American culture during Halloween. “Native people, they’re still here, which I think people neglect or forget at some point,” Dunkley said. “They’re like, ‘Oh, it’s just an image, just a mascot, just a costume, just this, all the time.’ But after a while, all that kind of builds up and erases the fact that they’re still native people, here, seeing this.” clairewolters@temple.edu @ClaireWolters

intersection@temple-news.com


INTERSECTION PAGE 20

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

CULTURE

Costumes misrepresent value of Asian cultures Centuries of Asian culture and history is devalued when people wear traditional Asian clothing as Halloween costumes. BY LAUREN REMY For The Temple News When clothing retailer Fashion Nova debuted its “Geisha costume” for Halloween, people accused the store of cultural appropriation. The costume inaccurately represented a Japanese geisha, a traditional entertainer. This is often incorrectly depicted in Western Culture as a person who does sex work, according to the New World Encyclopedia. The issue shed light on the larger issue of Asian cultural appropriation, which is not limited to Japanese culture. Dustin Kidd, a sociology professor, said cultural appropriation doesn’t have a blanket definition that applies to everyone, but is rather how an act makes someone feel. “It’s about the experience of a feeling that one objective scholar can’t identify,” Kidd said. “To see it and to know it is a different thing, to know what that wound feels like is different.” Lia Nguyen, a sophomore music therapy major from Vietnam, said she feels offended when aspects of her culture, including the Ao Dai, a long gown worn during special occasions, are appropriated for Halloween. “The history behind our clothes took hundreds of years to develop,” Nguyen said. “We only wear those traditional clothes during really important holidays,” she said. Traditional clothes are typically worn on important events like Lunar New Year and the first day of school. This value is not represented in Halloween costumes, which mimic traditional Asian dress for about $20. An Authentic Vietnamese Ao Dai can range from $300-$1,000, according to a Vietnamese travel agency. intersection@temple-news.com

LAUREN REMY / THE TEMPLE NEWS

“It has a lot of meanings,” she added. “It’s really sad to see your own culture being disrespected in a way.” “It alters the view,” Nguyen added. “For example, a lot of people here they don’t really know much about the world outside. So when they see someone who wears Chinese or Vietnamese traditional clothes during Halloween and [does] stereotypical gestures, it is disrespectful to the culture.” Kidd echoed these sentiments, reflecting on both personal and largescale impacts of appropriation. “There is a sense that their community has been stolen from and someone else is benefiting from what they stole from that community,” Kidd said. Nguyen said that when people appropriate Vietnamese culture during Halloween, they further undermine its significance. She added that because college Halloween celebrations are

largely centered on looks and partying, her culture is presented in a superficial light. “For me, Halloween is about appearance,” Nguyen said. “So when you adorn yourself in traditional clothes it should have more meaning than that.” Dan Chua, a junior communication studies major who is MalaysianAmerican, said Asians and AsianAmericans are often stereotyped as shy and excellent in martial arts and academics. When people appropriate Asian culture, these stereotypes are reinforced. “If you took Malaysian culture and boiled it down to just one action or one dish, you’re losing a lot of depth there,” Chua said. “But if people were to relate to it and try to experience it, that would be good. They’re getting a little taste.” For Chua, “getting a little taste” means literally just that. He said trying food from another culture is a way

to appreciate a culture in a respectful way without wearing their clothes. He suggested people not only try popular dishes that might simulate the culture, but also branch out beyond those. Nguyen added that sharing food is a better way to engage in a cultural exchange. She encouraged students to try different food trucks and understand the history behind various dishes. “Obviously as you can see from different food trucks at Temple, Asian food is diverse,” Nguyen said. “There’s Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese, Thai, Japanese. They’re all very distinct, and each culture has interesting history behind the food that we eat and through that you can understand more.” laremy@temple.edu Dan Chua is a freelance photographer for The Temple News. He played no part in the reporting and editing of this story.

temple-news.com


SPORTS

PAGE 21

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

VOLLEYBALL

Former setter now a Division III assistant coach Kyra Coundourides, a 2018 alumna, is the assistant coach at Baldwin Wallace University, where her parents played. BY TAYLOR SNYDER Volleyball Beat Reporter Kyra Coundourides never thought she would be involved with volleyball again after graduating. “Volleyball has always held a special place in my heart, but I was ready to branch out and try new things,” said Coundourides, a former Temple University setter and 2018 exercise and sports science alumna. Coundourides, however, is still immersed in women’s volleyball as the assistant coach at Baldwin Wallace University, a Division III school in Berea, Ohio. After playing her first two seasons at Virginia Tech, Coundourides transferred to Temple in 2016. She played a pivotal role in the Owls’ offense and served as a strong leader during her two seasons at Temple, coach Bakeer Ganesharatnam said. She recorded 2,360 assists at Temple and earned second-team American Athletic Conference honors last year. While completing an internship at Villanova’s strength and conditioning program after graduation, she continued to look for her next job. Searching for her next chapter in life led her right back to what she loves most: volleyball. Coundourides said she reconnected with her high school coach Scott Carter, who now coaches Baldwin Wallace. He’d offered Coundourides a job during her senior year, but she didn’t take it. After she originally turned it down, Coundourides asked in August if the offer still stood. Carter quickly welcomed her on board the coaching staff, she said. Coundourides’s parents, Karol and Stacy Coundourides, both played volleyball at Baldwin Wallace. Kyra Coundou-

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Former setter Kyra Coundourides serves during the Owls’ 3-1 loss to East Carolina on Oct. 6, 2017 at McGonigle Hall.

rides knew she had a legacy at the school, but did not think she would ever coach there. Kyra Coundourides had her first as a coach in 2011 when she began giving private lessons to children at The Academy for Volleyball Cleveland. She mentored players in every position, but she mostly worked with setters. During her time there, she coached one of her teams to a regional championship. One of the toughest transitions to coaching is learning all aspects of the game, Kyra Coundourides said. Coaches have to make sure the team is in sync and balance players’ personalities, Ganesharatnam said. “Kyra being a setter, she’s been exposed to some of those qualities that you need to become a good coach, so I think she will make this transition very well,” he added.

Kyra Coundourides said playing for Temple taught her about working with different styles of play and personalities, due to playing with such a diverse roster. Temple’s roster features players from Europe and from across the United States, including several from Hawaii. “That taught me how to be adaptable and understanding to all types of personalities and styles of play,” Kyra Coundourides said. “Now as a coach learning all of that at Temple has helped me work with all of these different styles of play and personalities at Baldwin Wallace.” Kyra Coundourides’s time at Temple under Ganesharatnam taught her leadership and discipline, which she has carried over to her coaching career, she said. “She was always very personal on the court, making eye contact and trying to always motivate us on the court,” senior

MIKE NGUYEN / FILE PHOTO

defensive specialist Mia Heirakuji said. “She really understands the game,” senior setter Hannah Vandegrift said. “She knows when to push the girls and when not to push so I think coaching is a good path for her.” Baldwin Wallace is 25-3 this season with Coundourides as an assistant coach. Coundourides sees herself coaching there for a long time and plans to pursue a master’s degree in physician’s assistant studies at the university. “I love coaching these girls because I love coaching athletes who play for the love of the game,” Kyra Coundourides said. “They push day in and day out through good and bad times and play because they simply love volleyball. I admire that.” taylor.snyder0001@temple.edu @TaylorSnyder_1

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SPORTS PAGE 22

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 24 COMEBACK the final pass of the game to earn a 2417 upset win against nationally ranked Cincinnati (6-1, 2-1 American Athletic Conference). The Owls (5-3, 4-0 The American) earned their first win against a top-20 team since their 34-10 win against Navy in the 2016 conference championship. Temple is tied atop The American’s East Division with Central Florida (7-0, 4-0 The American), which is ranked No. 10 in the Associated Press poll on Monday and has won 20 games in a row dating back to the start of the 2017 season. The Owls are in the midst of their bye week, gearing up for a Nov. 1 road matchup against UCF. Temple will then face Houston on Nov. 10. The Cougars (6-1, 3-0 The American) lead the West and received votes in Sunday’s AP poll. After that, the Owls have a matchup with No. 21 South Florida (7-0, 3-0 The American), which is second in the East Division. The winner of the East Division will face the West Division victor in the conference title game. Coach Geoff Collins said on Monday that early-week practices will focus on developing the Owls’ young talent. Preparation for the Nov. 1 game against UCF will ramp up later this week. Junior wide receiver Randle Jones felt confident Temple would beat Cincinnati in overtime after it tied the game on a 20-yard touchdown pass to redshirt sophomore Branden Mack with 49 seconds left. Russo connected with junior wide receiver Isaiah Wright for a 25-yard touchdown on the third play of overtime. All Temple had to do was prevent Cincinnati’s offense from scoring a touchdown to secure the win. Junior linebacker Shaun Bradley intercepted Cincinnati redshirt-freshman quarterback Desmond Ridder on thirdand-36 to clinch the game.

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GENEVA HEFFERNAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS Redshirt-freshman offensive lineman Griffin Sestili celebrates amid Temple’s 24-17 overtime win against Cincinnati on Saturday at Lincoln Financial Field.

“That’s the Temple TUFF: Never quit no matter the circumstances, you just go out and play your game,” Russo said. “We had some mistakes at the end that were my fault, but we just went out there and kept competing and kept playing.” Russo threw interceptions on the two drives that preceded the game-tying touchdown. Cincinnati had chances to take a two-score lead, but Temple’s defense forced three-and-outs after both turnovers. Senior cornerback Rock Ya-Sin said Russell, senior safety Delvon Randall and Bradley kept saying, “It’s up to us to win this game,” on the sideline in the second half. “We knew we had to get stops,” Russell added. “Fourth-quarter shutouts, those are big-time. If a team can’t score in the fourth quarter to push the lead, you can’t get comfortable, they are al-

ways going to be on their heels.” Two Cincinnati turnovers in the first five minutes allowed Temple to jump out to a 10-0 lead. The next 11 offensive possessions, before Mack’s score, resulted in seven punts, three interceptions and one turnover on downs. The Bearcats scored 17 consecutive points, including freshman running back Charles McClelland’s 42-yard, go-ahead touchdown rush in the third quarter. The Owls’ defense forced a turnover on downs and four punts after McClelland’s touchdown to keep it a one-possession game. Mack and Wright said trailing in the second half on Saturday was a familiar situation. The Owls trailed during the second half of a game for the fifth time this season, but Saturday was only the second time they came away with a victory. Collins said the team practices sce-

narios in which it trails or is in overtime and needs a touchdown to tie or win the game. “We knew it was going to be a dogfight going in,” Ya-Sin said. “So that is what we prepared for. We wanted it to be a dogfight, we didn’t want an easy game. We knew it would come down to the last few seconds.” “What an unbelievable football game,” Collins said. “It was really nice to see us keep our composure in a testy game. …Our guys were the ones that had the composure when others didn’t.” michael.zingrone@temple.edu @mjzingrone

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SPORTS PAGE 23

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

CROSS COUNTRY

Owls ready ‘to make a name’ at conference meet men’s race, and both teams kept most of The men’s and women’s squads THE COURSE their rosters intact. The race will be at The Golf Course look to finish better than last On the women’s side, UConn will at Audubon Park, which has never been year’s third place result. used for a cross country meet of this be looking to defend its 2017 title, when

BY DONOVAN HUGEL Cross Country Beat Reporter The men’s and women’s cross country teams will race at a golf course in New Orleans on Thursday for the American Athletic Conference Cross Country Championships, which Tulane will host for the first time. Temple University hosted the conference championship last year at Belmont Plateau in West Philadelphia. Both teams placed third to record their best finishes in program history in The American. This year, they’re hoping to win. “We’ve never been to this course before,” Temple’s coach James Snyder said. “It’s on a golf course, so I’ve seen some videos of it and I have the course map and I have an idea of what it’s going to be like. But we don’t know what to expect from this course.” Connecticut will look to defend its women’s title, while Tulsa’s men’s team looks to win its fifth straight conference title. Southern Methodist’s women’s team enters the conference meet ranked No. 3 in the U.S. Track & Field and Cross Country Coaches Association South Central Region. Only top-5 nationally ranked University of Arkansas and the University of Texas, which received votes in the most recent coaches poll, are ranked higher than SMU. The American’s women’s teams will start the day with a 6,000-meter race at 11 a.m. Then the men’s teams will run an 8,000-meter race at 11:50 a.m. The Temple News asked several American Athletic Conference coaches about Thursday’s race and how they’re preparing their teams for the course.

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significance before, Tulane coach Eric Peterson said, making its debut special for the conference championships. “It’s a beautiful park, and just like all of New Orleans it’s very flat and there aren’t many hills,” Peterson added. Although Tulane has practiced on the course before, Peterson said none of the teams should have a serious advantage because the course is flat and fast. “The fact that it’s new wasn’t really bad news to me, and I wasn’t really taken aback by it,” UConn women’s cross country coach J.J. Clark said. “I just said to myself, ‘We’ll go there like everyone else and see the course and compete.’ This is why you compete and run the race.” Temple sophomore Lucy Jones said Snyder has prepared the Owls to run on several types of courses. “He’s been able to base our training around the course that we’re going to compete on in New Orleans,” Jones said. “So I have a lot of confidence in myself and the girls that I’m going to be running with because we know what to expect.” There is a 90 percent chance of rain on Thursday in New Orleans and 10 mph winds are expected, according to the National Weather Service as of Monday night. Because it’s a grass course, the course usually isn’t used when rain is in the forecast, Peterson said. Peterson added that Audubon Park “should be a very fast track,” but rain could dictate a slower pace for the runners.

IMPACT RUNNERS

UConn and Temple placed second and third behind Tulsa in last year’s

they beat second-place SMU by 29 points. Redshirt sophomore Peter Lynch has been Tulsa’s top finisher in the team’s past two meets, most notably finishing third with a time of 24 minutes, 56.2 seconds at the Missouri Southern Stampede on Sept. 15. Lynch will try to fill the void left after the team’s top runner Ben Preisner graduated last year. Preisner finished in second place at the conference meet two years ago and in third place last year. UConn is bringing back the majority of their runners from last year, Clark said. His teams will look to take the championship for the men’s competition and win a second straight women’s title. Clark added that he expects freshman Randi Burr to have a big role in the team’s attempt to repeat. Burr finished seventh at the team’s first meet of the year, the Minuteman Invitational, and she had a solid performance at the University at Buffalo Stampede Invitational with a time of 22:51.5. At the Princeton Invitational on Oct. 12, Burr placed 62nd with a time of 22:51.8. UConn senior Haley Hasty and sophomore Mia Nahom could also contribute to their school’s title chances due to their experience and top finishes this year, Clark added. Temple graduate student Louis Corgliano, sophomore Kristian Jensen and junior Zach Seiger are among the group of runners for Temple who are going to have a hand in trying to get the team’s first American Athletic Conference title. In the team’s first meet, the Temple Invitational on Aug. 31 at Belmont Plateau, Corgliano finished first, while Seiger and Jensen finished in sixth and

seventh place respectively. At the next meet, the Army Invitational on Sept. 24 in New York, Seiger and Corgliano finished in first and second respectively, and Jensen finished eighth. At the Princeton Invitational on Oct. 12 in New Jersey, Jensen finished fourth while Corgliano and Seiger finished back-toback again in 12th and 13th. Temple seniors Katie Leisher, junior Grace Moore and Jones are part of a deep group that will also try to capture the team’s first conference championship. Jones and Leisher finished in third and fourth at the Temple Invitational. Moore did not race, but then went on to win the Army Invitational. Jones finished second, graduate student Kira von Ehren finished third and Leisher came in 11th. “One of the strengths of our team this year that we were missing last year is that we have a lot of moving pieces,” Seiger said. “We’ve got guys who are finishing in fourth for us one meet and then finishing in first the next meet. It creates more of a competitive atmosphere every day at practice, and you have more confidence in yourself all the time as a result.” Temple’s confidence elevated to a “completely different level” this year, Jones said. The team sees winning a title as more attainable this year than in 2017. “There’s not just three or four of us who are really fit,” Jones said. “It’s one through nine who are all at an outstanding level of fitness. Not only are we all so fit, but we’re all so mentally prepared to make a name for ourselves at conferences.” donovan.hugel@temple.edu @donohugel

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SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 23, 2018

PAGE 24

DESIGN BY CLAIRE HALLORAN & PHOTOS BY GENEVA HEFFERNAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS Redshirt-junior running back Jager Gardner carries the ball during Temple’s 24-17 overtime win against Cincinnati on Saturday.

FOOTBALL

HOMECOMING KINGS The Owls remain undefeated in The American, after a comeback win against No. 20 Cincinnati. BY MICHAEL ZINGRONE Co-Sports Editor As redshirt-sophomore quarterback Anthony Russo led Temple’s offense downfield on a potential game-tying drive

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on Saturday against Cincinnati, Chapelle Russell said he couldn’t help but feel nervous. “The whole game we were just anxious,” the redshirt-junior linebacker said. “We just played hard every snap because we know what we are capable of.” Temple tied the game, scored on the first drive of overtime and intercepted

COMEBACK | PAGE 22

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Vol. 97 Iss. 9  

Oct. 23, 2018

Vol. 97 Iss. 9  

Oct. 23, 2018

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