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VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VO MIDTERM ELECTION VOTE VOTE VOTEVOTER VOTE VOTE VOTE GUIDE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VO VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VO VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VO VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VO VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VO VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VOTE VO Read more on Page B1

VOL 97 // ISSUE 10 OCTOBER 30, 2018 temple-news.com @thetemplenews

NEWS, PAGE 7 The Tyler School of Art will be renamed to reflect its architecture and environmental design division.

OPINION, PAGE 10 A columnist argues we need to pay attention to trans fats in Halloween candy.

FEATURES, PAGE 16 Students rally against a transgender policy proposal by the Trump administration.

INTERSECTION, PAGE 17 Students explore their experiences in the natural hair movement, like the “big chop.”


NEWS PAGE 2

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

THE TEMPLE NEWS A watchdog for the Temple University community since 1921. Gillian McGoldrick Editor in Chief Kelly Brennan Managing Editor Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor Evan Easterling Chief Copy Editor Greta Anderson News Editor Alyssa Biederman Deputy Campus Editor Will Bleier Deputy City Editor Jayna Schaffer Opinion Editor Laura Smythe Features Editor Zari Tarazona Deputy Features Editor Khanya Brann Deputy Features Editor Michael Zingrone Co-Sports Editor Sam Neumann Co-Sports Editor Claire Wolters Intersection Editor Shefa Ahsan Multimedia Editor Maria Ribeiro Director of Engagement Siani Colon Asst. Director of Engagement Hannah Burns Photography Editor Luke Smith Deputy Photography Editor Madison Seitchik Web Editor Ian Walker Visuals Editor Myra Mirza Visuals Specialist Claire Halloran Design Editor Jeremiah Reardon Designer Phuong Tran Advertising Manager Kelsey McGill Advertising Manager Daniel Magras Business Manager

The Temple News is an editorially independent weekly publication serving the Temple University community. Unsigned editorial content represents the opinion of The Temple News. Adjacent commentary is reflective of their authors, not The Temple News. Visit us online at temple-news.com. Send submissions to letters@temple-news.com. The Temple News is located at: Student Center, Room 243 1755 N. 13th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

ON THE COVER CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

CORRECTIONS Accuracy is our business, so when a mistake is made, we’ll correct it as soon as possible. Anyone with inquiries about content in this newspaper can contact Editor in Chief Gillian McGoldrick at editor@temple-news.com or 215-204-6736.

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

DEVELOPMENT

Fox expansion will open by end of break Several graduate programs will occupy the lower floors of 1810 Liacouras Walk. BY BLAKE NUTIS For The Temple News The Fox School of Business expansion into 1810 Liacouras Walk, and the skywalk, will open after fall break. Dozie Ibeh, the associate vice president of Temple University’s Project Delivery Group, said Fox will occupy the first five floors of the extension after Nov. 25. The skywalk between the third floor of Speakman Hall and the fourth floor of 1810 Liacouras Walk will open at the same time, he wrote. The $49 million expansion into 1810 Liacouras Walk began in August 2017 and the university expected it to be completed during Fall 2018 to coincide with Fox’s centennial celebration. Fox Interim Dean Ron Anderson said the expansion will fill the needs of Fox students and faculty. “It will not take long to see the benefits of our school’s expansion into 1810 Liacouras Walk,” Anderson wrote in a statement to The Temple News. “Also, increased access to the university’s Innovation and Entrepreneurship Institute and its renowned resources will be available to our university’s many makers, creators and entrepreneurs.” The Business Communications Center, a tutoring center in Speakman Hall that helps Fox students improve their business writing, will occupy the second floor, according to a July 2017 release. It will also have space for Business Communication course instructors. The school’s Marketing and

Communication division will also be relocated to the second floor, while the Department of Statistical Science will move to the third floor. Fox’s Office of Research, Doctoral Programs and Strategic Initiatives will occupy the fourth floor, and the fifth floor will house Fox’s Center for Executive Education. The Temple News reported in August 2017 that Fox’s high rankings were one of the driving factors behind the school’s rapid development on campus. In January, Fox’s Online MBA lost its No. 1 rank from U.S. News and World Report after it self-reported a data error. An investigation has since revealed the school submitted falsified data for seven programs for years. Senior marketing major Jo King is a peer tutor coordinator at the BCC, which will be relocated. “We technically were supposed to have moved in already, but the date got postponed in the summer to some time this month,” King said. Teresa Cirillo, the academic director for Business Communications who oversees the BCC, wrote in an email to The Temple News that she expects the center to move into the expansion at the end of the semester. “Opening a communications center during midterms or finals seems counterproductive,” King said. “I’m pretty neutral about [the move],” she added. “I never really saw the need for extra space at Fox.” blake.nutis@temple.edu @blakenutis Editor’s Note: News Editor Greta Anderson is a writing tutor at the Business Communications Center. She played no part in the reporting of this story.

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CAMPUS

Summit brings minorities to cannabis industry The Diasporic Alliance for Cannabis Opportunities offered business education to minorities. BY ISSALINA SAGAD For The Temple News

Desiree Ivey and Cherron Perry-Thomas, the founders of the Diasporic Alliance for Cannabis Opportunities, traveled around the country to attend cannabis industry conferences. They quickly realized they were the some of the only people of color in attendance. “When we would look around a conference of 20,000 people, we would represent 1 percent,” Ivey said. “Enough is enough. Our people clearly can’t fly and afford a $799 ticket. That’s their way of keeping us out. They don’t want us in this billion-dollar industry.” Eighty-one percent of marijuana business owners and founders surveyed across the country were white, in a 2017 report compiled by Marijuana Business Daily, a cannabis industry news publication. Only 4.3 percent of business owners surveyed were Black. Ivey and Perry-Thomas created DACO to bring cannabis business education directly to minority groups. Ivey also works at a for-profit organization that helps women in the cannabis industry. Perry-Thomas is the founder of Green Dandelion Marketing, a group that helps organic brands develop their businesses. DACO aims to reduce the stigma of cannabis, bring awareness to careers in the industry and create more educational resources for marginalized communities. The alliance’s clinic also offers medical marijuana cards for only $50, making the treatment option more affordable, said Micah Mahjoubian, the policy director for state Sen. Sharif Street, who represents the area near Main Campus. DACO hosted its first Cannabis Opportunities Conference, which was sponsored by Street and held in the Medicine Education and Research Build@TheTempleNews

ISSALINA SAGAD / THE TEMPLE NEWS State Sen. Sharif Street stands with Desiree Ivey, co-founder of the Diasporic Alliance for Cannabis Opportunities, at the organization’s conference on Oct. 20 at the Health Sciences Campus.

ing on the Health Sciences Campus. The alliance offered free workshops and exhibits open to the public on Oct. 19 and 20 about cannabis-based businesses. DACO reached out to Street because of his push for pro-cannabis legislation. He said the alliance opens the dialogue for empowering marginalized groups in the cannabis industry. Current laws impacting the industry make it difficult for the average person to start their own business from the bottom up, Ivey said. Because marijuana remains a Schedule I substance under the Drug Enforcement Administration’s classification, there are many regulations and expenses, like licenses and start-up fees, which some people in underserved minority communities cannot afford. Porter Gardiner, a Thai bodyworker who practices yoga and acupressure, attended the conference. She uses cannabis-infused oils and salves for her clients’ different conditions. Her son was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis two years ago and treats his pain and flares with

cannabis products. “Because of that, it’s more than just people smoking it just to relax for a day,” Gardiner said. “We need this because we have legitimate ailments that we need within our own system that can help us.” For those like Gardiner and Ivey, who has lupus and also treats flares with cannabis, reforming marijuana laws will make treatment for illnesses more attainable, as well as make the industry less costly. Mahjoubian said the Decriminalization of Cannabis in Pennsylvania bill would legalize and tax marijuana purchases and businesses. The bill was put forward by Street and is currently sitting in the state senate. “The more reform that we get, the more folks that will have these opportunities,” Mahjoubian said. By doing this on the federal level, Mahjoubian said, banks would be able to get involved and create loans for startups. Medical marijuana research, which Temple is currently conducting, would be able to have a stronger foothold in

Philadelphia. The cannabis industry is not only about growing and distributing marijuana, but also includes hemp products to make jewelry, clothes and medicinal oils. Rashida Watson, the owner of the Silk Tent, a store in the Powelton neighborhood where she designs and makes her own jewelry, said DACO’s agenda can also benefit businesses on a local level. “This is for the community and... the average person [to] have access to all this information, and to benefit the same way that large companies do,” she said. Desmond McKinson, Street’s communications director, said that it is imperative that events like DACO become routine. He said that as the cannabis industry emerges, Street’s team recognizes the importance of being inclusive to all groups of people. “This event will help educate, destigmatize and empower some of these communities,” McKinson said. issalina.sagad@temple.edu

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


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COVER STORY

FINANCIAL AID DUE! ENTER YOUR PASSWORD TO PAY IMMEDIATELY! ***************

FINANCIAL AID DUE! ENTER YOUR PASSWORD FINANCIAL AID DUE! TOENTER PAY IMMEDIATELY! YOUR PASSWORD TO PAY IMMEDIATELY!

Scheme targets financial aid refunds PAY NOW OR FACE 15 DOLLAR LATE FEE! ENTER YOUR INFORMATION NOW!

FINANCIAL AID DUE! ENTER YOUR PASSWORD “We have deployed two-step for emTemple students and faculty are in a statement in August. The phishing TO PAY IMMEDIATELY! campaign gains access to students’ fiployee payroll services like direct depostargets of the phishing scheme every day.

BY HALLIE JACOBS For The Temple News

T

emple University students are being targeted by an email phishing scheme that goes after financial aid refunds. No one has reported having their financial aid refunds stolen, said Larry Brandolph, the associate vice president of Computer Services and chief information security officer. Still, several students said they’ve received phishing attempts to their Temple email accounts. The Department of Education warned higher education institutions in August that it identified the malicious phishing scheme, which targets students’ financial aid through fraudulent emails and accessing student portals. Schools that do not require students to have two-factor or multi-factor authentication to access student portals, like TUportal, are more vulnerable to the attacks, Federal Student Aid wrote News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

nancial aid refunds that the university returns through direct deposit. While Temple uses this process to return refunds, the university does not require two-factor or multi-factor authentication on TUportal. Only faculty, staff and student workers, have access to this method for identity verification. Brandolph said university workers have had access to multi-factor authentication on their TUportals since 2016. The university is working on building and implementing a multi-factor authentication method for the general student body within the next six months, he said.

MULTI-FACTOR VERIFICATION The university is already licensed to provide two-step authentication to most students, faculty and staff, but has not yet implemented the technology for students who are not employed by the university, Cindy Leavitt, chief information officer and vice president for Computer Services, wrote in an email to The Temple News.

it, benefit information and W-2s, which already is being used by student workers,” Leavitt wrote. “We are working on how to extend two-factor authentication for other student services in the next few months.” Employees, including student workers, have access to staff tools in the Self-Service Banner, which includes multi-factor authentication, Brandolph said. Students who are not employed by the university do not have the same access, but often receive financial aid refunds through direct deposit on TUportal. According to the most recent university factbook, more than half of full-time undergraduates received need-based financial aid during the 2016-17 academic year. Nationally, more than 19 million public university students receive direct federal loans, the DOE reported. Brandolph said the phishing scheme is attempted on a daily basis. “It’s a constant phishing scam, phone scams, we see it all, every single day of the week,” Brandolph said. Freshman early childhood education major Anna Goodwin said she received

several emails during the summer about financial aid offers and loans that she knew at the time were scams. Most of them, she said, made unrealistic offers. “I could always tell when they were scam emails because they asked me to click on links or sign up for something,” Goodwin said. “My guideline for telling if they were fake was to decide if they were too good to be true.” The DOE suggests colleges and universities report successful attacks to the federal government, but it is not required. The university does not report the scheme’s attempts, or keep record of the number of false emails sent to students, Brandolph said. The FBI is also aware of the phishing scheme, Leavitt wrote, and has been providing educational resources to IREs about the attacks. “The FBI will do some investigation at the local office levels, but phishing is a major focus for them currently,” she wrote.

HOW IT WORKS The phishing campaign attempts to gain access to student portal accounts by sending a deceiving email, which temple-news.com


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prompts students to share account information, like their login to TUportal.

should also be available to the general student body.

The emails appear to come from a university address and refer to enrollment and updates to direct deposit payment methods, according to the FSA. The attackers have done research and understand universities’ portal operations.

Debbie Porter uses direct deposit to receive her daughter’s federal financial aid refunds. “Anyone who has a Temple email account should have that extra protection,” Debbie Porter said. Samantha Porter said that while she

“It’s a constant phishing scam, phone scams, we see it all, every single day of the week.” -Larry Brandolph, chief information security officer

The scheme is successful because students provide the requested information and use just one method of authentication, a username and password. Attackers change the bank account information for financial aid direct deposit to their own bank accounts. “The attackers are exploiting a common practice at many [higher education institutions]: the use of single-factor authentication to access institution systems,” according to the FSA. There are other ways to receive financial aid refunds from the university, like through paper checks delivered by mail, but students can enroll in direct deposit for their refunds. Freshman risk management and insurance major Lena Nguyen said her parents handle her tuition and financial aid, so she does not think the phishing scheme would directly affect her. “I usually run everything by my parents because I don’t know anything about money,” Nguyen said. “I feel like it wouldn’t affect me that much because I’d be kind of careful about it.” Parents of students are also vulnerable to attack, Brandolph said, because they often receive financial aid refunds through direct deposit on TUportal. Parents have not reported instances of being targeted by the scheme. Senior psychology major Samantha Porter is a student worker in the Education Abroad Office. Porter’s mother, Debbie Porter, believes the two-step verification her daughter has access to @TheTempleNews

has received several phishing emails and has access to the two-step authentication process, she has not set it up. She said since it is only a suggestion, not a requirement, she did not want to go through the process of creating it. “I know there are instructions online, but I got really confused trying to read them, so I gave up,” Samantha Porter said. Samantha Porter said most of the spam emails tried to get her to click on a link, and one was written as if it was from a professor. She deleted them immediately after receiving them, per the instructions sent to all Temple staff warning them about the emails. She feared she could have been more vulnerable to these attacks because she does not have her two-step verification setup, Samantha Porter said.

PREVENTATIVE MEASURES Many universities encourage students to use multi-factor authentication, while some even require it for all faculty and staff. For example, the University of Maryland required all students to be enrolled in this method beginning Oct. 15, according to an email sent to students. Penn State announced in September that the university mandates two-factor authentication for all its faculty and staff. It is also available to all students. Information Technology Services sent an email to the Temple communi-

An email may be a phishing scam if it includes the following: The message was sent by an unfamiliar or unexpected sender. The message is asking you for your password and personal information. Temple will never ask you for your password or any personal information via email. The message contains a tone of urgency or extreme excitement. Phishing scams will often use phrases such as "Please login to avoid your email account being closed," to try to invoke fear or excitement and get you to respond. The message contains unexpected links and attachments. Never click on an unexpected link or attachment in a suspicious message. If you want to see where the link redirects to, hover over the link to see where the URL is going. The message sometimes includes spelling, grammar and writing errors. While sometimes you see spelling, grammar and writing mistakes, phishing emails are becoming more sophisticated with less errors. Source: Temple University Information Technology Services, Tech Bits: NCSAM Tips for Spotting a Phishing Scam

ty on Sept. 26 with tips on how to spot phishing scams in emails. In effort to prevent the community from falling victim to email scams, ITS recommended that students and faculty search for clues in the body of suspicious emails to determine if they are false. If the email is from an unrecognized sender, asks for passwords or personal information, has a tone of excitement, includes unexpected attachments or links and has writing and grammar mistakes, it could be from a cybercriminal, according to ITS. The university also told students and faculty it will never ask for their personal information or passwords via email. Emails that ask for this information are likely a part of the phishing campaign. ITS also has online resources that describe phishing schemes and how to

identify them, including an example phishing email. The ITS webpage instructs students to forward suspicious emails to abuse@temple.edu and not to respond. The daily reported phishing attacks can be temporarily monitored on ITS’ System Status site. Freshman accounting major Elena Van said she saw multiple suspicious emails in her inbox this summer. She said she does not know how to differentiate between real emails from the university and fake emails that could be part of a phishing scheme. “I tend to be a really gullible person, so I don’t know how to differentiate whether or not [they’re] real or not, but I have received a lot of financial aid emails,” Van said. hallie.jacobs@temple.edu

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


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TRANSPORTATION

Philly students advocate for fares added to tuition A student joined the SEPTA Youth Advisory Council to advocate discounted fares. BY HAL CONTE For The Temple News The SEPTA Youth Advisory Council is pressing to add unlimited SEPTA student access added to tuition. The council’s Student Fare Discount Initiative would offer a transit pass paid for through a student’s tuition. Yasmine Hamou, a senior political science major, was recently added to the nine-member organization. “It would be game-changing,” Hamou said. “There’s already a thing where we can get a 10 percent discount, but that’s not enough.” Will Herzog, the executive chair of the YAC, said the Student Fare Discount Initiative was proposed in 2011. They hope to implement the initiative at several Philadelphia colleges. In 2016, the council met with SEPTA and other stakeholders to discuss cost structure and implementation, but this was the latest progress of the initiative listed on the YAC’s site. “We started this project with a lot of resistance from SEPTA,” said Herzog, a senior growth and structure of cities major at Haverford College. “They weren’t too happy about it. But now they’re helping develop it.” In a 2011 survey of SEPTA riders ages 14-22, the council found that more than 66 percent of those surveyed would be “much more likely” to access SEPTA if it offered a discounted youth pass. Herzog and other members of the YAC see the initiative as important not only for students’ wallets, but also for the economic future of the city. A 2014 survey by Campus Philly, a nonprofit organization that encourages students to live and work in the city showed that 64 percent of recent Philadelphia college graduates live in the city immediately after graduation. Philadelphia is at a point where young people need to remain in the city News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com

HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS Yasmine Hamou, a senior political science major, stands on the platform of SEPTA’s Cecil B. Moore subway station on Wednesday.

to guarantee its economic viability, Herzog said. “The statistic that one in [seven] of all Philly graduates are from Temple makes it that much more important that Temple students get this,” Herzog said. “It would include every single mode of public transportation that SEPTA operates. If students could use it just by tapping their student ID cards, it would be great.” Jeff Doshna, the chair of the Department of Planning and Community Development in the Tyler School of Art, said this initiative would increase sustainability and reduce emissions from vehicle congestion, which could improve the community’s health. “It is a thing we could do to make North Philly relationships better and get cars off the street,” Doshna said. “Students’ cars are occupying the road,” Doshna added. “There’s a reason why emissions are so much higher in

congested areas. I think that this makes it harder for students to feel like they’re respecting the community.” Some regular commuters, however, like sophomore computer science major Abdullah Jandali, who travels from King of Prussia, Pennsylvania, to Main Campus every day, are hesitant about the idea of putting SEPTA fares into tuition. “Some people don’t commute, and they live here or somewhere nearby,” Jandali said. “They would be paying for someone else’s transportation, and I don’t think that would be fair.” “Regardless, someone would have to pay for it,” he added. “I paid for my SEPTA pass separately from my tuition. If it would be discounted, that would be great, but I can’t imagine it being by much.” A successful program would include other schools like Haverford College, Swarthmore College, Bryn Mawr College, Jefferson University and Temple,

Hamou said. The YAC was founded in September 2009 as a spinoff of SEPTA’s Citizens Advisory Committee, created by the state legislature in 1967. For Hamou, the YAC serves two purposes: to promote SEPTA to young people and give them a stake in public transportation improvements. She became a member of the council after attending a meeting for 5th Square, a Political Action Committee for transit and urban planning in Philadelphia. Hamou said that Jon Geeting, who co-founded 5th Square, reached to her after he saw her active political commentary on Twitter. He invited Hamou to a 5th Square meeting with the president of SEPTA where she was encouraged to fill out YAC’s online application for the program. “I graduate in May, I want to have [the initiative] set up by then,” Hamou said. “It’s on my radar and my No. 1 goal. ...Of course, this is still an ongoing conversation between SEPTA and the university.” Hamou is currently engaged in two unpaid internships. She said that a University Pass would allow more students to take professional opportunities, as transit costs would not be a factor. Evan Wise, a 2018 community development alumnus who is a YAC member and a Rutgers University city and regional planning graduate student, lives in Yorktown, a neighborhood near Main Campus. Wise joined the organization during his sophomore year after being told about it by a professor. He is now the vice chair of the council. “Universities across the country have programs that allow for free rider access,” Wise said. “We could do a lot better. There’s a lot of upsides there for students.” “Transportation is something we can all get behind,” Hamou added. hal.conte@temple.edu Editor’s Note: Yasmine Hamou is a freelance reporter for The Temple News. She played no part in the reporting and editing of this story.

temple-news.com


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CAMPUS

Architecture program ‘found a home’ in art school Discussions to include the architecture program in the Tyler name began in 2003. BY WILL BLEIER Deputy City Editor

The Tyler School of Art will be renamed the Tyler School of Art and Architecture in July 2019. The decision, which was approved by the Board of Trustees earlier this month, will better reflect the range of architecture courses offered at the school and encourage interdisciplinary collaboration within Tyler. The changes will create the Department of Art in Tyler. It also calls for the renaming of the Department of Architecture to the Department of Architecture and Environmental Design. The decision to change the name was partially because of the growth the architecture program has experienced

since becoming part of the Division of Architecture and Environmental Design in 2016, said Susan Cahan, the dean of the Tyler School of Art. The division makes up one-third of Tyler’s faculty and students, she added. Cahan said the name change process included feedback for a strategic plan from the entire faculty and constituencies of alumni and students. “It is an expression of our desire for enhanced collaboration across disciplines, for greater interaction and synergy,” Cahan said. “It’s a public expression of the unification of the full breadth of disciplines in the school.” According to the agenda references from the Oct. 9 Board meeting, the Department of Art will include programs in the Department of Crafts and the Department of Painting, Drawing and Sculpture, and both departments will be eliminated after the name change. The Department of Architecture

and Environmental Design will focus on programs in the built environment, an architectural term referring to the spaces in which people live and work. The programs within the Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture and the Department of Planning and Community Development will be moved to the Department of Architecture and Environmental Design. Graduate architecture student Kyle Taveira, who is also president of Temple’s chapter of the American Institute of Architecture Students, said his late nights in the Architecture Building with his classmates refining projects until 2 a.m. are finally being recognized. “It’s actually funny because that’s the time people in the building bond the most,” he said. Architecture joined the Tyler School of Art in 1998. In 2003, discussions began to include the discipline in the name of the art school, Cahan said.

Lauren Lockwood, a junior architecture major, said many of the assigned readings in her classes tie together architecture and art, and the name change will reinforce that curricula. “It’s going to connect us back to art,” Lockwood said. Kate Wingert-Playdon, an architecture professor and the associate dean of the Division of Architecture and Environmental Design, said the interactions between the two disciplines are similar to how the architecture workforce operates. “We have so many leaders in the profession…shaping our built environment, and to bring their presence into the university psyche, I would say is a really important thing,” Wingert-Playdon said. “It has found a home,” she added. william.bleier@temple.edu

POLITICS

Bills could implement statewide medical amnesty The bills would provide immunity for drug overdose and underage alcohol poisoning victims. BY ITALIA MESSINA For The Temple News

A statewide medical amnesty policy could be altered to include drug overdoses and underage alcohol poisoning, according to a bill introduced in the state House of Representatives. Pennsylvania state Rep. Carolyn Comitta introduced a pair of bills on Oct. 17, co-sponsored by state Rep. Mary Jo Daley, that would implement a statewide medical amnesty policy for drug overdoses and underage alcohol overdoses. The proposed bills would guarantee increased protection for those who self-report and practice “Good Samaritan” intervention for alcohol and opioid-related overdoses. Victims would also be guaranteed increased protection under the law and would not be charged @TheTempleNews

if they seek help. House Bill 2719 provides immunity to victims of drug overdoses and 2720 does the same for underage victims of alcohol overdoses. The person who calls for help for a victim is already granted immunity under the “Good Samaritan” law. “What we didn’t have, and that these bills would provide, is immunity for the victim,” Comitta said. Mary Ciammetti’s son, Christian, died from alcohol poisoning in 2015 while a junior at Temple University. She created an alcohol education program, Don’t Stall, Just Call, at Temple in 2016. Ciammetti testified to members of the state House of Representatives on Main Campus in April, lobbying for a statewide alcohol education and medical amnesty program. Ciammetti told The Temple News that while many universities, including Temple, have medical amnesty policies in place that protect both the person who

calls for help and the victim, off-campus protections are handled differently. “Throughout the state...they are not consistent,” Ciammetti said. “You may be attending college in a town where you have medical amnesty on campus, but if an incident occurs off-campus, you are treated differently. This is a big problem.” Ciammetti raised the issue to Daley, who decided to co-sponsor the proposed bills in the state House. “It’s to really let them know and educate them on how they can do something to help without getting in trouble, themselves,” Daley said. Ronan Gleeson, a sophomore finance and computer science major who received medical amnesty, said a statewide policy would encourage more students to call for help. During the 2017-18 academic year, 119 students used medical amnesty, an increase from the 2016-17 academic year when 88 students utilized the policy, ac-

cording to Megan Patrick, the assistant dean of students for Student Conduct and Community Standards. “If students aren’t sure what’s going to happen if they do call, that might be a disincentive for them to actually call,” Gleeson said. “Everything with medical amnesty should be set up so that students call without any apprehension.” Ciammetti encourages students and parents to bring up these issues with their state representatives before the two bills are reintroduced in January once state representatives are elected in the 2018 midterms. She said parents must take the initiative to ask colleges about their current medical amnesty policies and “put the ball in their court.” “You need to dig deeper and see where you are,” Ciammetti said. “Because the rules in Pittsburgh are different from the rules in Philadelphia.” italia@temple.edu @messina_italia

News Desk 215.204.7419 news@temple-news.com


OPINION PAGE 8

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018 EDITORIAL

Foster minority representation While marijuana policies are changing across the country, so is the stigma surrounding the substance. But we can’t ignore the reality that people of color are still disproportionately arrested on marijuana-related charges. Now, mostly white people will benefit from the industrialization of the same substance that Black people are nearly four times as likely as white people to be imprisoned for smoking or possessing, despite similar usage. On Oct. 19 and 20, Temple University hosted a conference organized by the Diasporic Alliance for Cannabis Opportunities — a company seeking to give opportunities to underrepresented entrepreneurs. The Cannabis Opportunities Conference offered job fairs and speakers, all for free. The aim of this conference was to increase awareness of careers in the cannabis industry for people in marginalized communities. DACO is also

making marijuana treatment more accessible by offering medical marijuana cards for only $50. The Temple News Editorial Board thinks DACO conferences and treatment affordability efforts are much needed and a step in the right direction toward opening doors for marginalized groups. Some people in predominantly minority communities who are experiencing economic hardship often can’t afford expenses that would allow them to take part in the growing cannabis industry. So, efforts like DACO’s help combat that. It’s important to acknowledge privilege, especially when it keeps others from being part of an entire up-andcoming business and a form of medical treatment. Cannabis conferences that aren’t directed toward minorities exclude whole communities, like Temple’s North Philadelphia neighbors.

EDITORIAL

Celebrate, but remember, Fox’s errors The Fox School of Business unveiled its expansion into 1810 Liacouras Walk last week. The school will begin occupying the building after fall break to coincide with its 100-year anniversary, a university official said. On Thursday, the school also held Foxtoberfest, which is part of its centennial celebration. The event, which took over Liacouras Walk, engaged students, faculty and alumni and featured music, free food and a beer garden. While these events and projects are beneficial to students and faculty, it is important to remember that administrators in Fox are still being investigated by several state and federal agencies for knowingly misreporting letters@temple-news.com

data to U.S. News and World Report for its Online MBA program and several other graduate programs. State Attorney General Josh Shapiro and the United States Department of Education are investigating these matters, and more than 30 Fox MBA students are suing the school. The school’s $49 million expansion into 1810 Liacouras Walk will offer workspace for students and faculty in the programs, whose data was misreported by staff for several years. It is worth celebrating the achievements of students, faculty and alumni at the business school, but we should not forget that this scandal has greatly impacted the school’s reputation and the students’ experiences.

A LETTER TO THE EDITOR A North Philadelphia community resident criticizes the university’s proposed on-campus stadium project.

In my humble view, what needs to be addressed in regards to the football stadium awaiting to be built is a collaboration between the Board of Trustees and those of the neighborhood, directly. Need to remove all of the “middle of the field” people, like the churches and the City Council, speak directly with each other, those suburban white people with the neighborhood Black people, the majority who have been residing in the area for over 30 years and own their homes, where the stadium to be built is proposed. Need to then get a consensus, as those “under the age of 35” will not comprehend the gentrification nor the experience the rise in property taxes. Those white suburban trustees, none of whom reside anywhere in North Philadelphia, can easily want the stadium to be built. But again, this total disregard and total disconnect the trustees maintain, then wondering aloud why no construction is even in sight still — mind boggling. These trustees, highly intelligent individuals, privileged and well-to-do, having made no attempts at even a common dialogue (those socalled town meetings, all a waste of time as again, too many “middle people” involved), just a waste. As for the trustees, they need to sit down among themselves, and keeping it all fair, should construct a board with regards to the stadium, and add several of those neighborhood residents to the board, along with the same trustees/ white people who will together preside, addressing all pending issues, present and future, and the board needs to issue common stock shares as well, equally distributed, regardless of the “race disparity.” As for term limits, those same neighborhood residents who will be the ones to endure the “wild partying,” the “noise” and so forth, can at least enjoy equal dividends distributed, based on the Temple football team winning! In simple words, trustees need to be

equally weighted financially and invested with the community, not just some “bribe” in constructing one building that is to provide “social services” for which the City of Philadelphia does already. A day care center? Really? This is like a dog to a bone, throw the neighborhood residents something they can chomp on so as Temple can put its full financials toward the stadium. There also needs to be revenue sharing, not equally distributed, but generous so as the neighborhood surrounding the proposed stadium, benefits. This is all about money, plain and simple, and the trustees are still disrespecting the area neighborhood, not to mention the residents, many of whom have been in their homes for over 30 years! Temple needs to offer the neighborhood youth jobs, not just summer jobs but jobs all year round, those between the age of 21 to 30 and there needs to be a race-injection, meaning white/Black people associated on the regular (it is urban and North Philadelphia, so need to be mindful of the overall race majority, Black people). There is this one gentleman from Berean Presbyterian Church at Broad and Diamond, a trustee, he would make for a good advocate in regards to speaking in favor of the neighborhood, but again, a board needs to be constructed and those same neighbors need to be a full part of, term limits all around, Black neighbors and white trustees who will construct the board entirely; rotating the board positions, maintaining the white/Black mix, will then enable the stadium to be maintained, along with those services required for upkeep. It just all starts with a real dialogue, back and forth, full mutual respect, with the “first hand offered” by the trustees to the Black neighbors. Justin Nelson is a North Philadelphia community resident.

temple-news.com


OPINION

PAGE 9

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

THE ESSAYIST

There’s more to me than where I was born A student who was adopted racial diversity. And those stares used to cans who aren’t adopted feel about their about their ethnicity, you might get a from China struggles to answer bother me because I felt as though I be- identities. But personally, I feel conflict- reaction you didn’t expect. And that’s longed where I was, while others didn’t ed when it comes to how I identify as a understandable because backgrounds are questions about her ethnicity. BY JAQUELINE MINNIS For The Temple News At first glance, I look like an Asian-American woman. But just because someone looks like they’re from a certain part of the world, doesn’t mean they identify with that region. Ever since I was a little kid, people always stared at me. My mother told me it was because I was cute, but I didn’t believe that was the only reason. I was adopted from China when I was 1 year old by my adoptive mother, who is of Irish descent. Obviously, we don’t look alike. When I got to a certain age, I knew the way the two of us looked together was the real reason I couldn’t escape the strangers’ stares. I grew up in an area with very little

agree. I was just me, so I wondered why I was prone to this unwanted attention. As someone who was adopted at a very young age, I felt lost when someone asked me where I’m from. People felt inclined or even entitled to ask, since most of the town’s population — including my own family — didn’t look like me. And I always knew the answer they were looking for — the obvious one I should technically provide. But that didn’t feel true to me. I always struggled with my ethnicity. Enveloped in two completely different cultures, I belonged more to the culture I don’t look like. Although I still have these tendencies, as I have grown I have developed a better understanding of who I am and how I feel about my ethnicity. I don’t know what it’s like to live in China or how other Asian-Ameri-

person. Over the years, I have learned to be proud of my Chinese background, but I am also proud of the way I was raised. It’s not that I am more “Westernized” or more Chinese, but that I have found a balance between these two very important cultures in my life over the years, by answering questions about my ethnicity and telling the story of my adoption. Ethnicity can be a touchy topic if you don’t approach it correctly. Obviously, I can’t speak for all people of the many cultures and parts of the world, but when someone I don’t know asks me what my ethnicity is, I usually don’t have an issue telling them. But I know that’s not the case for everyone. Not everyone will be as open about answering identity-related questions. Sometimes when you ask people

personal. People have mistaken me for being from a different Asian country or for a Pacific Islander, and I kindly correct them, letting them know that I am, in fact, from China. I usually add that I was adopted, and then there’s a look of either curiosity or empathy on their face. Despite my frustration with having two different cultures, I like telling people where I’m from. I think the questions always come from curiosity, and I appreciate that. But if curiosity strikes, try not to assume. Always ask first whether you can guess someone’s ethnicity. I’m OK with people asking me where I am from, but I’d also like you to get to know me first. I am so much more than my ethnicity, and so is everyone else. jaqueline.minnis@temple.edu

JEREMIAH REARDON / THE TEMPLE NEWS

@TheTempleNews

letters@temple-news.com


OPINION

PAGE 10

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

NUTRITION

Making strides toward a trans fat-free Halloween It’s important we know what artificial trans fat cannot be added into teens who are obese in the U.S. has more Thanksgiving on the list of holidays than tripled since the 1970s, according when people don’t count their calories. ingredients we’re handing out to any products. Removing trans fat in candy that will to the Centers for Disease Control and And that’s OK. But we should be aware children each year. As a kid during Halloween, I never thought about the nutritional value — or lack thereof — of candy I was collecting door to door. I never thought about the additives in these delicious sweets. That was until my nutrition professor made CHRISTINA an interesting MITCHELL prediction: this year will be the first Halloween free of trans fats. In 2015, the Food and Drug Administration gave food industries three years to rid the market of partially hydrogenated oils, which are the source of most trans fats. This means as of June,

be in the possession of small children is a huge step in combating obesity. Each Halloween, the average child trick-ortreater consumes about 7,000 calories of candy, Fortune reported in 2017. Trans fat is the least nutritional kind of dietary fat, according to the Harvard Medical School. It increases low-density lipoproteins, or bad cholesterol and decreases high-density lipoproteins, or good cholesterol. Trans fat is strongly linked to heart disease and has no known health benefits, unlike saturated, polyunsaturated or monounsaturated fats, which are recommended in small amounts, according to Harvard Medical School. This is why it’s crucial that a treat given to kids meets a certain nutritional standard. The percentage of children and

Prevention. The small concept of less trans fat consumption can definitely help reverse this statistic. Sarah Knockstead, a sophomore media studies and production major, said her family loves preparing its house with Halloween decorations for trickor-treaters to see as they come knocking. “Kids look forward to coming to our house every year, which makes me happy,” Knockstead said. “We normally hand out Hershey’s and other goodquality candy.” Even when you buy “good-quality” candy, it doesn’t hurt to check the label. “Partially hydrogenated oils” is another term for trans fat, according to WebMD, and if a product contains any of this ingredient, it is better to leave it on the shelf. Halloween may be right next to

of what we are handing out to developing children. Michael Sachs, a kinesiology professor, said this is especially important today because of the stationary lives many people live, adults and children alike. “We have a lot of entertainment options, and we spend a lot of time sitting down,” Sachs said. “My father used to like to tell me, ‘Are you eating to live, or are you living to eat?’” Sachs added. And whether you’re eating to live or living to eat, everyone should take steps toward having healthier holidays and every day after that. Getting rid of trans fat in Halloween candy is a great place to start. christina.mitchell@temple.edu

CLAIRE HALLORAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS

letters@temple-news.com

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OPINION

PAGE 11

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

MUSICIANS CROSSWORD

INSTRUMENTS WORD SEARCH

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PIANO GUITAR TRUMPET DJEMBE SITAR TABLA SAXOPHONE VIOLIN CELLO HARMONIUM

BAGPIPES SYNTHESIZER CLARINET CONGAS TRIANGLE FLUTE XYLOPHONE TROMBONE BASS BANJO

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1. Wants to dance with somebody (who loves her)

7. She will never be royal 9. The King of Pop 11. Satchmo 12. Bad gal 13. Queen B 14. House band for The Tonight Show

2. Musical bugs 3. Harder, better, faster, stronger 4. Rising singer in “A Star Is Born” 6. Partying Like It’s 1999 8. Famous for Las Vegas weddings 10. First rapper to win a Pulitzer

Prize for Music

Answers from Tuesday, October 23: 1.Pumpkin, 2.Frankenstein, 3.Zombie, 4.Witch, 5.Monstermash, 6.Mischief Night, 7.Costume Party, 8.Trick or Treat, 9.Candycorn, 10.Clowns, 11.Warewolf, 12.Rocky Horror, 13.Skeleton, 14.Haunted, 15. Vampire, 16.Ghosts

@TheTempleNews

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FEATURES PAGE 12

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

STUDENT LIFE

Inclusivity advocate to study away in California Shawn Aleong hopes to learn skills that will help him launch a company that would advocate for people with disabilities. BY MICHAELA ALTHOUSE For The Temple News

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hawn Aleong dreams of one day launching a business that will include and advocate for people with disabilities. “I would love to be able to walk outside and see people with disabilities with other people that don’t [have them], together,” Aleong said. Aleong’s first step in achieving his dream is making the most of his education. The freshman legal studies major will study away in San Francisco in Spring 2019 and hopes the trip will increase his financial knowledge so he can help others with disabilities succeed in the technology and finance industries. Though still in the works, Aleong’s future business named the Devon Group will hire individuals with and without disabilities. He said the company will create training programs on inclusion and appropriate work environments for people with disabilities, in addition to helping them find housing. The trip, organized through the Fox School of Business, will take Aleong to San Francisco for an immersive course on digital and alternative financial services like artificial intelligence, the digital finance ledger Blockchain and Bitcoin, a digital currency. “I hope that I can learn so much about Bitcoin and smart contracts and all those things...so that I can figure out a way to better serve people with disabilities and minorities,” said Aleong, who is diagnosed with cerebral palsy, a movement disorder. Aleong, 30, said he is particularly passionate about inclusion for people

features@temple-news.com

HANNAH BURNS / THE TEMPLE NEWS Freshman legal studies major Shawn Aleong started a GoFundMe to raise money to study away in California in Spring 2019.

with cerebral palsy. Aleong launched a GoFundMe campaign in September to raise money for his studies in California. So far he has raised almost $900 toward his $3,000 goal. James Lammendola, a legal studies in business professor who previously taught Aleong, said Aleong’s work stood out in the class of almost 200 students. Aleong took Lammendola’s Law and American Society course in Fall 2016 as a continuing studies student, before he enrolled at the university. “I see in Shawn those good qualities that I consider citizenship,” he added. “Someone that cares about what’s going on in the world, knows it affects him and his loved ones in some way and he’s trying to find a way to contribute to that.”

Aleong first came up with the idea for his business in 2015, but his internship last summer at Disability Rights Pennsylvania — an organization that advocates and provides resources for people with disabilities — inspired him to start laying the framework. “I want to make sure intellectual disabilities are heard loud and clear,” Aleong said. He added that by creating a model of integration, he hopes to set an example of inclusivity for corporate America. “Being honest, being humble, being a leader and using these tools to help others is the greatest business,” Aleong said. No stranger to social justice, Aleong has advocated for people with disabilities

for more than six years. He serves as the deputy director of government affairs for Temple Student Government and sits on the board of advisers for Temple’s Institute on Disabilities and the board of directors for The Arc of Philadelphia, an organization that advocates for the rights of people with disabilities. Aleong is also a member on the city’s Police Advisory Commission and is a member of the NAACP. He frequently speaks at events on campus about disability awareness and said he hopes to eventually serve on the board of a major business. “[Shawn] in no way, shape or form allows his disability to cause him not to be a champion for himself,” said Charlie Leone, the executive director of Campus Safety Services. “What he needs and the opportunities that are here, he goes for them. He’s a great role model for us.” Aleong credits Temple with his love for advocacy, adding that his participation in the two-year Academy for Adult Learning program in 2012 changed his outlook on life. It prompted him to enroll at Temple in 2018 and pursue his legal studies degree with an entrepreneurship minor. Aleong believes there is a lot to improve on in how society views people with disabilities, but he’s grateful for the resources the university provides him with. To accommodate his disability, Temple has set Aleong up with a peer note-taker during lectures and a reading and writing coach. The most important message Aleong wants to send, though, is for the world to know the strength of people with disabilities. “It’s not disability, it’s ability,” Aleong said. “In fact, it’s not me that has a disability, it’s society.” michaela.althouse@temple.edu @michaela_kla

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

VOTER GUIDE

Educated voting is the best way to exercise citizenship

PAGE B1

INSIDE

Dear Readers and Voters, This midterm election, we produced a voter guide to help our readers vote in Philadelphia. We interviewed almost every candidate on the ballot, so the information and points of view are authentic to each of them. As journalists and a hyperlocal news source, it’s part of our mission to make sure our readers have access to tools and information to make informed decisions in our democracy. To make sure we focused on issues people in our community care about, we created an online survey anyone could answer. We asked what readers are concerned about, what they’d want to ask specific candidates and anything they might want to know about voting. This didn’t just inform our process — it directly impacted our coverage. Before today, we’ve written stories inspired by this survey, like one explaining the voter registration process or the efforts by different polling places near Temple University’s Main Campus ahead of the election for voter turnout. As a result of reader engagement, we now have this eight-page voter guide. It includes what each candidate on the ballot thinks of the various issues you told us were the most important. We also have a page dedicated to describing your rights when you arrive at the polls. We have an online version of this insert that contains links to more information, so you can learn even more ahead of Nov. 6. Leading up to the election, and on voting day, The Temple News will have all our social media DMs open, and either myself or another member of our staff will be available to help answer any questions you have about the elections. Now go out and vote! Julie Christie Digital Managing Editor

Read the guide online for more interactive and in-depth content at temple-news.com Words: Julie Christie, Greta Anderson | Reporting: Greta Anderson, Lindsay Bowen, Julie Christie | Photo: Page 4 by Luke Smith and Jamie Cottrell, all other photos via candidate sites | Graphics and Illustrations: Myra Mirza, Ian Walker, Claire Halloran | Design: Jeremiah Reardon, Claire Halloran, Julie Christie, Greta Anderson

What’s on the ballot?

B2

The ballot question, explained

B2

United States Senate candidates

B2

Congressional representatives for the 2nd and 3rd districts

B2

Candidates for governor

B2

181st District: Milton Street and Malcolm Kenyatta

B2

At the polls: Your rights and your polling place

B2

Contributors can be reached at news@temple-news.com

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VOTER GUIDE PAGE B2

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

What’s on the ballot?

GENERAL AND SPECIAL ELECTION - TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 6, PHILADELPHIA COUNTY

OFFICE Puesto

DEMOCRATIC

REPUBLICAN

GREEN

INDEPENDENT

LIBERTARIAN

Democratico

Republicano

Verde

Independiente

Libertario

Straight Democratic Ticket Boleta Democratica Consecutiva

BOB

UNITED STATES SENATOR

CASEY JR

1

Straight Repu blican Ticket Boleta Republicana Consecutiva

101

BARLETTA

LOU

2 201

Straight Gree n Ticket Boleta Verde Consecutiva

NEAL

GALE

3

Straight Independent Ticket Bo leta Independiente Consecutiva

4

Straight Libertarian Ticket Boleta Libertario Consecutiva

DALE R

301

KERNS JR

PERSONAL CHOICE Eleccion Personal

5 501

(Vote for 1)

Senador de los Estados Unidos (Vote por 1)

GOVERNOR AND LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR

(Vote for the candidates of one party for Governor and Lieutenant Governor)

Write In Por Escrito TOM WOLF Governor

SCOTT R WAGNER Governor

PAUL GLOVER Governor

KEN V KRAWCHUK Governor

JOHN FETTERMAN Lt. Governor

JEFF BARTOS Lt. Governor

JOCOLYN BOWSER BOSTICK Lt. Governor

KATHLEEN S SMITH Lt. Governor

102

202

302

Gobernador y Vicegobernador

Write In Por Escrito

(Vote por los candidatos para Gobernador y Vicegobernador de un partido)

REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS 3rd District (Vote for 1)

502

DWIGHT

EVANS

103

BRYAN E

LEIB

203

Representante del Congreso Distrito 3 (Vote por 1)

3

REPRESENTATIVE IN THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY

MALCOLM

KENYATTA

181st District (Vote for 1)

Representante en la Asamblea General Distrito 181 (Vote por 1)

105

MILTON

STREET

205

Write In Por Escrito

2

In February, the Pennsylvania Supreme Court redrew the state’s congressional districts. Depending if you live east or west of Broad Street, you have different candidates for Congress. This year, both the 2nd and 3rd congressional districts, which include all of North Philadelphia, are up for election. The 3rd district candidates are Dwight Evans and Bryan Leib, and the 2nd district candidates are Brendan Boyle and David Torres.

Write In Por Escrito

SOURCE: Philadelphia City Commissioners, Ballotpedia.org

news@temple-news.com

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VOTER GUIDE

, 2018

PAGE B3

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

Ballot question

QUESTION

Should the City of Philadelphia borrow ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY-ONE MILLION DOLLARS ($181,000,000.00) to be spent for and toward capital purposes as follows: Transit; Streets and Sanitation; Municipal Buildings; Parks, Recreation and Museums; and Economic and Community Development?

Pregunta

CITY BOND QUESTION (Bill No. 180552) "Should the City of Philadelphia borrow ONE HUNDRED EIGHTYONE MILLION DOLLARS ($181,000,000.00) to be spent for and toward capital purposes as follows: Transit; Streets and Sanitation; Municipal Buildings; Parks, Recreation and Museums; and Economic and Community Development?"

Pregunta del Bono de la Ciudad (Proyecto de Ley Nro. 180552) "¿Cree usted que la Ciudad de Philadelphia debería pedir un préstamo de CIENTO OCHENTA Y UN MILLONES DE DÓLARES ($181,000,000.00) que se gastarán en y para fines capitales como se indica a continuación: tránsito, calles y saneamiento, edificios municipales, parques, recreación, museos y desarrollo económico y comunitario?"

City Council passed a bill on Sept. 13 to add a ballot question that, if approved, would allow the city to borrow up to $181 million to fund transit, parks and municipal buildings. If the question receives enough “yes” responses, the city could borrow the money from any bank or other appropriate institution. In the 2016 general election, Philadelphia asked voters an almost identical question — except that value was for $184 million, not $181 million, which passed. The funds would be divided just about the same way as they were in 2016, with nearly 57 percent of the money going to municipal buildings.

Where will that money go? Streets and sanitation $36.9 million

YES SI NO NO

Parks, recreation and museums $26.6 million

Economic and community development $14.6 million Municipal buildings $97.7 million Transit $5.2 million SOURCE: Philadelphia City Commissioners, Philadelphia City Council

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VOTER GUIDE PAGE B4

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

On the issues: U.S. Senate candidates The Candidates BOB CASEY (Incumbent) Casey supports green energy and a U.S.-led global climate protection initiative. He also supports increased border security but doesn’t think a policy to deport undocumented immigrants is viable. He wants to create a path to citizenship for law-abiding immigrants. In 2014, Casey pushed a Senate bill that would allow students to refinance their federal loan debts at a lower interest rate. He also supports the Affordable Care Act and prioritizes expanding health care access and sustaining Medicare funding.

LOU BARLETTA (Representative for the 11th Congressional District) Barletta wants to focus on Medicare for seniors, and wants to allow people to search for health care in different states. Barletta wants to reduce the federal government’s oversight of higher education. He also wanted to see President Donald Trump’s immigration reform bill pass through Congress. As mayor of Hazleton, Pennsylvania, Barletta signed a law that penalizes employers for hiring “illegal aliens,” and continues to stand by the legislation. He supported Trump’s move to pull out of the Paris climate agreement.

DALE KERNS Kerns is “for immigration” and would like to see more people become citizens through a simpler process. He also said he wants to abolish the Department of Education and “get [the federal government] out of the business of loaning money to students.” Kerns believes health care should be controlled by the individual to make providers and insurance companies compete for more affordable prices. Kerns’ platform doesn’t include anything about environmental issues.

Campaign Spending Individual spending $21,268,801.94 raised

Total money raised Bob Casey spent $16.8 million of the $21.2 million he raised. He accounts for nearly 80 percent of the funding in this year’s Pennsylvania Senate race.

$28,289,248.50

$16,881,201.24 spent

$6,811,656.94 raised

$6,184,893.25 spent

$208,025.62 raised

Lou Barletta raised nearly $7 million for his campaign and spent about $6.2 million of it. He spent about 90 percent of his campaign funds.

Dale Kerns spent nearly 94 percent of the more than $208,000 he raised for his campaign. He raised less than 1 percent of the Senate race’s funds.

$195,485.65 spent

NEAL GALE Gale’s platform emphasiezes climate change. He believes the energy industry should turn toward renewable sources, which would create jobs with longevity. He also believes immigration is too politicized and wants policies that both regulate who can come into the country and “state the value” immigrants bring to the U.S. Gale views Medicare as a basic right and thinks health care should go to a single-payer model. He wants to redirect some military funding toward education. All information is from a combination of interviews with candidates, their campaign websites or state records.

news@temple-news.com

$764 raised

Neal Gale spent $20 of the $764 he raised for his campaign. He accounts for less than 0.5 percent of the race’s fundraising.

$20 spent JULIE CHRISITE / THE TEMPLE NEWS SOURCE: Federal Elections Commission campaign finance database

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VOTER GUIDE PAGE B5

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

Congressional representatives take on issues 2nd Congressional District Brendan Boyle Democrat

David Torres Republican

3rd Congressional District Dwight Evans Democrat

Bryan Leib Republican

Affordable health care Boyle supports medical service partnerships — like more than $1 million in federal grants he worked to get the Fox Chase Cancer Center — in underserved neighborhoods.

Torres is primarily concerned with providing affordable health care for the elderly.

Evans supports affordable health care and voted against Trump’s rollback of the Affordable Care Act, which he thinks would take away health insurance from those who need it most.

Leib doesn’t support universal health care and would like to see government get out of individual health decisions to “let private industry grow and thrive,” he said.

Boyle would like the Environmental Protection Agency to re-initiate Obama-era clean air and water policies, which regulate air and water pollution, and re-enter a United Nations agreement to reduce the effects of climate change.

Torres said solar energy is the future of job growth in the city and country. He believes opportunities will open for companies and trade workers through energy innovation.

Evans believes public policy directly affects the environment. In Congress, he supported bills to reduce carbon emissions and make metro area transit systems more environmentally friendly.

Leib said the country should take steps to increase energy efficient infrastructure and use more nuclear, wind and solar energy.

Boyle believes infrastructure improvements should include technological innovation. He co-chairs Congress’ Blue Collar Caucus, a Democratic effort to engage working-class voters.

Torres believes funding for Amtrak improvements should be on the same page with the city’s transit needs.

Evans believes Congress should work on environmentally sustainable transit to provide jobs rather than fund highway expansion.

While Leib said he would “advocate for any type of infrastructure spending whatsoever,” he also wants to focus on school infrastructure in Philadelphia.

Environmental protection

Infrastructure improvements

All information is from a combination of interviews with candidates, their campaign websites or state records.

@TheTempleNews

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VOTER GUIDE PAGE B6

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

Governor candidates take on issues Higher education

Addiction crisis

Government accountability

Tom Wolf (Gov.) (Incumbent)

As governor, Wolf sent funding to technical programs that helped increase students’ credential earnings by 32 percent. Under Wolf’s administration, Temple’s state appropriations increased by more than $8 million.

Wolf declared the addiction crisis a statewide disaster emergency in January. He has also funded projects like a $1 million grant to Temple University Hospital’s Temple Recovery Using Scientific Treatments Clinic.

Wolf signed an executive order in January 2015 that prohibited any employee, appointee or official in the state’s Executive Branch from accepting gifts. In an email to The Temple News, he wrote he plans to expand that rule to all public officials in the state.

Scott Wagner (Gov.)

Wagner wants to focus on giving state-related schools budgets on time. He also plans to divert funding from the state’s employee pension program to education, and stop using property taxes as a source of funding.

Wagner announced a $15 million pay-for-success plan to fund recovery programs, which means programs only get money if they show positive results. He also wants to expand Telemedicine, which is the remote delivery of services through technology.

Wagner wants to focus on tracking how money is spent in Harrisburg. He also believes his plans to cut back on the state’s pension program will help curb corruption.

Krawchuk wants to change how schools and what he calls other “giveaway programs” are funded by establishing a Universal Charitable Credit Act, which allows people to outline specifically what they want their money to go to.

Krawchuk wants to pardon nonviolent drug offenders in Pennsylvania. He also wants to mimic Portugal, where all drugs are decriminalized and people can go to centers to test the purity of substances.

Krawchuk plans to commission a “business architect” to map how the government functions and list every action people make. He added the business architect would help improve transparency and make government more accessible to the public.

Glover supports a Pennsylvania student loan buyback program and wants to “take several million dollars of the state budget into extinguishing defaulted [student] loans,” he said. He also wants the state to fund environmentally friendly industries.

Glover wants to legalize marijuana and create member-sponsored medical cooperatives that use holistic care for treatment. He also wants to release all nonviolent drug offenders from prison.

Glover criticizes corporate donations in politics, and believes the best way to curb this is to bring in more political parties. He supported a 2013 bill called the “Voters’ Choice Act,” which aimed to eliminate signature requirements for minor party candidates.

John Fetterman (Lt. Gov.) Democrat

Jeff Bartos (Lt. Gov.) Republican

Ken V. Krawchuk (Gov.) Kathleen Smith (Lt. Gov.) Libertarian

Paul Glover (Gov.)

Jocolyn Bowser-Bostick (Lt. Gov.) Green

All information is from a combination of interviews with candidates, their campaign websites or state records.

news@temple-news.com

temple-news.com


VOTER GUIDE PAGE B7

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

On the issues: Race for the 181st District Kenyatta wants to take on Temple as an alum and North Philly native

N

orth Philadelphia native Malcolm Kenyatta started his service career when he was 11 and ran for a junior block captain position near 11th and Master. Kenyatta is running to fill the seat of long-time State Rep. Curtis Thomas, who is Kenyatta’s cousin. Thomas announced he’d retire in early April and immediately endorsed Kenyatta, who defeated four other Democratic candidates in the May primaries. That win made Kenyatta the state’s first openly gay person of color to win a state House primary in Pennsylvania. Kenyatta, a 2012 public communication alumnus, previously held a position in Philadelphia’s Chamber of Commerce, where he led the chamber’s diversity initiatives.

system is the biggest treatment provider to people struggling with addiction. “At this point, we have criminalized folks that are struggling and not gotten them the help that they need,” he added. Kenyatta wants to make sure that responses to addiction include resources for people who are addicted to substances other than opioids.

Milton Street focuses on party to achieve political goals

M

ilton Street entered this year’s 181st District race on the Republican ticket, yet another party switch for the long-time politician and activist. Street has already served as the 181st District representative, but as a Democrat in 1978. He then moved to the state Senate in 1980 as a Democrat. After being elected, he switched parties to Republican and joined the majority in the state House. “We don’t have anybody in the majority from the inner cities,” Street said. He added that he switches parties

ON THE STADIUM

Kenyatta said he opposes Temple’s proposed on-campus stadium, which might not happen for several years, as the university plans to return to talks with the Eagles. Temple will continue to pursue a special services district near Main Campus. “[The special services district] is something that needed to be done a long time ago,” Kenyatta said. “The mutual trust, mutual respect and doing things as a good neighbor, not because you’re going to get something in return. But because it’s the neighborly thing to do.”

ADDICTION CRISIS

In the four ZIP codes included in the 181st district, there were 127 overdose deaths in 2017, according to data from the Medical Examiner’s Office. “We need to look at this ... and deal with the substance abuse problem as what it is: a medical issue,” Kenyatta said, adding the Pennsylvania prison

MALCOLM KENYATTA

MILTON STREET

Democrat

MINIMUM WAGE

Kenyatta aims to raise the state’s minimum wage and include increases for cost of living. “$7.25 is a starvation level wage... you cannot raise a family on $14 to $15,000 a year,” he said. Kenyatta believes the minimum wage needs to increase to $15 per hour because people can’t access resources like education if they’re working two to three jobs at a time. “We need to be preparing our kids to pursue their dreams and to do all that they want to do,” Kenyatta said. “But you can’t do that if parents and families are struggling paycheck to paycheck.”

Republican

to align with the majority party because he believes “the minority get their say, but the majority get their way.” Street is the brother of former Philadelphia Mayor and current political science professor John Street. Milton Street is also known for his push to legalize video betting terminals, which he believes will be able to fund schools and replace the city’s sugary drink tax.

ON THE STADIUM

Milton Street doesn’t see the proposed on-campus stadium as something the university could feasibly fit in a residential part of North Philadelphia. “Well, the stadium itself it’s just a

‘no’ for me, it’s like trying to put a 25 pound in a five-pound bag,” he said. “It’s just not enough room in the inner city for traffic problems. What do you do when you want to try to bring [35,000] people into a stadium and you and your main corridor’s Broad Street?” Milton Street added he’s “for football” and he believes the athletic program helps Temple, but he doesn’t have any alternatives to help Temple come up with an alternative place to play.

ADDICTION CRISIS

Milton Street views the addiction crisis as a mental health issue and believes it should be easier for family members to take power of attorney for a person suffering from addiction. “I don’t like to take the power of choice from anybody, but I think there’s got to be a standard where we can measure one’s ability to process and to make rational decisions and turn the power that power of authority over to a loved one that’s going to function in our best interest in terms of the drug use,” he said. However, he doesn’t support Philadelphia’s overdose prevention site, which aims to provide overdose prevention and treatment services and a safe place for people to use drugs under medical supervision.

MINIMUM WAGE

Milton Street supports a $15 minimum wage but also wants to explore a $10 minimum wage with health care benefits. “One of the things about the minimum wage is you can raise it to $15, now $17, now $18, whatever you want, they’re going to pass it on to the public,” he said. “I always try to balance, ‘What will be the best approach?’”

All information is from a combination of interviews with candidates, their campaign websites or state records.

@TheTempleNews

news@temple-news.com


VOTER GUIDE PAGE B8

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

Voting at the polls Voting rights and polling place rules

First-time voters, or those voting for the first time in a new precinct, need to bring an ID, but a photo ID isn’t required. Non-photo IDs need to include your name and address.

are broken, you can cast an emergency paper ballot. If the paper ballot isn’t offered, you can ask for one.

If your name doesn’t appear in the poll book, the poll workers should contact the County Board of Elections to correct any mistakes. You have the right to a provisional ballot if you believe you should be listed at that precinct.

You have the right to literacy and foreign language assistance without an “assistance permitted” designation in the poll book. You also have the right to refuse assistance.

If at least half of the machines in your polling place

If your identity or address is challenged, you can vote by signing a challenge affidavit and providing a witness who is a registered voter in your precinct to vouch for you. If you can’t produce a witness, you have the right to a provisional ballot.

People who have misdemeanor or felony convictions are allowed to vote if they are out of jail or

prison. If you’re on house arrest, you can vote with an absentee ballot. You can also vote if you’re on probation or parole. You can report intimidation, harassment or discriminatory conduct to the Department of State at 1-877-868-3772. You are technically allowed to take photos of yourself voting, however, you shouldn’t post them on social media until after you’ve left the building. The polls close at 8 p.m. but if you’re in line by then, you have the right to cast your vote. Do not get out of line if this happens.

Nearby polling places POTTER THOMAS SCHOOL 3001 N 6th St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

NO PHILA 7TH DAY ADVENTIST 1510 W Oxford St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

HEALTH CENTER DISTRICT 05 1900 N 20th St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

HARTRANFT SCHOOL 720 W Cumberland St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

GRAY MANOR 1600 N 8th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

NORRIS HOMES 1915 N 11th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

8TH & DIAMOND ST REC CTR 800 Diamond St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

NAT’L TEMPLE BAPTIST CHURCH 1628 Master St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

WOODSTOCK COMMUNITY CENTER 1924 N Woodstock St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

DENDY REC CTR 10th & Jefferson. Philadelphia, PA 19104

AMOS RECREATION CENTER 1817 N 16th St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

MOORE MANOR SR HOME 1999 Ridge Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19121

JOHNSON HOMES (PHA) 2500 W Norris St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

W D KELLEY SCHOOL 1601 N 28th St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

12TH & CAMBRIA RECREATION CTR 2901 N 12th St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

DUCKREY SCHOOL 1501 Diamond St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

CHURCH OF THE ADVOCATE GYM 2121 N Gratz St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

LOVE ZION BAPT CHURCH 2521 N 23rd St. Philadelphia, PA 19132

GIDEON SCHOOL N 29th St & W Glenwood Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19121

MASTERY CLYMER CHARTER SCHOOL 1201 Rush St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

AME UNION METHODIST CHURCH 1614 Jefferson St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH 2259 N 10th St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

KIPP PHILA CHARTER SCHOOL 2539 N 16th St. Philadelphia, PA 19132

THE SARTAIN APTS 3017 W Oxford St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

PENROSE RECREATION CENTER 1101 W Susquehanna Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19122

BROWN COMMUNITY CENTER 1701 N 8th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

CECIL B MOORE RECREATION CTR 2551 N 22nd St. Philadelphia, PA 19132

HANK GATHERS RECREATION CTR 2501 W Diamond St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

COMMUNITY CENTER 3018 N Percy St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

YORKTOWN APARTMENTS 1300 W Jefferson St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

BENTLEY HALL (PHA) 1728 N Croskey St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

RAYMOND ROSEN COMM CENTER 2301 Edgley St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

MORRIS CHAPEL BAPT CHURCH 2701 N 12th St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

BLAINE SCHOOL 3001 W Berks St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

CRUZ RECREATION CENTER 1430 N 5th St. Philadelphia, PA 19122

CARVER SCHOOL ENGINR & SCIENCE 1600 W Norris St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

OLD ST ELIZABETHS SCHOOL 1801 N 23rd St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

BEAUTY SALON 2751 Germantown Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19133

VERNON MARKS HOUSE 3226 Clifford St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

SUSQUEHANNA VILLAGE 1421 W Susquehanna Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19121

MEADE SCHOOL 1600 N 18th St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

FAIRHILL APTS COMMUNITY CENTER 2411 N 11th St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

DUPREE FUNERAL HOME 2809 W Diamond St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

STRAWBERRY MANSION SCHOOL 3133 Ridge Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19132

CHURCH OF FAITH & DELIVERANCE 1510 W Stiles St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

FOSTER MEMORIAL BAPT CHURCH 2401 N 18th St. Philadelphia, PA 19132

EVANGELICAL TEMPLE WORSHIP CTR 2428 N Fairhill St. Philadelphia, PA 19133

WARNOCK VILLAGE 2862 Germantown Ave. Philadelphia, PA 19133

MANDER RECREATION CENTER 2140 N 33rd St. Philadelphia, PA 19121

Look at polling places online with our interactive map at temple-news.com

SOURCE: Pennsylvania Department of State, ACLU of Pennsylvania Editor’s Note: Deputy City Editor Will Bleier is an organizing fellow for the Pennsylvania Democratic Party. He took no part in the editing or reporting of this project. Deputy Campus Editor Alyssa Biederman previously canvassed for the Pennsylvania Democratic Party. She took no part in the editing or reporting of this project.

news@temple-news.com

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FEATURES PAGE 13

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

MUSIC

Choral composition explores racial equity, justice The music education department chair’s work is inspired by W.E.B. Du Bois’s prose on freedom and civil rights. BY MICHAELA ALTHOUSE For The Temple News Rollo Dilworth has always gravitated toward words. Spellbound by the power and influence they have on people, he wrote “Credo,” a choral piece inspired by a social justice essay on racial inequality. “I’m always trying to get people to think and reflect,” said Dilworth, the chair of the Boyer College of Music and Dance’s Department of Music Education and Music Therapy. “That’s what art is supposed to do.” The piece is a three-movement, 12-minute choral work with accompanying piano. It will premiere on Saturday in a performance by the Mendelssohn Club of Philadelphia at the Church of the Holy Trinity on Walnut Street near Rittenhouse Square as part of the club’s annual “American Stories: I Believe” series. “Credo” is set to the text of scholar and civil rights activist W.E.B. Du Bois’s 1904 prose poem of the same name. In

the nearly 500-word text, Du Bois discusses his beliefs about freedom, nonviolence and racial equality. Dilworth uses modern jazz to bring the poem to the present and to life. Each movement, which is a division of the larger piece, of “Credo” represents a different style of traditionally African-American music. Paul Rardin, the chair of Boyer College of Music and Dance’s Vocal Arts Department, described movement one — “I Believe in God” — as jazz, movement two — “I Believe in Service” — as inspired by blues and the third — “I Believe in Liberty” — as gospel music. Dilworth said he believes Du Bois’s work is still highly relevant in modern society and is using his piece to connect the racial issues of Du Bois’s time to today’s political climate. “I do hope that it will allow us the opportunity to hold a mirror up to ourselves as a society and think about what our responsibilities are in terms of how we treat one another,” Dilworth added. The Mendelssohn Club commissioned Dilworth’s piece for the event, which will also feature a reprise of Dilworth’s 2011 “Rain Sequence” based on poems by Langston Hughes and Paul Laurence Dunbar. Dilworth said he will hold a teaching session with the audi-

ence on Saturday so they can sing along during the finale. Rardin, who is also the artistic director of the Mendelssohn Club, will conduct “Credo.” “The singers and I are just loving it,” Rardin said. “It’s one of those pieces that makes you feel great singing it. It’s uplifting.” Although the language in Du Bois’s poem is outdated compared to modern prose, Dilworth said he believes Du Bois’s ideas of inclusivity are current. “I hope it will resonate with people in 2018 and help them to understand where we were back then historically, but also to take a look at where we are now and see if his belief statement has come true in a passable and meaningful way,” Dilworth said. The Gleeksman-Kohn Children’s choir will also join the performance, which honors the late prominent American composer Leonard Bernstein’s 100th birthday. The Mendelssohn Club started the “American Stories” concert series about two years ago to look at diversity in American music, Rardin said. “The music that we’re doing before Rollo’s music is different enough, but also exciting enough, that the audience is going to have a real feast of different

HARSHITA BRAGADEESH Freshman business student

VOICES

What issue do you care most about in the midterm election?

If Trump is serious about redefining or restricting gender, then we should focus on that this election and vote according to our beliefs on that.

KEVIN KAMISENDU Sophomore international business administration major

I’m not American, so I’m a little detached from everything that’s happening. But I really care about economic equality, so if a candidate was concerned with decreasing poverty, I’d vote for them.

@TheTempleNews

things,” Rardin said. “[They’re] very rich dishes.” The 100-person Mendelssohn Choir, made up almost entirely of volunteers, rehearsed “Credo” weekly since September. Rardin and Dilworth invited the Gleeksman-Kohn Children’s Choir to include more local singers. Rae Ann Anderson is the conductor and director of the children’s choir, which she founded in 2006. She said the children have enjoyed working directly with Dilworth, and they continue singing the text even as they leave rehearsals. “By adding children to the choir and to this performance, it really adds a sincerity of what the text is meant to mean,” Anderson said. “It speaks.” For Dilworth, the opportunity to share Du Bois’s work through music is the chance to connect with the audience on a deeper level than just through words. “Music is an art form that allows us to express ourselves,” Dilworth said. “It allows us to explore other cultures, other worlds, other thoughts that are out there. But it also helps us to learn more about who we are as human beings. michaela.althouse@temple.edu @michaela_kla

JEREMY CARABALLO Senior finance major

Health care, because right now it’s uncertain with the Affordable Care Act and it getting repealed. We’ll see the new Congress, how they feel toward it and what they can do to progress and have universal health care for the country.

JENNIFER MOHR Sophomore computer science major

Gun control lately just [with] everything happening and obviously, our government’s not really doing anything about it. I want people to be elected who are going to do something about it and help restrict how many people have guns and how they get the guns. features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 14

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

LIVE IN PHILLY

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS

South Street Fall PumpkinFest brings Halloween festivities to Society Hill

The South Street Headhouse District hosted its annual Fall PumpkinFest under the Headhouse Shambles on 2nd Street near Lombard Street on Saturday. The event included costume contests, face painting, a pumpkin pie eating contest, mini golf and a hay bale maze. “It’s nice to have something in the neighborhood where the kids can do lots of activities, do crafts and get to enjoy the Halloween season,” said Society Hill resident Reynelle Staley, 42. The event also included acts from children’s performers like Mystique the Magician and Rebel Rabbit, while local band The Cheddar Boys performed bluegrass music. Philadelphia Brewing Company and Old Pine Community Center helped orchestrate the festival, at which the movies “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms” and the “Incredibles 2” were promoted. Germantown resident Justin Reaves, 26, attended the event with his 6-year-old daughter Nalaya. “I like how different vendors made a lot of different activities,” he said. Despite some rain throughout the day, event producer Mark Beyerle said the event ran smoothly after being moved to cover under the Shambles. features@temple-news.com

temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 15

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

ELECTION

Canceled classes give students more time to vote Some professors are canceling classes so students can turn out to the polls. BY EMMA PADNER For The Temple News Matthew Stein thinks it’s important to give students at least an hour and 20 minutes to go vote on Election Day. Students may have difficulty getting to the polls, especially if they have hectic schedules, said Stein, a political science instructor and doctoral political science student. He wants to give students the time they need, so he’s canceling his classes next Tuesday. This semester, Stein teaches an Introduction to Political Philosophy course. He said he always cancels classes on Election Day so students have the chance to get to the polls between their classes and jobs. “The feedback’s been positive because people want to either help out on campaigns, help out on Election Day or vote on Election Day,” Stein added. There is no university-wide policy canceling classes to give students time to hit the polls, but Temple University professors can choose to do so. Before the 2016 presidential election, students unsuccessfully petitioned the university on Change.org for classes to be canceled on Election Day. Some schools like Columbia University designate the day before the election as an academic holiday and Election Day as a university holiday. For other colleges, the decision to cancel class is often the professor’s choice. Joshua Lachewitz, a second-year law student, said some of his professors will record their classes next Tuesday and put them online so students can use class time to go to the polls. “People said that we would prefer to have class anyway because there were only a few people that were worried they would not be able to make it,” Lachewitz said. Many other democracies around the @TheTempleNews

KATE MCCANN / FILE PHOTO A voter casts a ballot on Election Day in 2012. Some professors have canceled their Tuesday class sessions to ensure students can make it to the polls on Nov. 6.

world, like Australia, Brazil and Greece, hold elections during a weekend so more people can vote, according to ThinkProgress, a news website operated by the Center for American Progress Action Fund. Political science professor Michael Hagen doesn’t have any classes this Election Day, but said he has canceled class in the past to give students time to get to the polls. “I’d like to be able to provide people with the specific opportunity to go and vote, and I like to do what I can to encourage people to start voting at a young age,” Hagen said. Madeline Colker, a senior English and media studies and production major, is registered to vote in Philadelphia and plans to vote during a short break between classes. “Our opinion is going to set the course for America for the next generation or so,” Colker said. “We need to be heard now.” Chris Smith, a junior political sci-

ence major and the president of Temple College Republicans, said he doesn’t think Temple should require professors to cancel classes, but professors should consider it. “So many people our age don’t vote and that’s terrible,” he said. “Any opportunity that Temple could give us to get out there and get our vote out is a good opportunity.” Earlier this semester, Temple College Republicans collaborated with Temple College Democrats to increase student and youth voter registration rates through #VoteThatJawn, a citywide campaign, Smith said. More than 10 partners participated in the initiative to turn out the youth vote, including the Klein College of Media and Communication, The Philadelphia Citizen and WURD Radio. “If I could get a couple of students who are on the fence to go to the polls on Election Day, and maybe get an idea [of the] responsibility that they have as a citizen of the United States, well then

I think that’s worth canceling a class and making it up later in the semester,” Hagen said. William Clark, a junior metals/jewelry/CAD-CAM major, said professors should keep in mind commuters like himself who vote at polling places far from campus. He plans to vote around 7 a.m. before class. “Voter turnout is really low,” Clark said. “Part of that is because we have a lot of shift jobs and schoolwork that gets in the way. I think school professors should make it as easy as possible for students to get out there and vote.” For Stein, canceling class is an incentive for young voters who don’t feel like their voices are heard. “If we can get more young folks out to the polls, then politicians have to pay attention to the age groups that have younger people,” Stein said. emma.padner@temple.edu @emmapadner

features@temple-news.com


FEATURES PAGE 16

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

STUDENT LIFE

Trans students express fear, anger at Trump policy The proposed policy would bar transgender and gender non-conforming people from receiving health benefits. BY CLAIRE WOLTERS Intersection Editor Ari Rubinson publicly came out as transgender two weeks ago, but the current political climate played a role in his choice not to do so sooner. “The LGBTQ community felt a surge of feeling safe and feeling supported by their community a couple years ago,” said Rubinson, a junior nursing major. “Now, we’ve kind of swiped the switch completely and we’re scared and unsure of what the future really holds for us.” President Donald Trump’s administration is considering a regulation to define gender as exclusively male or female, The New York Times reported last week. If adopted, the regulation would remove transgender and gender non-conforming citizens from Title IX anti-discrimination protections under federal law. The proposal would roll back a 2015 regulation under the Affordable Care Act, which made it unlawful to discriminate on the basis of gender identity. It would also reverse course on the interpretation of long-standing antidiscrimination laws. The LBGTQ community and its allies were outraged and hurt, taking to social media with the hashtag #WontBeErased. On Oct. 23, hundreds of protesters turned out at Love Park to show their support for transgender people in the city. Temple students in the transgender community said they were scared — but not surprised — by the news. “We’re living under a government that, quite frankly, is not respecting people and their right to choose who they are and their right to express who features@temple-news.com

MAGGIE LOESCH / THE TEMPLE NEWS A pride flag waves high above the crowd at OutFest, a street festival celebrating LGBTQ pride, in Philadelphia’s Gayborhood on the afternoon of Sunday, Oct. 7, 2018.

they are,” Rubinson said. Rubinson is getting top surgery in a few weeks to remove his chest, which is partially covered by his healthcare provider, United Health Care. He’s worried the surgery won’t be funded for transgender people who receive federal healthcare if President Trump’s proposal is adopted. “At first I was really scared [and then] that fear turned into anger,” said Gared Harbison, a senior criminal justice major and the president of the student organization Students for Trans Awareness and Rights. Tony Clark, a junior history major and the social media coordinator for Queer People of Color, said QPOC discussed the potential ramifications of the proposal on the transgender community at their general body

meeting on Wednesday. “We started off our semester with some light-hearted topics to get the semester into gear,” Clark said. “Now, with everything that’s charging politically, we will be talking more about how to protect ourselves and what to do if these legislations get passed.” “We aren’t always going to be here… but future generations… we owe it to them to make our voices heard,” he added. “Yes, trans people are here, we exist, we have existed, we continue to exist.” For Heath Fogg Davis, the director of the Gender, Sexuality, and Women’s Studies program and author of “Beyond Trans: Does Gender Matter,” it’s important to educate students on the governmental process needed to turn this regulation into a final rule.

He added the media’s sensationalization of this issue detracts from its explanation of the facts. “The report in the New York Times, as the media does often, didn’t delve into the real details about what a memo like this really means [and] whether or not a rule like this can actually be adopted,” Davis said. For a regulation to be approved, it must first be listed in the Federal Register and in the Agencies’ official docket on Regulations.gov, where it is then open to public comment and discussion. Next, the agency reviews comments and alters the regulation as needed before issuing a final rule, according to a step-by-step explanation by the EPA. Once a final rule is issued, it is codified and added to the Code of Federal Regulations. “The Department of Health and Human Services has called on the ‘Big Four’ agencies that enforce some part of Title IX — the Departments of Education, Justice, Health and Human Services and Labor — to adopt its definition in regulations,” according to the New York Times. Davis said each of these agencies must go through separate approval processes. The regulation is yet to be listed in the Federal Register. “Social media is an incredibly effective medium, but can also stir a lot of panic,” Davis said. “There is reason to be disturbed, and upset and energized to continue to fight, [but] I would caution against despair.” But for Harbison, the proposal alone is disheartening for the LGBTQIA community, even if the regulation doesn’t become an official ruling. “I feel like it’s not going to [happen],” Harbison said. “But that could just be hope.” clairewolters@temple.edu @ClaireWolters

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INTERSECTION TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

PAGE 17

CLAIRE WOLTERS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

HAIR

Natural hair movement encourages self-love

with straight hair could wear it at shoulThe movement gained popularity your hair in its natural state much less go for more representation in media.” to work and obtain a husband. ...Now, Samantha Lorenzo, a freshman neuder length, but the school made him in the early 2000s and is followed there’s very positive messaging that your roscience major, said some people still keep his curly hair short. by several students today.

BY RHIANNON RIVAS For The Temple News

C

urly hair is more than just a fashion choice. It’s a political statement. The natural hair movement began in the early 2000s as a celebration of the unique texture of Black hair. It now serves as an escape from societal pressures that idolize straight hair. A 2016 study by the Perception Institute, which conducts research on racial, gender and ethnic identities, found that out of the 4,163 participants, “the majority...regardless of race, show implicit bias against black women’s textured hair.” Lori Tharps, a Temple University journalism professor and co-author of “Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America,” said Black women have been told their hair is “ugly and inappropriate for public consumption.” “You couldn’t even be seen with @TheTempleNews

natural hair is beautiful, that it is manageable,” Tharps said. Jennifer Mota, a 2018 journalism alumna, and Darlene Duran, a 2018 psychology alumna, organized a “Curl Meetup” in August for people of varying hair textures, races and ages to talk about their relationships with their hair. Duran said they organized the meetup to serve Philadelphia’s natural hair community. Mota added that she credits the Black Panther movement of the 1960s for influencing the natural hair movement of the 2000s. The Black Panther Party was a 1960s African-American revolutionary group against police brutality and other forms of oppression placed on Blacks by white Americans. “Now we actually have it a little bit easier, and the generation after us is going to have it a little bit easier,” Mota said. “But we still have to keep these conversations aware, we have to fight

say her hair “looks messy,” or ask questions like, “What do you do with it?” and “Can I touch it?” “I’ve had people who didn’t understand or didn’t see curly hair often,” Lorenzo said. She added that she feels it’s more socially acceptable to have curly hair now than before. “You can just be yourself,” Lorenzo said. Doriana Diaz, a junior gender, sexuality and women’s studies major and co-founder of The Side by Side Collective, a holistic wellness group for women of color, said the natural hair movement offers her a sense of independence. “I didn’t know what being natural meant to me,” Diaz said regarding her experience before the movement. Kaelon Soto, a freshman neuroscience major, said he also faced prejudice for having curly hair. Soto attended a Catholic high school before college where, he said, students

“If I had a mini Afro, I had to cut it,” Soto said. “[Today] in the workplace, it’s a little more acceptable to have dreads or ethnic-styled hair.” Asia Lambert, a senior journalism major, said women used to be told they were “ghetto” if they wore their hair naturally. Now if someone doesn’t wear their hair naturally, they are considered a sell-out. “Natural hair is a growing lifestyle, and a lot of Black women, and just women period, are embracing their natural hair,” Lambert said. “But I think that there’s a stigma now against women that don’t wear their natural hair.” “There’s something very profound in that,” Diaz added. “When you’re learning about your hair, you’re learning about your womanhood, you’re learning about your blackness and you’re learning about self-love.” rhiannon.rivas@temple.edu @strrongr

intersection@temple-news.com


INTERSECTION PAGE 18

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

THE ESSAYIST

Leaving relaxers, finding beauty in the ‘big chop’ Relaxers damaged my Doing the “big chop” A student shares her hair. The chemical treatments forced me to care for my hair journey within the altered my hair’s natural in an entirely new way. I went natural hair movement. texture to a permanently through trials and errors

BY ALEXIS PEELE For The Temple News Growing up, I attended primarily white schools with barely any kids who looked like me. Being a Black girl in these schools took a toll on how I viewed myself and perceived beauty. At the time, I didn’t know what made me dislike the way my curly hair stood out in class photos or the protective hairstyles my mother gave me. All I knew was that I wanted a change — to feel normal among my peers or to have a day where I felt like my hair was just as pretty as every other girl’s in my class. In middle school, I asked my mom to let me get a relaxer, a hair treatment that chemically alters the curl pattern of your hair, making it completely straight. I thought I found the solution to beauty. For years I kept this routine going, chemically changing my natural hair to make it bone straight. I no longer worried about standing out from my classmates or answering questions about my hair. I was happy — until I wasn’t.

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straightened state by breaking the disulfide bonds found inside each hair fiber and reshaping them. Relaxed hair is prone to thinning, breakage, scalp irritation and more. Not only did I erase the natural state of my hair, I damaged it — and, for what? In my freshman year of high school, my perspective changed. After years of relaxers and salon visits, I began asking myself why I started getting relaxers in the first place. I had grown so accustomed to my chemically processed hair that I forgot what my curls looked and felt like. I started to realize I wanted a relaxer because I thought my natural hair wasn’t pretty and because I wanted to fit in. I viewed European beauty standards as the rulebook for all things pretty. These views were wrong. Being different and standing out made me, me. I finally let myself acknowledge this when I took on the “big chop,” cutting off all of the relaxed parts of my hair, two weeks before my freshman year at Temple. Initially, I was shocked. My natural hair was shorter than ever before. It was curly and soft, which was new for me.

to find new products, like leave-in conditioners, that suited my new strands. But I finally saw my hair for what it actually was. The experience of leaving relaxers to care for my natural hair sent me on a rollercoaster of emotions. I had to be uncomfortable at first, and then learn how to care for my hair. I met other people with natural hair at Temple whose guidance made the transition easier. What made this experience so beautiful was learning to love my authentic self. The natural hair movement ignited the process of finding myself and helped me discover exactly what made me want to hide it in the first place. It’s much easier to be yourself than pretend to be something you’re not. For me, that was my hair. The journey to natural hair is different for everyone and can be done for various reasons. Not having natural hair does not mean a person is unhappy with themselves or is trying to fit into a beauty standard. Not all journeys are the same, and that is OK. alexis.peele@temple.edu SHEFA AHSAN / THE TEMPLE NEWS Alexis Peele, a sophomore advertising major and blog exeuctive for Campus Curlz, wrote an essay about her relationship with her natural hair.

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INTERSECTION PAGE 19

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

FILM

New Netflix film depicts natural hair movement “Nappily Ever After” shows a Ethnicity in American Cinema, said the influences how she is treated and per- Black women in this culture...we’ve been Black woman’s exploration with portrayal of Black women in “Nappily ceived. When Violet Jones wore her hair told that our hair is not beautiful because Ever After” was more realistic than past long and straight, she was treated with it does not look like the European stannatural hair. BY ALESIA BANI For The Temple News

respect. “She was seen, she was appreciated, she was acknowledged when she had that Barbie-doll hair,” Tharps said. “When she didn’t, suddenly she became invisible. She became the Black invisible woman.” Tharps said the film highlights relevant issues, like restrictions imposed on Black women in the corporate world. More Black women are employed in management or other similar positions than in the past, but are still less represented than white and non-hispanic women in similar positions, according to a 2016 report by the Women’s Bureau of the United States Department of Labor. “Content makers, journalists, media makers have to continuously educate the public to show them the truth of what it means to see a Black woman wearing natural hair,” Tharps said. “It’s not dangerous, antithetical to progress or professionalism or educational excellence. Lathan, the movie’s lead actress, echoed this in an interview with CNN in September. “Beauty obviously plays into self-esteem and self-worth,” Lathan said. “As

dard, which is long and straight.” Tharps said the goal is not that everyone must wear their natural hair, but that people should be able to wear whatever they want. “We should stop policing women about their hair,” she added. India Green, a junior media studies and production major and president of Campus Curlz, a natural hair and service-based student organization, said the film resonated with her. “Although I didn’t do the ‘big chop,’ I did begin to look more into myself and not associate my identity with my hair,” Green said. Green added that a big aspect missing from the film was education about the movement beyond entertainment. “I don’t think that every Black woman should be out here promoting natural hair if they don’t feel the need to be natural,” Green said. “It’s not a journey you have to go on. But, if you do want and you do believe in that journey, then I think that it is your duty to encourage other women.” alesiabani1@temple.edu

EMMA STEVENS / THE TEMPLE NEWS

When drunk and fed-up Violet Jones shaves her head in the pivotal scene of “Nappily Ever After,” the fictional character illustrates the experiences of many Black women who embrace their natural hair. “Nappily Ever After,” which premiered on Netflix this September, explores one woman’s journey through the natural hair movement, which encourages women of African descent to keep their natural Afro-textured hair. Violet Jones, played by actress Sanaa Lathan, undergoes the “big chop,” which is the process of cutting off chemically treated hair and opting for a natural hairstyle. Unlike other films that address this movement, “Nappily Ever After,” is performed and directed by women of color and is based off a book written by Trisha R. Thomas, a Black woman. Shari Thompson, a film and media arts instructor who teaches Race and

productions like Chris Rock’s 2009 documentary “Good Hair,” in which he interviews Black celebrities and visits hair salons, stylist competitions and an Indian temple to learn about hair culture. Thompson added that “Nappily Ever After” is a better representation than Spike Lee’s 1988 film “School Daze,” where two groups of women hash out the appearance of their hair, debating between curly or straight hair versus tightly coiled and kinky hair in a musical number called “Good & Bad Hair.” Thompson said that unlike the films by Spike and Rock, “Nappily Ever After” evoked a different sensitivity because it was directed and performed with a woman’s perspective on struggles of transitioning to natural hair. Viola Davis taking off her wig and makeup in “How To Get Away With Murder” in 2014 is another portrayal of this emotional experience, Thompson said. Journalism professor Lori Tharps, the co-author of “Hair Story: Untangling the Roots of Black Hair in America,” said “Nappily Ever After” accurately represented how a Black woman’s hairstyle

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INTERSECTION PAGE 20

THE ESSAYIST

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

Society can’t pin down my pajón

Rhiannon Rivas, a freshman journalism major, wrote an essay about how she found confidence in her natural Dominican hair.

A student reflects on how she learned to care for and accept her natural Dominican hair. BY RHIANNON RIVAS For The Temple News My curly hair has always been a battlefield. I was trained from an early age to make it look as straight as possible. I used relaxers, blow dryers, rolos — slang for hair rollers — irons and whatever else could tame the pajón, a popular word that means Afro-styled hair. If “beauty is pain,” I welded myself into the fairest of them all. I grew accustomed to the heat of relaxers singeing my skin. I was numb to the burn marks on my face and neck. I even ignored a scar on my forehead from when my skin melted off along with a hair clip at the salon. I created a set of rules to keep my

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hair straight. So did my community. I couldn’t exercise for fear of sweating. I couldn’t walk in the rain or snow. On the rare occasion I ventured to the pool or beach, I couldn’t enter the water. What I could and couldn’t do revolved around my hair. Growing up in a Dominican household exaggerated these challenges. My family would rather go outside naked than publicly display their natural hair. Some Dominicans, my family included, will swear they are 100 percent white, even though features like our hair say otherwise. In an effort to hide our African roots, Dominicans prioritize straight hair over enjoying life. After my mother granted me the freedom to style my natural hair, I searched on YouTube for ways to maintain it. I spent hours looking at how white women styled their wavy hair and mimicked them by lathering my hair in gel and hairspray. Eventually, one of my middle school

classmates gave me a bottle of “Pelo Chino,” and I started to treat my hair better, focusing less on getting rid of frizz and more on conditioning it. Over time, more people of color made Youtube videos, and I finally found “SunKissAlba,” who is Dominican with hair similar to mine. Seeing her gave me hope. I felt less alone in my journey to stop relaxing my hair, and it gave me the willpower to ignore every ignorant comment that came my way. People told me that I looked unkempt and unprofessional, but I knew those were lies. When I moved to Rittenhouse Square in 2016 with my family, I quickly realized we were one of the only families of color in our neighborhood. My natural hair was looked down upon. For the first time when I walked down the street, I felt people staring at me. I saw their looks of disgust and fear when I walked on the same block as they did. To stop this, my family practically begged me to go back to straightening

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my hair. They still do. They felt that if I looked more European, I would be treated better. This time, I refused to listen. The movement is my safe haven. I am more focused on living my life than worrying about revealing my natural hair, which I once kept secret. This August, at a “Curl Meetup” in Rittenhouse Square, I joined in solidarity with people of varying hair textures, races and ages. The circle of women with curly hair kept expanding as the meeting went on, all sharing their reasons for embracing their natural hair. I was in awe. To see people with hair like mine, in a space I felt alien in, made me feel like I was finally valid. rhiannon.rivas@temple.edu @strrongr

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SPORTS

PAGE 21

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

WOMEN’S SOCCER

Goalie leads conference heading into playoffs In the last five games Morgan Basileo started, she did not allowed more than two goals in a game. BY ALEX McGINLEY Women’s Soccer Beat Reporter

allowed. Temple has six shutouts as a team, but Basileo did not finish the other two games. Despite starting all but two games this season, Basileo does not take her starting role for granted. She knows if she is having a bad game, senior Jordan Nash can step in. Nash started 38 games from 2015-17 but has only started in two games this season — Sept. 9 against Boston College and Senior Day against No. 22 Memphis on Oct. 21. Nash’s presence as a backup has pushed Basileo to work harder, O’Connor said. “Fear is a great motivator,” O’Connor said. “A lot of Morgan’s success has been the fact that Jordan has pushed her so hard because she knows if she has a bad [game], Jordan is right there waiting. She’s never been able to get comfortable with being the starter.” Last season, Basileo saved 69 shots, while allowing 21 goals in 14 games. She did not play during her freshman year.

Basileo credits her defensive teammates for a lot of her success this season. The Owls’ defenders include seniors Kelcie Dolan and Kat McCoy, junior Emily Keitel and sophomores Natalie Druehl, Marissa DiGenova and Aisha Brown. “The way our backline plays, we’re all very much one unit,” Basileo said. “Having them sacrificing themselves, blocking shots and making my saves easier is all you can ask for as a goalie.” Basileo’s 92 saves lead The American. Basileo is 20 saves ahead of Tulsa sophomore Mica Mackay, who is in second place. Despite leading the conference in saves, Basileo is more focused on how successful the team can be going forward. “I don’t really care about those kinds of stats,” Basileo said. “I want to see us do well as a whole.” alex.mcginley@temple.edu @mcginley_alex

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Temple women’s soccer will make its first appearance in the American Athletic Conference tournament since 2015 on Wednesday. The Owls (7-10-1, 3-5-1 The American) will face Central Florida (9-6-1, 6-3 The American) at 4:30 p.m. in a firstround matchup between No. 6 Temple and No. 3 UCF. South Florida, the No. 18 team in the United Soccer Coaches poll and the top seed in the tournament, will host the tournament. To exceed in the conference play, Coach Seamus O’Connor said having a goalkeeper like junior Morgan Basileo is vital. Two teams from The American — USF and Memphis — are ranked in the top 25 of Division I in goals. In the last five games Basileo started,

she hasn’t allowed more than two goals in a game and recorded two shutouts. Basileo had 29 saves in that stretch and posted a .879 save percentage. Temple earned seven of its 10 conference points in Basileo’s last five games. Temple beat Tulsa, 1-0 on Oct. 18. Basileo was named the conference goalkeeper of the week after her performance in Temple’s 1-0 double-overtime win against USF on Sept. 30. Basileo recorded six saves against USF, which was ranked No. 19 at the time of the match. The last time the Owls made The American’s tournament, they lost to UCF, 2-1, in the first round on Nov. 3, 2015. This season, the Knights beat Temple, 2-1, on Sept. 27 at the Temple Sports Complex. Temple still qualified for the conference tournament, despite losing three of its last four games of the season. In those games, the Owls conceded three goals. Basileo is looking to continue her success in goal. In 16 games this year, she has four shutouts, 92 saves and 18 goals

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SPORTS PAGE 22

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

FOOTBALL

Temple, UCF fight for top spot in East Division The two teams are undefeated in conference play entering Thursdays matchup. BY SAM NEUMANN Co-Sports Editor Temple University and Central Florida have a short history playing each other. They never played before the 2013 season, the American Athletic Conference’s inaugural year. But each of the five years they’ve played one another, they had conference championship aspirations on the line. On Thursday night in Orlando, Florida, the two schools will fight for first place in the East Division. UCF, the defending conference champion, enters the game as an 11-point favorite over Temple (5-3, 4-0 American Athletic Conference), according to Westgate Las Vegas Superbook. The Knights, (7-0, 4-0 The American) who are the No. 9 team in the Associated Press Top 25 Poll, are on a 20-game winning streak dating back to their loss to

Arkansas State University in 2016. “Our guys embrace backs against the wall,” Coach Geoff Collins said Monday. “[UCF] is as good as an atmosphere there is in college football. [These] are the kind of games you chose to play at this level to be in. We have to embrace the opportunity.” With one more win, Temple would clinch bowl eligibility for the fifth straight season and be able to win the East Division by running the table. On Saturday, then-No. 21 South Florida (7-1, 3-1 The American) dropped its first game of the season, 5736, to Houston (7-1, 4-0 The American), making the path to the conference title game more clear. Temple and UCF are the only undefeated teams in conference play in the East Division, and No. 17 Houston is the lone team in the West. Both Temple and UCF had bye weeks before Thursday’s game. The Knights played their most recent game, a 37-10 win against East Carolina on Oct. 20, without starting quarterback McKenzie Milton.

The junior didn’t play against ECU due to an injury, UCF first-year coach Josh Heupel said Milton’s status will be a “game-time” decision for the game. If Milton doesn’t play, redshirt-freshman Darriel Mack will start for the Knights. Collins said he is preparing for both Milton and Mack to start. He added that the UCF offense has “more designed quarterback runs,” along with running the triple option when Mack plays. Mack rushed for 120 yards and a touchdown, while completing 12 passes for 69 yards against ECU. “Both are big-time players with a complementary cast surrounding them that is as good as anyone in the country,” Collins said. This season, Milton has completed 119 of his 200 pass attempts for 1,797 yards, 16 touchdowns and four interceptions. Milton is a potential candidate for the Heisman Trophy, which is given to college football’s most outstanding player, after finishing eighth in voting last year.

HOJUN YUN / THE TEMPLE NEWS Then-junior running back Ryquell Armstead eludes a defender during Temple’s 45-19 loss to Central Florida on Nov. 18, 2017 at Lincoln Financial Field.

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Either UCF or Temple has been involved in every conference championship in the history of The American. UCF won the championship outright in 2013 and shared the title with Cincinnati and Memphis in 2014. Temple lost to Houston in the conference championship game in 2015 before the Owls beat Navy the following year. UCF won the East Division and the conference last season. Last year, after the Knights went undefeated during the regular season, they won the American Athletic Conference title then defeated Auburn University in the Peach Bowl. The AP ranked UCF sixth in its final poll of the 2017-18 season, while the NCAA officially recognized its national championship claim alongside the University of Alabama, who won the 2018 College Football Playoff National Championship. UCF has won three out of the five matchups against Temple. Its 45-19 victory against the Owls in 2017 is the largest margin of victory for either school. Collins said he put an emphasis on winning the turnover battle. Temple committed five turnovers, while UCF did not commit any last year. Forcing turnovers instead gives the Owls a higher chance of winning, he added. In last year’s game, graduate student quarterback Frank Nutile, former running back David Hood and former wide receiver Adonis Jennings led the Owls in the box score. Hood and Jennings have graduated, while Nutile now backs up redshirt-sophomore quarterback Anthony Russo. The Owls have a 5-1 record since Russo became the starter on Sept. 15 against the University of Maryland. Temple is on a three-game winning streak, which includes its overtime win on Oct. 20 against nationally ranked Cincinnati. The team will kickoff at Spectrum Stadium in Orlando at 7:30 p.m. sam.neumann@temple.edu @SamNeu_

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SPORTS PAGE 23

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

MEN’S SOCCER

Forward’s scoring guides Owls to playoff berth It took five games before Temple’s leading scorer Lukas Fernandes became a starter. BY MAURA RAZANAUSKAS Men’s Soccer Beat Reporter Lukas Fernandes was frustrated. Motivated to get the playing time he felt he deserved, he went to talk to his coach. Coach Brian Rowland told Fernandes he needed to improve — his defense wasn’t strong enough to earn a starting spot. After honing his defensive skills and scoring a game-winning goal on Saturday, he’s now played a big part in clinching a spot in the conference tournament. “I was just taking every session, every drill we do that includes defense, and going as hard as I possibly could,” Fernandes said. “Because if you train hard, you’re going to play hard.” Rowland noticed his improvements and five games into the season on Sept. 8, Fernandes earned his first start of the season and just the third of his college career. Since then, he started every game and became the Owls’ (5-8-4, 2-3-1 American Athletic Conference) leading scorer with 16 points. “Lukas has been a good, bright spot,” Rowland said. “He is one of the guys when I first got here that really turned a corner maybe from years past. I kind of took him a little bit to get back on track after preseason, but I think it clicked and he certainly has taken on a bigger role on the team.” While improving defensively, Fernandes has become the Owls’ offensive leader this season. On Saturday, he scored his team-leading sixth goal to propel Temple to a 1-0 victory against Tulsa. The win clinched the Owls a spot in the conference tournament. Fernandes leads Temple in six offensive categories — goals, assists, points, game-winning goals, shots and shots on goal. With six goals, Fernandes is fourth

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JUSTIN OAKES / THE TEMPLE NEWS Junior forward Lukas Fernandes controls the ball while defended by Penn sophomore defender R.C. Williams near the Quakers’ net during the Owls’ scoreless, double-overtime draw on Oct. 23 at the Temple Sports Complex.

in The American. Fernandes’s 41 shots more than doubled the number of shots as senior midfielder Hermann Doerner and sophomore forward Justin Hahn, who are tied for second on the team with 19 shots. Fernandes’ shot total ties him for fourth in The American. “He’s honestly one of the best guys to play with,” Hahn said. “He’s very creative on and off the ball, and especially being up top, he gives you a lot of options to create the chances and that’s why he’s getting a lot of these results.” Utilizing Fernandes’s creativity on the pitch has opened up Temple’s scoring. In the first four games where Fernandes was a substitute, the Owls averaged 0.5 goals per game. Since then, Temple has scored an average of 1.08 goals per game. Fernandes’s creative play helps im-

prove his defending, Rowland said. Part of Rowland’s style of play relies on each player aggressively defending. When a forward like Fernandes wins the ball, it typically means the team takes over possession closer to its opponents’ goal because the forwards are in higher position on the field. “Any defensive moments that cause turnovers for us in our attacking half can lead quicker to goals,” Rowland said. “All of our players need to be good defenders so that we can hopefully put pressure on teams and force them into mistakes in their half.” As one of the best assets Fernandes said he developed over years of competing and watching soccer, he sees his resourcefulness with the ball at the top. He has played soccer for as long as he can remember. Because his parents are from Brazil, soccer has been an integral piece

of his life since he was little. “I remember just watching soccer with my parents growing up and how much joy it brought them,” Fernandes said. “It always made me so happy as a kid, watching them and watching the sport.” Now, seeing his hard work and training finally come to fruition with a starting role, three game-winning goals and a berth in the postseason tournament, Fernandes is excited and grateful but knows there is room for improvement. “It’s the best I’ve been playing at Temple,” Fernandes said. “I’ve finally been given an opportunity to do what I like, to do what I love every day, and it is so refreshing.” maura.razanauskas@temple.edu @captainAMAURAca

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SPORTS TUESDAY, OCTOBER 30, 2018

PAGE 24

LUKE SMITH / THE TEMPLE NEWS LEFT: Redshirt-junior Quinn Duwelius (right) talks to assistant coach Josh Herring during practice on Friday in the Student Pavilion. The team started their season on Saturday at the Liacouras Center with 10 performances in the top 15. RIGHT: Redshirt-junior Quinn Duwelius practices with junior foil Kennedy Lovelace during practice on Friday in the Student Pavilion.

FENCING

With Ibrahim gone, experienced roster fills void

The team began its season with her void with a strong supporting cast did not play for the second half of the McKendree University, a Division II 10 players placing in the top 15 of upperclassmen, including five seniors, season, after tearing her ACL in January. school in Illinois. Rockford said because many Temple will look to build on its on Saturday at the Temple Open. five juniors and four sophomores. BY ALEX McGINLEY Fencing Beat Reporter

D

espite missing their all-time wins leader Safa Ibrahim, Temple began its season on Saturday with strong individual performances. Temple University’s fencing team only graduated one player last season, but that player was epee Ibrahim, who earned 221 wins during her four-year career. The Owls started the season by hosting the Temple Open on Saturday at the Liacouras Center. All five members of the sabre squad placed in the top 12 at the event. The team is missing Ibrahim, but are working hard in her absence, coach Nikki Franke said. The team is filling sports@temple-news.com

Ibrahim left her mark on Temple’s program: she went 44-30 and won the individual epee title at the National Intercollegiate Women’s Fencing Association Championships last year. “She was a leader and a very hard worker,” Franke said. “She’s left that legacy and the girls have been really following that legacy this year.” Franke said having more seniors on the team will help the team have more success this season. “The upperclassmen set the tone,” Franke said. “Our squad leaders are doing a great job. Having that experience and maturity of those upperclassmen really helps a great deal.” The five seniors are epees Fiona Fong and Ally Micek, foil Auset Muhammad and sabres Blessing Olaode and Jessica Rockford. Redshirt-junior Quinn Duwelius

freshmen and sophomores competed last season, the team’s expectations increased for this season. Last season, sophomore sabre Eva Hinds went 54-20 in dual meets and placed second at the Temple Open. She finished ninth in the same event on Saturday. Sophomore epee Marielle Luke finished 23rd in the epee event, while sophomore foil Megan Ross took 18th place in foil. “Now that they’ve had a year under their belt, they understand what’s expected them,” Rockford said. “They understand how hard they need to work in order to be the top-10 team that we are. The freshmen are learning very quickly, just like I did my freshman year.” For this season, the Owls added three new fencers — sophomore epee Zahrah Dinkins and freshmen foils Cassie Navalta and Aryanna Abtin. Dinkins is Ibrahim’s cousin and a transfer from

successful 2017-18 season. The Owls earned 26 wins after totaling a programhigh 34 in the 2016-17 season. Junior foil Kennedy Lovelace earned All-American honors at the NCAA championships last season after finishing seventh out of 24 foil competitors. Junior sabres Malia Hee and Kerry Plunkett also represented Temple at the national meet, while Olaode served as an alternate. Olaode wants the team to have another year full of accolades before she graduates. “I definitely want to go out with a bang,” Olaode said. “I’m trying to work really hard, harder than I’ve ever worked before and set goals for myself. This could be my best season yet.” alex.mcginley@temple.edu @mcginley_alex

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Profile for The Temple News

Vol. 97 Iss. 10  

Oct. 30, 2018

Vol. 97 Iss. 10  

Oct. 30, 2018

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