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#movemeon

This work is released under a Creative Commons license. You are free to copy, distribute and transmit this work and to adapt it. However, you must attribute anything you use to the original author (their Twitter username). You are are not permitted to use this for commercial purposes. Any derivative works must be shared under a similar license. 1


Twitter birds used courtesy of Chris Spooner http://www.spoongraphics.co.uk/

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foreword It started with a simple idea: what if elements of teacher professional development could be carried out in small bursts? Hundreds of tweets - but only a few weeks - later we have this book. It is a testament to power of social networking to produce something worthwhile. As editors we would like to thank each and every person who ‘tweeted’ a 140-character message - be it one or several! Tweets remain largely as they were sent, but with the #movemeon ‘hashtag’ removed. In addition, for the sake of clarity, where words were (deliberately) shortened to fit within the 140-character limit they have been expanded. We hope you enjoy reading this as much as we enjoyed putting this together. :-)

@dajbelshaw

@stuartridout

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contributors @aliceayel

Mum, teacher of Modern Languages(French, Spanish, German), web 2.0 enthusiast, keen cook, eager member of Fosse Singers choir.

@cameroncampos

Me in 160 characters? A tough one...I love spending time travelling with my wife and little boy. I teach English but could just as happily teach history or IT.

@carolinebreyley

P1-P7 teacher in island school, Bath Rugby supporter.

@charte

Educator interested in languages, technology, personalised learning and international learning.

@chris_1974

Dad, hubby, maths teacher, probably in that order. Big fan of my SmartBoard

@daibarnes

ICT teacher/leader. 2*stepson, 1*daughter, 1*partner, 3*guitar, 1*piano, x*computers. Will follow educators.

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@dajbelshaw

28 year-old husband, father, teacher (History, ICT & Geography), Director of ELearning & Ed.D. student ('digital literacy?')

@damoward

E-learning practitioner techie teacher.

@DavidMiller_UK

Teacher, tailor, soldier, spy ...

@dughall

Interested in ICT, Education (ELearning, Web 2.0), Music fan. Parent . (My tweets are my own views)

@frankcrawford

Educator; speaker; school evaluation and improvement; strategy and innovation; futures; iPhone; biker

@futurebehaviour

Greg Perry- hubby, dad, maths and geography teacher, slowing footballer, speeding-up cyclist, learner, blogger and behaviour and learning consultant.

@Hjava

Husband, Father, Educator (snigger..) and all round top bloke. Humble too.

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@jamesmichie

Head of Media Studies / Leader for KS4 English - Chalfonts Community College.

@JamiePortman

Assistant Headteacher in Doncaster. Interests: Pedagogy, Leadership, Transforming Learning, Xbox360.

@johnmayo

Interested in Web2.0, handheld tech, communication technologies in education-also former History teacher. These tweets are my own.

@jonesieboy

Husband, father, head of maths at North Berwick High School, mandolin player, sailor, climber, snowboarder, Open Source software developer.

@jonsim29

Husband, father, ICT Teacher, chicken keeper, allotment lover.

@krysiaS

If i'm not listening to music there will be a soundtrack in my head. also teach Design and Technology.

@kvnmcl

I'm a Primary Teacher, musician, painter and love using tech in teaching and learning.

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@lizbdavis

I am an educator who strongly believes in the power of technology. Director of Academic Tech at Independent School outside Boston.

@lordlangley73

ICT consultant for Education Bradford and organiser of bMobLe.

@macca_mjm

The sunshine bores the daylights out of me.

@mister_jim

Primary School teacher in Blackpool. Keen on pushing the boundaries and engaging new technology in informative & creative ways.

@misterel

ICT & Flexible learning day Coordinator and Moodle user. Hoping to get Mahara and googleapps up and running soon. :)

@MoreThanMaths

Teacher of maths and ICT, student of French, aspiring edublogger and general lurker. I follow educators, maths and science people, plus a few others.

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@MrESpiers

I am teacher in East London exploring ways this could be useful...

@mrstucke

Director of E-Learning at Stretford High School, Manchester, UK.

@mvass

Chartered Teacher seconded as an ICT Curriculum Support Officer. Main remit is to introduce teachers to the benefits of using online learning environments.

@neilmcdonald7

Dad, Teacher and West Wing fan.

@nickdennis

History teacher and Assistant Headmaster at Felsted School in Essex with a focus on using new technology.

@nwatkin

History teacher who loves new ideas and media.

@nwinton

Head of English @ Perth Academy, Perth, Scotland. http://scr.im/nwinton

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@Paddymcgrath

Maths teacher in north west london, into education matters and kayaking!!!!

@parslad

Chartered Teacher in a residential school in Fife, emerging educational researcher, and podcaster.

@patrick_horner

(no bio)

@pearlyadder

Teacher, ICT Co-ordinator, singer, musician, Mac convert and part time video editor.

@primarypete_

UK Primary School Teacher interested in innovation, creativity and collaboration.

@psbenson

39 year-old husband, father, Head of Dept. teacher of Business & ICT, M. Ed. student with a growing PLN & interest in applying web 2.0 technology for learning.

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@qbhistory

(no bio)

@raff31

LFC and a bit of ICT and a bit random...to quote Miss Newham! Used to be http:// year1.greenparkschool.org.uk/ and is http:// raff.creativeblogs.net

@richardanderson

eLearning Coordinator, Wolverhampton CLC. Interests: new media, web design, skepticism, evolutionary biology.

@samhouseman

Head of art/ illustrator/ landlord/ cat owner.

@silverwaver

Millennium Fellow, Lecturer Social Media, ICT in Education & Life Long Learning, Photography, Sussex History & Mathematics.

@simfin

Presenter and consultant on e learning, new technologies and e safety.

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@squiggle7

Year 6 teacher in a large primary looking for exciting and innovative ways to teach.

@SteveWn

Freelance ed consultant: ed.tech focus: yp charity trustee: hist/ict teacher.

@struan_gardner

DHT in a small Scottish Secondary School. Scientist, ICT enthusiast, Kayak, MTB and unicycle fan.

@stuartridout

Head of ICT and teacher from MK. Run my own homework website, Moodle, blogging, new tech. Like running and going to the gym!

@svanstraten

TV director turned educator.

@swasey1d

Teaching grade one and looking for ways to integrate technology with primary students.

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@theotheralig

50 something teacher, Y3, RE co-ordinator. Into creative teaching and fun in the classroom. Sustainability is big new interest.

@tinado

Teacher in a small rural school north of Auckland. ICT and music keep me busy. Love marimbas.

@tobywilson

e-Learning consultant, working on BSF. Interested in Web2.0, gadgets, tech, photography, bikes, climbing.

@tombarrett

Inspiring and engaging learners with (and without) great educational technology.

@vicjenkins

Learning Centre Manager (Secondary), elearning trainer, MSc student.

@Vicki_Parsons

Escaped Primary teacher, Interested in ICT, eLearning, gadgets...

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@zoe1971 (now @fullonlearning)

@ZoeRoss19

Learning & teaching geek; creative learning developer & addict; tech lover; G&T consultant; ideas magpie.

I am Head of ICT and really interested in digital technologies / e learning. I'm also mum of 1, learner snowboarder & sometime cake baker.

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sections activities.............................................................. 17 behaviour............................................................

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classroom management..................................... 33 environment........................................................ 41 feedback............................................................. 45 getting better......................................................

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organisation........................................................ 61 staffroom............................................................

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technology..........................................................

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the final tweet.....................................................

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This section contains tips from the community that will help you to ensure that every activity is an outstanding learning experience for students


#1

It's the transitions between activities that make or break lessons. @dajbelshaw

#2

If you feel a lesson is going nowhere don't be afraid to stop it, go over with the class why it didn't work and pick it up later. @kvnmcl

#3

if you're going to read one book (and I only read one a year) then make it The Teacher’s Toolkit - lots of practical ideas! @primarypete_

#4

My 1st graders have a few routines; lunch choice, response to message on chart, then choices. Day starts with direction. @swasey1d

#5

Modulating your voice is a key ingredient in changing the pace of a lesson. @dajbelshaw

#6

Set up talking buddies and change weekly. Ask questions, set tasks to discuss with buddy. Select three children to share with whole class. @tinado

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#7

Starting the day with action is important. Set the children simple routines that allow them to be busy as soon as they arrive. @tombarrett

#8

To get higher quality oral answers try having a "no hands up rule" and give 20 seconds thinking time before asking for an answer. @charte

#9

re: 20 secs - I used to ask them to think of an answer, reject it then give me their 2nd answer... counters knee-jerk response. @simfin

#10

In pairs student on the left teaches student on the right about the topic/skill. Right student rates out of 10 and feeds back. @JamiePortman

#11

Using theme tunes gives a sense of urgency to writing down date, title, learning objective, etc. & sets the tone for the lesson! @dajbelshaw

#12

Create a 'hook' for the lesson that stimulates thinking like Dale Banham's civil rights starter More info at http://bit.ly/7HKJUL @nickdennis

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#13

Short of ideas & students bit restless? Timed 'workstation' activities (to music) with focused questions works well! @dajbelshaw

#14

Acronyms 2 help students learn techniques/ ideas - RAC=review, analyze, comment, ROC=responsibility, organization, communication @jamesmichie

#15

Ask students how they would allocate method marks to their exam questions. @chris_1974

#16

Always ask yourself for every activity - what is the pedagogical purpose? Is it just busy work or is it learning? @charte

#17

Make a few deliberate errors and wait for students to spot them, then discuss. I like to look baffled and get them to explain. @MoreThanMaths

#18

Try something different. If it turns out to be a mistake then you've learnt something, so it isn't really a mistake. @futurebehaviour

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#19

Use metaphors. Even better, actually *show* (video/hands-on) what you're teaching. Every learner is a kinaesthetic learner @dajbelshaw

#20

Use levels or grades when writing Learning Goals @chris_1974

#21

Always have a big question for lessons and units More info at http://tinyurl.com/ykomfz8 @nwatkin

#22

Never under estimate the value of play ... and it doesn't have to be purposeful play. @JamiePortman

#23

Every so often, give students a Post-It note and get them to write questions they've got that haven't been answered in lessons. @dajbelshaw

#24

When teaching difficult ideas (e.g. in poems) ask students to collect images relevant to what they’re studying & make a display from them. @jamesmichie

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#25

Have something to occupy the pupils as soon as they come in - an interesting image/quote/ question on board or task on their desk @ZoeRoss19

#26

re: having something on board when students arrive. I usually have question to make them think - revisit during lesson! @dajbelshaw

#27

Get students to teach a skill, 5 min slot, e.g. how to use clone stamp tool in Photoshop. 30 kids per class = over 2 hours P2P learning @jamesmichie

#28

Two reasons to ask a question are to collect evidence of learning and to cause students to think. Don't question to engage students. @Paddymcgrath

#29

STARTER: Choose any song and ask students to link the tone, title, lyrics etc to the topic they are studying to demonstrate higher order thinking @JamiePortman

#30

Use the same colour/clipart/area of board for things like homework. It creates a routine for students upon which you can build. @dajbelshaw

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#31

Have games and songs involving movement that you can intersperse through the day - lift energy levels, change the mood. @tinado

#32

Change where students sit often - certainly every few weeks. Breaks down social/cultural barriers (usually!) @dajbelshaw

#33

Try to start with something the students know and move on to something new. @silverwaver

#34

Thumbs up, thumbs middle, thumbs down gauge understanding at start and progress at end of lesson More info at http://bit.ly/7UoKFc @charte

#35

Explain to pupils what an ANALOGY is then ask them to CREATE their own analogies for the topic/skill/concept they’re studying: EASY @JamiePortman

#36

2 minute rule for revision. Every day, every lesson, 3 questions. What did I do? Why did I do it? What was I supposed to learn? @struan_gardner

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#37

Remember games are great learning tools and are not just for lower to mid-ability students but can also benefit more able students as well! @jamesmichie

#38

Get students to perform administrative tasks. Even older students like the sense of ownership and responsibility. @dajbelshaw

#39

Have intriguing lesson titles as a hook - “Mr Smy's Mathematical Dating Agency� for Spearman’s Correlation. @chris_1974

#40

Copying is good. Cheating isn't. Explain the difference. @futurebehaviour

#41

Adjust teaching during lesson in response to their learning. @damoward

#42

Make one lesson a week an independent learning lesson - gives you a break and believe me, they love it when you shut up for a bit! @jamesmichie

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#43

Give a big picture outline overview of the whole topic before beginning to work through the parts. @psbenson

#44

Snake reading: A student reads one sentence only, you announce a new name at the end of it, allowing many students per paragraph. @JamiePortman

#45

Approach learning in abstract ways - e.g. teach genre by getting students to bring in, then categorise fruit in lots of different ways. @jamesmichie

#46

Give handouts out before the lesson. Do not expect students to make considered comment as soon as they receive them. @silverwaver

#47

Have a plan that allows for ideas and suggestions to be explored and discussions to be followed through with engaged students. @jonsim29

#48

Keep in touch with people from outside education and bring them into your classroom. They have so much to offer. @krysiaS

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#1

Try to incorporate a rogues gallery in class. Kids bring in a pic from home. Gives them a sense of personalisation in the classroom. @mister_jim

#2

Some days the weather will affect the children's behaviour more than you can. Just go with it. @tombarrett

#3

Use the pitch of your voice to indicate sanctions or warnings. Lower the pitch instead of using normal happy bouncy teaching voice. @stuartridout

#4

Start your first lesson with a new class by asking them to tell you how they should behave in class. They'll say the right stuff... @jonesieboy

#5

...then ask them how they think you should behave. You might learn something! @jonesieboy

#6

Non-verbal cues such as your position in the classroom can often nip potential behaviour management problems in the bud. @dajbelshaw

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#7

ALWAYS follow through on any warning.

#8

Often a knowing/disapproving look is sufficient for low-level behaviour issues. Don't turn something little into a confrontation.

@dughall

@stuartridout

#9

As often as possible greet students at the door - this sets the tone for the lesson. @dajbelshaw

#10

Consistency is key - then everyone knows where they stand, and clear boundaries can be set in expectations of behaviour and learning. @theotheralig

#11

Not total consistency but intelligent consistency, coupled with emotional intelligence. @chris_1974

#12

If you get into a confrontation, remember who is the child is in the situation! (it's a toughie, I often want to say it to people) @stuartridout

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#13

Be long-suffering. Most powerful reprimands can occur when you can pull out a long list when they did this, this, and this ... @psbenson

#14

... but tomorrow must always be another day. Learners HATE you “dragging up the past�. @psbenson

#15

Treat a pupil as he is and he will remain as he is. Treat pupil as he can be and should be, and he will become as he can and should be. (Goethe) @johnmayo

#16

Always make it clear to the child that it's their behaviour you disapprove of ... not the child themself! @stuartridout

#17

Reward first, punish second - look for someone to reward and do it in front of the other students - great motivator. @jamesmichie

#18

Make references to things you like/do outside of school - makes you more 'human' and approachable as a teacher. @dajbelshaw

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#19

“Thank you to those people who HAVE put their pens down” = BETTER than telling those off that haven’t. Positively reinforce what you want. @JamiePortman

#20

If two or more kids give conflicting stories (there's a liar). Remind them that *they* know who's lying so are doubly betraying trust. @dughall

#21

Use “thank you” instead of “please” in instructions to make them more assertive. “Let's put that gum in the bin Doug, thanks.” @stuartridout

#22

Ask students if lighting is OK, you're speaking at an audible volume, etc. - it shows you care and anticipates potential problems! @dajbelshaw

#23

Use strategies to achieve quiet in class: Your arm goes up first and every students arm goes up till quiet. Works Y7-Y11. Save your voice! @JamiePortman

#24

If you do have to shout, know what you're going to say. Fumbling for words whilst raising your voice sounds weak... @dajbelshaw

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#25

One positive comment is more powerful than ten negative comments. Keep it positive! @stuartridout

#26

“Don't be so childish!� doesn't really work with a six year old. @dughall

#27

Do not underestimate the power of praise. Used well it can have a positive impact on behaviour management. @misterel

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#1

Ask a pupil 'what are you doing' and they'll tell you! Try using 'What should you be doing?' instead when they are off-task. @misterel

#2

Go and watch the basketball team or the school production and tell students how good they were. It helps you build relationships. @stuartridout

#3

Give a blast of loud music to get students' attention. @ZoeRoss19

#4

Have music on quietly when students enter. They settle in and quiet down quickly to hear what it is. @cameroncampos

#5

Praise, praise and re-praise the praiseworthy. The young ‘uns like it, and the older ones need it! @Hjava

#6

Lost your voice? Feeling a little hoarse? Don't want to shout? Turn lights on and off quickly to get students' attention! @dajbelshaw

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#7

Encourage students who are confident with a topic/skill to become ‘champions’ they can help students if you're busy with others. @ZoeRoss19

#8

Learn the students name and use them often. It shows you are making an effort to recognise and acknowledge individuals. @misterel

#9

Be positive much more than (and even to the exclusion of) negative. Tell them what they are capable of. @psbensonf

#10

Greet every student with a smile and salutation as they enter or as you walk down a lined up class. @dughall

#11

With boys, praise the work, not the child. In general they'll respond better that way. @chris_1974

#12

Use examples of celebrities who have worked hard to achieve their goals to motivate students to realise their own. @mister_jim

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#13

Don't shout over the top of students. Lower your volume and let them come down to your level rather than the other way round. @stuartridout

#14

When counting down from 5 to get quiet, start loud, but get quieter quickly, so that the 1 can hardly be heard. @chris_1974

#15

Stamps and postcards home do work, even at Key Stage 4. @misterel

#16

Be honest at all times. As soon as you're caught lying to them, you'll lose their trust. @mister_jim

#17

Children will naturally push boundaries. Keep rules simple but no matter what, always enforce them. @kvnmcl

#18

Encourage learners, much as you would a runner in a running race - particularly with pace & final laps! @psbenson

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#19

Ask students to get on with their learning, instead of get on with their work. @JamiePortman

#20

Learners are like bacteria - eventually they become immune to certain strategies, especially those which we use too often. @psbenson

#21

Share planning with students so they know where they are going next in their learning. @stuartridout

#22

Stay positive, always try to say something positive to students (even if it's hard to find sometimes). @aliceayel

#23

Never underestimate the importance of spending time with kids. No matter how tired you are if they need to talk, you need to listen. @dughall

#24

It's often more effective to talk to students 1to-1 about behaviour than to do it in front of peers (especially true for teenage boys). @lizbdavis

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#25

Some learners can’t organise themselves, lose their work and turn up without any materials. Keep their work in your classroom. @psbenson

#26

Tell every class that they're your favourite class every so often. @dajbelshaw

#27

When your class do something great, tell their form tutor so they can celebrate it. Tutors only ever hear the bad things! @stuartridout

#28

Stand at the door & greet students on their way in and on their way out, shows your are happy to see them & helps with behaviour management! @jamesmichie

#29

Every now and then ring a parent to tell them great things about their child - kids love it. @Vicki_Parsons

#30

Get to know the young people you teach. What's their ‘moon-walking bear’ - things you don't notice at first? More info at http://bit.ly/1l1Id @frankcrawford

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#31

Never underestimate the power of a positive letter home! @stuartridout

#32

Getting students to cover their books for first homework of year prevents graffiti & shows who you're likely to have issues with! @dajbelshaw

#33

Get some cool looking postcards, send them to parents praising their kids when they have done outstanding work/effort etc. @jamesmichie

#34

Don't underestimate the power of praise. Butter them up. Build up their self-esteem. Give them the confidence to be successful. @psbenson

#35

Revisit SEN sheets and CATS score sheets a few weeks after the start of the year once you've got to know your classes and can put faces to the names. @stuartridout

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#1

Have help posters at the front of your room; don't give help, simply say “there's a poster for that.� @chris_1974

#2

... and colour code posters - yellow for data, pink for number etc... More info at http://bit.ly/7i0lrp @chris_1974

#3

Have displays relevant to learning - or at least can be referred to during a lesson to aid teaching delivery @qbhistory

#4

Hang visual prompts at child height so they can become kinaesthetic prompts too e.g. number lines that they can count along by hand @mister_jim

#5

Use older kids to help coach younger ones crossing age boundaries @damoward

#6

Create a learning wall of learners' work showing standards - not by age or class but to show progression in curriculum areas. @frankcrawford

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#7

Put artifacts in your room, could be gasmasks or computer parts. Kids love the visual aspect and it stokes their imagination. @macca_mjm

#8

Make your room multisensory, put displays at different heights, display children’s work as much as possible. Give them ownership of the space @mister_jim

#9

Get whiteboards mounted around the classroom - use for groups to collaborate, teach their peers, present to the class. @MoreThanMaths

#10

Class ideas: student of the week-effort, achievement etc. WHILT(what have I learnt today?) in big letters by the door. @MrESpiers

#11

Always a good idea to have a PEE (Point Evidence Explain) display around the room to support literacy development @neilmcdonald7

#12

Use displays as an interactive tool with post it notes or as a showcase of the work done in the lesson. More info at http://bit.ly/7edlkZ @nickdennis

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#13

Create interactive displays related to ongoing units that can be utilised by learners through continuous provision @primarypete_

#14

Only display evidence of process around the learning space to show what you really value @zoe1971

#15

Give older students a topic and a space; let them create displays - gives them ownership of the space and are often fantastic. @ZoeRoss19

#16

Want students to take pride in their work? Take pride in the workspace - engaging displays and tidy room make a big difference. @MoreThanMaths

#17

Classroom ideas: Inspirational quotes, literacy wall, exemplar work, AFL display, news space to link lessons and headlines @MrESpiers

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#1

Spend time planning to do less but more effective marking. Mark what will move them on, not just tick and flick! @charte

#2

Always follow up “Whats the answer?” closed questions with “How do you know?” or “Why?” @chris_1974

#3

Use classroom display boards as teaching tools and not simply to display work - e.g. put up grade criteria and refer to them in lessons @jamesmichie

#4

Various online companies allow you to make customised stickers and stampers. Students value them more highly than generic ones! @dajbelshaw

#5

Four threes. 3 postcards to 3 random pupils every day to write 3 things they liked and 3 things they'd change about your lesson. @frankcrawford

#6

Always carry a pen. Whilst explaining or giving feedback, write in books/on work too. The best “marking” is done straight away. @futurebehaviour

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#7

Don't ask questions with many right answers, IF you are only after a particular answer. 'Guess what's in the my head' questions are not popular with students. @chris_1974

#8

Use highlighter pens when marking to show if students have met learning objectives highlight title green for yes, yellow for no. @dajbelshaw

#9

Always give positive comments and praise before criticism and targets. If your comments are all negative, students will switch off. @jamesmichie

#10

Get students to demonstrate their understanding by using ONLY the contents of their bags. Higher order thinking required EASY! @JamiePortman

#11

Get students to create questions for a partner to do, then assess each other's work. They often write really tough questions @MoreThanMaths

#12

Involve the children in marking process by creating specific success criteria with them. They then look at one item off it and check through work. @mister_jim 47


#13

Label your students! Buy mini labels and print out with hints, key facts, targets, praise etc. These are very popular with my students @MoreThanMaths

#14

Use competition and rewards at all levels. Y11's secretly love stickers!!! @mrstucke

#15

Get your thumbometers out. Straight up for ‘I totally got it’, down for ‘haven't a clue’ and an infinite number of positions in-between @struan_gardner

#16

I'm a learner (using that word now instead of pupil now - thanks @frankcrawford ). Allow me a voice and some trust @mvass

#17

Have feedback sessions on pieces of work, a 1:1 conversation with the learner and they record the formative points and agree targets. @patrick_horner

#18

Use APP statements for next steps when marking @primarypete_

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#19

When asking questions to class give 30 secs individual thinking time and then 30 secs to discuss with neighbour/learning partner @stuartridout

#20

Find different way of saying “I don't agree with you” Avoid saying that “you are wrong” @silverwaver

#21

Have a pot of lollysticks with each child's name on really quick random name generator to ensure all answer questions @squiggle7

#22

Let your students write their own report cards. Let them write a report card for you. @struan_gardner

#23

When asking questions tell the class that you will ask Tom, then Dawn, Doug and then two randoms. This gives thinking time - takes the pressure off! @stuartridout

#24

After completing a task, ask pupils if they understand so that you can set the task better next time @silverwaver

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#25

Keep marking positive. Don't just tick books, use “EBI� (Even Better If...) to suggest improvements. @stuartridout

#26

A traffic light system can help test understanding -who's red, orange, green? You can use cards/images on PCs or just ask verbally @ZoeRoss19

#27

Mark work in green, blue, black, purple NOT red - students hate seeing red pen all over their work! @jamesmichie

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Often it’s the little things that make the big difference. This section contains ideas for little changes you can make each day.

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These little changes add up and soon you’ll be doing them without even thinking about it!

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#1

Ask a colleague to come and observe the first time you do a particular activity -worth having feedback from another point of view! @dajbelshaw

#2

... or ask the teaching assistant what they thought or for suggestions on how to reach students who struggle. @stuartridout

#3

Ask yourself at the end of the day if every student has had the chance to make some sort of contribution. @dughall

#4

Keep your sense of humour, and be prepared to admit if you get it wrong. @chris_1974

#5

Talk to pupils about how you have failed at school to help them understand the need to make mistakes to improve. @krysiaS

#6

Don't split your trousers at school. Do it outside the post office on the way home, like I did tonight. @futurebehaviour

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#7

Remember teaching is a marathon not a sprint.... pace yourself. You could be teaching for 40+ years. @misterel

#8

No matter how difficult it gets, how disastrous lessons go, how undervalued you feel. We've all been there. Ask for a helping hand. @kvnmcl

#9

We all have stuff to learn, whether NQTs, Middle Leaders or SLT, and we could learn it from anyone. @chris_1974

#10

Enjoy what you teach. If your class sense your enthusiasm, they too will be enthused by it. @mister_jim

#11

Some children haven't been socialised to sit listening to an adult. Some children can easily conceal that they're not listening. @parslad

#12

Never forget that children WANT to learn, if they aren't engaged it's probably not their problem or fault. @nwinton

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#13

Great minds do NOT think alike!

#14

Remember that students want to do well too.

@samhouseman

@psbenson

#15

Challenge, guide and support pupils, don't narrow them to just seeing everything your way. Be prepared to be corrected. @mister_jim

#16

Remember “Education is the lighting of fires not the filling of pails� (WB Yeats). Be a Firestarter today! @johnmayo

#17

Make your pupil council into a learning council. Remit? To help improve learning. @frankcrawford

#18

There is never a good time to use sarcasm. @dughall

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#19

Never underestimate the positive impact of failure. Learning happens when we get it wrong, and unnoticed when we get it right. @nwinton

#20

The mind is the limit.

#21

If you're not enthusiastic about your subject how can you expect anyone else (students) to be? @chris_1974

#22

Two-timing teaching. Give a timers to 2 learners. One times how you speak for. The other how long the learners talk for/ do stuff.

@samhouseman

@frankcrawford

#23

Realise that they have bad days too.

#24

Whenever on a course ask people attending to share one of their best Teaching & Learning - practical ideas. @psbenson

@mister_jim

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#25

Think Question -> Answer -> Question and not just Question -> Answer. @silverwaver

#26

When facing a problem, improvise, adapt, overcome don't hide in the corner of your staffroom. @johnmayo ... or ask for help from others! (ed.)

#27

If exam boards and publishers offer free books, posters etc always always say yes you want them! @jamesmichie

#28

Don't be afraid to admit you don't know or that a pupil can actually teach you something. @Vicki_Parsons

#29

Your real goal is to be respected by the students - not necessarily to be liked as that is not always the same thing... @charte

#30

Best advice I was given when I started teaching - be yourself. @damoward

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#31

Ask questions of your colleagues and your students, remember we are all still learners and can always do better! @jamesmichie

#32

The best tip I ever received in teaching? “Sometimes good enough, is good enough.” You can't do everything perfectly in this job. @mrstucke

#33

The best advice I was given was “you will have your ideal. Then you will realise a working ideal. Be realistic and go with it.” @krysiaS

#34

Get a colleague to visit your class. Not at the back. At the front looking at the LEARNERS. How are THEY reacting to your teaching? @frankcrawford

#35

Constantly reassure learners that you like them. @psbenson

#36

Factor time into you day to just chat to the kids. You'll get loads of potential lesson ideas out of it! @mister_jim

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#37

Best learning is when the teacher facilitates & pupils get on enthusiastically (teacher as helicopter spectator) @suzibewell

#38

Give teachers observation formats to observe learning. That way, they have a reason to stand back and quality feedback to learners. @zoe1971

#39

An oldie but a goodie - speak to kids on the corridor. It builds that level of trust and develops a good rapport. @neilmcdonald7

#40

Put a small post box at the back of the classroom and ask students for lesson ideas! Works a treat. @macca_mjm

#41

Lighten up. Share a joke. Smile. Be good fun.

#42

Ask your mentor for some positive features of your lessons and make them even better.

@psbenson

@silverwaver

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#43

Treat pupils like people.

#44

My first Head of Department said: “Say what you mean and mean what you say.”

@frankcrawford

@damoward

#45

One idea at a time.

#46

Creativity takes courage.

#47

Don’t treat learners as a group. They are not all the same. Don’t let a minority skew your view of the whole class. :D @psbenson

#48

Plan your lessons, but know when to call it quits or to deviate. Don't always plod on regardless.

@silverwaver

@samhouseman

@chris_1974

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60


‘Be prepared’ counts as much for teaching as it does for boy scouts! The hints, tips and advice in this section are all about making your life as an educator easier and (more) stress-free.

@chris_ 1974 61


#1

Keep a folder (digital/physical) of quick tasks/ exercises to pull out the bag when things go awry! @jamesmichie

#2

Always have everything you need for the lesson ready beforehand - including spare pens, paper, etc. for inevitable forgetful few! @dajbelshaw

#3

Create seating plans from baseline data, group students of similar ability, add photos & preferred names - great behaviour management! @jamesmichie

#4

If you veer off your plans keep note of where you go. Especially if the new directions lead to a better outcome @kvnmcl

#5

Leave time for students to tidy the room. Maintaining a clean and tidy classroom sends a clear message about your expectations! @jamesmichie

#6

Search around for a resource share/ community in your subject area. Find a good one and it will be invaluable. More info at http://tiny.cc/c7HgH @patrick_horner 62


#7

Set up book/equipment monitors in each of your classes, rotate each half term, helps with organisation and gives students ownership @jamesmichie

#8

If you are tired at the end of a lesson, then you are working too hard and you should be making the students do more of the work @silverwaver

#9

Have bank of lessons, resources & activities to use for cover lessons when you are sick, like I am right now - the lurgey has got me! @jamesmichie

#10

Mix up your lessons, some with 4 or 5 different short tasks, some with 1 or 2 more longer tasks @jamesmichie

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#1

Get on with staff - organise regular socials, like a staff curry night. @chris_1974

#2

Remember that your colleagues get exhausted, stressed and frustrated just like you do. @dughall

#3

“Cake Friday� is a great way of sitting down with department and sharing the events of the week. @misterel

#4

Always get on with the janitor and your cleaner. They're the only ones that really can make your life hell! @nwinton

#5

If you are stressed and a colleague approaches you asking for your time, arrange a suitable time rather than lower your professionalism @primarypete_

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#6

Ask your partner/friend/colleague for a tip for new teachers and listen to what they say. @silverwaver

#7

If you don't have time to do extra things then say no. I'd rather you say that you didn't have time than let me down. @stuartridout

#8

Run drop-in sessions for staff training. It sounds less draconian than formal learning. @svanstraten

#9

Treat support staff well, most will go out of their way to help you if you talk to them like equals... @vicjenkins

#10

Get coached. If possible get trained as a coach. @chris_1974

#11

Try not to be possessive about resources, plans etc. It's a hard job ... sharing makes it easier for everyone. @dughall

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#1

Express your gratitude to the ever faithful IT dept! @cameroncampos

#2

With your IWB put your laptop in extended desktop mode. It allows you to keep lesson notes etc on the laptop screen @chris_1974

#3

In Moodle use forums to provide updates and useful links. Subscribe all students so they get message in e-mail, keeping them up to date. @jamesmichie

#4

There are many tools (including Windows Movie Maker) that allow you to 'clip up' digital video into segments. Worth doing! @dajbelshaw

#5

Learn to use your IWB interactively. It is an expensive projection screen. @tobywilson

#6

Help staff remember passwords: e.g. make 1st and last letters of random word capital. Then add a memorable date. Simple but safe. @svanstraten

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#7

Check the power supply to everything before you call upon the person responsible for ICT. @dughall

#8

Don't over do PowerPoint, sometimes all you need is a whiteboard and a marker; all they need is some paper and pen - keep it simple! @jamesmichie

#9

Get students to make a video about a topic give loose brief and camera, be ready to be surprised by the results - educational freedom! @jamesmichie

#10

Add interesting feeds to your Moodle courses - e.g. news, blog updates, images etc @jamesmichie

#11

Brainstorm on IWB with http://bubbl.us/ Collaborate on a mind map from multiple logons. Export to JPG or embed HTML code in VLE @tobywilson

#12

Do parents know how to help their child revise via wikis, forums, podcasts etc? INVITE them in and show them. They want your tips!! @JamiePortman

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#13

Turn the computer off and then turn it back on again if something has crashed and isn't working before calling ICT person. @lordlangley73

#14

Video everything - presentations, assessments, yourself - use for peer/self assessment, target setting and a teaching resource @jamesmichie

#15

Learn how to save as Powerpoint Show (.pps or .ppsx). Much better option in classroom! @nwinton

#16

Insist all coursework is done on Google Docs. They will benefit from your feedback along the way and less of them missing deadlines. @patrick_horner

#17

Set up a school Delicious account to enable staff to share their findings of useful resources and share great sites with children. @pearlyadder

#18

Introduce yourself to everybody - ask them who they are and what they do. Teachers, IT support, caretakers, office, etc @MrESpiers 72


#19

Set up mobile blog, give pupils the number, set homework and have them text in responses, they'll love it and it’s a resource for next lesson. @jamesmichie

#20

Let children choose teacher laptop background each day as reward - fit with a theme, e.g. Wii african safari. More info at http://bit.ly/5vEHcX @primarypete_

#21

Use a random student selector to add extra fun. More info at http://bit.ly/8nxXU3 @richardanderson

#22

Don't reinvent the wheel. There is so much help out there on the web. @silverwaver

#23

Get students to keep blogs (blogger is good) during coursework projects so that they can reflect and evaluate their learning. @jamesmichie

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#24

Personalisation is important to students. Make a PowerPoint show more personal by including the class name on slides as a template. @stuartridout

#25

If you have an IWB make a register in Excel. Use the cell fill colours to show presence/ absence. Kids love filling it out for you! @svanstraten

#26

Have been using Mimio mark-up, screen annotation to work on rhyming words and clarifying meaning in shared book @tinado

#27

Add notes to PowerPoint and Word documents so when you share them with colleagues they can use them more effectively @jamesmichie

#28

Avoid making another PowerPoint presentation with too much text that’s too small. Stick with a max of seven lines of text and use all the screen. @tobywilson

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#29

Always assume that the network/internet/ youtube will crash at the most inconvenient moment possible... save, download, backup! @vicjenkins

#30

Set up a YouTube account and whenever you find a useful video add it to your favourites so that you can always find it to use again. @jamesmichie

#31

Use blogs to evaluate and document work. All our AS/A2 students keep them during the coursework process. Example at http://bit.ly/7aY2BW @jamesmichie

#32

Stand back and watch your pupils as they try out things on the computer and learn from their mistakes @silverwaver

#33

Be paper free; have work submitted online or by e-mail and use “Track Changes� function to mark work @jamesmichie

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#34

When presenting stuff from the web on IWB use the built in magnifier to make it readable. All PCs have one. @tobywilson

#35

Use the tech they have in pockets. Record deadlines and interviews, take pics, use music to subdue them when appropriate. @MrESpiers

#36

Get used to using your VLE by setting up a simple course with just forums for homework discussions - simple but effective for you and them. @jamesmichie

#37

Get good at Google. Learn the advanced search terms e.g. site: filetype: More info at http://bit.ly/tips4google @tobywilson

#38

Use wikis to improve students editing skills, they submit draft, you edit, they improve, look back at history to evaluate improvements @jamesmichie

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#39

One of my favourite websites for an IWB is http://jacksonpollock.org/ works well with a Promethean ActivWand. Strangely rewarding. @tobywilson

#40

Collate useful websites on a blog,VLE or on school website so that students have easy and instant access. @jamesmichie

#41

Find keen evangelists and send them ideas you find or devise. Also get students involved in assessing new tech. @svanstraten

#42

Many people don't use the compress tool in MS Office. In tools in the save as box. A must for email, VLE etc. @tobywilson

#43

Sign up with Atomic Learning - plethora of “how to� videos for PP, Premiere, Photoshop, Flash, Final Cut etc ... the list goes on! @jamesmichie

#44

Add interesting feeds to your courses - e.g. news, blog updates, images etc - use cross curricular/non-subject related feeds @cameroncampos

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#45

Be aware that a lot of web flash content can be embedded in Smart Notebook @chris_1974

#46

Use Audacity to get kids to make audio glossary of key terms, save as MP3, collate on blog or VLE and let them download to their iPods. @jamesmichie

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@jonesieboy

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#MoveMeOn