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N200

Bakassi remains Cameroun’s territory –FG August 25, 2012 **Vol.9 No.504

–PAGE 3

Murder via facebook

CYNTHIA’S KILLERS DEMANDED N20M –Mum

‘They gave us fake bank account number, fake hospital name’ •We allowed her to enjoy herself. She used the condoms herself –Suspect No. 1 •When she struggled to escape, my cousin started beating, biting her –Suspect No. 2 •Rohypnol, the drug that –PAGES killed her 10, 61-66


N200

Bakassi remains Cameroun’s territory –FG August 25, 2012 **Vol.9 No.504

–PAGE 3

Murder via facebook

CYNTHIA’S KILLERS DEMANDED N20M –Mum

‘They gave us fake bank account number, fake hospital name’ •We allowed her to enjoy herself. She used the condoms herself –Suspect No. 1 •When she struggled to escape, my cousin started beating, biting her –Suspect No. 2 •Rohypnol, the drug that –PAGES killed her 10, 61-66


ACN TO OBJ:

N200

Declare source of your wealth August 25, 2012 **Vol.9 No.504

–PAGE 12

Murder via facebook

CYNTHIA’S KILLERS DEMANDED N20M –Mum

‘They gave us fake bank account number, fake hospital name’ •We allowed her to enjoy herself. She used the condoms herself –Suspect No. 1 •When she struggled to escape, my cousin started beating, biting her –Suspect No. 2 •Rohypnol, the drug that –PAGES killed her 10, 61-66


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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012


SUNG GIRL

SATURDAY SUN

Agusut 25, 2012

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Bakassi: No going back on GTA - FG From AIDOGHIE PAULINUS, Abuja

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he Federal Government has said there was no going back on the Green Tree Agreement (GTA) it signed with Cameroon over the Bakassi Peninsula. It would be recalled that following the dispute over the land and maritime boundary between Nigeria and Cameroon, the International Court of Justice (ICJ) gave its judgment on October 10, 2002, which, among other things, ceded Bakassi to Cameroon. In dealing with the impasse arising from the implementation of the judgment, the United Nations (UN) SecretaryGeneral further facilitated the GTA between Nigeria and Cameroon, which was signed on June 12, 2006. The agreement, committed both countries to implement the decision of the court and to recognize the land and maritime boundary between the duo as delineated by the court. In a statement signed by the spokesman of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Mr. Ogbole Amedu Ode, and made available to Saturday Sun in Abuja, the Federal Government said in recent weeks, there have been agitations by some Nigerians for the country to review, indeed, renege or repudiate the agreement, saying at the height of the agitation, is the selfstyled Bakassi Self-determination Front. In an apparent response to the recent flurry of agitations to reclaim Bakassi from Cameroon, the Federal Government said: “As a responsible, peace-loving and law-abiding country, Nigeria is guided by provisions of its constitution which enjoin the country to respect international law and treaty obligations, and to settle international disputes by negotiation, mediation, conciliation, arbitration and adjudication.” The statement further read: “In line with the principles of the rule of law, the Federal Government wishes to seize this opportunity to urge aggrieved parties and those with legitimate claims to seek legal means and established channels to ventilate those grievances in a peaceful and orderly manner.” While appealing to all Nigerians affected by the ICJ ruling to ensure that they live within the laws of the new authority, the Federal Government said it will continue to take every diplomatic step in its engagements with Cameroon to ensure that their rights are fully protected. The statement also said: “It is in this respect that the ministry welcomes the statement from the Nigeria Bar Association (NBA), condemning the secession threat emenating from Bakassi. The Federal Government appealed to residents of Bakassi to remain calm and also urged them not to resort to any unconstitutional acts capable of threatening the peace that has been achieved between Nigeria and Cameroon.

We may not complete our multi-billion naira projects before 2015 - Uduaghan From PAUL OSUYI, Asaba

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overnor Emmanuel Uduaghan of Delta State yesterday said his administration was investing in multi-billion naira infrastructural projects in order to diversify the economy from relying in oil earnings. The governor stated that most of the projects started over five years ago might not be completed before he leaves office in 2015 but insisted that he was laying a solid foundation for his successors to build on. The projects include Oghareki power plant, Asaba International Airport, upgrade of Osubi Airstripe to international standards, industrial clusters (Koko Industrial Park, Warri Industrial and Business Park and Asaba ICT Park), dualisation of the 149km Ughelli-Asaba expressway, among others. Speaking as guest lecturer at this year’s edition of Public Policy Forum organised by Business Hallmark newspaper on the topic, “Niger Delta: Beyond Resource Control, Burdens and Realities of Transformation,” Uduaghan said he was preparing the state for an end of oil era. “When we hand over, it will be a state, which others can build on because we have laid a solid foundation for its future, something that is sometimes difficult for our critics to understand.

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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012


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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

Everyday Living

5

•Romance •Society •Life more

KURAMO SURVIVORS’ TALE OF WOES •We lost 16 residents to ocean surge and our belongings to bulldozers By VINCENT UKPONG KALU and GILBERT EKEZIE A week after tragedy struck at the Kuramo beach in Lagos where about 16 residents were washed away by an ocean surge, some survivors are yet to come to terms with which of their losses to mourn; the dead neighbours or their belongings left in ruins by bulldozers of Lagos State government. One of the survivors, John Akwa, an artisan from Cross River State, depicts the dilemma of the displaced residents of the beach which many regard as “a city of sin” when he narrated to Saturday Sun how two tragedies befell them within some hours. “We were still mourning and confused over the tragedy; how the small community lost 16 persons when all of a sudden, we saw fierce looking and gun-wielding soldiers, mobile policemen, and KAI men with their Black Maria like bees besiege the area and gave us two hours quit notice. Before the expiration of the ultimatum, bulldozers arrived and some of the recalcitrant residents who were slow in moving out their belongings couldn’t believe it when the bulldozers ran over their makeshift houses. “It was all tears, wailing and weeping. We didn’t know what to weep for – Are we weeping because of some of the residents that were swept away by the ocean or the manner we were forcefully ejected without days to look for alternative places. It was all confusion, my brother”, he stated. A visit to the beach revealed an end has come to the city of sin, a once bubbling shanty which was reduced to rubble last Saturday by agents of the state. What was left at the beach as at last Wednesday were three dogs that couldn’t locate their owners, threadbare mattresses and polymer mobile toilets with stickers boldly written, “ Lagos State Ministry of Environment approved”. Also, used and disposed condoms littered the area, lending credence to the debauchery and lascivious lifestyle of the ‘city’. In his lamentations, John Akwa, who had lived in the area for over three years, poignantly told Saturday Sun that the manner the evacuation order was given, seemed that the state government was praying for such a

Bulldozer working the beach

Rubble at Kuramo beach calamity to befall the area. “The way the government ejected us seemed premeditated and was praying for such a tragedy so that it will be an excuse to send us packing. Where do they want people to go? Some have children, this is not fair, and we should have been given some weeks to move out, while the government looks for solution to the surge”, he added. For a security personnel with Eko Atlantic, whose office is within Kuramo area, what happened was nemesis catching up with Kuramo beach residents. According to him, their sins touched the high heavens and God decided to visit them with anger to scatter them. The security officer, who pleaded anonymity because of the mood of the displaced residents, described the area as ‘a city of sin’ and noted that any sin that was not committed there never existed. “Look, this place you are seeing was small and mighty. It was a still water runs deep.

Any sin that was not committed here has not come to planet earth. Here, prostitution was taken to another level. In the evening time, you see people making love at the ocean bank and other people would see them and mind their own business as they see it as normal thing. Sodomy and lesbianism are practised here, drugs are sniffed in the open; Indian hemp is also a prominent feature here and alcohol was abused to an unpardonable level. Gambling is a big business at the beach. “Oga, I have seen things the last two years I have worked in this organsisation. What I have seen, my mouth cannot say it all. The sin of this place got out of hands and I think government was aware of the evil going on here and kept quiet. For the people that lived here and visitors, the only thing that brought them together was sin; sin was the common denominator.” Olumide, one of the displaced residents of Kuramo is from Kwara State. He said he had

Body of a recovered victim

been doing his business in the area for almost four years. He bemoaned their eviction and advised that government should copy the harmonious relationship that existed among the residents. “Kuramo was mini Nigeria, a crucible for melting differences among people; every tribe was fairly represented here and we lived in peace and saw ourselves as one, even some West African nationals from Togo, Ghana, Cote D’Ivoire, Mali, Senegal and Benin Republic were here with us as well as Cameroonians, we lived together and everybody minding his or her own business”, he stated. According to Olumide, Kuramo was a home even to the office working class especially company security guards who live on mainland but because of high transport fare, they couldn’t go home everyday, they often passed the night in Kuramo and go home by weekend. He regretted that government has equally displaced this category of people. “We were always conscious of our existence and not to provoke the government into thinking otherwise about us and that was the more reason that people here hardly do anything that could warrant the law enforcement agents beaming their searchlights on the area and that was the reason there was no incident of theft or robbery here. Some people after committing crime elsewhere would come here to take refuge and would stay there for months and years without being detected”, he added. Beside being a home to all manner of people and characters, the area was a boisterous 24-hour city full of fun. It accommodated everyone. The makeshift houses went for as much as N1, 000 per night and N30, 000 a month. Commercial sex hawkers paid this much as rents to some touts who claimed to be in charge of the area. “Some people would close from work and come here to ease off tension before going home and this indulgence is all over and such people would miss Kuramo like those of us who were doing business here.With this demolition, both residents and visiting prostitutes would return to the streets like Ayillara, Ojuelegba in Surulere and Allen Avenue, Ikeja”, Olumide stressed.


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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

EverydayLiving Goshen Estate: Another disaster waiting to happen By VINCENT KALU and GILBERT EKEZIE Goshen estate is located at Lekki Phase1 in Eti Osa Local Government Area of Lagos State, is one of the coastline communities the state government has directed that their residents must relocate immediately to avoid the kind of disaster that hit their neighbours in Kuramo beach where about 16 persons were swept off their homes last Saturday by an ocean surge. A week after the evacuation order, home owners and other residents in the estate appear set for a battle of their lives rather than abandoning their life investments in the hands of the rampaging ocean. Very close to the beach, Goshen estate where a plot of land goes for N90 million and above, now risks great implications. Initially, home owners did not believe the ocean would ever cross its bank and flow to the estate when they paid millions of naira to own a property in the high priced estate but trouble started in 2008 when the estate’s fence was washed away. It was later re-erected, with heavy stones placed as barriers. But after sometime, the ocean surge became so vicious that it pulled down the stone barriers erected by the residents. This has since heightened fears among residents who are now desperate for a solution to salvage their life investments. More signs that danger lies ahead are damages caused within the estate. Aside washing away some land areas, the ocean also swept away a brand new Hyundai Jeep belonging to a young lady who visited the area recently. According to some of the residents, the lady was driving along the beach and her vehicle was trapped. All efforts to bring the Jeep out failed, so she abandoned it, hoping to return the following morning. Unfortunately, before her return, the vehicle had been swept away by the ocean. To battle a common enemy, each home owner in the estate has now been asked to pay N5million to execute a reclamation project. Workers were seen at the scene trying to bridge the ocean that was flowing so heavily above 12 feet high. Some of the residents spoken with, expressed fears that if urgent steps were not taken, there is going to be a serious surge that would likely claim lives. “In fact, what we are seeing here is a very dangerous scenario. It keeps on coming closer each day. In March this year, it was at a very long distance, but within five months, it is already closer to the estate fence, showing that there is danger.” He pointed out that residents had been tackling the ocean surge in their own little

. As residents defy relocation order

Effort to save estate way and that was the reason it has not taken over the whole estate. “ If you look round, you will see that the whole area is almost surrounded by the ocean and if something urgent is not done, there would be another serious incident of ocean surge. As a result, house owners were asked to pay N5million to tackle the problem, and something is being done on that.” Another resident was of the view that living in such an environment, without putting a better barrier against ocean surge, would amount to one toiling with his life. “With what is happening here, anyone living here is exposed to danger because the ocean may take over the whole place in a short period of time. I could remember that a former resident here left because while praying one night, she saw a vision where the ocean grew up to the sky and consumed all the occupant and having given the revelation, she told her husband and they bought another house at Park view estate and relocated. So that painted a picture of what would likely happen in the area if something urgent is not done.” A worker in the estate explained that the area is no more habitable and that residents live in fear especially since the Kuramo beach surge that claimed 16 lives. “We have

Surroundings of the estate being swept by the ocean

been threatened by the ocean for a long time and we believed that nothing would happen. But since the surge took place at Kuramo beach, everybody has known that anything can happen if care is not taken. Moreover, I blamed owners of the estate for locating it closer to the ocean without considering lives of the people, if anything happens.” In a reaction to the relocation order issued

by the state government, a resident stated that it would not be easy for the residents to relocate, having bought their property with hundreds of millions. “We heard that residents here were asked to leave due to fear of ocean surge and that is why the residents decided to tackle the menace with their own resources because it is not easy for one to forfeit the huge amount of money incurred in securing this place.”

A Hyundai Jeep swallowed by the ocean at the estate

Entrance to the estate


SATURDAY SUN

August 25 , 2012

7

EverydayLiving

Edward with deep cuts

Butchered like goat •Mad man attacks boy, leaves him with deep machete cuts By UCHE USIM

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onday, August 6, 2012 evil visited the family of Mr and Mrs Isong Edward of Ndi Okorukwu compound, Arochukwu LGA, Abia State. That day, a dangerous madman, named Michael Okoko cornered their 13-year-old son, Christian. After the encounter, the lad was left unconscious in the pool of his blood, butchered. All over his body are deep cuts. “But for the grace of God and the timely intervention of people, my son would have died,” Mr. Edward said. Presently, Christian is in hospital, receiving treatment. The father said that “even his bones” were cut. Trouble started for little Christian that fateful Monday evening when he made a brief stop at a guava tree after disposing refuse at a public dumpsite. Beside the site stood a guava. Completely attracted to the ripe guavas, the young boy jumped on it and began plucking. Shortly after, the 27-year-old Okoko came to rest at the foot of the same tree. According to eyewitness accounts, when the young boy got down, he shouted a command to the boy, asking him to hand over the guava fruits. Out of fear, the boy obeyed. However, just as the boy turned to go, Okoko pulled out a short machete from under his shirt, dragged him into a nearby bush and began to butcher him. Within seconds, Christian’s morbid body went limp on the ground in the pool of his own blood. Luckily, the eyewitness, who had been watching the incident, rushed to the scene after Okoko had run away. The boy was immediately rushed to a hospital in the village and the matter was later reported to the police. Meanwhile, the attacker, Okoko, probably

having realized the gravity of what he did, disappeared. But he was later fished out when police mounted a manhunt for him. As at the time of filing this report, he was still in Police detention in Ozu Abam as the Arochukwu Magistrate Court, where he would be arraigned, is on recess. A police source said: “The court will determine the appropriate punishment for Okoko”. Saturday Sun gathered from Ozu Abam indigenes that Okoko has a long record of violence. According to Uche Nnanna, who had a telephone conversation with our correspondent, the man had at different times damaged both public and private properties. “We also have cases where he went to people’s farms to beat them up and destroy their crops all in the name of madness. He

Edward

has been wreaking havoc and getting away with it. We also have cases where he harassed and beat up market women at the market square. He was the one that also damaged the church monument at Ugwuakukamalu. He poured very hot water on Orji Ogbu, a tailor who suffered serious burns. He also destroyed the glass at the house of Mr. Dan Abba at the Iyinobosi area of Ozu Abam. He is really a thorn in the flesh of Ozu people”, he said. Corroborating this account, Isong Edward said there are three members of Okoko’s family with horrible record of mental health problem. “They were formerly living in Ibadan and when they came back, we started seeing the evil in them. His two other brothers are suffering from the same madness but his own is really serious. They are a menace to our society. Their parents are old farmers, they can no longer control them”, he said. Christian is currently undergoing treatment at Mben Cottage Hospital, Ohafia and, according to his parents, he is always needing blood, saying they are short of money for his continued treatment. He is also expected to undergo surgical operations and more scanning sessions at the orthopedic hospital. “All these cost money and we don’t have it. We need about a million naira, and as poor people, we can’t

afford that. We want Nigerians to help us,” the father said. In the same vein, the Ozu Abam Development Union (OADU) is appealing to the public for assistance. A statement jointly signed by its chairman, Peter Okon and secretary, Prince Abbah made available to Saturday Sun reads in part: “The Ozu Abam Development Union and the parents of Master Christian Isong Edward are appealing to the government of Abia State and well-meaning citizens of Abia State, to help financially in Master Christian Isong Edward’s treatment, as his parents are not capable of footing the bill.”

Edward before the attack


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SATURDAY SUN August 25, 2012

Recurring failure in WAEC examinations

EDITORIAL

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esults of the May/June 2012 West African Senior School Certificate Examinations (WASSCE) recently released by the West African Examinations Council (WAEC) follow the same pattern of poor performance by candidates that has become the norm for four years now in the country. Only 649,156 candidates, 38.81 per cent of 1,695,878 candidates who sat for the important examination obtained credits in five subjects, including English Language and Mathematics, which is the minimum qualification for admission into universities and polytechnics in the country. About 61.19 per cent, totalling 1,046,722 million, candidates failed to meet the mark, and are therefore ineligible for admission into these tertiary institutions. Head of Nigeria Office (HNO) of WAEC, Dr. Iyi Uwadie, while announcing the results in Lagos, also confirmed that the bogey of examination malpractice is still bedeviling the examination, with results of 112,000 candidates withheld for involvement in various degrees of malpractices. This news of bad performance in WASSCE, though distressing, should not be a surprise to discerning Nigerians. Although the 38.81 per cent success rate this year is better than the 30.91 and 23.71 per cent recorded in 2011 and 2010 respectively, the failure of over 60 per cent of candidates in any examination should be a cause for serious worry. This is because such mass failure not only highlights the failure of strategies designed by education authorities to stem the tide of failures in public examinations, it is also a waste of public resources. The dismal performance in WASSCE is a fallout of the scandalously poor academic standards of students presented for the examination. The low quality of the students is a consequence of the collapse of our value system and the resultant lackadaisical attitude to academics by students, the government and some teachers. The mass failure is also fuelled by the policy of automatic promotion in many public schools, which does not encourage students to put in the necessary effort to pass their examinations. These days, also, there is little emphasis on

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the benefits of having good education. Attention of youths seems to have shifted to the entertainment sector where they feel they can achieve stardom and make more money. This is detrimental to their studies. The Internet and social networks, instead of being used as aides to academic work, have become huge distractions, with deleterious effects on students’ studies. Again, there is a dearth of role models for students. Teachers, once reverred and respected by students and the society, now mostly lack commitment to their jobs. Some take bribes from students in exchange for marks. Our political leaders, also, cannot be held out as examples for youths. Hence, the growing disinterest of students in their studies, and unbridled quest for relevance and glory outside the classroom. All segments of society, including parents, guardians, teachers and examination bodies, contribute to the worsening performance of students through aiding and abetting of examination “special centres”, where good results in public examinations are cooked up by ubiquitous education merchants and their collaborators in the examination bodies. All levels of government in Nigeria have also not demonstrated the necessary commitment to improving quality of public education. Schools are not properly equipped. Teachers are not adequately motivated to do a good job, or compensated for their efforts. Definitely, no nation can reap what it has not sown. A nation that has not invested in provision of quality secondary schools and teachers cannot expect roaring success in public examinations taken by its students. All these issues need to be addressed if Nigeria is to expect better results from students. It is good, however, that the latest results are better than those of recent years. Let the efforts that led to this improvement be intensified so that the trend can continue and students can post better results next year. Secondary schools are the foundation on which tertiary education is built. Every effort should be made to improve the quality of students in secondary schools. This will improve quality of students entering and passing out of tertiary institutions. Since the problem of poor performance in public examinations is a reflection of the collapse of values in the country, national re-orientation towards positive values will help to address the problem. We need to go back to the values that gave education pride of place and made students make their studies a priority in the past. Let us arrest the deterioration in education and every sector of national life. If we do this, the annual ritual of lamentation over woeful performance in WAEC examinations will come to an end.

T H E D I R E C T O R AT E TONY ONYIMA Managing Director /Editor-in-Chief FEMI ADESINA ETHEL NMEZI

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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

9

Lessons from Edo guber poll By EBOMHIANA MUSA

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he July 14, 2012 governorship election in Edo State, described by political analysts as a watershed in the political history of the state, will continue to attract comments, at least until the winner, Comrade Adams Aliyu Oshiomhole, is sworn in for his four-year second term in office. This will definitely take place on November 12 and it’s only God that can alter this. And I believe that He will neither alter nor stop it because He is the God who rewards hard work, the God of equity and fairness, the God who says that the labourer deserves his wages and that a lazy man must not eat. By all standards, Oshiomhole deserves that victory because he faithfully and diligently worked for it. While others were snoring, he was busy burning the proverbial midnight oil, strategising and racking his brain on how to improve the lot of his people and make Edo a model among the comity of states in Nigeria. The result of all these was the Tsunami of July 14, which is unprecedented in the history of party politics and electioneering in Nigeria. Even at the peak of its rigging, the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) never captured all the wards and all the local governments in any of the 36 states of the Federation and the Federal Capital Territory, FCT. But here is a miracle worker in Edo State, Oshiomhole, who, against all odds, laced with threats, achieved the feat in Edo State. With all the miracle results emerging from the South-South states of Rivers and Akwa Ibom in virtually all the past polls, they were still lighter years away. But this total victory comes with its huge challenge, the challenge of managing the

huge success and the challenge of accommodating all the positive forces that wreak the havoc on the opposition parties at the poll. The man behind the wheels needs plenty of patience, wisdom and wide consultations to successfully take the vehicle of state to a safe destination. This will be a topic for another day. However, the outcome of that election has taught us a number of lessons, which must not be lost in the euphoria of the celebration. Unfortunately, most Nigerian politicians will not learn any lesson in it simply because they have ears, yet will not hear and have eyes, yet blind to political realities in their environs. They choose to listen to themselves only and perhaps, political sycophants who tell them what they want to hear. Some of us used to believe that there is a bad spirit hovering around political offices in the land, which deafens and blind our leaders on assumption of office, whereby they behave like a dog destined to be lost. The scales suddenly fall off their eyes the moment they vacate office, they are full of regrets, with tail between their legs, they begin to craw back to old friends with apologies and lousy excuses for their stubbornness while in office. But the case of Oshiomhole in Edo State has changed my perception of a typical Nigerian political office holder. This is a man who sees political office purely as a call to service and a bond between him and the people, a leader par excellence and not a boss, a man full of passion for his people and his state, a man who has redefined leadership in Edo State. At the end of his stay in Osadebay Avenue, he would have successfully made Edo State a model for other states and above all, serve as a stepping stone to greater pedestal for service to humanity across political and socio-cultural

divide. He prefers to relate more with the masses (the hoi polloi) rather than the rich bourgeois) who oppress others with their wealth. A man who works round the clock with little or no time for leisure, God willing, he will be 60 on April 4, 2013, yet, he is bubbling with energy, as if he is in his 30s. He works as if there is no tomorrow. He is in a hurry to do so much within the limited time available to him in office, given the fact that our dear state was pillaged and raped by some heartless leaders for close to a decade and left prostrate. He has proved to his fellow politicians that with hard work, the people will always stand by you and thirst for more. Work for the people and they will compensate you with their votes at the polls. More especially, do not detach yourself from them. This is a governor who will visit the market woman, eat and drink with her and share her problems. It was, therefore, not surprising that the average Edo person was very passionate about the man they fondly called Oshio Baba and they were ready to lay down their lives to defend their votes that guaranteed his second term mandate in office. The bike riders, market women, commercial bus operators, artisans, farmers and various professional groups queued behind the man they have given a number of sobriquet to reflect how much he had touched their lives within a very short period in office. This is a people who had lost all hopes that anything good can come out of Osadebay Avenue, given their bitter experience with bad leadership in the last decade. Oshiomhole came and gave them hope, an enduring hope they will ever live to cherish. As a leader, be satisfied with what you have, never be carried away with the lucre of office and start eating with both hands. If you do, it will smear your mouth; the people will shout foul

and at the end of the day, you become an unwilling guest of anti-graft agencies. A leader who conscientiously, diligently and selflessly works for the good of his people and humanity does not have to dip his hand into the commonwealth for his personal benefit. The goodwill that comes with the office is more than enough. In fact, good name, the elders say, is better than silver and gold. All these, Oshiomhole has brought to bear in governance in Edo State. If he has been a spendthrift and a political glutton, Edo State would have still remained in the woods. Today, Edo State is a success story, a classical case of dry bones rising again. Oshiomhole is a study in political craftsmanship. In Edo, we have Oshioism in action. I sincerely believe that students of political economy should be interested in the magical turn around of Edo State within the short period of three and a half years by a man who was written off, at inception, by cynics as an ordinary union man, only good at organising rallies and protests against constituted authorities. To fellow Nigerians who have lost hope in the present crop of leaders in our country, I dare say that Oshiomhole, Babatunde Fashola and Olusegun Mimiko are the hope of this generation, our authentic brand. They are Obafemi Awolowo, Ahmadu Bello and Nnamdi Azikiwe reincarnate who have come to quench our thirst. The are focused, selfless, determined and very clear as to why they are in government and what governance means. Again, permit me to prophesy into the political future of these generational leaders: One of them will surely lead us to the Promised Land. • Musa is a political commentator based in Benin, Edo State.

Okorocha, promises and Imo State By BLYDEN AMAJIRIONWU

and the PDP. This is at a time he has done fantastically well, apart from promver since the change of guards in ises. Imo State, under Okorocha, has witImo State Government House nessed whimsical indiscretion, visionmore than one year ago, I have lessness, crass disregard for due process, followed events with keen interunequalled disdain for the rule of law est. I have followed the promises and and deceit. actions of the governor. I must say that I blame those who invited Governor some of the utterances of the governor Okorocha to deliver a keynote address at are careless. Take, for example, what such a revered workshop for the Governor Rochas Okorocha said unguarded statement. If one may ask: recently, while delivering a lecture at a Are the organisers not aware of what’s National Dialogue organized by the happening in Imo State? Are they not National Human Rights Commission aware that Imo State is run like an Abuja. He had said: “The visionless empire presided over by an emperor? leadership of the Peoples Democratic Are they not aware that Governor Party (PDP)-led government was Rochas Okorocha sacked 10,000 duly responsible for the birth of Boko employed workers from the state’s civil Haram in the North, kidnapping in the service without qualms? Are they not East and OPC menace in the West.” In aware that Governor Okorocha dissolved the said speech, which was widely all boards in the state, despite the fact reported in the media, he purportedly that their term had not expired, just advised President Goodluck Jonathan because they were put in place by the to stop acting like a politician. PDP government? Are they not aware According to him, any leader not that Okorocha has demolished over 1, ready to take responsibility is vision000 houses belonging to Imolites without less. He sarcastically stated that there any plans to pay compensation to their was nothing wrong with “the Head of owners? Are they not aware that State but there is something wrong Okorocha has awarded contracts worth with the state of the head.” billions of naira without due process? How could a governor say that? This Are they not aware that Okorocha is runis absurd! It is indeed, regrettable that ning an unconstitutional 4th-tier governGovernor Okorocha, whose achievement ment in Imo State? Are they not aware in one year in office still leaves much to that Okorocha unconstitutionally sacked be desired, has the audacity to throw 27 elected council chairmen and 305 jibes at the President of the federation councillors in the state and that courts of

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competent jurisdiction have ruled that he had no right to so do? Are they not aware that Okorocha has not much for Imo people since becoming the governor? Did they ask question about over N57 billion allocations to Imo LGAs since elected chairman and councillors were removed from office? Are they not aware that Imo State has not paid officers of the immediate past administration their severance allowance, including that of the former governor? Are they not aware that arbitrariness has replaced democracy in Imo State since May 29, 2011? Are they not aware that Imo State has no functional House of Assembly, but a Ministry of House of Assembly, where APGA elected members only go and sign bills and laws drawn up by the government? My advice is that organisers of the lecture should immediately visit Imo State, hold discussions with civil servants, churches, schools, artisans, market women and other groups and see what’s happening. After that they would render an unreserved apology to the people of Imo State. Nonetheless, the attack on the PDP government cannot be made an issue here because the people know the pedigree of the attacker. It is a known fact that Okorocha wants to run for the Presidency under APGA, a very laughable daydream that one is not perturbed with, because he has done so severally. One hopes he remembers how he fared

each time he did. While the Achike Udenwa and Ikedi Ohakim administrations are remembered in Imo today as liberal governments that gave jobs and contracts to Imo people, the Okorocha regime is known as the government of Okorocha, by the Okorochas and for the Okorochas. At present, the people of Imo State do not matter. Those unlucky to secure a contract from the government are required to source for funds and execute the contracts without mobilisation, a queer style that has impoverished contractors in Imo State. Imo people also observe the unconscionable scramble for Imo land and property. The present attempts to take over the land of Owerri people, part of Alvan Ikoku Federal College of Education and a large portion of the land of Federal University of Technology (FUTO) are inglorious examples. It is really a shame that intelligent Nigerians sat down at the lecture to listen to only sound and fury from a governor, who, it will take eternity of lectures and tutorials to learn the simple rudiments of administration and leadership. I wonder how the people of Imo State, with one of the highest levels of intellectual development in Nigeria, ended up like this. •Amajirionwu writes from Owerri, Imo State


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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

National news Dana air crash: 2 victims buried in Imo From VAL OKARA, Owerri

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ears flowed freely yesterday as the remains of Mrs. Echendu and her daughter, Jennifer Uzoma Ibe who died in a Dana air crash on June 3 in Lagos were committed to mother earth at their country home, Amuzi Ikenanzizi in Obowo Local Government Area of Imo State. The corpses were brought to St. Mary’s Catholic parish, Amuzi, venue of the church

•Bereaved mother, Mrs Joy Rita Osokogu

service at about 12.55pm in two separate sport utility vehicles (SUV) in white caskets. The solemn mood in the church got tensed as mourners including old men, women, youths, politicians and captains of industries wailed uncontrollably. In the service were present and past political office holders in the state including Governor Rochas Okorocha, former governor Achike Udenwa and his deputy, Chief Ebere Udeagu, the former Chairman of the

Cynthia’s killers demanded N20m, says mum From MARIAM ALESHINLOYE AGBOOLA, Jos

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ather of Cynthia, the 24-year-old lady killed by her facebook friends in Lagos has said he believes his daughter did not die in vain because there are lessons other people need to learn from the unfortunate incident. This is even as the mother of the deceased, Mrs. Joy Rita Osokogu revealed that her daughter was scheduled to introduce her fiancée to the family in August, adding that her assailants had in a telephone conversation with her early this month demanded a ransom of N20 million unknown to her that they had already killed her daughter then. Speaking at his residence at ECWA staff quarters new GRA in Farin Gada,Jos, Major Gen. Frank Osokogu said it was stupid for somebody to travel and meet friends that he or she had not known because they have been chatting on social media network. He said: “Even though I have lost my daughter, her loss might not have been in vain because there are lessons other people need to learn from this unfortunate incident. I believe it is stupid for somebody to travel to go and meet friends that he or she had not known because you have been chatting with them in social media network.” According to him: “I strongly believe that adventure is just too much and risky. You should know people before you begin to visit them every other person, especially the students have a big lesson to learn for this.” In her own account, the mother of the deceased, Mrs. Joy Rita Osokogu, who described her daughter’s life as too fast even though she never had premonition that she would die that young, stated: “Anytime I see my daughter, I said you are too fast little girl of 24, you have every-

•Her death will serve as lesson to other youths- Gen Osokogu thing in life. Her daddy bought a new car for her when she graduated at the age of 24. She took part in Miss Nigeria 2010 and was one of the runners-up.” She said she was always on her daughter to get married on time but anytime she approached her on marriage, she would promise to bring her fiancée for her parents to know. She said the last time they spoke, she promised to bring the man by August. She said when Cynthia got missing, she had fasted and prayed for those three weeks until her corpse was found. According to her, Cynthia would have seen her the day Senator Gyang Dantong was killed in the thick of the Berom/Fulani crisis, but she could not come because the road was not safe for anybody to travel and as such had to stay back in Keffi. In her words: “On Sunday, 22nd July, she called to tell me that she had arrived Lagos to collect some goods that had just arrived from overseas and promised to come and see me immediately she arrived from Lagos. So, when she did not call me on the day she was supposed to arrive, I called her number but it wasn’t going. At that time I called my husband who lives in Abuja and my senior son to intimate them of what is happening.

So, I went to the police to complain. But when we called the number again, it was going and someone picked it and said that she would come back. So, I ran to the police and told them everything, they (assailants) also told the police that they cannot speak with Cynthia because she was in the hospital. Not until after two weeks they now told me that I should not bother to call again that she had been killed.” She recalled that Symbol Hospital, Benin where they told her that Cynthia was initially, turned out to be a fake hospital, adding: “I told them that you people said we should send N20 million but the account number they sent to me was fake one. They told me we have killed her; it was after this that I declared her missing.” She said she is leaving the revenge of her loss for God to take. “I fear God so much; vengeance is for God.” Giving a run-down of her daughter’s life, she said: “Cynthia attended Command Secondary School, had university education before proceeding to the Nasarawa State University for post-graduate diploma in Public Administration. “While in 300 level she said her ambition was to go into business after her university educa-

tion”, she added. She further disclosed that her first son gave Cynthia money to set up a boutique which she named‘Dress Code’ in keffi, Nasarawa State. “When she finished her university education, my daughter opted to do her NYSC in Jos instead of Abuja because she wants to stay with me. When she finished, she was Miss NYSC for batch B 2010. Early this year, she got a job with MTN here in Jos but because the salary was not good, she left the work and got admission into Nasarawa State University for postgraduate Diploma in Public Administration”, the bereaved mother added. In his own account, Gen. Osokogu, who described his daughter as “a nice girl who was full of promise and well disciplined,” said up till now he could not comprehend why his daughter would be killed, adding: “It is still irrational.” He said the question of whether they killed her for ritual is ruled out because his younger brother in Lagos had already seen her body in the mortuary and confirmed that there was no body part missing. The distraught father, who said he saw her last about a month ago, when he visited her in school and gave her

some money and the laptop she forgot at home, pointed out that as at the time they were looking for her, no ransom was demanded from the family, “so we cannot quite place what the motive was. That is why I say it is incomprehensible as at now.” He said he got to know that he was missing through her friend in Abuja who she had dropped her car and some of her possessions with before travelling to Lagos. “It was when the friend did not see her on the day she promised to return that they started looking for any of the family members. They got in touch with me and said my daughter has travelled, they have not been able to get in touch with her. I told them to come over to my house and they came and told them to go and make statement to the police. From there, the search started, that was about the first of August”, Gen Osokogu stated. The father of four with Cynthia being the baby of the family, said as the only daughter, she was a home girl. “She has not been playing prank, all what I know she was a good girl. I have three boys and her, she is the only girl and last born of the family”, he added saying her death would be very difficult for the family to bear.

Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC), Professor Maurice Iwu, his brother, Chief Cosmos Iwu, Chief Emmanuel Iwuanyanwu, Speaker, Imo State House of Assembly, Chief Benjamin Uwajumogu and two former speakers of the state House of Assembly, Chiefs Maxwell Duru and Noel Chukwukadibia. Others included SSG Imo State, Prof. Anthony Anwuka, Alex Mbakwe, IMSU, Vice Chancellor, Prof. B.E.B Nwoke, Sir bright Nwelue, Chuma Nnaji and Chukwuemeka Nwajiuba. In his homily, Rev Fr. Professor Jerome Ikechukwu Okonkwo and also Vice Chancellor of Gregory University, Uturu, Abia State, noted that what matters in the life of a man is not the death of the body but that of the soul. He said that the service was meant to put a stamp on the deceased and described the stamp as the cross of Jesus Christ. The priest advised Christians not to be carried away by affluence or positions of authority but to see all these as vanity which they must leave behind when recalled by their creator. Governor Rochas Okorocha, in his tribute, reminded the bereaved family that death, though painful, is an inevitable phenomenon that could befall any living creature. The husband of the deceased, Mr Ike Ibe described his late wife as an incredible and an accomplished woman who devoted her life to charity and philanthropic activities. He explained that his departed wife spent her time working on and campaigning about those neglected issues affecting the ordinary person, the voiceless, the weak, the hungry and the widowers, adding that his late wife, being meek and humble made the poor and the forgotten class her companions.

...As controversy trails whereabouts of murder suspects By CHRISTOPHER OJI

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wo suspects who allegedly killed MajorGen Frank Osokogu’s daughter, Cynthia were yesterday transferred to the State Criminal Investigation Department (SCID), homicide section, Panti, Yaba, Lagos . A senior officer at the SCID, however, contradicted this claim. According to the source, the suspects are yet to be

transferred to the SCID. “The suspects are being confined in maximum security. Wherever they are detained does not matter but the most important thing is that they are in police custody and well protected”, the police source added. Command spokeswoman, Ngozi Braide, a Deputy Superintendent (DSP), however, confirmed that the Area Commander of Area ‘E’ Command, Mr Dan Okoro personally supervised the

transfer of the suspects to the SCID. Another source at the Area ‘E’ command, who pleaded anonymity, told Saturday Sun that the suspects are still in the custody of the police in Festac because some victims are still coming to identify them. It was gathered that more female victims of the suspects, Nwabufor Okwomu and Odera Ezekeil, have shown up at the Area Command. Meanwhile, the claims by

alleged victims that they were also lured to hotels in Festac area by the suspects through interactions and chats on facebook and blackberry are presently still being investigated by the police. It was gathered that the police high command in the state has already arrested some management staffers of the other hotels mentioned by the suspects during their confession. A source at the police headquarters disclosed: “The commissioner of police is angry with these hotels for

not coming forward with such information before now. “The management staff of those hotels risk prosecution for withholding such information. It’s possible that the command would have checked the crime if these people had reported this matter earlier.” It was also gathered that the police have placed a security watch on all the hotels within Festac area to ensure that such incident does not occur again.


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

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National news Chinese sex cartel in fresh trouble From ADE ALADE and CHIOMA IGBOKWE

• Immigration raids apartment, arrests 13 teenage girls

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executives and expatriates to hire for sex, at the cost of between $1000 and $2500. Following the initial report, the cartel run by a Chinese couple, hurriedly evacuated the girls and fled into hiding. After a few weeks in hiding, the cartel, which operates from three different buildings on Emina Crescent, off Toyin Street, Ikeja, Lagos, returned to business in full gear and with more work force. A source close to the cartel told Saturday Sun that no fewer than 20 Chinese teenage girls were brought into the country

o fewer than 13 Chinese teenage girls camped in an apartment in Lagos for commercial sex trade are now cooling their heels in the custody of the Nigerian Immigration Service following a dramatic raid of their operational base, even as security agents have declared a manhunt for the kingpin of the syndicate. Saturday Sun had, in recent exclusive reports, exposed a cartel behind Lagos homes, where about 40 Chinese teenage girls are camped for Nigerian politicians, business

. Declares kingpin wanted in addition to about 40 already camped for the booming commercial sex trade. Fresh trouble, however, came for the syndicate on Thursday, August 16, 2012 when a team of immigration officials raided one of the

apartments, where the ladies were camped. A source in NIS said 13 of the young girls were arrested from the apartment while the kingpin, Sun Li escaped. Other girls camped in two other buildings, on the same street, were thereafter, quietly relocated to

some hotels by the syndicate. The arrested girls have since been cooling off behind bars, as Immigration authorities investigate how they were brought into Nigeria, with a view to determining whether they should be deported or handed over to the Chinese Embassy in Abuja for appropriate action.

When contacted on the development, NIS spokesman, Joachim Olumba confirmed the arrest of the Chinese girls, adding that investigating officials were still on the trail of the fleeing kingpin of the sex ring. He told Saturday Sun that the arrested girls and further investigation of the syndicate have since been moved to the Abuja headquarters of the Service.

Declare your source of wealth, ACN challenges Obasanjo

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he Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN) in Oyo State has challenged former President Olusegun Obasanjo to a public debate with its leader and former governor of the state, Alhaji Lam Adesina, on who was the most incorruptible, the most relevant to his immediate constituency, or even the course of democracy in Nigeria. The party made this known in a release issued by its Publicity Secretary, Hon. Dauda Kolawole, in a reply to a statement credited to the former president demanding exGovernor Adesina’s relevance while in office. The ACN said that the former president was daily losing credibility in a country he administered twice in his lifetime, stating that this was a symptom of the “colossal deceit” of patriotism and incorruptibility that he made the world to believe were his moral credentials. The party said that it was challenging the former president to disprove the claim that he is one of the richest Nigerians alive, stating that he should explain how he came about his colossal wealth while pretending to the whole world that he was frugal and above board. “The same anti-corruption institutions established by Obasanjo were gaping with astonishing complicity while the regime he headed distributed billions of our hardearned patrimony as graft to legislators to win a third term. It is a shame that, rather than act like a statesman and admit his involvement in a project that would have burnt this whole nation but for the intervention of providence, Obasanjo has shamelessly denied that he held the patent of the shameless venture. “Former Vice President Atiku Abubakar first opened the lid of the character called Obasanjo. Through unassailable documents, he showed the whole world how corrupt the man who paraded the mantra of an incorruptible president was in purchasing cars for liaisons and cornering juicy contracts by proxy. Those allegations were never

answered by our ‘incorruptible ex-president till today,” the ACN said. While asking that Obasanjo should ask God for forgiveness for how he had deceived Nigerians and the international community thus far, the ACN said that the problems that have made Nigeria a pigmy in an international community of giants could not be divorced from the insincerity of the Obasanjo regimes 1976-1979 and 1999-2007 as well as his tendency to destroy even those he built. “We challenge the former president to name an individual he built while in office who is still on the same page with him. He is like the typical Yoruba witch to whom it is suicidal to do good. He takes a maniacal relish in destroying those who have done him good. Obasanjo has the proverbial character of the Greek god called Janus: His public portrayal and the person he is in his closet. There is no leadership calamity that has befallen this nation that you will not find Obasanjo’s callous imprimatur in it,” the party said. The ACN said that it agreed with its leader, Alhaji Adesina, in his allegation that Obasanjo was complicit in the fate that has befallen the Lagos/Ibadan expressway. “While he was president, the Yoruba nation lost in all respects, infrastructure and even socio-politics. The main roads in Yorubaland, one of which were the Lagos/Ibadan expressway, the Ibadan/Abeokuta road and several others were left undone by him. He hounded our best brains and industrialists like Mike Adenuga out of town and in spite of all these, his barren eight-year slot has become a vicarious liability for the people of Yorubaland,” the ACN said. The party said that, comparatively, Alhaji Adesina has a huge following which is loyal to him and the party he heads, which is the ACN. “While governor of Oyo State, Alhaji Adesina built human beings and structures in Oyo State which are still enduring till today.

Governor Abiola Ajimobi of Oyo State (right) congratulating Mr. Akinwande Mukaila Akintoye shortly after his inauguration as Caretaker Committee Chairman of Egbeda Local Government at the Governor’s Office, Ibadan on Thursday. With them are the new Chairman of Ona-Ara Local Government, Mr. Akanni Nurudeen Ademola (second left) and the AttorneyGeneral and Commissioner for Justice, Mr. Adebayo Ojo (left). PHOTO: OYO STATE GOVERNMENT HOUSE

Don’t use force against Boko Haram, group tells FG From NOAH EBIJE, Kaduna

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aduna-based Non Governmental Organization, Initiative for Moral Rebirth in Nigeria has said the use of force against the Islamist sect, Boko Haram would not solve the problem of bombing and killings in the country. As a result, the group urged the Federal Government to apply logic, reason and conviction to bring the seemingly unending Boko Haram crisis to an end. This was contained in a communiqué issued at the end of the group’s congress in Kaduna. The communiqué, which was jointly signed by

the President of the NGO, Abdulwasiu Adebayo and the Chairman, communiqué committee, Abu Anas, reads in part: “The battle against Boko Haram is taking dangerous dimension as it has become apparent that the use of force is fuelling more destruction than what ought to have been extinguished. Therefore, it becomes necessary and urgent for the Federal Government to replace bomb and gun with logic, reason and conviction. “The government may be proud of military might to crush insurgence but the rate at which Nigeria is losing resources, security personnel and innocent people in the mayhem is alarming.While blaming the escalation of the

security challenges on unguarded statements from some prominent citizens, the group urged states feeling the heat to convene peace meetings among all stakeholders on a monthly basis. “Obviously, the provocative utterances of some ethnoreligious leaders are causing the crises. The governments of volatile states should convene peace and security meeting which will include ethnoreligious leaders where security matters would be addressed on a monthly basis, then ethno-religious leaders should be charged with the responsibility of maintaining peace in their domain and the report of progress or otherwise on this, should be entertained at the

monthly meeting, and then awards should be given to those who excel in this regard. “Governments should display equity, fairness and justice in the way and manner it handles the affairs of the states rather than ethnocentrism as there cannot be peace in an atmosphere of injustice. “The state of the insecurity in some parts of Nigeria is very unfortunate and capable of throwing the country into destruction if urgent steps are not taken to find a lasting solution to it”, the group added. It also blamed the threat to the nation’s peace on the alarming rate of unemployment and urged government at all levels to address the problem.

Ajimobi inaugurates 2 Accord Party members as LG chairmen

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overnor Abiola Ajimobi of Oyo State has sworn in two members of the Accord Party (AP) as local government caretaker committee chairmen, with a mandate that they must run their respective councils in accordance with the principle, policies and dictates of the ruling Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN). The two new chairmen, Mr. Akinwale Mukaila Akintoye for Egbeda Local Government and Mr. Akanni Nurudeen Ademola for Ona Ara Local Government – are to resume duty on September 1, 2012. It would be recalled that the gentleman’s agreement between the ruling ACN and

Accord Party, which is said to be aimed at ensuring a rancour-free administration in the state, had earlier resulted in the appointment of two AP members as commissioners and members of the state executive council. Speaking on the occasion held at the Executive Chamber of the Governor’s Office, Senator Ajimobi urged the two new council helmsmen to shed their toga of political affiliation and work with his administration to move the state forward. “Let me refer to your oath of office which is to bear true allegiance to your duty and to carry out your activities without fear or favour as well as to have the interest of the masses

at heart. “ In running your local governments, we expect you, as part and parcel of this administration, and based on our arrangement with Accord Party, that you work according to the dictates, principles and policies of the Action Congress of Nigeria (ACN). “Remember, it is an ACN government and, therefore, as you are coming on board, you should know that you are wearing the cap of that government. When you finish and you go back to your Accord Party, then you are Accord Party but as long as you are with this government, you are ACN. “Let me also say that where there is rancour, there will be

no development. The politics we are playing now is politics of development and not of rancour or abuses. We, therefore, expect you to join hands with us so that we can achieve the aims and objectives of this government in line with the ACN philosophy,’’ the governor said. He described ACN-led government as a progressive administration bent on restoring, transforming and reposition the state, adding: “What this means is that we must all work together to change things from what they used to be to what they should be. Therefore, we must put all hands on deck and ensure that we live above board’’.


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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

National news Jonathan assures on sustained democracy, stability and development From JULIANA TAIWO- nations. He stated this when he had OBALONYE, Abuja audience with the outgoing resident Goodluck British High Commissioner Jonathan yesterday reit- to Nigeria, Mr. Andrew Lloyd erated the Federal who was on a farewell visit to Government’s determination the Presidential Villa. President Jonathan reafto continue to work with Britain and other developed firmed his administration’s nations to promote good gov- commitment to evolving and ernance, political stability and implementing policies and socio-economic development measures that will help in Nigeria and other African Nigeria to successfully over-

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come present challenges. He noted that the already excellent bilateral relations between Nigeria and Britain had been significantly enhanced during Mr. Lloyd’s tenure. He specifically commended the High Commissioner’s efforts to boost trade and economic cooperation between Nigeria and Britain, the highpoint of which, he said, was

the visit of Prime Minister David Cameron to Nigeria with a delegation of British businessmen and investors. “We shall continue to count on your support and I hope your successor will continue your good work here in Nigeria,” the President told Mr. Lloyd. In a related development, the President also received the outgoing Egyptian

Ambassador to Nigeria, Mr. Youssef Hassan Shawki who is leaving the country after a two-year tenure. Jonathan expressed the hope that Nigeria and Egypt will continue to build up and expand areas of bilateral

cooperation. He wished Mr. Shawki well in his future endeavours and urged him to now consider himself a life-long Ambassador of Nigeria to Egypt and the rest of the world.

Bayelsa declares war on criminals From FEMI FOLARANMI, “This government has been on a steady march since its Yenagoa inception to tackle the issue of he Bayelsa State govern- insecurity in the state and our ment has reiterated its stand to ensure zero-tolerance zero-tolerance for crimi- for crime and criminality is nality, warning those who yielding the desired results. want to perpetrate crime in the Government, therefore, wishes to commend the efforts of state to think twice. The state Commissioner of the various law enforcement Police, Mr Kings Omire had agencies in the state and declared Bayelsa a no-go area would like to see these efforts for cultists, vowing not to intensified so that the state can spare them even as he alleged be completely rid off of all that they were the ones criminals and cultist groups. involved in armed robbery “At this juncture, governand other criminal activities in ment wishes to issue a clear warning to all criminal elethe state. The state government, in a ments in the state, including statement by the Chief Press all those with criminal tenSecretary to the Governor, Mr dencies, to pack up and leave Daniel Iworiso-Markson, the state or else be made to commended law enforcement face the wrath of the law, as agents for their vigilance in government has put all necescurbing crime in the state. The sary security checks in place statement is coming on the to ensure that the long arm of heels of mass arrests of rob- the law catches up with whobery suspects by security ever, no matter how highly placed, that engages in acts of agents. It urged residents to go about criminality or brigandage. their normal business as the Parents are particularly state government has put ade- warned to call their wards to quate security check in place order because there will be no room for clemency for anyto curtail criminal elements. The statement reads in part: one caught”

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The Speaker of the Grand National Assembly of Turkey, Cemil Çiçek, welcoming the Speaker of Nigeria’s House of Representatives, Hon Aminu Waziri Tambuwal, to his official residence in Cankaya, Ankara, yesterday.

Vocational training institute graduates 51 ex-militants From KOFA KINGS,Ughelli

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vocational training institute, Izisco Obos International Nig Ltd has graduated 51 ex-militants with a call on them to be good ambassadors of themselves and the Federal Government

amnesty programme. The proprietor of the institute, Captain Seide Isaac, in his address at the graduation ceremony weekend in Uwvie council area of Delta State, said a total of 51 ex-militants were successfully trained in under water/ex-

ray welding in a programme that lasted for nine months. He also disclosed that, the institute had graduated a total of 93 ex-militants within 18 months affirming that graduates from the institute can favourably compete with their foreign counterparts.

We are in Nigeria to save lives –Indian hospital From GODWIN TSA, Abuja

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he management of an Abuja based Indian hospital-Primus Specialty International Hospital situated in Karu, has decried the recent campaign of calumny attacking both the professionalism and credibility of the hospital, saying the ugly development was capable of destroying the good intention of coming into the country to save lives. The hospital was reacting to media reports suggesting that it was operating with quack doctors and obsolete medical equipment to dupe unsuspecting patients. Managing Director and Chairperson of the Hospital, Dr. Acla Dewan told Saturday Sun that such negative reports are capable of destroying the genuine intention of establishing the hospital in the country, adding: “It’s very disappointing, we’re helping humanity, we’ve come all the way, our doctors, it’s easy for us to come all away to start a hospital

because Nigerians need it. What offence have I committed by bringing such huge investment to Nigeria? Speaking on the credibility and professionalism of the hospital, Dr. Dewan disclosed that the hospital is an authority in tertiary health services in India commanding international respect, as it is located within the diplomatic zone in New Delhi with branches across India. She explained that with its proximity to embassies in New Delhi, patients across the globe visited Primus Hospital constantly seeking medical help, adding that majority of those patients were more of Nigerians from the top echelon of the society, ranging from ministers, National Assembly members, diplomats, business class and other government functionaries. “You see, when we were in India, we used to get many patients, and most of them were Nigerians. Most people coming to India were thinking that everything is going to be

resolved, but medical science has its limitation, we tell them, we can help you but the condition you have come in now, there’s hardly anything we can do. I met many patients, you know, Nigerians are like Indians, very close to their families.” Concerning the qualifications of the Indian doctors, again, Dewan said the process of recruiting the medical personnel was thorough, stating that most of the doctors working at the hospital have carried out between 50 and100 surgeries and operations as part of their experience. “Beside, the management also attest to the fact that its recruitment policy is in line with the government’s quota system for foreign companies. To that extent, the Ministry of Interior has certified its Indian medical personnel to carry out their work. Besides, Nigerians are being given the opportunity to ply their trades. Only recently, the hospital was accredited to run intent programmes for medical students’ training.”

Also speaking, a contractor to the federal government amnesty office Prince Clement Bebenemibo of the Bebeco Peace CNF Nig Ltd, argued that for the amnesty programme not to suffer setback due to the absence of jobs to accommodate exmilitants, the federal government should formulate policies that would pave way for multi-national oil companies to employ them. Bebenemibo said it would be a wasteful exercise after spending so much training the ex-militants under the amnesty programme and allow them go back to the creeks due to lack of jobs. He appealed to the Federal Government to facilitate the employment of exmilitants who have been trained in various vocations to enable them to take care of themselves and their families. One of the ex-militants, Mr. Awolowo Iyaragba, who spoke on behalf other graduating ex-militants, thanked the Federal Government for bringing them out of the creeks and appealed to government to make jobs available to them to take care of their families. He enjoined other ex-militants who had not been trained to remain focussed assuring that the Federal Government was prepared to train every ex-militant who has been enlisted in the programme.

BPE DG, Onagoruwa clocks 54

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s. Bolanle Ayodele Onagoruwa, the Director General of the Bureau of Public Enterprises (BPE), will be 54 years on Wednesday, August 29, 2012. Appointed acting Director General of BPE on March 8, 2010, she was confirmed as the substantive boss of the privatisation agency on August 11, 2010. Onagoruwa was trained variously at the University of Lagos for her law degree (1978); Nigerian Law School, Lagos (1979); University of Kent at Canterbury, England for a Post-graduate Diploma in

Politics & International Relations (1987); and the prestigious Harvard Business School, Boston, USA for the General Manager Programme (TGMP). She has also attended several local and international professional certificate training programmes. Onagoruwa joined the BPE with her wealth of experience acquired in legal practice and the banking sector in September 2000 as a Deputy Director (Legal Services.) She had a three- year stint at Federal Capital Territory Administration (on leave of absence) between June 2004 and July 2007.

Abike Dabiri-Erewa hale, hearty

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ast week, we reported, in our society page, Society People, that Hon Abike Dabiri-Erewa, a member of the House of Representatives, was receiving treatment abroad. We have long discovered that the federal lawmaker is hale and hearty and actually attended a social event, in Lagos, last Saturday. We regret the embarrassment the report may have caused Hon. Dabiri-Erewa. – Editor


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SaturdayInterview From KEMI YESUFU and PAULINUS AIDOGHIE, Abuja

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he late Chief Godwin Daboh was controversial all through his life. Almost everything the man known as ‘If you Takar me, I Daboh you,’ touched, turned into a controversy. Also, his death, according to his first child, Hon Olufunmilayo Daboh, wasn’t free of controversy. According to Ms. Daboh, her father died in mysterious circumstances. In this interview, the former lawmaker speaks on her father’s life, his death and their often rancorous relationship. She also spoke on the well reported bickering that occurred during her father’s burial, among other issues. It’s been five months since your father died. How has it been? My dad’s death was quite devastating for me because now I am all alone in the world. I am now an orphan. I lost my mother in February 2007. It has really been tough because recently my dad and I were close. In fact, my dad and I returned from Delta State, where we attended the burial ceremony of the father-in-law of my younger sister, Mrs. Oluchi Gbinije, on a Monday, only for me to hear that he died on Wednesday night. His corpse was taken to Garki Hospital, Abuja on Thursday and this means that he died in his house under questionable circumstances. Though the circumstances he died are very questionable, my immediate younger sister (Oluchi Gbinije) and I weren’t too surprised because my father feared for his life towards his last days. He told my sister and I that a particular family member had been threatening him. But I still give God the glory because I believe that nothing happens without God’s permission. I cannot question what happened; it will just be like when we wonder why God cast out Lucifer but still left him with the powers that he had. I guess this is why God’s ways are not our ways and I still give Him thanks, as He commanded that we should, under any circumstance. I also wish to thank all those who stood by the family during our trying time. Did your late father live in the same house with the family member who threatened him? It was a woman, who was threatening my father. He complained to many people not just my sister and I. One other happening struck me. Three weeks before my father died, he sent his General Manager to come pick me from my lounge after calling my mobile phone many times. I didn’t hear it ring because my phone is always on silent mode and I wasn’t near the phone since I was busy attending to my clients. When I picked his call eventually, he told me: ‘my daughter I want to see you in my office right away.’ I asked why he sounded frightened. I tried to explain to him that I would come when my driver returned from an errand, but he told me he had already sent his GM. At that moment, the GM walked in. I thank God that I went because he called all his workers together and again stated that this particular family member was threatening him. He said he was scared for his life, asking that we helped him. Maybe we should have done more than assuage his fears because three weeks after he was dead. I have little doubt about my father’s death being mysterious. I have his death certificate as the first child. It shows that he was brought in dead. They sneaked his corpse to the hospital and I wonder why. I live in Abuja; if they weren’t hiding anything, why didn’t they inform me of his death? I got a call that my father’s corpse had been deposited in Garki hospital. Are you saying that you father was killed? What I am saying is that my father died in mysterious circumstances. He wasn’t ill; he was hale and hearty. I just told you that we were both in Warri for the burial of my sister’s father-in-law. And because my father had expressed fear for his life to many people, it is quite clear that the circumstances of his death are mysterious. Neither anyone nor I would

Daboh

My father died in mysterious circumstances —Godwin Daboh’s daughter you believed that he died mysteriously? Would it (autopsy) wake him up? As I told you, I was surprised to hear of my father’s death. As if that wasn’t enough, the next thing, I was in hospital to see his corpse. When you get to the mortuary, the first thing they ask for was the payment for embalmment. It was after Why didn’t you call for an autopsy since they had embalmed him that one of my sisters

have expected that he would die all of a sudden. My father was strong for his age. He used to drive from Abuja to Maiduguri by himself; it was people around him that advised that he stopped this because he wasn’t getting younger.

who was so upset, asked that we demand an autopsy. But I have no doubts about what I have told you concerning the circumstances of my father’s death. In fact, I have text messages, which showed that the family member my father complained about also asked that I

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RITA LORI OGBEBOR ‘ I must therefore say

very clearly that we’re at a standstill. The country is stuck. We can’t think, and there’s no courage to move on

‘ With state police, minorities are doomed By FEMI ADESINA

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rontline industrialist and activist, Chief (Mrs) Rita Lori-Ogbebor is up in arms against the idea of having state police in the country, a development which former military president, Gen Ibrahim Badamosi Babangida (IBB) backed last week. If state police ever becomes reality in the country, says Rita Lori-Ogbebor, who is the Igba of Warri, then all minorities like her Itsekiri people are doomed. Soon, they’ll become history. They will be oppressed, repressed, till they get decimated. Hear the woman in this interview with Saturday Sun: “With state creation, minorities were put along or in the middle of majorities without adequate laws to protect them. So, today, a lot of minorities are languishing under the majorities. Even those in their natural homelands can’t speak anymore. Their natural abode have been taken over, they have no voice, and physically, they have no home… What do you think will be the fate of minorities under state police? The governors will appoint their cronies and supporters, and use them to oppress their opponents.” But Rita Lori-Ogbebor also has very strong words for the Federal Government in respect of the post-amnesty deal. The programme, she says, is appearing “to be more of an Ijaw affair.” She’s afraid for the minorities. But her state, Delta, is now

governed by a minority Itsekiri, just like herself? Then her bombshell: “Itsekiris are not happy with Uduaghan at all. They are disappointed in him.” The interview below: As an activist and political commentator, what’s your reading of the state of the country? We can’t over-emphasize the seriousness of the insecurity situation. It’s so serious people live one day after the other. And when you live that way, things are at standstill. You have no vision, therefore, no implementation or development of personal life and country. I must therefore say very clearly that we’re at a standstill. The country is stuck. We can’t think, and there’s no courage to move on. What then is the way out? We know of the problem in the North, but what we do not have our fingers on is why. For me, I think it is largely political. But the very start of it may not have been entirely political. It was a matter of hunger, of hopelessness, of not knowing what tomorrow would be. A situation where you can’t provide for your family, and you just know that your children will end up like you, in absolute poverty, is a terrible one. When a man is hungry, he will do anything to provide food for his family. If you feel you’re a hopeless man, a useless man who has failed in all his duties, the tendency is to ask what such a man is living for. He will rather take the pittance

he’s offered, give it to his family, and blow himself up. Do you see a correlation between what is happening in the North now, and the Niger Delta insurgency? What drove the Niger Delta insurgency at the beginning was poverty. The people were so poor, yet they saw wealth being taken from their own land. That was how it started. For example, at the very beginning, the Ijaws did not understand where the money was going. It was rumoured that the Itsekiris and the Olu of Warri had cornered all the oil money, so they fought the Itsekiris, and found no money. Indeed, both the Ijaws and the Itsekiris were suffering the same fate. I think the Boko Haram is having the same problem. They are so poor, and they don’t know who to fight, so they begin to fight themselves. It is difficult to know what exactly Boko Haram is. There’s no way you find a man satisfied with life bombing himself to death and leaving his family behind. The similarity between Boko Haram and Niger Delta is that both started, and were driven by poverty. But the Niger Delta was able to pinpoint the problem later on, after the Itsekiri fight. Now the problem is being tackled. But some people have reservations on how the problem is being tackled. Are you satisfied? Not in any way. Again, the situation has been hijacked by politicians as always. Politicians always try to reverse all positive agenda to negative for money.

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Saturday People •Continued from Page 17 All the money pumped into the Niger Delta for NDDC, Desopadec, through Ministry of Niger Delta, through the oil companies, is enough to revamp the region. But today, the Niger Delta is the same Niger Delta that militants fought for years ago. Indeed, the war is nowhere near over. There are still no jobs, no hope of real development, the militants are still talking and arguing over welfare. It is true that most of them have been sent abroad to learn professional skills, but when they come back, where is the blueprint for job creation? You must have a blueprint. The Niger Delta governors must come to the table together to streamline the region in business and job creation, they are busy dividing their states, their region for their own benefits. They are busy fighting for the next election, not thinking of the people. The leaders of the militants are equally set for war against themselves in the next elections.

‘Itsekiris not happy with Uduaghan at all’

There are talks that the Itsekiri nation was short-changed in the amnesty programme for militants. Itsekiris don’t like the word militants. We did not purposely gather arms to fight. We were rather attacked, and it took us a long time to pick arms to defend ourselves. So, when you say militants, Itsekiris will tell you they are not. We defended ourselves because we were being killed, the women being raped, the villages raided. That is still the situation today. The Itsekiris are still as poor as when the Ijaws attacked us. Now, people feel that the amnesty programme is an Ijaw affair in the name of militancy. This is why the Itsekiris are angry that they were neglected in the whole deal. But a son of the Niger Delta is president. If the problem is not solved under him, who then will do it? That is right. This is the time to solve the problem. If the issue is not settled now, it will be a very big problem for the country. When the son of the Niger Delta goes away from the place, and the matter is not settled, how do we raise our voices to the incoming president? Won’t he ask, what did your own son do for you? The second point is that the president should know more of the problems of the area than anybody else. So, if he doesn’t solve the problem, it will be a colossal waste of money, time and energy. You said the amnesty programme is now an Ijaw affair. In what ways are Itsekiris engaging with the post-amnesty office? First and foremost, it is the government of Delta State that should do it. The government should know where the shoe pinches. They should be able to articulate the agitations of the Itsekiri people. It is more so when the governor is an Itsekiri man. If the people therefore don’t get anything from the ongoing exercise, most of the dissatisfaction will be put at his doorsteps. I thought that the Itsekiris should be happy and satisfied that they have a governor because he should be able to see their problems. But I don’t think that is the case. I agree that when you are a governor, you are the father of the entire state, but for one of the children to languish under the pretext that you are father of all is not good. You want to show that you are not partial to any side, and you use it to play politics, it is sad. The Itsekiris are not happy at all. But don’t you have something like an Itsekiri conclave, where you tell him what you want? That goes on always. The different groups are always in consultation, but I don’t think it has been very fruitful. There is the call for state police in the country. Former military president, Gen Ibrahim Babangida threw his weight behind the idea last week. What is your opinion? Despite all that has been said for and against IBB, I think he’s an intelligent man.

But some things perplex me. During the creation of states, there were no guidelines. It was a matter of groups who can lobby best. Therefore, minorities were put along, or in the middle of majorities, without adequate laws to protect the minorities. Today, a lot of minorities are languishing under the majorities. Even those in their natural homelands can’t speak anymore. Their natural abodes have been taken over by the majorities. They have no voice, and physically, they have no home. This is one problem that can’t make the country to stabilize. With what I’ve just narrated about minorities, what do you think will be their lot under state police? The governors will appoint their own supporters and cronies into the state police, and use it to oppress and suppress their opponents

And under the present system, the governor is in control of the police, despite the police being federal. The Commissioner of Police is controlled by the governor, the area commanders, the DPOs, all are controlled by the governor. Even the Assistant Inspector Generals of Police in the zones, are controlled by the governors. I dare any of these officers to say they take instructions direct from the Inspector-General of Police. They’re all controlled by governors. I don’t want to name names, but I met an AIG who told me they take instructions from governors. There had been a communal problem, I went to him, and he told me they had instructions to support the government in the states under them. Can you imagine a federal police being supported by the governors? Why should that be? If you want the CPs to perform, make enough provisions for them to be independent. They But a minority is in power in Delta State depend on governors, so how do we expect now, so you should not be afraid? justice? If that happens under the federal You have posed a very difficult question police, you can imagine the chaos when govabout what is actually happening in Delta. ernors appoint their cronies as officers of the Even up till now, the government of the PDP law. The law will be twisted, and if the law is in Delta is not stable. E.K. Clark is saying twisted, we have no country again. Gov Uduaghan is the cousin of James Ibori, You were involved in a march against and that Ibori put him there. At the beginning, Delta State government recently over land. I thought it didn’t matter, that Uduaghan, an What was it all about? Itsekiri, would be able to perform whether The land in dispute is Okere land. Okere Ibori put him there or not. But I’m sorry to people own most of the land in mainland say he has to sacrifice Itsekiris most of the Warri, so you find most of the acquisitions time to remain in office. He had to be careful, done under the Olu of Warri in Okere land. as if coming near the Itsekiris, his job will fly And then, suddenly, Okere people have no out of his hands. That is the true position as land again, except a large piece of swampy far as the Itsekiris are concerned. land, which we leased to the Nigerian Prisons, We thought after the first term in office, the to plant rice. Now, the lease has expired, and governor would change. But he has not. the land reverts to us. One day, we found that There are two factions of PDP in Delta State, sand was being pumped on the land. We one led by E.K Clark, the other led by formed a committee to find out who was Uduaghan. So, he’s careful by pleasing the behind it, and we were told it was the Delta Urhobos and the Ijaws, and sacrificing the State government. We wrote the governor, Itsekiris. The Itsekiris will fight their battles and for more than two years, there was no by themselves from now on. answer. Finally, we met him after two years, The police are supposed to guarantee jusand told him, this is our land, what is happentice. If they can’t, then the country has failed, ing? He said we should not worry, that we and there will be anarchy. would be happier with time, at what he would

do with the land. We were not satisfied, but he did not engage with us anymore. Finally, after five years, he agreed to meet the Okere people in my house in Lagos. They came and presented their case to him. Don’t forget I am a chief of the Warri kingdom, a daughter of Okere. So, we presented our petition, and told him that we wanted to build a cultural centre on the land, since it was the only one we had. We want a place where we can meet, hold conferences and other meetings. He agreed. Three days later, the Olu of Warri sent for us, and said he had been mandated to mediate about the land. The Olu gave us the nod to use the land. We had a master plan, and started work. A week later, the governor himself brought soldiers to drive our people off the land. Our children were going to be violent, but we restrained them, and went to court. At the court, we were seeking an injunction to stop the government from building a school on the land, because round about us, there are about six schools with land areas that double our land. On the first day in court, the matter of jurisdiction was determined in our favour. The second, which was to restrain the government, was postponed to August 7, as the judge said he wanted to put the government on notice. On August 7, Okere people from all parts of the country had congregated in the court, when we were told that the judge who wanted to deliver judgment had been kidnapped. We were very angry. The young people were almost going berserk, but we had to pacify them. We went to see commander of the Joint Task Force (JTF), who controls the army, navy and the police. He told us he was there to keep the peace, and if anybody disturbs the government, he will deal with such people. I then asked him: are you here for justice or just to carry out orders? He said he was there to defend the government. I was very devastated, as the army I knew was not created for that purpose. So, you can see my fears about state police again. What are your suspicions about the kidnap of the judge. Do you think government had a hand in it? I am very doubtful and extremely worried about the state of justice in this country. But I don’t intend to leave it like that. Without the courts, where is Nigeria? If a judge was coming to deliver a sensitive judgment, and he was kidnapped, where then is Nigeria? It’s a sad event. I’ve lost appetite since then. A high court judge appointed to dispense justice is kidnapped? The whole country must stand up, or the country is lost forever. I ask for a probe. Though the government says the kidnappers have been killed and the judge released, anybody can say anything. I ask for a probe. I’m a senior citizen, I’ve served this country for more than 40 years, I create jobs and employ people, but I have no hope in this country again. If a judge can be kidnapped, then all other judges can stay in their homes, as they will be afraid to dispense justice again. The case has now been taken to September 23 or 24, and meanwhile, the state government continues with the building project, under a heavily militarized atmosphere. I learn the judge that was kidnapped has no tolerance for corruption, so I smell a rat. There are procedures for acquiring land, government did not follow such, but just jumped on our land. Our fear now is that they can make a law acquiring the land and backdate it. It is not beyond our governors to do. But what they forget is that people like us are still around, and we will talk. We don’t care, and we will continue to talk. We won’t let go our land, it’s the only one we have.


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Saturday People By PETER AGBA KALU

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ven with the declaration of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) that there’s no hiding place for corrupt people, a member of the Nigerian Economic Summit, Mazi Sam Ohuabunwa, says that there’s nothing to show that the country is serious about war against corruption. Speaking in Abuja, he said that President Goodluck Jonathan and his government need to do more in the fight against corruption. He also spoke on other issues. Some people attributed our frequent air crashes to corruption in the aviation sub-sector, while others are of the opinion that insufficient regulation is the cause. What do you think? Well, the terrible thing about Nigeria is the high burden corruption has put on everyone and all national activities. Because of this high corruption perception index everything is tainted with corruption. Even before we investigate issues, even before we know what is happening, the world and most Nigerians would normally believe that corruption is involved. It may be right; it may not, but it’s a very shameful thing because I believe that not all things that happen in Nigeria are tainted with corruption. Not all. But this perception has begun to be an issue. So that is number one. Number two is that if you look at the way things have happened, in the period of 2005, 2006, we found that we had many air accidents; many. It was so frequent and we were all scared. But between 2006 and 2012 there has been relative safety. The accidents had been few and far inbetween, which showed that something had been done right within this period. It could be regulation; it could be other things that had happened, which enable us to have an improvement. Now, this accident that just happened; for me, it’s not enough to castigate regulation or to say we’re corrupt. Accidents happen all over the world. The basic issue that we need to ask ourselves and which is of concern to me is to be sure that the regulatory agencies haven’t lost momentum. If we had this safety for five, six years and suddenly this, it could be that there was a loss in focus, a loss in regulation. And what I would rather say is that we need to establish a system whereby we’re consistently on our guard because, to me, this air crash is one too many. Air transportation is one where everything must be done every time to avoid one mistake because one mistake can be costly. That would be my thinking. And truly I can tell you I am one man who has been so impressed by recent happenings in the aviation sub-sector. When I travel, and I do travel very frequently, I am amazed at the amount of infrastructural work going on in almost all the airports in Nigeria simultaneously: it was as if we had been sleeping for years then all of a sudden this money that was never available became available and the airports are being modernised. We had complained that these airports looked like death traps; they looked like pigeon holes; they looked like rat coves. But now work is going on. It is our hope and belief that this work in infrastructural development will also be reflected in regulation and in acquisition of equipment that will improve air safety. It is believed that the aircraft ought not to fly… Well, I will not buy that. The reason I won’t buy that is that the pilots, two of them, are foreigners. Their lives must be as valuable as the life of any other person on that aircraft. And therefore, if they were willing to put their lives at risk I would be surprised. There could have been negligence. I’m not ruling that out. But I don’t want to buy that of speculation. I’ll like to wait till I hear the result of the investigation. You know for me the reason I believe that it could be any way we’re human beings. Human beings can make mistakes; human beings can be negligent. But I’m not removing that. It’s not as if I would be surprised, it’s not that it’s not impossible, but I would be surprise if the engineer is negligent, the pilots are negligent, the air terrific controllers are negligent and the crew in the aircraft also negligent. They

What I’ll do about Boko Haram if I were president — Ohuabunwa

•Ohuabunwa say it shouldn’t fly and the people who run the aircraft, who manage the aircraft, who fly the aircraft would enter into the plain. I have a few friends who are in the airline industry and one of the things they tell me is that the pilot has the final say about the ability or the capability or the soundness of an aircraft. The moment the pilot says something is wrong with my aircraft; nobody can authorise flying until the pilot is satisfied. So I am not saying there was no negligence. I’m saying that it would be a tragedy if people who are entrusted with people’s lives become negligent. It would be a tragedy, as if they wanted to commit suicide and therefore they took others along. Each time I see the pilot in a cockpit I have the confidence that he is sure that this plane is safe to carry him. I mean if planes were

piloted by remote control, you know, the pilot is nowhere, sometimes I can run to those conclusions of negligence of this or that. But if a pilot, not even one, but two, decide that the plane is good to be flown, would we say it’s misplaced trust? We must operate on some level of trust. The training pilots go through is such that gives them a personality. It gives them a sense of self-worth. If you meet pilots they have a high sense of self-worth. They are constantly being reviewed. They do psychological training; they do health reviews and appraisals to make sure that a pilot is always at the best of his intellectual prowess at best physically and that he is taken care of. So I would be surprised if it was negligence; if people knew that that plane should not fly and it flew, it would be crucial if that was the case.

There’s the belief that greed pervades the industry … If behind all these was unbridled greed, behind it was some façade, may be we’re looking at the whitest sepulcheres or painted sepulcheres. I don’t know, may be, but I don’t rush into judgment or condemnation because anybody can make mistakes. Anybody can do things unintentionally. And life is full of uncertainties. There are people who do the best they can and yet things don’t work out for them, or things go wrong. The crux of the matter is that you may have more information than I have. I look at things from where I’m coming. So I expect everybody to do the right thing at

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August 25, 2012

Saturday People removal? Late last year or early this year, Largarde, the new IMF president came to Nigeria. That was just before the removal of subsidy and I was saying that the private sector is willing to understand what is going on; the private sector is willing to support government because we preach deregulation, especially at the Economic Summit Group. We know it would solve our problems. When we deregulate, tell me how many people I’m bribing in MTN to supply me network. So the issue is that deregulation is removing government’s participation. I was telling them we were ready to support deregulation, but government must prove that it has become more efficient in utilisation of savings; people are worried that if this money is saved it would be stolen.

•Continued from Page 19 all times. Yes, there may be deviants and that’s why regulation is there to ensure that deviants are put on the line and not allowed to endanger the society. And if we have failure in regulation, then we need to deal with the issue squarely. And that’s why I have called for a proper investigation and if anybody has been negligent, deviant or purposely taken decisions to endanger the lives of people, such a person must face justice. I have also indicated that it is not okay to wait for accidents to happen before everybody wakes up. We should have a system that consistently monitor performance. I have recommended that there should be a schedule of inspecting aircraft. It is not now we say technical committee go and inspect aircraft after one year. We should have this committee constantly. We should affiliate with international rating organisation, international regulatory organisation. Like in the airline industry, we have the ICAO. This ICAO should be there to make sure they’re constantly benchmarking and supervising our own NCAA and other aviation regulatory organisations in whatever they’re doing. At least that would help to give us confidence that the Nigerian factor is eliminated and that what we’re doing is according to best global standards, so that when accidents happen we go and look for the cause and not really jump into conclusions and think that somebody has patently or consciously negligent. When you talk of looking for a cause and also having patience for the report to come out, this is the 34th aircraft to crash in this country since 1956. Out of the 33 that crashed, the reports have not been made open, even though there were panels that were supposed to investigate and look into them… Well, I am not aware that reports have not been released. We had reports of what happened with some crashes in the past. We eventually knew what happened after they had looked at the black box. But nobody has been punished, for once… I agree that that’s part of our national feeling generally – not just aviation. We seem to have a system where people get away with blue murder. Crimes and deviants are not properly visited and not visited promptly. Because sometimes they say justice delayed is just denied. When a case is proved, the appropriate sanctions should be applied. I believe that is one thing that is promoting problems, promoting deviance, promoting crime in our country and making people to get away with what they do. I think it’s a major area of concern in our nation. We need to change that. We need to change that, if we want the country to change, if we want transformation to happen. People respond to carrot and stick; they respond to punishment and reward. So we should have a system where people, when they do bad, are punished and they know why they’re punished. When they do well they’re also rewarded. Either way, one would promote deference. The other one would promote good behaviour. When people see that the nation is rewarding people who are behaving well many people will follow them. If they see that, indirectly, those who are doing evil are rewarded, they go and carry arms. And then at the end of the day you are granted amnesty and then you’re given a heroes welcome. Would it be right to say that the nation is drifting? I hope you’ll permit me if I sound religious, because my understanding is that God created this world and He controls it. He runs it. So whatever He says would be superior to whatever anybody can say. And what He has told us is that all things work together for good. I believe that from our foibles; from our successes, whether they are pyrrhic or temporary or adhoc, all these things will work out well for Nigeria. And the reason I think so is that I know that this is still one of the nations under the sun, where the worship of God is taken seriously. In this nation, we have all kinds of deviants, but the country has enthroned God and God will always defend his name. So that’s my hope.

•Ohuabunwa

‘Deviants must not be allowed to endanger society’ You know, I thank God I have this kind of hope because it’s what I called anchored life. If you were to look at current situations, if you were just to look at them with your naked eyes and speak about them the way you see them you will probably be a little bit discomfited. If you look at the level of unemployment in the country, if you look at the level of insecurity, if you look at the level of poverty you’ll be scared. You will think the country would come to nothing. I believe that despite these frightening statistics about unemployment and poverty, the country has moved forward and I believe that it’s capable of moving forward, even beyond where it is today. Everybody is doing everything in the name of God. Boko Haram is throwing bombs in the name of God. Pastors are ripping off people and building private universities and buying jets in the name of God. Our politicians are corrupting the system calling God. What’s going on? I must state that when Jesus Christ was here all the things that go on today happened. Remember that he said that time would come when some people would ask God if they did do things in His name. And he said that God would tell them, ‘I know thee not. Get thee behind thou worker of iniquity.’ He said the time will come when men will no longer have regard for others. They will only believe in the religion of their stomach. God told us that it would come when men would be lovers of themselves. He told us time would come when,

if it were possible, even the elect would be deceived. These are words of God, the allknowing God. So He knows what will happen before it happens. This is not a Bible lecture but in Colossians chapter 3 verse 17 and verse 23, the Bible says whatsoever you do, do it in the name of God, but it was not about negative things. You can say that if you want to steal, steal in the name of God. Do that and let us see how it would work. If you want to commit adultery, you can’t say you do it in the name of God. Do it let us see how it would work. Why? Because the hypocrisy will be evident! You cannot say I’m committing adultery in the name of God and stealing money in the name of God. it will be evident. Do you think there has been any improvement in the war against corruption by the Jonathan administration? There’s no evidence. There’s no evidence that there’s improvement. Absolutely none! There’s none. This is the truth of the matter. When you look at the kind of stories that are still coming out and none of them are being convicted you will agree with me. I don’t think we’re winning the war against corruption. We’re not; it’s an area we’re not making much progress. People seem to have been conditioned to corruption and are just praying that they are not unlucky and become scapegoats. I think we need to do more. Government and the president need to do more. Until we take drastic actions, Nigerians will take it as a joke. What’s your stand on fuel subsidy

Power Holding Company of Nigeria has increased electricity tariff without regular supply. What is your stand on this? My brother, it is the question of the chicken and the egg, which one comes before the other. We will not improved power until we price it properly. That is the reality. As long as we’re doing subsidised power supply, investments will not come. The same thing that is affecting the downstream petroleum. When you’re writing your proposal to the banks, asking for funding, the first thing you put there is sales. And you cannot determine sales if you don’t know price; It’s the same thing with power. The problem with power is that government has been investing in it. Government is building power; they’re doing distribution; they’re doing transmission – because they have not deregulated it. I think the NERC (National Electricity Regulation Commission) is taking us there gradually instead of suddenly. I hear some people say there should be deregulate first and let the market fix the price. Government can do it, but there will be such a great shock that it can kill the system. So I think that’s why they’re doing it gradually. The moment it goes up, other entrants will come. And once other entrants come people will start selling products, just like the telecoms industry. They’re now bringing down prices at least to a level that is affordable. So I can’t blame NERC. I can’t blame Professor Barth Nnaji because if we don’t do this, in the next 50 years the power situation will not be any better. It will not be any better. You can imagine where we’re today, not bothering about NITEL and imagine if we were afraid that price will go up, where would we be today? If you were to advise the President, what would be your stand on how to tackle Boko Haram? The President should do the counter-terrorism attack, using intelligence and not using military; not using guns. Gun is only terrorising the people. Some people believe that to infiltrate Boko Haram you need committed Hausa Moslems, but some of them may be in sympathy to their cause because of religion… I don’t think so. You see, there is enough motivation that makes people sell their parents, sell their children – enough motivation. You’re talking about ethnic whatever. However many Hausa and Moslems have they killed? That’s enough to anger a good man. If they were doing this battle and they were killing only non-Moslems or non-Hausa it will be a different thing. Now, they’re killing both. There’s a way you can motivate people and they sell their parents. It’s wrong to sell your parents, but its right to expose crime even if it’s done by your parents. So I think it can work. What I’m saying is that in the North there are those against Boko Haram. You have people who are pro-Boko Haram. Half of those who are pro-Boko Haram can be bought. They can be bought with proper motivation for their own good. Do you think President Jonathan should be given another opportunity in 2015? The truth of the matter is that as the president has said we should not be talking about 2015 now. I don’t think we should talk about this. It’s not that somebody told me. I mentioned that he said so. I believe that it’s a complete distraction.


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

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Saturday People I rose from background of poor academic Towards a performance to earn 6 degrees –Dalley Peaceful By MOSHOOD ADEBAYO, Abeokuta

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r. (Chief) Gbenga Dalley is a rare Nigerian gem. The academic achievements of the former Head of Department of Mass Communication, Olabisi Onabanjo University, Ago Iwoye, are arguably rare to come by, as he parades six academic degrees in Communication and Law. Interestingly, Dalley had a humble beginning. He worked himself to the top, as it were. Today, apart from his academic accomplishment, he owns a primary and secondary schools in Abeokuta, the Ogun State capital. Looking back at what he has passed through in life and what he has become, he said: “To God be the glory, this is not my own making, but that of God. I have almost lost hope, just as my father, until I got to Form 3 when the dull boy changed to be a brilliant boy, ranking among the best five in the class.” He recalls with nostalgia: “I never knew I could even pass out of a secondary school when I was in the primary school. Things were not working well for me and I was worried, just as my father who wanted the best for me.” Although he hails from Abeokuta, Dalley was born and bred in Ibadan, the Oyo State capital. He attended Alafia Institute, Mokola, Ibadan, one of the best in the town. “I started well in Nursery One and Two, but when I got to primary school, the tide changed for worse; I could not cope. I was as worried, just as my father, who did everything humanly possible to make sure that things changed for better. One day, he called one of his friends, a headmaster of a school, to diagnose my problem and the man told him my background was bad. He recommended some baby birds books for me. My elder sister was saddled with the responsibility of making sure that I read the books. But they did not follow up,” he said. Continuing, Dalley said his troubled father, a medical doctor, had to move him to Osogbo, when he went on transfer and had him repeat Primary 3. It was the same old story, as he also found it difficult to read and comprehend. “What I used to pray for was that during the third term, I should be pushed on trial, because at that time, I did not see myself passing examination normally. That was how, gradually, I moved on trial and I was moved to St. Luke, Molete, Ibadan, where I improved gradually, but I was not yet there, as expected by my father and I,” he revealed. The former HOD said although his poor academic performance affected his Primary School Leaving Certificate, he made an improvement. “When I started catching up, I was able to comprehend, but I still had problems in reading. My anxious father wanted the best for me. He obtained entrance examination forms for Government College, Ibadan and several others. For me, I was not sure that my poor academic performance could secure me admission in the school,” he said. On what happened thereafter, Dalley said: “They managed to get me a school, not the one that my dad wished. I started improving., I was doing well in English Language, particularly in Comprehension than in Composition. I managed to read and comprehend. I still remember very well that while I was writing a comprehension, I could not spell the word ‘because.’ According to him, a literature book, The Incorruptible Judge, where he acted the lead role, was a turning point in his life. “The book assisted me and gave me one clue that, all along, I have not been reading, because, as the leading actor, I was forced to read and memorise. Since then, I re-discovered

•Dalley myself and things began to change positively for me.’’ When his father moved to Abeokuta, Dalley was also moved from C.A.C, in Ibadan, to Egba High School, where he was made to repeat the Form 3. He said: “I did not like repeating the class. When my father insisted that I was going to repeat the class, I told him that I was not going to school again. I insisted that if he did not allow me continue in Form 4, I would drop out. I was already regarded as a senior and had even started sending students of Form One to Form 3 on errands. My father, as tough as he was, in terms of upbringing and discipline, surprised me by not forcing me to go to school. I did not, however, know that he was working behind-the-scene to make sure that I return to school and repeat Form 3.” He revealed that his father got one of his friends, Justice Ogundare, to prevail on him to repeat the class,which he later accepted. “Something happened that day, when I got to his court. He was presiding over a case, and he immediately adjourned it and asked the court clerk to bring me to his chamber. Unlike my father, who would not ask what the matter was with me, Justice Ogundare asked me what the problem was. I gladly told him. In his bid to persuade me to repeat the class, he described my juniors, as witches and wizards, who he claimed had foreseen my future and knew that I would be a star in future and they were ready to scuttle it. He pleaded with me not to allow them scuttle it. The judge started to work on my psyche, pleading with me to return to class and suddenly he removed his wig and put it on my own head and guided me to a mirror within the chamber. He told me nice things and ended with a prophecy that I would later in life be a lawyer,” he said. Dalley said that after the session with Justice Ogundare, “there and then I made up my mind to repeat the Form 3 as well as read very well so that I could beat my mates. Today, I thank God who used the judge to transform my life.” According to him, “my repeat of the class was like a transformational tactic for me, as I became more serious. Surprisingly, I was

rated among the top five in the class, to the surprise of everyone, including my father who had almost written me off. I sat and cleared the West Africa School Certificate Examination as well as the General Certificate Examination. I wanted to read Medicine. I later went for A’ Level science programme at the then Ogun State Polytechnic, now (Moshood Abiola Polytechnic), where I passed some courses and failed others. You know Medicine is not for unserious students, since I did not clear all the sciences, I could not realise my ambition of reading Medicine at the University of Ibadan, where I was offered Biochemistry as an alternative, which I rejected. “I was still pushing for sciences, but, by faith and providence, after going through my credentials, even though I did not apply for Arts-related courses, I was moved to the Faculty of Arts to read Language Arts. That was when the university system was still working. I remember very well that after looking through the prospectus, I realised that for a student to be in the Faculty and read the course I was offered, he or she must have passed Literature. I neither applied for Arts nor passed Literature at the School Certificate level. I was still admitted for the course, and passed in flying colours. I did my master’s degree and PhD in the same course, at the same prestigious University of Ibadan. With my experience, I don’t see why a child would not make it in life just because his beginning was not too impressive. It is only an imbecile that probably can’t do well. That was one of the reasons I established the two schools. I give glory to God for salvaging me; turning me around. The miracle God did in my life is still there and He is still doing it in the primary and secondary schools I established. On the performance of his schools, he said: “In our secondary school, we started writing WAEC in 2006, and our students have been coming out in flying colours. Let me tell you that this school is not just one of the private secondary schools that go behindthe-scene to ensure the students pass at all costs. We work hard for whatever successes we must have recorded in recent time. My joy is that I have also succeeded in impacting positively on students who never thought they could make in life. “I will never forget my late father. During my trying period, he was concerned, he stood by me; he never left me to my fate. May be if he had not shown concern, I would have been a nuisance, not only to him, but also to the entire Dalley family.” He said that he lost his mother early in life. “The person I knew as my mother was not actually my mother; she was my step mother. I lost my mother early in life, but I have to thank her for bringing me to life,” he said.

Living (Vol. 3)

By Josiah Bonire 07055822097 jjbonire@yahoo.com

Critical thoughts on Behaviour (Section Five):

Chapter One Caution 2201. Beware of happiness, for it often brings accidents. 2202. Foolish pride rigidly chooses a path into an unknown world. But wisdom rather explores all possibilities with caution, especially on what it knows little about. 2203. He who knows not many failures won’t make a good leader, for he will be too daring. And he that has met too many failures won’t lead well either, for he will be too fearful. 2204. Watch the spirit of jealousy. It makes to be angry and unable to learn. 2205. A wise ignorant man would rather choose to be foolish so as to be able to learn. 2206. But a fool rather flexes his muscles, as if force has a special ability to reveal secrets. 2207. Don’t ever lean on a project you embark on, its failure can make you to fall. 2208. In a world of uncertainties, a wise man does not encourage dogmatism. 2209. Hmmm… Let a man persevere on what might succeed, lest he spends his life pursuing failure. 2210. Whatever gives a lot of pleasure to the present threatens the happiness in the future. 2211. Where actions based on belief fail to yield positive results over a long time, a wise man looks again at his belief. 2212. Let each man watch his ways. Only if memory fails in onlookers would a devil successfully change and be seen as a spotless angel. Preparing For The Future 2213. Don’t go to bed because the mood for a particular work is lacking, if a mood is not suitable for a work, find the work that is suitable for the mood. 2214. While waiting for tomorrow, get the best out of today. 2215. Where there is a future, there is a destiny. 2216. Defer pleasantries till the end of your journey, if you are not to lose attention for the journey. 2217. The lust for more makes a man forget to use what he has. 2218. Whatever will threaten the success of the future diverts attention to the joys of the moment. TODAY IN HISTORY:

August 25, 1964: Kenneth Kaunda wins election to become first president of an independent Zambia


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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

Saturday People How we made Nigeria the fastest growing telecoms market –Juwah L cient, affordable and easily available.

ooking at 11 years since the introduction of Global System of Mobile (GSM) telephone, Dr Eugene Juwah, executive vice chairman of the Nigerian Communications Commission (NCC), has declared that the country has made history as one of the fastest growing telecoms nation. In this interview, he talked about the impact of telecoms on the economy, the role of NCC and others.

How would you score NCC in the past 11 years? We have done very well. For five years running, we’re the fastest growing mobile market in the world. Telecoms sector contributes about six per cent of our GDP; it has brought more than about $18 billion in Foreign Direct Investment; it has created more than 12, 000 quality jobs and has enabled even small scale entrepreneurs selling cards and accessories to make money. There hundreds of medium scale businesses that have sprung up as a result of this. Some are major dealers in handsets and allied products. It is really difficult to quantify the impact of the telecom growth but it can be measured by its contribution to GDP. Maybe oil sector can compete but I’m telling you when it comes to creating jobs there have not been a sector like telecommunication . It is kudos to us, there have been issues about QoS and that is being addressed and I hope that it will be solved.

How would you assess 11 years of GSM in Nigeria? We haven’t planned any celebration yet, maybe the service providers will be doing that, but I must say it has been eleven glorious years for the country, which just a decade ago was nowhere on the global telecom map. If you consider the fact that we moved from 400, 000 lines to over 100 million lines all in a space of eleven years then you will appreciate why the whole world, including the International Telecommunications Union (ITU), is talking about Nigeria. Yes, it calls for celebration, but at NCC we are looking beyond the GSM success story. We have our eyes set on making the services more efficient, more affordable and readily available. That is why we are doing what we are doing now on broadband. What of quality of service (QoS) by providers? The QoS is bad; we fined the operators and they protested strongly, but we stuck to our guns. They have paid up. Having said that, I must state that it is not sustainable to be fining them every month; they cannot be paying N2.5 billion every month. We are acting like a responsible regulator, giving them time to repair what they have and then coming back to check whether there are improvements and if there are none within that period, then we have an option to sanction again. From the feeler we are getting from our field checks, the service providers are as worried as everybody and they are building and upgrading their networks. We expect that this would translate to better quality of service in the coming months. There are cases of illegal use of frequencies. What are you doing about it? We have a regulation now. Before, there have been a lot of guidelines where you have to negotiate with the operators. But now our regulation has the force of law, even if we enforce based on this regulation and people go to court, we are covered. We are now more prepared to enforce our directives and regulations than before. I want to emphasise that we don’t take delight in shutting down businesses, but we are a responsible commission set up by law and the industry we oversee is governed by laws. Therefore, we expect anybody who wants to play in the industry to comply with these laws. Whereby you fail to do so, you leave us with no responsible option but to shut you out of the communication loop, which you are using illegally. Why poor QoS, in the first place? Of course, the fact that we don’t have fixed lines, is puting a lot of pressure on GSM, which is a wireless technology. It has capacities and limits and that’s why we are starting this broadband initiative. The type of poor quality of service we are witnessing is a fallout of over-dependence on GSM and this is made worse by the absence of a strong national infrastructure backbone at the take-off point. But at the NCC, we are determined to bridge the gap. Good broadband automatically creates opportunities for fixed telephony and we hope that this will go a long way also to shifting the burden on GSM. One thing is clear to one and all at this time, and that is, Nigeria offers a huge market and good busi-

•Juwah ness environment for telecom. There are other challenges of poor infrastructure in other sectors, but we believe that with the transformation drive of the Federal Government to reform other relevant sectors coupled with the growing consciousness to deploy broadband services, Nigeria is on the verge of yet another

telecom revolution, which will aid learning, medicare, commerce, agriculture, governance among other services. The direct impact of broadband is that cost of telecom services will crash and efficiency will improve. This is our destination, this is our goal… to see telecom services across the country that will be effi-

What is the role of telecomm in rebranding Nigeria? Without doubt, telecom has given Nigeria a good name. For the first time in the history of the nation, Nigeria ranked as the fastest growing telecom market in the world for five consecutive years. It is by far the fastest growing in Africa and we are not losing ground to anybody. These facts are well documented at the International Telecommunications Union. At NCC, we are working tirelessly to deepen the market. Foreign Direct Investment in telecom is growing and will keep growing because the world sees us as doing the right thing. We have used telecom to tell the Nigerian story in a very positive way. I am happy that today foreign investors want to associate with the Nigerian economy. They are confidently bringing in their money and their know-how and our people are getting new jobs and acquiring new skills. •This interview was culled from Nigeria Political Economist, August 2012 edition

The iroko revolution in rural transformation By OLAMIDE AKINMOLAYAN

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ities all over the world are getting bigger, as more people move from the rural to urban sites, but that has created enormous problems, with respect to environmental pollution and the general quality of life in these cities. Rural areas are now left with the old ones and few youths who are filled with the hope of living the “affluence” of the city someday. The rural areas, with its natural endowments and beauty, are now deprived of basic amenities with the major focus on the urban sites, leaving the rural people to live in archaic norms and tradition, superstitious beliefs and living every day as it comes. No wonder high rates of mortality, illiteracy are recorded among these people with little development in health, infrastructures, education and the likes necessary for proper growth and descent exposure. The Ondo State government, under the leadership of Dr. Olusegun Mimiko, has witnessed an era of a new song, as the story has changed in the rural areas. The caring heart governor, who believes “what is good for the goose is also good for the gander” has taken his time to listen and risen up to the needs of the people in the rural areas. The rural health service before the Iroko administration had been more or less dor-

mant as little or nothing has been done to improve the rural health centres. Children and pregnant women made unending and excruciating visits to the city for proper care. Those who couldn’t go through the stress would sit back at home at the mercy of medications from uncertified medical personnel’s, religious homes and local medications. The Mimiko administration has taken it upon itself to see to making infant and maternal mortality, which is a rampant feature of the rural areas a thing of the past. The Abiye safe motherhood programme has made significant impact in the lives of pregnant women in the rural and urban settlements. Accolades are being showered on the governor for initiating this programme. One of such is from the former vice-chancellor of the University of Port Harcourt, Emeritus Professor Belsey Harrison. The programme, which has been applauded by various health organisations all over the world, has assisted greatly in reducing the rate of infant and maternal mortality in Ondo State. Pregnant women in rural areas and children within 05 years now enjoy free and qualitative health care in public health institutions. The rural areas in Ondo State from the riverine areas to the mainland still bask in the euphoria of the millennium compliant projects of the Mimiko administration which has put

the state ahead in the continent of Africa. As it is in health, so it is in agriculture. The government, through the ministry of agriculture, has set a policy thrust to promote and accelerate development of agriculture in the state. This is included in food, free crops, livestock, fishery and forestry, to provide raw material for agro based industries and farmers in the state to ensure food security and to efficiently harness the agricultural resources of Ondo State. Realising the role of education as a factor for getting Nigeria out of her current sociopolitical challenges, the Mimiko-led administration has therefore, invested in the education sector even at the rural level the same as he has done in the rural areas. Students in the rural communities are now filled with hope of a better tomorrow as they stand a chance to enjoy the same education benefits and adequate funding enjoyed in the urban centres. Obviously, God has been good to Ondo State as His unforeseen hands have taken the state from the rubbles to a censure to be admired far and wide. The peasant farmer and elites alike, working class to students; every resident of Ondo State have enjoyed the new dawn, the reformation and transformation in the land, as the state rises from glory to glory making Ondo state “A Place of Pride.”


SATURDAY SUN

EW

August 25, 2012

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EVERY WOMAN

My strict upbringing affected my social H life

By VIVIAN ONYEBUKWA vvnchinyere@yahoo.com er outward appearance betrays what she really is. Merely looking at her, one would think that she is one of those unserious young ladies who are only interested in

-Princess Halliday,Talk show presenter

Continued on page 24

FASHION POLITICS ENTERTAINMENT SOCIETY &LIFESTYLE


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SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

EW

EVERY WOMAN

‘We need to showcase Nigeria positively’ I am the last child out of 5. I ‘ve always being on my own. I don’t have a social life. I grew up in a strict home. My father was a mobile policeman. I never talked to a boy until I was 18 because my father would not allow that. He would threaten to luck you up. As a result, I always had fears with my parents. They were hard, so I was never given any opportunity to rebel. Then, I never even talked to my mother, but now, we are the best of friends and I can tell her anything. The kind of upbringing I had never allowed me to do certain things. For instance, I have never fixed my nails and few days ago, my mother encouraged me and insisted that I had to fix my nails because of the kind of work I do. But this is the same woman that would never allow you to do such a thing. However, I fixed my nails after much persuasion by her, but I immedietly removed it because I am not used to it. The strict upbringing played a major role in my life. I can’t attend parties and I can’t really do much on social life.

Continued from Page 23 looking good. But she is far from that. Princess Halliday is a combination of beauty and brain. She is a woman of many parts. She is a film maker, talk show host and is also involved in developmental projects. Her artistic nature cannot be overemphasized. She is an actress and has featured in some movies. Miss Halliday is equally a movie producer. She is multi-lingual and can speak Hindi language fluently which explains why she has always been attached to Hindi movies. In this chat with Saturday Sun, she disclosed that her love for the media drove her into what she does because she sees it as a platform to communicate to the people. Born to a Bonny mother, Princess Halliday disclosed that her father is from Abia while her grandmother is an Indian. What is your talk show all about? Princess Halliday Show is a show that showcases what people are doing in Africa. The show tries to change the perception of what people have about Nigeria. I showcase to the world that we still have people who do well and we need to showcase them. The show is informative, inspiring and interesting at the same time. Entitled Empower Africa Initiative, it is one way to show people that Africa is doing great. We have been able to showcase some renowned artists from Hollywood. We equally showcase people, not just artists from Hollywood. To be on the programme, you must have done something positive to Africa.

But looking at your appearance one would not believe that you had such an upbringing? My appearances betray that. I guess it is my work. At age 4, I was already a presenter. I have always had the passion for affecting lives. It is important we allow the child to have self-esteem and not to grow in fear. Are you going to train your child the same way your parents did? I am not going to train my children the way my parents did. I would like my children to be what they want to be. My parents made a mistake by instilling fear in me. I will let them have self-esteem.

I also learnt that you ave an educational programme? Tell us about it. We have a programme where professionals in Nigeria can go to America to study International Business and Globalisation and we have the first set that have just concluded the programme.

As one who have lived abroad for quite sometime, what is whites’ perception of Nigeria? They think Nigeria is full of zoo, but they tend to forget that on the street of Richmond they have beggers begging for alms. We should try to change that perception. They don’t believe I am a Nigerian but I keep telling them I am a Nigerian. So, you can change that. We want to influence the world positively through the show. That’s what I want to achieve.

What inspired you to go into such a programme? It is the passion I have for Africa and Nigeria that inspired me to do what I do. I studied Petroleum Enginering and I am also an International Business Consulant. Myself and my partner, a professor in one of the American universities saw the need for Nigerians to study abroad, and how difficult it is for Nigerians to study abroad. So, we decided to come up with this programme. How do you choose your candidates for the programme? Candidates are recommended and we must ensure that you come back to Nigeria after your programme. Strong ties and background search are done by people who have been here.We are also working on a programme on orphanage homes and streets, which we started a month ago in Port Harcourt.

They would always give one excuse or the other not to be on the show. The upcoming ones are my major challenges. It’s not easy to get them on the show.

Wat’s life like in Nigeria? I don’t have social life in Nigeria. I love Africa and Nigeria because we have abundant resources. I love Nigerian music.

What were the early challenges you faced when you went to live abroad? I have always shuttled abroad even as a cild. So, when I went abroad, it was not difficult to mingle.

What are the challenges you face in your talk show programme? My major challenge is that people who have done great things are excited about it and are always willing to come on the show, but those who are coming up don’t.

Who is your kind of man? I want a man who loves God, whose DNA would provide for me because God has provided for us. He must be a man that protects, provides and loves God regardless

of his achievements. I want a kind of man that will make me go on my knees. He must love God and if he loves God, he would love me. As a man, you should be a provider but you don’t need to have all. Can you recall your growing up days?

Halliday


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August 25, 2012

Natural medicine: My experience (15) By PAUL TORTY

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am so grateful to God for His mercies and love. His inspiration for the things we do cannot be quantified. At the beginning of last year, we decided that we were going to advance by installing medical laboratory testing machines. Recently, we have just opened a medical laboratory office in Ikeja, Lagos State, which has started functioning. We will carry out full medical diagnoses and treatment of health disorders. It was not an easy task considering the limited financial strength, but God helped us, when in April last year we started by opening the same medical diagnoses in Idimu, Ikotun area of Lagos State.Our vision is speaking and coming to pass daily to the glory of God. We decided to go into diagnoses as this is helping us in our work. And today, we have started our journey, a giant stride in our practice of natural medicine to the glory of God. Early this year, we started by informing our readers and patients that we are going to re-define natural medicine practice by installing standard acceptable laboratory testing machines so that we can practice natural medicine like the way it is done in the developed world like the U.S, England, and Canada and I am happy that we are achieving that feat. Natural medicine is not a practice for mediocres. It is a practice where nature meets science. Today I am happy to say and to the glory of God that we have installed in our Lagos office, an E.C.G machine for investigation of heart conditions, we have installed ultrasound machines for investigation of the state of the womb whether there is fibroid, ovarian masss or cysts. Ultrasound also helps us to check if a woman is fertilile and ovulating properly. Ultrasound also helps us to check the state of the prostate, kidney, liver, spleen, bladder, gastro intestinal tract,etc. Ultrasound machine is very essensial to know how the baby is developing in the womb. Ultrasound machine is, therefore, essesential and useful for both male and female. Other laboratory machines now available in our medical laboratory are Microscope, Spectrophotometer, laboratory incubator machines, Genotype machines etc. These machines help us to investigate whether a patient is suffering from any STDs, such as staphylococcus, streptecoccus, ecoli and other bacteria which may later lead to infertility.The spectrophotometer machine also helps us to check for the kidney and liver functions. We have set a pace in natural medicine. To the glory of God, we have these machines in our branches at Idimu, Ikotun and Ikeja, Lagos. We hope to introduce same in Port Harcourt, Abuja and Enugu branches by the grace of God. But for now, one can access our herbal remedies for diverse diseases and infections from any of our branches in Port Harcourt, Abuja, Enugu and Lagos. If you are outside Lagos and have already conducted these tests, then you can place order for our herbal remedies as well. I have always said in this column that we have documented herbs that give you the result you need. Our major mission is to ensure a healthy society irrespective of class and status. Everybody can benefit and enjoy health to the fullest. Cases of ravaging diabetes, and hypertension can be remedied with our herbs. Cases of asthma, ulcer, hepatitis, fertility problems, kidney and bladder problems can be addressed with our herbs. Of course, we have had several testimonies of men and women having long term fertility problems who took our herbs and eventually had children. In the recent time men battling with prostate problems, inability to urinate, excess urination in the night hours are signs of prostate problems among men. In the U.S, research by Prostate Society of the United States of America says prostate is the second cancer killer problem. And, therefore, we have had tremendous results in prostate treatment. I advocate that men in their 40s and above should come for prostate scan. Prostate condition which is not discovered on time can eventually lead to prostate cancer. We have a foundation called the The Saints Medical Foundation which is advancing a course for healthy prostate because all over the world, men in their 40s and above are dying from this problem. This should not be so. Come for P.S.A tests and prostate scan today. If you already have the problem, you can place order for our herbal remedy which can be delivered to you.

EWEVERY WOMAN

We have documented testimonies. Prostate problem is rampant. This is the most common health problems suffered by men all over the world. A survey carried out by American Prostate and Cancer Society says in every six men, two will have prostate problems.

STAPHYLOCCOCUS, INFERTILITY, FIBROIDS AND STDs:

I have noted severally that there are three major specie of staphylococcus: Staphylococcus epidermidis which attacks the skin). Staphylococcus saprophyticus which attacks the urinary tract leading to biting and painful sensation in the urinary tract.) While staph Agoro aureus is the immune crasher or immune destroyer which attacks every tissue of the body such as the lung, thereby leading to pulmonary and respiratory condition the result being difficult breathing and cough condition. I also noted that staph attacks the heart leading to a change in the blood pressure and purse rate. Staph also attacks the blood leading to crawling sensation on the body, skin irritation and biting sensation as well. Call Dr Torty on 08037140368, 08051625888, 08083860575. Call now, distance is not a barrier. Dr. Torty is the publisher of Maximum Health Link magazine in Lagos and the CEO of The Saints Herbals, The By RACHAEL AGUNTA Saints Medical Foundation and Express Medical Diagonoses. Website: www.drpaultorty.com and elping the underprivileged is a www.thesaintsmedical.com, Email: natural phenomenon with her. paultorty@yahoo.com. Facebook name:paul torty Indeed she was born with it. Our offices are: Mrs. Biola Agusto-Agoro still recalls Lagos office: Ariket Plaza , Alake Bus her growing up experiences; how several families would come to their Stop, Suite 12, last floor, Idimu; house regularly for feeding Aishetu Emeowa Plaza, off Lonlo Bus Stop, allowances or children’s school fees Iju; 41, Awolowo Way by Ecobank, Opp. Ipodo when she was a child. Perhaps the greatest challenge they equally faced Market, Ikeja. with her father’s estate was trying to Abuja: 268, Ado Bayero Block, Garki 2, get tenants who had lived for, in Ultramodern New Market, Abuja. Enugu: Shop B2, Ifesinachi Plaza, by Ogbete some cases, 22 years without paying rent, to start paying rent to the chilMain Market, close to Holy Ghost, Enugu. Port Harcourt: 2 Awkwuzu Street, off Ikwere dren. She grew up with this passion to help the downtrodden. On her Street, Mile 1, Diobu, Port Harcourt. part, she started from Nigerian Red Cross Society and went on to prison ministry, where they regularly visited and took foodstuff and other materials to female inmates of Kirikiri Prison. That passion still lives on. Recently, she was inducted as the new president of Soroptimist International of Lagos, and as a president, she is expected to carry out some developmental projects. According to her, her project will focus on education, particulary the girl-child education. “My project will focus on distribution of books and other materials to schools and tertiary institutions in Lagos. The idea is to create awareness and catch them young and cultivate reading culture. I also want to make a meaningful impact on educating girls, knowing full well that when you educate the women, you have educated the whole nation, as we are the mothers of the nation”. On how she intends to carry out this project, Mrs. Agoro said: “We shall be shipping in container loads of books from USA and London to be distributed free of charge to students. Freight of each container load alone is about 19,800 Dollars”. She hopes that with God and the good people of Lagos, they will attain their goals and aspirations. The investiture ceremony which was held at Motor Boat Club, Ikoyi, attracted relations, friends and wellwishers of Mrs. Biola Agoro. Highlight of the event was inauguaration ceremony of the newly elected members of the club who will work together with the newly elected president in the next two years.

I‘m passionate about girl-child education

—Biola Agusto-Agoro, President, Soroptimist International of Lagos

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An insight into her background shows that Mrs Biola Agusto-Agoro was born in Lagos on August 31, 1955. Her father was the late Chief Imam, Alhaji Lawal Basil Agusto Q.C; the first Nigerian Muslim lawyer. Her mother was the late Mrs. Nimota Akonke Agusto (Nee Oshobo) She began her primary education in 1961 at the Jamat-Ul-Islamiyat Primary School, Patey Street, Lagos and completed her primary education at Lebanese Community School, Yaba, Lagos. She got admitted into Methodist Girls’ High School, Yaba in 1968 and passed the WASC with grade one in 1972. She joined the Higher School Certificate (Science) Class in January 1973 but did only a term. She was at various times President of Senior Literary and Debating Society, Vice President of the Dramatic Society, Librarian of Scripture Union, Captain of Slessor House and she played net-ball well. She gained admission into Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria for a Diploma in Accounting in 1974 and completed in 1976 with a credit. She thereafter worked with the Accounting firm of Akintola Williams and Co, Lagos. She proceded to Luton College of Higher Education, Bedfordshire, England, now Luthon University, in 1978 and obtained Association of Certificate and Corporate Accounting ACCA, Foundations A&B Certificate in December 1979. She thereafter proceded to South Bank Polytechnic, Lodon, now South Bank University, and obtained ACCA. Finals 1&11 in 1981. She had brief working experience as the Accountant of Ladgroup Company Ltd, Lagos and Nigerian Bottling Company, Ikeja (Coca Cola). She secured employment with the Nigeian Petroleum Corporation in 1983 and had a brilliant career. She got a commendation for outstanding performance dated 18th November, 1987, from the minister. She attended several courses while at NNPC including SUN Accounting Computer Course in England. After her retirement from service, she set up her own business called Shop One Ventures Ltd. She is currently the CEO of Auguso Books Dot Com, Ltd and Agusto Babe Nig.

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It’s traumatic to have a sickler

RADIANT LIFE with

Evang. FEMI OLAOLUWA

08056158736, 08022556887 radiantlife40@yahoo.com

w.w.w. radiantencounterfemi.blogspot.com

Encounter with God of wonders

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hatever the situation, there is always the need to make up your mind like the woman with the issue of blood in Luke 8:43 - 45, connect to God and take a step of faith. The story of the Shunamite woman in 2 Kings 4 was a classical example of an Nick encounter with God of wonders. She was delivered from barrenness even at her old age Beloved readers, I may not know that reproach in your life but one thing I have come to discover in life is that the decisions you make or refuse to make as a person determines, to a large extent the course of your life to a great extent. Until you decide to do something, nothing will change in your life. Even the Lord God may not do anything for you until you have made up your mind on that particular thing. So, the truth is that when you are claiming to be waiting on God, it is you He is rather waiting for you to act in accordance to that very desire. Note: In preparation for the year MBER months, Pentecostal Canaan land Mission, Inc aka His People’s Church will be holding Three Super Nights of Wonders, Theme: Recover your Position from August 29 to 31 (10pm) @ 26/28 Adewunmi Abudu Street, off Osolo Way, Ajao Estate, Lagos. Host: Pastor Nick Medo Uwa For prayer and counselling call Pastor Nick Medo-Uwa on 08036044454, 08060213492.. Email:pcanaanland@yahoo.com.

EVERY WOMAN

—Olubunmi, founder, Aladetuye Sickle Cell Foundation

Faith that work wonders Text: 6:19. eloved reader, it is possible for you too to reach the Lord Jesus Christ with that simple and seemingly small faith of yours? He was crucified because of the sins and guilty of mankind before God. Jesus, therefore, became the substitute for our sin. And through His death on the cross and res- Duru urrection on the third day, a great inheritance is being released to whoever accepts Him as Lord and personal Saviour. The divine promise to reward Christ for His atoning death is being shared with usHis believers (John 17:10). But as many that received Him to them He gave the power to them who received Him. John 1:12. Every single word of God is, therefore, profitable to effect a change in whatever situations that work contrary to our lives- the sons of God. In His agony on the cross of Calvary, the Lord Jesus Christ interceded for our sins (Luke 23:34). And he still continues this-intercession in Heaven till moment. He loves you so much. You are more than a conqueror through Him that loved us (Rom 8:37). For prayer and counselling, call him on 08037211009. Pastor David Duru is the head Pastor of Foursquare Gospel Church (Awesome Assembly), Prince Adeyemi Street, Off Governor Road, Ikotun, Lagos.

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100-Must Watch Christian Films

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Errors of the saints

his movie reveals the tragedy that befalls a couple pastors, Owarangun like so many Christians who ignorantly take their home for granted in the name of ministry. The movie also uses the family of another couple acted by seasoned role interpreters, Rotimi Amodu and Feyi Adepoju to drive home the message how

foundational errors of omission and commission before and after marriage have destroyed many homes. Errors of Saints recommends: don’t be too heavenly conscious to the extent of being earthly useless; Christians to live on the biblical principles of transparency and forgiveness. Written by Evang Adedare J. Segun (08052240282) and produced on the stable of Digem Film Production, Kwara State.

Call or SMS Evang Femi Olaoluwa (08056158736) for inspiring Christian films, RADIANT Drama Tracts and information to publish your Christian message/movies in The Sun

Aladetuye

By ONYEKACHI JET

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rs. Olubunmi Aladetuye is a mother of two. One out of her two children is 29 years and living with Sickle Cell Disorder. She has for the past 29 years, been living and sharing in her daughter’s pains as sickle cell patients. To her, she would not wish that any individual should go through life as a sickler or even parents of a sickle cell carrier, an experience which she described as traumatic. “I don’t wish or pray that an individual should go through life as a sickle cell carrier. Not even that any person should have such a patient as a child

to cater for. It is not something I wish for even an enemy”. And to ensure her wish that incidents of sickle cell is reduced to the barest minimum, does not just remain a wishful thinking, she came up with Taiwo Aladetuye Sickle Cell Foundation, a non-governmental organization (NGO) that caters for the needs of people living with sickle cell disorder. For Aladetuye, her effort in trying to alleviate the plight of people living with sickle cell disorder, particularly, children is driven by passion and commitment. She told Saturday Sun that she does not just sit in wait

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SATURDAY SUN

EW Continued from Page 26 for sufferers to come to her, rather, she goes to hospitals, communities, churches and mosques to search out those who need care. In this chat, she held that the health challenges faced by people living with the disorder should not be an excuse for parents not to bequeathe such children with quality education. She paints the picture of what life has been as a mother of a sickler: “It’s indeed, traumatic. I don’t wish any woman to have such experience. It’s traumatic-financially, emotionally, physically – name it; in all aspects of life. It drains one’s life. There’s no lie in it. My husband left us 17 years ago. But I may not say her condition was the reason he left. He must have his reason. Every marriage has its own challenges. According to her, her daughter’s condition has in every way impacted on her and is instrumental in offering herself up for services to humanity. On how the idea of the NGO came to her and its sustenance, she said: “I got that vision through my experiences. So, I go out to the poorest of the poor. And I go out to look for drugs. I beg pharmaceutical companies, pharmacies and then, Governor Fashola. Presently, I have collated names and details of about seven SS patients, hoping to go to one philanthropist. So, when I have the money to go, I will go there. “I really do not know what to say regarding how I have been coping and sustaining the foundation as a single parent. I have been alone, but God has been sending fathers, pastors, Christians, mothers even friends to help us”. Aladetuyi disclosed that Governor Fashola is one of those who have flung his doors wide open to her foundation. “I’ve been a mother of a 29-year-old sickle cell individual and I know the pains parents go through. So, when I registered this foundation in 2011, I talked to the Head of Hematology at the Lagos State University Teaching Hospital (LASUTH), Dr. Dosunmu, and Dr. Akinwunmi in Paediatrics about the foundation and its our aims and visions. “I had to look for the very poor ones among them, who could not afford the cost of treatment. I go to their houses to pick them out. And among these, I got six of them who need hip replacement. They couldn’t afford it. So, I collated their names, history, their details and family background. They’re actually poor. Very many of them are orphans. So, I wrote a letter to Governor Fashola. He directed it to Ministry of health and I was invited for interview, and I was there. I was so delighted. “Then, they told me to write a letter and gave me directives on how to go about it. I did that and I was following it up for about four months. In February this year, I was again, delighted to have letters on behalf of these six patients, really, to have free surgical treatment on the bill of the Lagos State government. And I delivered the letter to Dr. Dosunmu at LASUTH. So, he then registered them and sent them to the department where they needed the surgery. My daughter was one of the beneficiaries. Actually, everything is free, except the drugs. I can appreciate the challenges they have in LASUTH with drugs. It’s only the drugs I paid for, which is interesting. We’re highly grateful to Governor Fashola. “Presently, I have 60 people living with sickle cell disorder in our care. I go to churches, mosques, houses, the orphans, even the destitute to look for the poor ones. There’s one in LASUTH now, Gift Eno Sunday. She is three-year-old and has ulcers in two legs and she begs for money. By God’s grace, we’re trying to do something on her behalf. All the six patients require treatment outside the country. But the government wants them to go to

August 25, 2012

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EVERY WOMAN

familytonic with Osondu Anyalechi oanyaalechi@yahoo.co.uk

Domestic violence

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Aladetuye

LASUTH first. So, the ones they can’t handle in LASUTH, I’ll take them back, maybe they give us money to get treatment outside. That was what I’m told. Our project, however, is not limited to children alone. We are open to every person who deserves attention in the management, care and treatment of sickle cell disorder. We remain ever grateful for investing in the lives of these great future generations and the health of Nigerians in general. May and Baker is also one corporate organisation that has not left us. In December during Christmas, they gave us pain relieving drugs and multivitamins”. Aladetuyi averred that even though the health condition of sickle cell patients remains a great challenge to their education, they should not be denied quality education. “My daughter was given admission to read Microbiology at the age of 16. She’s just finishing her programme. She’s 29 years now. So, it does not affect their educational development. However, parents should not use this challenge as a reason for not giving quality education to their sickle cell children. Though they have this challenge, they are as intelligent as other normal people. Most of them are very brilliant”. “In fact, one of our missions is to create sickle cell clubs in secondary schools and tertiary institutions. The objective of that club will be to educate the youths who are yet to go into marriage on issues regarding sickle cell anaemia and matters of the heart. We want to get them aware that love is not just enough, but have to be very careful in relationship decisions, because at the end of the day, when they’re married, if they have SS children, it is traumatic. Those of us who have bad experience are still crying. But God is faithful.

here is hardly any month the newspapers do not report of a spouse killing the partner or a member of the other’s family. What bothers me is that there was a time the couple meant much to each other. At that time, letters were flying up and down, enriching the postal services. With the text message in vogue, after sacking the post office, young lovers use it to express their affection. If the toasting messages are true, how can one then murder the spouse? But there was a day the lady started telling her family members about a certain handsome and kind man, while Uncle also was telling his family about a special lady, the only one in town. Each family might have said something negative about the other person or the family but the Romeo and Juliet, brushed it aside. Each time they exchanged visits, people might have complained about some odd behavior they noticed but it meant nothing to the lovebirds. The truth remains that each of them might have seen unsavoring character, including suspicion of a strange relationship with an opposite sex, that might have put someone on inquiry, but it was swallowed up by affection. One day they wedded. One day they discovered that they were more intimate when they were engaged, living separately, than after wedding that has brought them together. One day, Aunty bought a dagger or borrowed one from Mallam and did not show it to her sweetheart or to her children. She hid it strangely in her bedroom. One wondered the purpose it would serve. If it was to cut the vegetables, what business had it in their bedroom and did she really need a dagger for that? After dinner, as was usual with them, they spent quality time arguing and abusing themselves. That was no news to their neighbours or were they praying – loud prayers? Praying? Not in that house! Bible reading and discussion? Not in that house! That is for fanatics. Not for those who have made it in life like them! When Aunty woke up at midnight, what else than for her to visit the toilet? No, it was not. In fact, she had not slept at all. With dagger in her right hand, one wondered whether she would be going to the kitchen at that time. As one still wondered, Uncle’s loud voice was heard, followed by groaning… and then he shouted, ‘Vicky has killed me’. Nothing was heard again. But in the morning, there was no more Uncle. He was dead, his wife, his sweetheart, the sugar in his tea, the butter in his bread… had killed him! Albert Schweitzer, organist and son of a Lutheran Minister of God, who earned three doctorate degrees in Theology, Philosophy and Medicine, formulated a philosophy he called, ‘Reverence for life’. I committed much of it to memory in 1964 when we did Literature on his book. ‘Reverence for Life,’ according to him, ‘is a philosophy that says that the only thing we are really sure of is that we live, and want to go on living. And this is something that we share with everything else that lives – from elephants to blades of grass. So we are brothers and sisters to all living things, and nothing else, neither race nor colour nor religion nor sex, should be more important than this one deepest, most extraordinary thing connecting us...’ Albert Schweitzer insisted that life must be reverenced, whether it is that for human beings, animals or plants. He believed that each of them has a right of existence. He would not tolerate the plucking of the head of a flower ‘for idle amusement’. If holes were dug where poles or planks would be erected the next day, he ran fingers into them to ensure that no creature, such as frogs, were there. If Albert condemned the plucking of a flower, what would he say of a spouse lifting the hand to murder the partner no matter the gravity of the offence? If the killing of a frog, even by accident, was not acceptable to him, what excuse has a spouse that pours acid on the partner? Your defence could be that Albert was influenced by his Christian background. I have my doubts. As much as I know, he was a great moralist but not born-again. He was a Dean of a faculty in a German university when he read a magazine that detailed the ravages of diseases in Africa. He rationalized that what Africans needed was not the Bible but drugs! He decided to enter the Medical School. Thinking that he was insane, the Dean advised him to see a Psychiatrist. After graduation, he came to Lambarene, in Gabon, as a Missionary Doctor and established a hospital. To him, the Lord Jesus was not God but a Jewish Rabbi that wanted to rule the Jews if He rose from the dead, which, according to him, He did not. Albert still confessed that He would remain his ‘Master’. That was where he goofed, not knowing what some kids in the kindergarten class know. It does not require any theology or academics to know that Jesus is God. But we must appreciate Albert’s love and respect for God’s creation. He died, sadly at the age of 90 without a personal knowledge of that Creator. I cannot fathom why some people have no respect for life. Science has made inroads in many ways and the internet remains a great mystery. I visited a zoo in Dallas and saw the wisdom of man in keeping and preserving wild life. I touched a snake and ‘it could not do me nothing’ because I touched it through a glass casing – the wisdom of man. I was safe in the midst of lions, leopards, chimpanzees, elephants, et cetera. But as much as man has tried to keep them at bay, it was God that created them. Man cannot create anything, not even an ant! If we cannot create, we have no excuse to kill our fellow human being. For further comment, please contact Osondu Anyalechi on 0802 3002-471; anyalechiosondu@yahoo.com


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y almost three-year-old daughter and her one-year-old sister are often best of friends, but recently I have noticed that they are beginning to have more fights as the day goes by. Sometimes, the noise from these fights, as both scream at the top of their voices while holding tight to a toy or anything that they are fighting over, can be very stressful. I have come to realise that no matter how I choose to resolve the impasse, it always takes some time to calm them both down at least to the point that the crying finally stops. With this twosome it is always a no-win situation for me. If I give the object of contention to one, the other cries the more and I am seen as being ‘unfair’, if I take it away from both of them, I am seen as being ‘mean’ and the screaming is amplified by the two. More often than not, I chose to be mean! My two older daughters have their own fights too, but at 11 and nine years, I keep out of their fights, (which thankfully is mostly verbal) and within a short while they resolve the matter and become friends again! This quick resolution may be as a result of the fact that for almost eight years, it was just the two of them, so they did not have much choice of other play mates if they decided to fight each other. As it is now, the age difference between my two eldest daughters and the last two is such that playing is more interesting in two groups according to age! I said earlier that I am thankful that the fights between my older daughters are often verbal, in my mother’s case; the fights included physicals, especially between my brothers in their pre-teen and early teen ages. My immediate elder sister and I also had some physical fights too, and memories of those days and how we relate today are what give me hope that my children will one day ‘run out of fight’! My sister and I were like twins because she was older by a mere one –year- five month’s margin; this short age gap between us also gave me the impression that we were mates. So, the fight often started because I did not want to acknowledge her seniority. We fought over very trivial things. So trivial that I would not mention any here! I guess the main issue

August 25, 2012

EW

EVERY WOMAN

everydaymother with Grace Oluwole 08028288582 graceland2110@yahoo.com

Fighting for nothing! was that each of us was trying to assert our authority. While parents should try to stay out of their older children’ fights and allow them to learn to resolve their differences themselves, there are instances that parents must intervene especially when the fight is getting to a level where there is a danger of physical harm. A sad but real example is a case where a sibling fight resulted in a fatality. This happened when I was in secondary school. A teenage brother and sister were slugging it out when the brother punched the sister on the breast, she slump and died before help could get to her. Unfortunately their parents were not around; perhaps if they have been home, they would have put a stop to the fight before it claimed their daughter’s life. The girl was my junior by two classes but we were both athletes so I knew her well. The day before the incident we all saw her in school; she was in top spirit so you can imagine our shock when we heard the next day that she was dead! Coincidentally, my mother was working in the same office with the father so she too got to hear of the tragedy. On arrival from work that day, she called us all together and talked sense into our heads about fighting, she pointed out that it could have happened to anyone, but that it was avoidable. The thought that such an incident could be the result of a fight between siblings

(like us), was so terrifying that it took the wind out of the sail of my fight for good! As parents, we cannot prevent our children from being children and fighting among siblings is part of growing up. But we can minimise bodily harm and reduce the stress caused to members of our family by all the bickering and fighting, by establishing some rules around the house even before the ‘serious fights’ begin. You can establish the ‘no body contact rule’; this means that no matter how angry you may be, you are not allowed to hit anybody! Of course, you must expect (without saying so aloud) that the rule may be broken from time to time, so the rule must include that whoever breaks it will be punished as a deterrent. That way you are likely to have fewer physical fights. You must also be concerned by ‘language use’ and ‘name calling’. Before the fights begin, your children should know what language is allowed in the house and what language is forbidden. Concerning these rules, parents are to live by example, if you do not want your children to fight and use foul language, then you must NEVER fight or use foul language even when you think your children are not looking. Concerning the urge to intervene all the time your children quarrel, you may inadvertently make it appear to one child that another

is always being ‘protected and favoured’ and this will definitely lead to more resentment and more fights which is not the aim of your getting involved in the first place. In a sibling fight there would always be a stronger and a weaker fighter, and the natural instinct of a parent is to take sides with the ‘weaker’ child and blame the ‘stronger’ for always being troublesome. However, this would give the ‘rescued’ child the impression that he can get away with more as mummy and daddy will not only come to his rescue but will blame his sibling. Parents, who intervene this way, could be creating more problems than solving problems. If this early childhood quarrels are not handled with care by parents, this could lead to siblings detesting one another even as adults. On the other hand, as children, it is natural for siblings to swing back and forth between loving and detesting one another. While growing up all the fights notwithstanding, my sister and I were so inseparable that if for any reason, we were away from each other for long, we actually fell sick! Same for my daughters, even while the fight is on, they still want to be around each other. Today, thankfully, my sister is my best friend and confidant. We have mutual respect for each other and though we may have different opinions as it so happens from time to time, we don’t even argue anymore, we have no more fight in us for each other! I hope and pray that the love, care and respect that exist among my siblings will exist among my children so that they would realise that all the fights were for nothing after all!

Sex: Frequently asked questions, answers and testimonies (158)

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y husband and I own a shop and we both work together. Women are always smiling at him. Some try to flirt with him and prefer to order from him. He has not cheated on me but I don’t like what is going on. So sometimes we fight. My husband is a handsome man and knows how to thrill women. But I don’t want any woman looking at him like that. What do I do? Mrs James Dear Mrs James, the only way you can stop women from looking at your husband is by chaining him to the bed in your room and keeping him there as your prisoner. Would you want to do that? I doubt it. If you marry a handsome man, women will notice him. Beautiful people get noticed. It is not their fault. Your husband is a business man who treats his customers well and keeps them coming back to buy again and again. In the world of business, your husband is your biggest asset and you should be grateful. He has not cheated on you and there is no reason for you to be mad at him or assume that something is going on. My advice to you is to relax and trust your husband. When it was time for him to marry, he chose you out of all these other women. That means you are special. So be happy and avoid doing anything that will damage your relationship. Take care - Uche Hello Sir. I bought Max Desire as you suggested and I am beginning to notice the difference. I tend to want sex more and I enjoy it more too. Thank you – Mrs Ofokansi You are welcome. Max Desire is a good and effective female libido booster - Uche I enjoy your column sir. I am a grown up man and I enjoy sex. My fiancée complains of the size of my organ. So I don’t know if your male organ enlarger can save my relationship. Are they effective? Do you have an office in Abuja? Please answer all these questions then I will know and place an order – Bolaji Dear Bolaji, I will recommend a few products that can help you but I want to know something. Did your fiancée really tell you that your penis is small? Or you just feel that is what she must be thinking? I ask because very few women will tell a man to his face that he has a small penis. That is rude and insensitive. Anyway if your penis is really that small, a combination of products will work best for you. I recommend using a penis pump (Jack Pump) and an enlargement cream (Mega Me Enlargement Cream). They are effective and you will like the results. We don’t have an office in Abuja. We are based in Lagos

and we deliver all over Nigeria from here. Whatever you order will be brought to your door step. Take care – Uche Please what is your sincere advice for someone who experiences waist pain, strong itching all over the waist and laps, weak erection, quick ejaculation, watery sperm and very low libido all as a result of chronic staph infection that has defiled all manner of treatment? Very Worried Man It is unlikely that everything you just mentioned is as a result of the staphylococcus. I recommend going to a proper hospital for the treatment of your waist pain, itching and staphylococcus. These are all illnesses and we don’t diagnose diseases. I also want to observe that if the sexually transmitted disease you have is treatable and still persists after treatment, then it is either of two things. It is either you have been getting the wrong treatment or that you have been getting re-infected after treatment. Reinfection usually happens when one has unprotected sex with partners who also have the same disease or when one does not change underwear after treatment. As for your other complaints of weak erection, low libido and watery sperm, Sex Volts supplement will solve them. For premature ejaculation, use Stay Hard Delay Cream during intercourse– Uche Hello Sir, what is the difference between Mojo Boost and Libigrow Libido Shot? Sani Dear Sani, they are both good for multiple sexual performance and energy. But Mojo Boost can be used by men or women – Uche I have been experiencing weak erection for some time and eventually bought the Pistol Pump to see if it will help me and it worked. My erections were harder after pumping. But when I start having sex, it will get soft again – Francis Dear Francis, Penis Pumps are for penis enlargement but if you are using it to get an erection, you must use it with a Cockring. Once you pump and get your erection, wear the Cockring immediately and you will not lose the erection again until you finish having sex - Uche And that’s it for today. The names of the people featured here have been changed for their privacy. Men and women in need of these treatments/novelties can call 08027901621 or 08051924159 or any other number here to order or they can also order online at www.zeevirtualmedia.com. Zee Virtual Media delivers to you wherever you are in Nigeria. For enquiries, send your emails to custserv@zeevirtualmedia.com — Uche Edochie, MD, Zee Virtual Media.


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Editor: SHOLA OSHUNKEYE

YOUR SATURDAY MAGAZINE

AGATHA AMATA Producer,Inside Out

Working with people with adversity changed my life –Pg 30


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August 25, 2012

Interview

AGATHA AMATA Producer,Inside Out

Leadership without good successor = FAILURE By TEMITOPE DAVID-ADEGBOYE gatha Amata. Know her? She is certainly a well-known personality in the country. As a talkshow hostess, she commands attention. For 15 unbroken years, her face has graced the television screens of thousands of homes. A graduate of Botany from the University of Jos, she has, indeed, made a name by pursuing her passion: producing Inside Out, an advocacy programme meant to “give voice to the voiceless.” Talking about giving voice to the voiceless, Agatha, through her programme, has hit the bull’s eyes several times. And to say she is quite happy about her modest achievement is to put it mildly. Speaking to ICON last week, she noted:“Sometimes, I go out and someone walks up to me to say,‘thank you, that episode you did affected me positively.’ For instance, I went to a branch of a bank and a securityman said to me, ‘thank you, because of Inside Out, I decided to go back to school.’There is also a case of a painter who painted my office but didn’t know it was my office.When we eventually met, he said the reason he was alive today was because he watched an episode and that day, he was supposed to have committed suicide. But the episode touched him and today, he has his own paint manufacturing company, and he is doing.” In fact, she is so encouraged by the kind of impact she has been able to make through the programme that she is planning on starting a new concept:“Inside Out Extra ” which seeks to give an answer to frequently asked questions on various issues including health, education, environment, politics and so on. In this interview, the mother of two who hails from Ebu, Oshimili Local Government Area, Delta State, tells the story of how the programme came into being, what has sustained her and things that prepared her for the role she is playing in re-building Nigeria. She also has a word for the youths.

A

It’s been 15 years since you began hosting Inside Out with Agatha. What would you say is your greatest achievement so far? For me, it would probably be the fact that I have been able to give the average man on the street a voice. Because sometimes, I go out and someone walks up to me to say, ‘thank you, that episode you did affected me positively.’ For instance, I went to a branch of a bank and a security man said to me, ‘thank you, because of Inside Out, I decided to go back to school.’ There is also a case of a painter who painted my office but didn’t know it was my office. When we eventually met, he said the reason he was alive today was because he watched an episode and that day he was supposed to have committed suicide. But the episode touched him and today, he has his own paint manufacturing company, and he is doing. There were also pensioners who, about five years ago, called to say because of the episode on pensioners and their plight, they were called to Aso Rock for negotiations and their mode of payment has greatly improved. Those, for me are things that make it worthwhile, that make me think that I’m not just wasting my time. So, Inside Out, is more than a TV programme for me. It’s an advocacy; it’s a way to let the man on the street get his problems heard and get people who are in authority come and make a change. The payoff is ‘Touching lives, changing society.’ So, anytime I hear we’ve been able to change something in the society, I feel fulfilled. Though it’s a long way but we are starting somewhere Did you start the programme to be the voice of the voiceless? If I say that, I would be lying. When I started the programme, I did simply because I just wanted a talk show. I love talk shows. Then when I travelled, I would watch all the talk shows on air in America. I came back and just thought to myself, why don’t we have a talk show where people would just come and say their problems as they are for people to listen? That was just what I wanted. I didn’t even have a clear focus of what I wanted to do with the programme. What I knew was that I did not want to be doing celebrity interviews. I knew that I wanted it to be a people’s programme. With time, the programme took on its own life. All sorts of people started coming: widows came, people who had job issues came and on and on How do you get the topics you treat?

‘Don’t ever want to be like anybody. Look for your own space.

Amata Again, if I say I come up with all these topics, I would be lying. I cannot take all the credit. Apart from the fact that we also take a look around us and see what is happening, I get e-mails, phone calls and so on. Beyond looking around to know what affects us,

the issue of B.Sc and HND discrimination to me that I didn’t even know was an issue. Maybe because I have a B.Sc, so it doesn’t have anything to do with me. The weekend that programme was aired, I received more than 300 calls from people thanking me. People are already calling us from abroad that we should come and treat issues as they are affecting them over there. If I tell you about the number of e-mails that I’ve received about Nigerians and visa issues, you would be amazed. I don’t have those issues, so people bring them up and we treat them. That also tells me that people know what we stand for. What are the challenges of running a talk show in Nigeria? PHCN (inadequate power sully by the Power Holden Company of Nigeria), TV stations, money- I could go on. There are a lot of challenges. We operate in an environment that is very hostile to even any business, not just a talk show. You have to generate your own power. Number two, abroad you can go into the ready-made studio with your audience and just do the recording, but here we don’t have any of such facility. So, we started out in Unilag (University of Lagos) using one classroom with windows. It wasn’t sound-proofed. I used that for almost eight years before they drove me. From there I went to Nigeria Institute of Medical Research and the chairs had tables, which was not a studio setting at all. But you know, you grow and you learn. Today, I have my own studio; it may not be big but it is soundproofed and I can operate in my own environment. That is a major challenge. The fact that you have to do everything by yourself is worrisome. Now, people use my studio and I thank God that I’m able to provide that for people now. I didn’t have that opportunity. But here I am providing that for people now. In Nigeria, you pay stations that you get airtime with. Currently, I am on 17 stations. In the US, Oprah is earning several thousands of dollars for airing her programme while in Nigeria I am paying several thousands ofNaira to be seen fighting the cause of the people. It’s ironic but that is the situation we’ve found ourselves in this country. As an independent producer here, you will produce, pay the station, beg advertisers, which are very few. So, the challenges are many. But this is what I say to people: if you are passionate about what you are doing and you know there is no plan B, you would find a

there are lots of issues that because they do not affect us, we do not know about. For instance, the residents of Makoko have been in touch with us. I don’t have a Makoko problem but they have been in touch because they want to be heard. Some people brought

If you have someone you admire, take the good from the person, knowing that the person still has the bad side’


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way to make it work. So, it is your passion that has kept you going? I always say God first, then my passion. However, there are days that I sit and cry and ask myself, who send me? If I think about the cost of airtime alone, it’s huge. Also, some of the people who come on the show can’t even afford transportation fare to and back home. So, we have to give transport fare to those kind of people. I believe that I am adding value to the society, which is why I am still doing the programme, because there were times in the early days that I thought to myself that I really didn’t have to be doing this. I could have just picked on politicians and make money from them but that is no Inside Out. The fact that a bus conductor can challenge the commissioner for transport; an okada rider can look at the commissioner and tell him, oga I no agree, you can’t ban okada gives me great fulfillment. And I keep doing that not knowing where it would lead me in life. But 15 years down the line, the amount of favour that has come to my person has shown me that I haven’t really done badly. It might not be in terms of naira and kobo but in terms of goodwill. Money can’t buy that. I have been very fortunate. I’ve never been one to look at challenges as obstacles; I use them as stepping stone to something bigger. And God has been good to me every step of the way. I always tell people that I am a living testimony to God’s goodness. And I mean it. You read a science course at the university and then had to start a talk show. What was your first time on set like? They told me that you can’t go on set without knowing your lines, I had the script and I didn’t sleep through the night trying to memorize the script. The next day, as soon as my director said action, I went blank. Opa Williams who was one of the people on set then said to me that I should throw away the paper and anything that comes to my head, I should say. That was how we were able to make it through that session. And that is the format that Inside Out has taken ever since. There is no script; there can’t even be a script because you don’t know what the man in agony would say. I learn as I go on. And I think that is what has endeared the people to the programme. I don’t pretend to know what I don’t know. If they say something that I have never heard about, I say it. It’s a learning process for me too. Which would you say is the most touching topic you’ve ever treated? I would say when I dealt with child labour. I remember picking up a child from the road selling groundnut. The entire tray could not have been more than N100. I gave her the money and she took me to her home. That day changed me as a human being. That girl who was about nine then had been raped about twice. And she was still on the street. I thought to myself that the woman who was allowing her daughter get exposed to such inhumanity was irresponsible herself. So, I went to the house with the aim of picking up a quarrel with her. Their house was made with zinc. When it is afternoon, they all have to come out because it is too hot inside. To my amazement, I saw about seven other children and my first question was: why on earth do you have so many children without having the means to care for them? She said to me, ‘sister, where I come from, we no fit tell our husband no.’ I told her I wasn’t saying she should say no but at least she should go for family planning. She said they do. And then, I asked her to explain to me the kind of planning that still allows her to have so many children without spacing. She then said, when she puts to bed, she would go and stay with her mother in the village for one year. Whenever she returns to her husband, that means she is ready for another pregnancy. That is family planning to her. She had no clue about contraceptives and all others. Then I asked her what the N80 that the daughter was to bring home from sale of groundnut would do for her? She made a statement that till I die, I would never forget. She said: “Aunty, hungry don ever catch you and you soak gari? You and all your children siddon dey look the gari, una never fit start to chop because e never swell reach to beleful all of una? She made me know that many of those children who stand by at parties waiting to carry our leftovers were her children. She also said that for many of those children, that is the only time that they get to

Amata

Photo: BIODUN ADEYEWA

Interview

Disappointments don’t bother me eat rice. I can never forget that. You see, many of us are guilty of chasing the children away when we find them at events, but it is because we don’t know how important that meal is to that child. Since that day, whenever I see those children, I pack everybody’s food on my table and give to them. It was an eye opener for me. The only reason I can sit and complain about a lot of things is because I know better. And so, I have to thank God

‘I grew up knowing that I can get anything I need through hard work, diligence and perseverance. All you need is a good education to prepare you for the future’

for my parents. It is because I have the benefit of education that I can criticize her. If you were coming from the background that she came from, you would be just like her. There are lots of things in life that we have that we take for granted because we have it and we assume everybody else should know. But not everybody knows. There was also one that we did when people with disability came to me that they wanted a Bill to be passed so that the disabled can be cared for in the society. A deaf woman came to me and said radio and TV is useless to her because she has never listened to them. When she had her baby and her baby is crying, somebody would have to tap her to alert her because she can’t hear the cry of a baby. She said Nigeria is not friendly to people with disability. She can’t go to a hospital, she can’t report to the police because they will say they can’t hear her. It was after that episode that I wrote to all TV stations to have sign languages, at least during their news hour. Thank God, one of them listened and started it. I can go on; but those two stand out in my mind and it has changed me as a person. What life lessons have all of these taught you as a person? I am a different person. I have benefited immensely. I really don’t lack anything. People always give me things because of what I do. Everyday, people walk up to me and tell me of one challenge or the other that they are facing and I try the little I can to assist. I’m not rich enough to help all of them as much as I would have love to but I see it as a privilege being able to touch lives. What prepared you for this role that you’ve had taken up? My mum is everybody’s mum. My father died when I was in Form two and left seven children with my mum. Even at that, I can’t remember when it was only the seven of us that my mum catered for all through growing up. Even now that she has retired she is still into one form of philanthropy or the other. She is always calling me that her children need computers even now that all her children are grown and have all left the house; she still has other people’s children she

wants this or that for. Sometimes, you don’t know the importance of things until later in life. It is as I look back now that I realize I couldn’t have done anything but to want to give and give because that was what I grew up with. Giving, to me, is natural as it is for my mother. She would wake you up at 4 am and tell you women don’t sleep till dawn. These are morals many of us don’t even give to our children these days. I am equally guilty. Today, if I sleep at 3am, I wake at 4am. Even If I’m going to sleep back, I would still wake up. We had a day in my house when boys cook and a day when it was the turn of the girls. The day my brothers had to cook pounded yam, you would see them sweating in the kitchen. There was nothing like, ‘this is for boys and that is for girls.’All my brothers can cook, wash and clean. That was the upbringing we had. And I thank my mum for all these she imbibed in me. These are all that shaped me and prepared me for whom I am today. I saw a woman struggle to raise seven children up. Those are the values that I think we need to get back into our children. We have become too sophisticated. What would you thank your father for? What I will thank him for is that from when I was born till he died, he made me know that nobody can put me down except I allow him or her. My father will tell you, ‘ask and negotiate.’ If you wanted anything from my father, you had to be able to convince him on why you need it. And he will tell you, ‘no doesn’t mean you can’t get it, it means try again.’ And that is what I grew up knowing. I grew up knowing that there is nothing I need that I cannot get. So I’m not put off by disappointments. I’m not put off by being told no, over and over again. Rather, I tell the person he or she would look for me later. I don’t believe I need a man to achieve anything. A man is supposed to be a partner in progress. I don’t believe I have to sleep around to get anything. I grew up knowing that I can get anything I need through hard work, diligence and perseverance. All you need is a good education to prepare you for the future. How much of time do you have for your children so you can inculcate these things you learnt into them? My children are my best friends. Having time for them is something I don’t compromise. And I have been blessed. My time with my children cannot be negotiated even till now. They are in college already and even as they know I’m not there with them, they know I am somehow. There was something that gladdened my heart sometime ago when I went to see them. Two of the cab drivers in the school said they had been waiting to meet me because he is one of the most wellbehaved boys they’ve ever known. And that gladdened me. To you, who is a good leader? Somebody that is able to carry people along. Somebody that has the fear of God in him or her. Somebody who is humane. If you can’t carry people along, it is a problem. Leadership for me is about being able to have successors. My office runs without me. Any decision that is taken in my absence, I believe is in the best interest of the company, even though I may not be in total agreement. Everybody is important to the good leader. Nobody is indispensable. For me, leadership is about also building so many leaders. I have built so many leaders who have come off my programme. The Future Awards crew met on my set- Toyosi Akerele and so many other that I have lost count of. I have got a lot of youths become Inside Out fans. They came in with their heads down but today, their heads are high up because their confidence level has improved and they know what they want and where they are headed in life. They are the only ones who limit themselves, nobody can limit them. The situation might not be rosy but they know how to navigate to get to where they are going. People that make money in this country don’t have two heads. So, we must all learn to put behind the obstacles and get there. If we complain about this country, have we ever sat to question why despite all these no light, no water, corruption and all that, companies are still moving here? Something is in this country and we must open our eyes so we can see properly. If there is nothing here, they will not come. There is something we have in this country: we have the population. What you need is the idea.


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August 25, 2012

Interview

CHRISTIAN AZUBUIKE OBOH MD,NDDC

Corruption, our greatest challenge By PETER AGBA KALU Any contractor that has ever collected money from the Niger Delta Development Commission (NDDC) but failed to execute the job needs to be worried.Dr.Christian Azubuike Oboh,managing director of the commission says they should urgently return to site or be ready to cough out the money. “I can tell you that we will recover such funds that were taken by some fraudulent contractors who have refused to work for us,”he told Daily Sun in an interview in Port Harcourt,River State.To underscore his seriousness,Oboh reveals that NDDC was finalizing plans to enlist the support of the anti-graft agencies,the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC) and the Independent Corrupt Practices and other Allied offences Commission (ICPC) to recover the funds. As NDDC boss, what keeps you awake at night? What keeps me awake is the desire to make the difference in my own little time given to me to serve. Hopefully, I want to see the little I can to deliver within the limit of time. Sometimes, such thoughts keep me awake and I brood over them. I often ask myself, ‘Can achieve this?’ I have that desire. God willing, I know I will be there at the end of the day. You have been quoted as saying that in the next five year, there would be a new Niger Delta Region. What really is your projection? Recently, we had a seminar, where the Niger Delta youths were invited. The question we asked ourselves was, ‘After oil, what will be our future.’ We all agreed that this is the right time for us to begin to lay the foundation for alternative sources that will sustain us after the oil is gone. We may believe that oil will still be there even after our generation would have gone, but there is the need for us to venture into other areas that can also sustain the economy, if oil is no more. You know that the advanced economies are looking for alternative sources of cheap energy. Probably, if oil is no longer in vogue, we may begin to sustain ourselves with, say cassava, produced in large quantities in this region. That is what we are looking at. Is there any master plan on ground that shows how the Niger Delta region will be, say in the next five to 10 years? Yes, you remember that there has been a master plan for the Niger Delta area, not for NDDC alone. So, we expect the states to key in. We know, to a large extent, that the implementation of the master plan has not been properly followed. That is why, towards the last quarter of this year, we will be putting technocrats together to look at the master plan totally and then be able to advice us if the plan is being implemented accordingly. If not, what do we do to bring it in line? We are not going to do this alone. We are going to do this in conjunction with the states of the Niger Delta region. Therefore, it is not going to be a document that will be produced solely by the NDDC. The governments of the states of the Niger Delta region and the oil companies will make their inputs, too. This time, we also expect the civil societies that have always criticized us to be among the group that will review the master plan. We have the NDDC, the BRACED Commission, the Niger Delta Ministry, the Federal Government, the states and the local governments. All of them working in one way or the otherto develop the region. Do all these institutions plan in common in order to avoid conflicts or duplications of projects? Yes, this was lacking in the past. But with the coming in place of the advisory board of the NDDC, comprising, among others, the state gover-

nors and the minister of the Niger Delta, the conflicts or the duplication of projects that may arisen have been reduced to the barest minimum. In fact, to less than five per cent. Now, whatever projects NDDC proposes will be made known to all the respective state governors and the minister of the Niger Delta. What I am saying is that the cooperation between these various organs have so improved that whatever they are doing, we are in the know and what we are also doing they also know. I can equally tell you that there is a road project that the Rivers State government was undertaking but which the NDDC has taken over. God willing, we will take up the challenges that will come our way and then do our best. It has been observed that many of your projects are located in Bayelsa State. Is it because of President Jonathan Goodluck who is from the state? The Obia-Nembe Road is a partnership project between NDDC and Shell. So, we are not under-

Oboh

taking it alone. The other projects you mentioned were awarded by NDDC before Jonathan became the President. But the truth you must know is that projects in NDDC are awarded on the basis of derivation. There is a sharing formula that NDDC uses to allocate projects to member states. Therefore, you may not be totally correct to say that the award of projects is lopsided. You ought to know that Bayelsa has an environment that is quite challenging. It is a riverine with much swampy areas. It, therefore, needs more bridges to connect the various villages. That is why we are doing these projects in the area. We will continue to do projects that will make more meaning to the people. We have also commenced the process for the implementation of the second batch of 29 mega projects sited across the region. Two of the projects are sited in Abia State, eight in Akwa Ibom, two in Bayelsa, one in Cross River and seven in Delta State. Edo State has one, Imo and Rivers, four each. The commission has put all machinery in motion to ensure the effective implementation of the projects. As you can see, NDDC is not all about President Jonathan and Bayelsa State. The Elele Rice Mill project located in Rivers State is very huge but its appears abandoned. It is quite sad that the project was allowed to remain like that. When we came on Board last December, we promised that by July this year, we will be producing the NDDC rice. But now, it seems that we have lied. Unfortunately, we had relied on the assurance given to us by those who were supposed to be driving the project. But we took over the project and we are now directly driving it. God willing, we have scheduled to visit the

‘Our vision is to ensure that the Niger Delta states are dotted with projects completed by NDDC. If we are able to realize that, it means that we have been able to also add value in our own time’ project site with the governor of Rivers State. We are hopeful that soon the factory will start running. The technical partners from Thailand are waiting for us to hand the project over to them, so that they will look at the plant and do a pre-running test. As soon as that is done, God willing, we will hit the market with the product. Apart from the rice mill project is there any other agricultural project you are embarking on? In 2011, we had quite a few agricultural projects. There is an agric loan facility that we domiciled with a bank for cooperative society. We are giving capacity to some farmers because we also realized that for us to move from where we are now to the next level of agriculture we need to let farmers know what to do, be it in the application of fertilizer, utilization of agric loans and how to create the market for their farm products. They also ought to know what to produce and how to produce them. For instance, we let farmers know how they can utilize cassava in terms of changing forms and the market to sell them. All these we are doing. We have people at three training centres. We have places were we are training people in various forms of agriculture. In the 2012 budget, we have proposed to open farm settlements in the region. If we have the nod of the National Assembly, that is also one programme that will employ many of our youths who are willing to work. The National Assembly has reviewed the NDDC budget for 2012. What is the policy trust of the budget? Our main focus in 2012 is to complete ongoing or abandoned projects. In the whole of Niger Delta region, there are many NDDC projects spotted all over. Nearly all the project sites are active because we have released funds to the contractors. This means that if we give contractors enough money, there is the likelihood that more projects will be completed in 2012. If this effort is sustained, I can assure you that in another five years, Niger Delta will be a beautiful place. What factors influences the award of contracts by NDDC? In 2012, we are not awarding projects that do not have demand; that is, projects that do not meet the needs of the people. To ensure this, we will make sure that all the stages leading to the award of a contract is followed or complied with before a project is awarded. You find out that some contractors will go to site only to discover that what we have given them or what was designed is in conflict with what is on ground or what they are doing. This has


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

ASPIRE

33

Interview

Compromise in business Odi-trofani bridge often led to requests for contract variations and waste of resources. We are, therefore, willing now to do the right thing. We are also getting enough professional staff to do the supervision because we also realized that in some of our sites, we did not know what was going on there. What are your greatest challenges in your bid to achieve your goals in NDDC? The greatest challenge we have in NDDC is corruption. I am not saying that we are saints but there has been a high level of connivance. People have connived to deprive the region of large sum of funds. But we believe that with the kind of team we have and with the new orientation, new culture that we have now in NDDC our mandate will be delivered. We now have a large pool of dedicated and honest staff to ensure that we deliver on our mandate. We will be as transparent as possible in our dealings, particularly now that there is the Freedom of Information Act that makes it mandatory for us to let you see our books. We are going to reduce corruption to the barest minimum. Again, in order to achieve a quick delivery of projects I visit the sites and I warned the contractors against indulging in sharp practices that will impede the successful execution of the projects. Where contractors choose to circumvent laid down procedures and execute their projects below expectations, they shall be demolished at their own expense. Our problem in the past was that once contractors receive mobilization fund they fly out to London to rest or celebrate only to come back after squandering the fund to ask for contract variation. But this time around, where requests for variation are not justified, such projects shall be determined, re-advertised and re-awarded to serious contractors. For quick delivery, I implored consultants and resident supervisor to ensure that their staffs were not only qualified but always around to monitor progress of work by contractors. Where consultants choose to send inexperienced or non-engineers to supervise engineering projects, such contracts shall be terminated without notice. Same fate applies to consultants in other fields. There was a media report that when you came on board, there was a plan to decentralize the management of NDDC. In line with this, some Directors were, recently, posted to man your state offices.

Though it is still early to assess the effectiveness of this policy, are there signs that NDDC is achieving its aim? Yes, I believe that in a matter of weeks, we will begin to reap the success of what we have done. In the past, if a contractor earned an Interim Payment Certificate, (IPC) it would require some staff to go from the head office to the project sites in the states to asses the contractor’s performance. But with this new policy, the case is now reversed. We have staff now in the states who are closer to where these projects are located. We can now quickly know when a contractor has earned an IPC and his due payments will be facilitated. Contractors are now paid earlier, supervision and project delivery have also become better. This is a policy we intend to pursue. Did you come up with this vision or you met on ground? There was a decentralization programme before we came. We are only fine-tuning it to ensure that we have our best in the various states. Is there any policy or system that you met on ground, when you came on board, that has, in one way or the other impeded you from moving as fast as you ought? Some aspects of the law establishing the commission should be looked at again. I am not a lawyer but we could see that there are a few areas of it that should be amended. For example, NDDC is an intervention agency but the length of time it takes us to complete one procurement process is too cumbersome. Assuming there is an emergency situation, such as an oil spillage in a community that requires the provision of emergency relief, I can tell you that it may take us two months to be able to finish the procurement process and then intervene. By this time, what we provide would have become meaningless for the community. This is one of such situations we are looking at. However, we would not be in a hurry to ensure that we discard the procurement process as provided by law because the process makes for transparency. But there is need for the government to look at the situation of the commission and then relax some aspects of the law that could encumber or slow down the process of our intervening in major disaster situations. Accepted government is a continuous process; but your administration seems to be focusing much attention and energy on completing and

commissioning your predecessor’s unfinished projects. One wonders if you lack an initiative of your own. When are you going to initiate new projects? Our vision is to ensure that the Niger Delta states are dotted with projects completed by NDDC. If we are able to realize that, it means that we have been able to also add value in our own time. But apart from that there are quite a few landmark projects that we have ventured into. You know that traveling from Rivers State to some parts of Delta State takes more than four-five hours. If we are able to do this landmark project, it will certainly improve the economy of the region and make life easier for the people. If the bridge is completed, it will take about 45 minutes from Port Harcourt to Ndoni and in another 20 -30 minutes you will be in Asaba. This is one of such landmark projects that we have proposed for each of the states within the region. God willing we will achieve them. What about projects that are abandoned by contractors after receiving mobilization fee? We are now talking with ICPC and the EFCC to see how they could assist us recover such funds with the contractors who have refused to go back to their project sites. Initially, we tried not to quarrel with them but to persuade them to go back to site. Honestly, for some of them, the funds are actually trapped in the distressed banks. For those ones, it is not the fault of the contractors. But we are also engaging the banks and the federal agencies supervising the banks to ensure that the trapped funds are recovered. Definitely, I can tell you that we will recover such funds that were taken by some fraudulent contractors who have refused to work for us. In essence, you’re telling the contractors who took NDDC money and ran away that their judgment day is at hand if they don’t mobilize to site? There is no way somebody can take the money belonging to you and me without delivering his assignment and I will go to sleep. Some people are looking at accountability as being on the side of those who are serving in government. Those in the private sector too need to be accountable to those they are doing projects for or rendering services to. A man who takes government money and refuses to do the corresponding work should be made to face some disciplinary action.

Compromise is often touted as a virtue. But what is usually put upon a pedestal behind a gauzy curtain is a package deal containing two different concepts under the same label. The first concept is the coming to an agreement on details under a shared basic principle, and the second is the destruction of both sets of basic principles to meet in the muck halfway between. The first concept, hashing out details under a shared basic principle, we can call haggling. An example of this is two traders who want to exchange goods. The basic principle is trade and the details is how much of X to trade for how much Y. Both traders will try to get a good deal, but will only deal if they can get a price which is beneficial to both. This is how markets are made and prices of goods are determined. A second example is two people deciding which movie to watch. The basic principle is friendship and the details are how to express that friendship. The second concept, the surrender of basic principles to achieve some agreement, is not simply hashing out details. Basic principles are either followed or not followed. They cannot be partly followed. An example would be two people deciding on whether or not to initiate force. The basic principle of one person is respect of man qua man. The basic principle of the other is might makes right. There is no way to bridge this unbridgeable gap. Another example would be deciding on whether to follow a moral principle or not, such as honesty. One can either be honest or dishonest, represent reality or try to fake reality, but there is nothing in between. Any deliberate compromise of an accurate representation of reality results in a deliberate faking of reality. Acting in the first manner, haggling, is not what people refer to when they advocate compromise as a virtue. To do so would be like commandeering a pulpit to preach breathing. No, when compromise is presented as a virtue it is the second concept that is advocated. Compromise anything and everything in the name of “getting along”. “Getting along” is held as the only basic principle which can not

be compromised. To the compromisers, it doesn’t matter what a man advocates as long as he’s willing to renege on whatever it is to meet the group halfway. Anyone who’s willing to compromise and make some deal, any deal, is OK. It is this type of compromise that is advocated as a virtue which is evil. Evil is not some powerful force which only an equally powerful force of good can vanquish. Life is not about some epic clash between the mighty forces of good an evil. Evil is impotent and parasitic. Good is living life and flourishing. Evil is finding someone or something which is good and tearing it apart in hopes of gaining something from the pieces. Evil is incompetent. It can only survive through mooching off of the competent. Without good there is no evil, and evil exists only to the extent that the good allow themselves to be preyed upon, to be compromised. When good and evil compromise, it is evil that wins. Good can only lose by compromising; evil can only exist through the act of compromise. When there is an attempted compromise between honesty and dishonesty, the result is dishonesty. When there is an attempted compromise between justice and injustice, the result is an injustice. When there is an attempted compromise between rationality and irrationality, the result is irrational. When there is an attempted compromise between integrity and not acting in accordance with ones convictions, the result is an act not in accordance with one’s convictions. The advocating of compromise as a virtue follows the standard package deal formula. It holds up the first concept, haggling over details, as an obvious example of a good thing, then equates that with the second concept, the destruction of principles. This bait and switch tactic is a back door to moral relativism, the principle that any system of ethics or principles is just as valid as another. A compromise on a basic principle is the destruction of that principle, and a compromise on a good principle is the lifeblood of evil. Culled from www.importanceofphilosophy.com


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SATURDAY SUN August 25, 2012

ASPIRE

Human Interest

Deadly Gamble! Are you one of those Nigerians patronizing itinerant barbers and manicurists? Doctors say you may be playing with fire. By ERIC DUMO Until he almost had his finger chopped recently, Rumi Okochu, 25, was a big fan of local nail cutters known as Maiyanka kumba in Hausa dialect. With just N40, he would have his finger and toe nails cleaned and trimmed neatly. He does this twice a month and have had no reason to worry until about one month ago when he had a shocking experience. “The mallam (nail cutter) almost cut off my finger,” he began. “I don’t know what he was thinking of or where his mind was but I just felt this mad pain on my left hand as he was trimming the nails. When I looked, there was blood rushing out, he said it was a mistake that I was moving my hands and that was why he mistakenly cut my finger with the scissors he was using. Though, the finger has healed, I still feel slight pains because it was swollen after that period. Later the chemist that treated it for me said I have contacted whitlow in that finger. Since that time, I have stopped cutting my nails with all these mallams.” Aigbe Paul, too, has had a terrible experience patronizing local nail cutters that daily patrol many Nigerian streets and communities looking for customers. He said even though he was always scared patronizing them because of the fear of contacting sickness, his last encounter with one of them made him to stop. “For several days I was feeling pains on my fingers and toes. It was as if the aboki cut off pieces of my flesh. Whenever I put on shoes, I was always feeling pains on my toes and it has never been like this that was why I was surprised. But before it becomes something else, I told myself that I would never cut my nails with mallams again. I don’t want to contact any disease or sickness please,” he said. But while the likes of Okochu and Paul have learnt a few lessons and decided to steer clear of this mode of pedicure and manicure for fear of its imminent risk, there are scores others whose addiction and loyalty seem unbroken – even with the dangers they portend and present. At Oshodi, a bustling suburb within the Lagos metropolis, the reporter stumbled on a rare sight in the course of the week. A middle-aged man was having his hair shaved at a corner of the busy road by another man whom the reporter later found to be a mobile barber who goes in search of customers from street to street. The vendor was using a tiny, silver-coloured metal shaped in form of a knife to scrape his client’s scalp to achieve a clean shave. There were two other people waiting in line to be attended to by this local ‘beautician’. It was a normal routine for most of the people here and so nobody really cared if the practice has any danger attached to it or not. Afew questions thrown at some of the men, and it was revealed that some have been engaged in it for many years. “It is the cheapest way to get my hair shaved,” one of them who identified himself as Yemi, told the paper. “At the salon now, to barb your hair, you have to pay N300 and that’s too cost as far as I am concerned. But with this aboki people, one can have a hair cut with N70 to N100. This is not my first time of patronizing this man (referring to the man shaving the hair), he comes here almost everyday and people barb their hair from him.” When the reporter asked this group if they were aware of such diseases like HIV AIDS and that they could be at risk of contacting it by using the same metal object to scrape their hairs, there was a seeming consensus in their response. The men said they were not afraid because if nothing has happened to them since, they see no reason why it would be now that they would be contacting disease by barbing from their customer who most simply addressed as Megida but whose original name is Aliyu Shehu. At the popular Mile 12 market, Mohammed Suna and his brother, Basil, are taking pedicure and barbing services to the homes of people. Now in the business for about eight and five years respectively, they have become regular faces in this Lagos locality and its surrounding neighbourhoods. While Mohammed, the elder of the two, gives a single haircut between N80 to N100 and makes around N600 daily on the average, Basil who specializes in trimming and cleaning finger and toenails for N50, say his daily income is around N300 to N400. They told the paper that their customer base is dropping by the day and that they can’t tell why. “When I first started this work, I could make around N1000 to N1200 but now, it is difficult to even make half of that amount. Even most of my customers don’t call me anymore and I don’t know why. But when I go to Kosofe where our people are many, that’s where I get small customers in a day sometimes. Honestly, I don’t know why it is like this. Even my brother is not making money they way he used to. He told me a few days ago that he wants to go back to Kano because business is not going as before anymore,” Mohammed told the paper.

Local manicurist in action. How safe?

Dr. Bassey Sights of local service providers like the Suna brothers is a very familiar one across most parts of Lagos, especially in localities that have high concentration of the Hausas of Northern Nigeria. In Agege, Ijora, Obalende and Ebutte-Metta for example, their presence is well known and their services well patronized. Many of such practitioners who are mostly men, move around with their tools tucked into portable bags, which they carry on their shoulders. Apair of sharp scissors, a bottle of detergent and mentholated spirit, an aluminum cup and also a small knife, are some of the tools used by practitioners. But while attending to a customer, most of these items hardly go through any acceptable process of sterilization, making the spread of disease inevitable. Experts say there are a number of deadly infections and diseases that individuals who patronize such modes of cleanup can be exposed to. A recent report found up to eight bacteria and five fungal species in some of these tools used by the likes of Shehu. Some of the deadly bacteria include Micrococcus luteus, Micrococcus roseus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Hafnia spp, Shigella spp, Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus spp. Those of the fungal were identified as Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Mucor spp, Trichophyton spp and Candida albicans. Those in the medical line told the magazine some of these are able to cause grave harm to the human body. Daniel Bassey, a medical doctor, insisted that the practice of using the same tools to service more than one customer was extremely dangerous and is among major factors contributing to the spread of deadly diseases such

as HIV and AIDS in many parts of the country. He advised individuals to take their health issues serious and not expose themselves to unnecessary risks. “The issues concerning most of the things that has to do with our people taking care of their health is that most times people are not getting adequate information. When somebody is poor or not educated, what happens is that the person is not able to have a good bargaining power to get the best quality health care services. Before now we didn’t have the prevalence of most of these diseases like HIV we have today. “HIV, which is a virus, is very deadly and cannot be extinguished by antibiotics. In that regard, we have also discovered that the use of sharp objects that has to have contact with one person’s blood and then also used on someone else without proper sterilization, can contribute to spreading the disease faster. HIVitself is a dermatological problem in the sense that it lives in the blood and can only be passed through blood contact. Apart from through sex, this is a major avenue for transmission of such disease as HIV. “People are aware of this fact but then we still have the prevalence of HIVAIDS because people are careless with their health and safety. If you check the population of the Hausas, lets say you take a sample of 1000 individuals and you decide to test the active adults, up to 60 to 70 per cent of them would be tested for HIV because most of them go through all sorts of pedicure and manicure processes that are unsafe. Some of these things are done so crudely with tools like blade, knives and scissors. “Yes I agree with some people who argue that some of these practices has been very traditional but because tradition is not something that is static but should be dynamic, then there should have been changes over the years. Modernization has offered us a lot of options in whatever we are doing, so I expect that people in this category too should have adapted to these seeming changes. “Having said so, we have been able to convince most of them that they cannot do this forever. They don’t have what it takes to sterilize their equipments because they are mere vendors. When you say you want to me manicured, they just quickly cut your nails and some of them cut so close, exposing the person to grave danger because they would have shaved so close to where the blood cells could have contact with the object used. “It is almost the same thing you find at the salons when you don’t go there with your own clipper and kits. Most of what they use to sterilize their equipments cant completely eliminate the virus spreading HIV. Apart from HIV, there are so many other scalp and nail diseases that these things can lead to. These can move from one person to another and without proper medication, it could lead to some very serious problems. That is why we advise people not to engage in such practices as cutting their nails and barbing their hairs by roadsides vendors who use one object for every customer. It is a very

risky gamble and it is in the best interest of individuals to abandon such unsafe practice,” he said. But some vendors like Ahmed Alimi do not share Bassey’s view. He rejected the claim that they are helping spread disease in the country, maintaining that their mode of operation has nothing to do with endangering peoples’health. “Some of us have been in this business for many years so I know everything about it. In most part of the North, this is the main way people shave their hairs and keep their nails clean. I have never seen or heard anyone dying because he patronized us. So all this one you are talking about is not correct,” he argued. The situation is not peculiar to Lagos it is the same in other parts of the country where regardless of spirited campaigns by the governments and other known organizations on the dangers of sharing needles, blades and other sharp objects, the romance with local pedicurists and barbers have remained largely unchanged. Not even the influx of cheap clippers and handy personal nail cutters and filers have been able to completely eradicate this practice a growing number of individuals even educated ones have continued to be engaged in this risky practice. Buchi Anyamele, a psychologist based in PortHarcourt, capital of Rivers State, told the magazine in a telephone conversation that the major issue is not that people are not aware of the risk involved but that it is sometimes difficult for people to abandon a particular lifestyle in favour of another, even if the new way is the more acceptable. “Africans generally find it difficult to break away from their past in anything they do, and this is one of the reasons why the continent has remained largely under-developed. You cannot blame those people who still give their nails to one man on the roadside to trim or open their hairs for him to shave. It is either they are ignorant or aware of the dangers but afraid or unwilling to switch to another mode of having it done. But I think with more enlightenment, more people would understand why they should not endanger their lives anymore.” The number of individuals who patronize vendors like Alimi across the country is not known but there are fears the figure could be on the rise, especially with daily survival becoming very critical for many in the face of the nation’s dwindling economy. A lot of persons live below the poverty line (less than US$1) in many communities and so investing as ‘much’as N300 for a single haircut or having a safe finger and toenail treatment in a standard salon for around N500, could only remain a dream. Even though, there are cheaper bargains in some places, the situation of the economy might not still leave enough naira notes in the pockets of ordinary Nigerians to address such needs – leaving the likes of Shehu and the Suna brothers a huge part of many people’s lives – a situation that might not likely change in the very near future even with the risk associated.


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ASPIRE

SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

ASPIRE

Traveller

Traveller

POETRY IN MOTION

Ikogosi

By ABUMERE EASTER 07056031011

KNOWLEDGE HURTS I am Abumere Easter, A student,poet and writer From my little years of learning, I’ve got these lines to make Lines that easily beset you, Like coal instead of ice But if you’ll read and learn, Anxieties crumble in an ounce I’ve wondered a great deal, At the cocoa house in Ibadan But my fancy soon was killed By the pains of the builders Those who have mastery of the Arts, Envy the slave who makes the bed At the discovery of grandeur, The soul wishes to till the earth What we know is what kills us For we’re slaves to what we fear The plight of wise men is wisdom And the anguish of beggars,lack The poet,revered and adorned, Is saddled by the lines he drops Even the wealthiest amongst us, Clamours for a crown of no honour To love knowledge is death disguised For none knows whence it blows But to have the happiness of life, Let joy itself be Jesus the Christ.

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The myths and splendour of a tourist haven With the first phase of the redevelopment plan of the Ikogosi Warm Spring; Mc Gee Camp (named after the Baptist missionary that built the chapel) expected to be inaugurated in October, the tourist site when fully operational, will no doubt change the face of tourism in Nigeria reports ADEWALE SANYAOLU, who took a recent tour of the resort. A trip from Ado-Ekiti, the capital of Ekiti State to Ikogosi Warm Springs in Ikogosi Ekiti takes less than one hour, thanks to the good state of roads connecting about five villages before the final stop, where the popular tourist resort is located. The rhythmic splash from cascading waters, birds singing atop lush green canopy of tropical vegetation, and the serene ambience of the fall lures and gets you sucked into its scenic scene. Apart from the captivating atmosphere that serenades tourists on end, the inhabitants of the community daze the first time visitor with hospitality that does not fade even with time, answering every nagging question with infectious smiles. Welcome to Ikogosi Warm Springs, where nature is truly at work. For tourists, the high point of the springs is the inexplicable factor behind the flow of warm water beneath the ground mixing with the flow of cold water and meeting at a particular point without any losing its original temperature from the source as a result of the connection. Though yet to be verified, myths run whole gamut, from wives of the same husband turning into warm and cold springs to a hunter discovering the spring on a hunting expedition. Scientists on the other hand, give the possible and plausible explanation that the deeper a body of water goes underground, the hotter it becomes and if by chance it is forced back to the surface through some earth fault, the temperature will be relatively high. Over the years, the tourist centre has suffered neglect from successive governments, which cared little about the state of infrastructure, leading to dearth of structures, despite its good start with the Baptist Mission. The mission established the youth and conference centre and other conveniences on a hill adjacent to the warm spring area that have been attracting both local and foreign tourists since the 1950s. However in 1978, Ondo State acquired it from the Baptist Mission, erecting a few infrastructures before the resort centre was finally acquired by

Ikogosi Warm Spring

Ekiti State Government shortly after it was carved out of the old Ondo State. It, however, suffered a lull until the admin-

istration of Dr. Kayode Fayemi started the rehabilitation process in July, last year.

The rehabilitation work, which is still ongoing, will, upon completion, change the entire landscape, state of infrastruc-

ture and facilities at the resort to make it comparable with any world-class tourist centre anywhere on the globe, according to Dr. Fayemi. “When we came on board,” he said, “we felt there was an urgent need for us to intervene in the massive rehabilitation of the resort in order to save the common heritage of the Ekiti people from imminent collapse.” The essence of the rehabilitation work, according to the governor, is to provide a resort that cuts across all social strata-low, middle and upper classes, so as not to cut off anyone from the resort, especially the locals, as obtained in other climes. And in doing this, the government was careful enough not to cut off the resort from history by not pulling down the old colonial structures which dotted every nook and cranny of Ikogosi. Rather, it is now a mix of the old and new through a well-designed architectural masterpiece. The rooms have been redesigned to meet international standards, from 3 to 5-star to hostel accommodations (24 units for educational purposes such as excursion trips for schools). There is also internet provision, ample parking lot, shopping malls, amphi-theatre, good road network, security with CCTV, security gadgets and personnel, warehouses, laundry, restaurants and all other amenities that make up a world-class resort. To achieve a balanced resort, the setting has been divided into four areas. There is the place called The Villa designed for the upper class, and sitting atop the hill overseeing the entire landscape. Also, there is the Executive Villa and another redesigned twin structure which entire roofing sheets have been recently changed to give way for a modern outlook. That’s not all. There is also the Western Chalet, which overlooks the new swimming pool, and another two blocks of chalets currently being prepared for tourists’ comfort and enjoyment. Sesan Ibidiran is the Special Adviser on Tourism Development to Governor Fayemi. He says the essence of the different categories of accommodation was to cater for the specific tastes of the different categories of people coming to the resort for holidays, picnics and conferences. He gives a further break-

Adewale Sanyaolu savouring nature’s wonder

down of what to expect on the tourism site upon completion. These include a 100-room complex, comprising a presidential villa, self-contained single-room accommodation, and hostels that would be tastefully furnished. They would all be due for inauguration in October. That apart, a conference room capable of sitting about 360 people at a time, an amphi- theatre and large car park are also part of the package. Besides, Ibidiran also says tourists would be enthralled by the perfect combination of all these efforts coupled with the natural atmosphere of Ikogosi, which, he assures, would be jealously preserved and shielded from degradation and destruction upon completion. “There are a lot of people that come here and don’t want to go,” says the Special Adviser, “but, unfortunately, there is nowhere to sleep. This is why we are putting all these structures back in shape. They were dilapidated before this administration came on board. Also, the swimming pool was completely removed because it was not in use. But now, we have moved very far. If not for some delay, we had expected that the place would have been completed by March this year. That is why we are all here to make sure that contractors perform and meet up with the expected date of delivery because the Governor would not be

One of the refurbished structures

ready to take excuses from anyone.” Fayemi, in an interview, disclosed that the on-going rehabilitation work at the popular resort, upon completion, would boost economic activity in the state. It would transform the state’s economic landscape and provide huge employment opportunities for the citizens. It would also impact positively on the economic empowerment of the rural dwellers. More importantly, he added, revenues accruing from operations within the resort, the hotels and other facilities would enhance the Internal Generated Revenue (IGR) base of the state as taxes would be paid to government coffers. The Governor stressed that the need to develop a world-class tourism site in the state and, by extension, the country, informed the decision of his administration to commence rehabilitation work on the tourism site. He informed that the on-going rehabilitation work, currently in its first phase, would culminate into the second and third phases respectively. “I will not want to spoil the fun by saying that you have not actually seen anything yet as far as the redevelopment of Ikogosi is concerned,” Governor Fayemi continues. “At the moment, what you have seen are just carcasses, though, capable of giving you a picture of what is to come on

stream later. But this will not be a rounded picture.” At the moment, he said, the state is already in partnership with Mantis Collection of South Africa, who, he described as experts in rural and games resort management, adding that sustainability is a key factor considered by his government in the Ikogosi project hence, the partnership. He debunked any ambition by the state government to be involved in the day-to-day running of the resort. “I am making this clear that the Ekiti State Government will not run the resort,” he declares. “We know that government does not do well in running businesses. We are not going to burn our fingers and ruin this laudable project with that. We cannot afford Ikogosi going aground. The money being sunk here is not mine. It is the generational fund which must yield the dividends for this generation and generations yet unborn. There are facilities for all categories of people.” But why choose Mantis against the preponderance of tourist site operators in the country? The response came out of Fayemi’s mouth almost automatically: “We were looking for a partner that understands rural resort, that understands theme park, a partner that knows how to run a games reserve, a partner that can combine all with operating a hotel in the city. We made research and found out that the Mantis squarely fits in better than others who are mainly good at operating chains of hotels in various cities of the world. I have visited three of their holdings and I found out that Ikogosi will benefit greatly from their wealth of experience.” Fayemi also disclosed that Mantis selection and engagement is a blessing because he later found out that the group had earlier carried out a detailed research on Ikogosi forest and has the list of all unique flora and fauna which are endemic to the place even though some of them are at the fringes of extinction. “We have to re-enact and re-generate them,” the governor says. “Hence, we have acquired about 10,000 hectares of land beyond the Ikogosi forest to serve as a buffer zone for the wildlife. What is on the ground now is just a tip of the iceberg. The warm spring is just serving as the niche while the wildlife, the games village, the golf course will be major attractions in there. And to God be the glory, the Mantis also run some of the most successful games reserves in South Africa.”

MY SATURDAY TEWA ONASANYA Publisher,ExquisiteMagazine

‘My Saturdays are strictly for my family’ By ADAEZE ATUEYI-OJUKWU Tewa who? That may be the question on your mind after reading her name. Well, if her name does not ring any bell, it’s not because of none or underachievement. The Delta State-born mother of two, who studied Pharmacology at University of Portsmouth, in the United Kingdom, is the hardworking, high-flying publisher of Exquisite Magazine, a glossy lifestyle magazine. Ask most journalists, and they would tell you that journalism is a jealous job, a 24/7 vocation that leaves practitioners little or no time for family or extra-curricula activities. However, despite the frenetic speed that news breaks, despite the way the job chokes the time of practitioners, the pharmacologist-turned-journalist holds Saturday somewhat sacred. Almost like Sunday, her day of worship. In this short encounter with ASPIRE, the publisher says Saturdays are strictly for her family. “For me, my Saturdays are mostly to relax,” she says. “When I wake up in the morning, at about 8a.m. I go swimming with my kids. They love to swim, and since that is like the only time I relax with them, I make it a point of duty to take them go swimming every Saturday. When we get back, I try and fix breakfast for the entire family. We spend most of the evenings relaxing until we go to bed. I also go for events if I have one fixed for that day and then because of my work, I go for parties too. My Saturday is generally spent relaxing. How I spend my Saturday, from wake up time to retiring to bed, mostly around my family, even extended family members. Sometimes, I take my sisters out to the cinemas and we have fun.”


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

ASPIRE

37

Traveller

dour n ture and facilities at the resort to make it comparable with any world-class tourist centre anywhere on the globe, according to Dr. Fayemi. “When we came on board,” he said, “we felt there was an urgent need for us to intervene in the massive rehabilitation of the resort in order to save the common heritage of the Ekiti people from imminent collapse.” The essence of the rehabilitation work, according to the governor, is to provide a resort that cuts across all social strata-low, middle and upper classes, so as not to cut off anyone from the resort, especially the locals, as obtained in other climes. And in doing this, the government was careful enough not to cut off the resort from history by not pulling down the old colonial structures which dotted every nook and cranny of Ikogosi. Rather, it is now a mix of the old and new through a well-designed architectural masterpiece. The rooms have been redesigned to meet international standards, from 3 to 5-star to hostel accommodations (24 units for educational purposes such as excursion trips for schools). There is also internet provision, ample parking lot, shopping malls, amphi-theatre, good road network, security with CCTV, security gadgets and personnel, warehouses, laundry, restaurants and all other amenities that make up a world-class resort. To achieve a balanced resort, the setting has been divided into four areas. There is the place called The Villa designed for the upper class, and sitting atop the hill overseeing the entire landscape. Also, there is the Executive Villa and another redesigned twin structure which entire roofing sheets have been recently changed to give way for a modern outlook. That’s not all. There is also the Western Chalet, which overlooks the new swimming pool, and another two blocks of chalets currently being prepared for tourists’ comfort and enjoyment. Sesan Ibidiran is the Special Adviser on Tourism Development to Governor Fayemi. He says the essence of the different categories of accommodation was to cater for the specific tastes of the different categories of people coming to the resort for holidays, picnics and conferences. He gives a further break-

Adewale Sanyaolu savouring nature’s wonder

down of what to expect on the tourism site upon completion. These include a 100-room complex, comprising a presidential villa, self-contained single-room accommodation, and hostels that would be tastefully furnished. They would all be due for inauguration in October. That apart, a conference room capable of sitting about 360 people at a time, an amphi- theatre and large car park are also part of the package. Besides, Ibidiran also says tourists would be enthralled by the perfect combination of all these efforts coupled with the natural atmosphere of Ikogosi, which, he assures, would be jealously preserved and shielded from degradation and destruction upon completion. “There are a lot of people that come here and don’t want to go,” says the Special Adviser, “but, unfortunately, there is nowhere to sleep. This is why we are putting all these structures back in shape. They were dilapidated before this administration came on board. Also, the swimming pool was completely removed because it was not in use. But now, we have moved very far. If not for some delay, we had expected that the place would have been completed by March this year. That is why we are all here to make sure that contractors perform and meet up with the expected date of delivery because the Governor would not be

One of the refurbished structures

ready to take excuses from anyone.” Fayemi, in an interview, disclosed that the on-going rehabilitation work at the popular resort, upon completion, would boost economic activity in the state. It would transform the state’s economic landscape and provide huge employment opportunities for the citizens. It would also impact positively on the economic empowerment of the rural dwellers. More importantly, he added, revenues accruing from operations within the resort, the hotels and other facilities would enhance the Internal Generated Revenue (IGR) base of the state as taxes would be paid to government coffers. The Governor stressed that the need to develop a world-class tourism site in the state and, by extension, the country, informed the decision of his administration to commence rehabilitation work on the tourism site. He informed that the on-going rehabilitation work, currently in its first phase, would culminate into the second and third phases respectively. “I will not want to spoil the fun by saying that you have not actually seen anything yet as far as the redevelopment of Ikogosi is concerned,” Governor Fayemi continues. “At the moment, what you have seen are just carcasses, though, capable of giving you a picture of what is to come on

stream later. But this will not be a rounded picture.” At the moment, he said, the state is already in partnership with Mantis Collection of South Africa, who, he described as experts in rural and games resort management, adding that sustainability is a key factor considered by his government in the Ikogosi project hence, the partnership. He debunked any ambition by the state government to be involved in the day-to-day running of the resort. “I am making this clear that the Ekiti State Government will not run the resort,” he declares. “We know that government does not do well in running businesses. We are not going to burn our fingers and ruin this laudable project with that. We cannot afford Ikogosi going aground. The money being sunk here is not mine. It is the generational fund which must yield the dividends for this generation and generations yet unborn. There are facilities for all categories of people.” But why choose Mantis against the preponderance of tourist site operators in the country? The response came out of Fayemi’s mouth almost automatically: “We were looking for a partner that understands rural resort, that understands theme park, a partner that knows how to run a games reserve, a partner that can combine all with operating a hotel in the city. We made research and found out that the Mantis squarely fits in better than others who are mainly good at operating chains of hotels in various cities of the world. I have visited three of their holdings and I found out that Ikogosi will benefit greatly from their wealth of experience.” Fayemi also disclosed that Mantis selection and engagement is a blessing because he later found out that the group had earlier carried out a detailed research on Ikogosi forest and has the list of all unique flora and fauna which are endemic to the place even though some of them are at the fringes of extinction. “We have to re-enact and re-generate them,” the governor says. “Hence, we have acquired about 10,000 hectares of land beyond the Ikogosi forest to serve as a buffer zone for the wildlife. What is on the ground now is just a tip of the iceberg. The warm spring is just serving as the niche while the wildlife, the games village, the golf course will be major attractions in there. And to God be the glory, the Mantis also run some of the most successful games reserves in South Africa.”

MY SATURDAY TEWA ONASANYA Publisher,ExquisiteMagazine

‘My Saturdays are strictly for my family’ By ADAEZE ATUEYI-OJUKWU Tewa who? That may be the question on your mind after reading her name. Well, if her name does not ring any bell, it’s not because of none or underachievement. The Delta State-born mother of two, who studied Pharmacology at University of Portsmouth, in the United Kingdom, is the hardworking, high-flying publisher of Exquisite Magazine, a glossy lifestyle magazine. Ask most journalists, and they would tell you that journalism is a jealous job, a 24/7 vocation that leaves practitioners little or no time for family or extra-curricula activities. However, despite the frenetic speed that news breaks, despite the way the job chokes the time of practitioners, the pharmacologist-turned-journalist holds Saturday somewhat sacred. Almost like Sunday, her day of worship. In this short encounter with ASPIRE, the publisher says Saturdays are strictly for her family. “For me, my Saturdays are mostly to relax,” she says. “When I wake up in the morning, at about 8a.m. I go swimming with my kids. They love to swim, and since that is like the only time I relax with them, I make it a point of duty to take them go swimming every Saturday. When we get back, I try and fix breakfast for the entire family. We spend most of the evenings relaxing until we go to bed. I also go for events if I have one fixed for that day and then because of my work, I go for parties too. My Saturday is generally spent relaxing. How I spend my Saturday, from wake up time to retiring to bed, mostly around my family, even extended family members. Sometimes, I take my sisters out to the cinemas and we have fun.”


38

ASPIRE

SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

Winning Ways

How to be the best in the emerging world order Let's Talk Opportunities

DELE ABEGUNDE deleabegunde@yahoo.com 0807-788-7880

I am an unrepentantly proud Nigerian. I love this country and anywhere I go when I am asked ‘are you from Africa?’ my reply, always, is that I am from Nigeria. In some cases, they wouldn’t have heard of us, but in most others, they have heard of us and in the very negative sense. But whatever the case may be, Nigeria, the land of my birth, is the best. Last week, CNN placed Nigeria among the TEN nations that will control the world’s economy by the year 2050. A thorough analysis of the emerging economies was done and it was predicted that by 2050, Europe, the world and the US would be looking to a group of ten countries from Asia and the African/Pacific regions. China, India, Singapore, Hong Kong were among those from the Asian region while Nigeria is the sure strong hope from the African/Pacific. This had been the projection before and our leaders never allowed us to get there. But with information now, and a determined populace, we would surpass the projections. I would be talking on how it would run later, but readers, permit to answer those who will be making this to happen before I go back to the projections. From my writings of the last two weeks, a lot of mails have come in asking for many things. I am sure I will not be around by 2050, so, let me answer you first. A friend of mine returned on Thursday from one of the countries that I had discussed after taking his daughter there for the pre-college oneyear study. This, he did, based on the encouragement that I gave in our church and he came to see me directly as he returned to confirm that taking one’s child out is the best right now. He was glad for this but was saddened to discover how low our education was rated over there. Despite the fact that his daughter was the best out of her school in the SS3 examinations, her rating had to make her go for pre-college preparation, so that through this, I am sure, she will break the record there and get scholarship straight. The competition is getting stiffer for the younger ones and the celebration of the mediocrity here has no place in the emerging world order. As I am writing now, those whose questions I am answering will know. Whether you are a graduate or not, if you want to be the best in the emerging world order, you have to take the examinations appropriate to your desired goal. In the United States, a medical doctor could become a lawyer and vice versa, and a History graduate could still go ahead to read medicine and become a surgeon. It is not as straight-jacketed as here. When my daughter was graduating in her Master’s, the best graduating undergrad-

uate student read humanities, I really think Fine Arts or so, and when he was giving his valedictory speech and about his future plan, he said he was going to become a medical doctor, a neuro-surgeon for that matter. My daughter later told me, it is going to happen. My submission is that there are some international examinations that could make the poorest students in Nigeria to win scholarships by passing these examinations by making record-breaking successes in them. The brain power is there. The types of examinations have been mentioned last week and the way to it for those outside Abuja, Lagos and Port Harcourt is through the Internet. The first thing is to find, through the search engine of Google, the course of your choice and the college offering it thus: Money Management/ Universities in the US or Architectural Engineering/Universities in Canada. Thereafter, the conditions will be laid out for you and your admission requirements. Then, you should, after finding the university offering your course, request for funding support, that is, whether there is a grant or scholarship in place, and there are several layers of scholarships. They go from departments, faculties to school, companies, states, professional bodies, alumni associations, and all manners of them. One thing is certain, only the best gets them. There is no 419 over there or who you know, it is your brain that speaks for you. I have suggested how the poor but brilliant students could raise money for these exams and for the sake of those reading me today, for the first time, you could organize home coaching for privileged children, mow lawns of the rich, take photographs and sell when professional bodies like ICAN, NBA, Nigerian Medical Association, NMA, are meeting or whatever. For the indulgent ones, you could get your church or mosque or old students association to help you. I don’t believe in that, I believe in working for it. Please, my young Nigerian readers, do everything righteous

Lord, I stink Touch the Sky

“Clothed with righteousness only from above, Gone are your layers of self so you can be filled with my love” He took my layers of sin, hurt and pain And clothed me with love, truth and mercy in His name!

PAAGO ALEELE IMABEL aleelepaago@yahoo.com, 08023620564

This poem can make your eyes misty. THE ONION I was an onion before Christ set me free, Layers upon layers of iniquity; An ugly onion whose fragrance was so strong That my Jesus bought and loved all along. Unknown to me what He was going to do, Of what He was planning I had no clue; Pulling each layer off one by one, In order to make me more like Jesus the son. The first layer wasn’t so bad – They were easy to fix: Just change the way I talk And learn more of how He wanted me to walk.

‘Whether you are a graduate or not, if you want to be the best in the emerging world order,

Reading His word and learning again, How to put aside my life of sin; But the next layer was pulled which hurt more; He was getting closer to the core.

you have to take the examinations appropriate to your desired goal’

The brokenness and all the guilt; Past memories that I thought were gone, But they were buried under layers disguised in a fragrance so strong!

and under God to get international education and exposure. You will not regret it. For those wishing to buy cars, this is being done on line now. There is no magic about it if you do not have the same opportunity of travelling abroad that, by God’s special grace, I have. The same thing works all over the world through the Google search engine too. Just write “Car Auctions in The US”, and a whole lot of sites will be opened to you and with your money, you could bid online via Skype on Tuesdays and Thursdays, the real live auction dates for the vehicles of your choice. But for the ones that have the opportunity of going for the live auctions, like I do whenever I am in the US, you get unbelievable bargains after 12 noon when the first two hour (10am to 12noon) rush is over. The fees payable are negotiable despite their standard rates, and clearance in Nigeria is now easy. I will be grateful if nobody calls my line any more on these two issues. Thank you.

hand, He said, “Now and only now, can you be The creation that will minister before me.”

Unknown to me what He would find there I simply gave it to Him in prayer. As another layer was removed, He started to cry, Pulling this layer brought pain to my Father on high. And I was crying over the sadness I felt –

As onions peel more and more And they put tears in our eyes as we get closer to the core, So my Father wept over my pain Giving me a balm of comfort and strength to sustain. “No more layers,” I screamed, As He continued to peel them off me, “I’ll have nothing left my Lord, what will I do? I will be nothing but a worthless core to you.” But He just said, “trust me,” and continued to peel. I was sure He was blinded to my pain that was so real. Year after year, I shrank more and more Until all that was left of this onion was a core. It was then that I began to understand, As the Lord embraced me in His loving

Yes, we all are onions, learning with each day How to overcome as each layer is taken away. Some layers tear and pull at our hearts While others grieve us to our innermost part; But we are nothing but an ugly onion without Christ, Layers upon layers of pride, lust, sin and strife; Only God can take those layers away And clothe us with His righteousness in that final day. (© A Window of Hope, Paago Aleele Imabel) For we are the sweet fragrance of Christ (which exhales) unto God, (discernible alike) among those who are being saved and those who are perishing: to the latter it is an aroma (wafted) from death to death (a fatal odor, the smell of doom); to the former it is an aroma from life to life(a vital fragrance, living and fresh). And who is qualified (fit and sufficient) for these things? (who is able for such a ministry? We?) 2 Corinthians 2:15-16) Amplified Have you ever felt a sense of unworthiness? Have you ever been entrusted with a responsibility for which you think you are ill prepared? These were some of the feelings I had last Saturday during the inauguration of the Save Nigerian Schools Project. It was an event that redefined my perspective on service. I stared at the sheer size of the task ahead, peered into the possibility of its impact if per chance we are able to achieve what we have set out to do and asked myself why God picked me for such a task. I know I am the least worthy to carry out any activity of significance. But He chose me. I looked at the people that surrounded me out of their willingness to support the vision, and I was stunned, these people were much more qualified than I was, much more capable if I may say, but together we stood there looking at the possibilities of tomorrow and asking like Paul did, “who is equal to such a task?” I was reminded of David and his bunch of ragtag army (“agberos” we would have called them). Yet they became the Mighty Men of David. Were they worthy? Not at all. I was reminded of the day David was anointed by Samuel. The entire town knew Prophet Samuel was around, but David’s father sent him out to the bush. When the prophet insisted that David must be presented, the young lad had no opportunity to even take a bath. He was stinking too. Abraham stank, Jacob stank, Moses stank, Paul stank, and I am being careful not to mention the more notorious ones – the Samsons and Mary Magdalenes of the Bible. Maybe you stink too. Show me a saint that does not stink, and I will show you a saint for whom Christ did not die. We are all worthless onions until Christ comes and makes us His own. Thank you for standing by us. Thank you for the warm birthday greetings to me. Yes August 23 remains my New Year. Now let’s get down to the task of making this country better. Let’s battle for the next generation. That is my New Year resolution. The Save Nigerian Schools Project has come to stay and together we will become the change we desire.


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

ASPIRE

39

Winning Ways 1000

business books you must read before you die

By ERIC DUMO

Lily in murky waters The book, Breaking Night by Liz Murray, is a firsthand look into the world of inner-city poverty. Born to drugaddicted, mentally ill parents, Liz grew up largely neglected. More than a memoir, Breaking Night is an eye-opening account of the realities of poverty and drug use in our cities, what it does to children, and how difficult it is to break the cycle, to somehow overcome the lack of options that defines ‘Gripping true story of a poverty. Liz’s is a heartbreaking but segment of society you may unique tale that will not be familiar with, stick with you. Gripping true story of the writer recounts her immensely underprivileged life without a trace of bitterness’ a segment of society you may not be familiar check on drugs. At age 9, she with, the writer recounts her started pumping gas and bagging immensely under-privileged life groceries for tips so she could without a trace of bitterness. buy food. With no rules or rouShe spent her childhood cold tines, she stayed up until the sky and filthy, her stomach often grew light and very rarely went burning from hunger, watching to school, which eventually her parents spend their welfare

Becoming rich through your business This week, I will like to share some ideas with businessmen and businesswomen, entrepreneurs and those that intend to start new business venture. Starting new business of your choice can turn to be one of the most profitable decisions you have taken in life. Although many people desire to own their personal business, but not many possess the necessary and sufficient conditions, and characteristic features of good entrepreneurs. One can say succinctly that not everybody can successfully float or start a new business. Many just don’t possess the qualities and lack some characteristic traits that make a successful manager. The lack of these qualities, notwithstanding, below guidelines can contribute to making a successful businessmen and entrepreneurs. Always have a comprehensive and detailed business. This will help you to identify and discover areas of business opportunities, possible problems. A well prepared business plan coupled with financial projections is necessary when external funding is required for the business. It is good that the entrepreneur assign a reasonable salary to himself. He should apportion this salary to himself as if he was to get a monthly paid salary from other employer or from other enterprise. There is a need to keep adequate records of all financial transactions.

Ensure that all cash takings are banked first on daily basis. It is also advisable that all payments and receipts are done through the bank. Always try to reduce overhead costs and staff expenses as far as it is possible and it can be accommodated. Regularly review all your cost. You can employ the services of good consultants or auditors. Avoid wasteful spending, fraud and personal drawings by the entrepreneur. In other to effectively do this monthly, quarterly or yearly, business budget (cash budget, production budget, sales budget etc) are necessary. Always avoid any greedy business

‘Develop the habit of generating new ideas. Fresh idea can open a big market opportunity for you’

ideas/deal. Don’t prepare to meet strange people at strange locations for the sake of business discussion/deal. It is not always safe to deposit big money with any strange person or for business, you are not sure of. It is wisdom if you learn how to keep originality of your business ideas to yourself. If you do otherwise, a casual friend whom you confined in may steal your idea; perfect it and succeed while you are still preparing to take off. Develop the habit of generating new ideas. Fresh idea can open a big market opportunity for you. Plan to have more than one business enterprise. You can always invest the surplus from one business to the other lead business. Having two or three businesses can keep you employed throughout the year. Think of how to expand your business using the invention and the use of new technology. This will not only increase your business productivity but bringing innovation into the business and the products As your business grows think of the need to engage the consultants, auditors and Lawyers to see to the cases of inefficiencies, control problem and fraud. Ensure your products meet acceptable standards. As the need may arise you need to write inside the National or International papers and give press release to clarify matters of misconceptions or otherwise which may pose threats and dangers to your business

earned her a stay at a group home for troubled girls. By 15, she was living on the streets with friends, frequently hungry, sleeping wherever she could. Shortly after her mom’s death, she decided there had to be a way to change her situation. She enrolled in high school, completed it while homeless, and was eventually accepted to Harvard. For a middle-class person not intimately familiar with the dayto-day life of families living in poverty compounded by the issues of drug abuse and mental illness, Breaking Night is truly an eye-opener. Though a heavyhearted story, Murray writes in an engaging way void of self-pity. She’s tender in depicting her parents, saying they couldn’t give her what they didn’t have. Her unconditional love for them is as inspiring as it is surprising. The length makes reading it quite a commitment and at times the story seems unnecessarily drawn out. The book was published in September 2010 by Hyperion and is made up of 352 pages. It is indeed an important, inspirational read that might even spur you to action.

Success Tips

DADA Z.I. (The Educator, 08028471149, 07029309472) Dadazi2000@yahoo.com

image. Starting a new business takes a lot of courage, hard work, skill, perseverance and common sense which, of course, is not common.


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SATURDAY SUN

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August 25, 2012

literaryworld

with Henry Akubuiro hakubuiro@googlemail.com

08070965586

Literature and Nigerian dialectics By JAMES ILE

I

n a recent essay in Saturday Sun, this writer did establish the fact that years of training in humanistic education, especially, in literary education exposes the person undergoing the training to both macro and micro information types of culture, politics, history, religion, sociology, human psychology and philosophy; and that the person that has undergone this type of training, essentially, transforms these information types to knowledge and that he or she goes further to transform the knowledge into judgment and action –that is, he or she uses knowledge in a concrete and practical way. Apropos using knowledge in a concrete and practical way: it is common knowledge to students of Marxist Ideology that human society is divided into classes and that this division gave rise to contradictions or conflicts in idealist and materialist world views, as well as metaphysical and dialectical ones. Dialectics is an ancient field of study that dates as far back as the days of Socrates. In dialectics, logic and reason, not emotion, are required in identifying truth. The truth of an argument is always determined by how the contradictions of the enquiry are resolved through their clarification –that is, building a synthesis from thesis and antithesis of an argument. Therefore, the idealist’s world is a world in which realities are mental constructs or mentally constructed –that is, there are no realities in the sense of these realities being independent of the mind. For the idealist, therefore, human ideas, identifiable in values and beliefs, shape society. For the materialist, however, the world as matter is an independent observable reality, which is at his or her disposal to mold, change to suit his or her whims and caprices in accordance with his or her capacity to understand its laws and utilize them. Not only is the world as matter an observable reality to the materialist, man and his way of thinking, society and nature are all observable realities. While a materialist deals with matter as material, as something observable and therefore changeable, the Metaphysician deals with existence and its nature in a non-empirical way –that is, he or she uses the mind’s capacity to enquire into things not observable. Therefore, dialectical materialism as proposed by Marxism would mean a logical, empirical method of enquiring into nature, human society, nature of existence in society, etc., with a view to turning to advantage the knowledge acquired from assiduously studying these realities to the benefit of the working class, who constitute the mass of the oppressed and exploited in society. If we understand dialectical materialism to be this, then dialectical Nigerianism would mean both logical, empirical and metaphysical method of looking at Nigeria as an observable reality –that is, its social structures, human and material conditions, etc., as well as the turning to advantage the knowledge gained from carefully studying its realities and contradictions to the advantage of the Nigerian people, who are suffering under the oppression and exploitation of the deeply corrupt “working” and ruling class. On the metaphysical level, the writer had already speculated that dialectical materialism is metaphysical in the sense that the perfect state it desired, which is communism, is utopia; even when it was achieved, it still failed. Therefore, dialectical Nigerianism incorporates metaphysics in its understanding of existence in the Nigerian context. Apropos existence: quite unlike dialectical materialism, which tended to reject the Godhead, seeing it as part of metaphysics, that is not verifiable, dialectical Nigerianism integrates the Godhead in its quest to interpret Nigeria. It does so because it believes that man’s quest for perfection explains the fact that there is a perfect condition, which even dialectical materialism tried to create with communism. Dialectical Nigerianism sees that perfect state as representative of “Godness”, hence the magnetic pull it has on a conscious man, who aspires to perfection and who naturally ennobles and improves his or her humanity in that quest. Dialectical Nigerianism understands this desire for perfection as inherently characteristics of man; therefore, it identifies that in man’s socialization. Socialization creates virtues and vices as well. Man identifies the vices as those things in man’s society in the process of socialization that works against both man and society. Man, having identified that in the process of socialization, sees overcoming them as the

Okara healing for his or her society. Therefore, the desire to heal his or her society forms part of man’s mission in the process of understanding himself/herself and attaining perfection. And the whole of this process justifies the existence of God and even predestination; predestination in the sense that there has been from the beginning of time a road that leads to perfection and damnation as well, which man discovers in the process of socialization. Therefore, the conscious knowledge of the existence of God and the need to strive towards perfection is the inherent characteristic of Nigeria as the will of the whole of Nigerians and, as such, must form part of its mission in its development. Such will also be the state of Nigeria when the poor, the jobless, the oppressed and the exploited will have overthrown the leadership of the ruling and working classes. Observing Nigeria as a reality, one sees that it is a nation of nations. This is one of its realities. Another Nigerian reality is manifest in its social structure. The social structure consists of different classes: (a) the upper class, which comprises the political class and the business moguls, who are in partnership with each other; (b) the working class, which comprises the senior public servants in government establishments, banks, universities, parastatals, government agencies and research institutes. (c) There are also the working class people in the lower cadre of establishments and then the Marxist’s working class, the proletariat, who work in privately owned industries and multinational companies in manufacturing and oil businesses. They are indeed the proletariat, who are poor; (d) however, there is also another class within the poor working class people, who are indeed the poorest of the poor, because they are jobless –beggars, poor widows, the Almajiris: all these people belong to the lowest class in the social structure. The ruling classes do not necessarily own the means of production, because they are bereft of the business acumen to own and manage means of production. They, however, have access to the coffers of the nation or at least own oil blocks,

which spin money like money spinning machines through underhand deals in oil subsidy or are in partnership with businessmen, the real owners of the means of production or they are using the instruments of state power to personally aggrandize themselves. The nature of existence of Nigeria is traceable to the condition of its state of evolution. Before the coming of the Europeans to the place known as Nigeria today, Nigerian peoples lived as nations. They interacted through trade and commerce. Therefore, their different states of existence or values might have predetermined their goals, needs and interests. Furthermore, the Amalgamation of the Northern and Southern protectorates, which, in reality, was the merging of the “tribes”, engendered cultural pluralism. In other words, there was going to be a clash of incompatible values and institutions. And if one has to follow arguments proffered to justify colonization, colonialism ought then to be a modernizing process, hence the amalgamation. The colonial officers might have intended through this to bring about a contact situation among the “tribes” and enhance thereby economic competition: such contact situation might have been expected to trigger the modernization process. What this means, in effect, is that Nigeria, ontologically, is primitive or traditional, modern and post-modern. These contradictions make dialectical materialism as propounded by Marx and Engel rather metaphysical: while dialectic materialism proposes that human life in primitive societies would consist essentially in the struggle to survive, by appropriating what nature itself provided, the mode of thinking in a communist state, which is supposedly in its highest form of development, would be characterized by the unity of thought and action –that is, by the unity of theory and practice. Nevertheless, the primitive state immanent in a modern and post-modern Nigeria does not, however, show any form of incapacity for abstract thinking –that is, in the ability to unify theory and practice in the mind’s capacity to articulate, analyze and understand phenomena. It does also not overtly demonstrate the ontological propensity to survive entirely by instinct by solely appropriating from nature. Even the pre-colonial Nigeria portrayed in Chinua Achebe’s Things Fall Apart did not fit into the picture of the primitive society described by dialectical materialists: by implication, therefore, the primitive or traditional society existent in the modern and post-modern Nigeria today has emerged from the primitive condition of even pre-colonial era. However, the ignorance, prejudice and narrow-mindedness associated with primordial conditions are still existent. Indeed, although dialectical materialism might have been justified in proposing that the capitalist mode of production would carry the separation of manual or unskilled and mental or skilled labor to the extreme and even attain its highest level of development through state monopoly capitalism and eventual multinational monopolies with attendant dictatorship of the monopolies, yet its alternative –that is, communism, which is, according to Marxists, the most perfect state of modes of production, has not been successful because it did not bring the heaven it promised the working class. The dictatorship of the working class it ushered in became, indeed, the dictatorship of a few powerful working class people, who have succeeded in being what George Orwell described in his epic fable, Animal Farm, as all animals being equal, but of some being more equal than the others. He also showed how this few powerful working class people, who have become more equal than others, operated in his masterpiece, 1984, where the state became a big brother that watched everybody through its secret security apparatuses. The contradictions of class relations in the Nigerian state

Continued on Page 41


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

ASPIRE

41

literaryworld Continued from Page 40 make dialectical materialist method highly impracticable: dialectic materialist method talks of bourgeois ideology and the bourgeoisie are the new owners of the means of production during the age of enlightenment, who desired only wealth maximization and the surplus value derivable from labor force. There might still be some owners of means of production in Nigeria, who might fit into dialectic materialist picture of bourgeoisie; however, owners of means of production in Nigeria are to be found among government officials –that is, civil servants, the political class, who are actually the ruling class and business moguls. When members of the working class are also owners of properties and means of production, then another dialectical method of enquiry becomes necessary in the Nigerian situation to really understand Nigeria’s evolutionary trends and its realities that should be observed. Wole Soyinka described in his Season of Anomy the synergy in the relationship that exists between the ruling and working classes in Nigeria as a sodality that transcends regional boundaries. It is these classes that actually exploit and oppress the poor in Nigeria. The exploitation and oppression have nothing to do with the political economy of their relationship –no, there cannot be any form of political economy here because there is no labor to necessitate the exploitation of labor force: there is instead the embezzlement of funds required to uplift the living standard of the people, which includes of course the working and ruling classes. Dialectical Nigerianism would, therefore, mean under-

‘Ruling, working classes have unleashed worst form of dictatorship on Nigerians’ standing clearly the contradictions of the Nigerian society and knowing what to do with the knowledge derived from such empirical study. Dialectical Nigerianism does not speculate that the dictatorship occasioned by the monopoly of state capitalism and that of the multinationals will be overthrown by the dictatorship of the working class through the highest and most perfect mode of production –communism –no: dialectical Nigerianism speculates that the oppressed and exploited poor, upon enlightenment through humanistic education will orchestrate a revolt akin to the terrorism of ethnic militants and Boko Haram insurgents. Let us not forget that in the last essay, the writer had argued that years of training in humanistic education mean being exposed to information –what had been termed in the essay to be macro information on cultural types, political, religious, historical, sociological, philosophical and human psychological types. It was argued that on the individual level, culture as a macro-information type has micro-information types, for example, values, morals, belief systems, ethics; that politics as a macro-information type has micro-information types, too, for example, power dynamics, power relations, political players and politicking; that the micro-information types of religion are the denominational issues, the Muslim/Christian

Lagbaja to perform at Wole Soyinka Prize award night By HENRY AKUBUIRO

P

opular masked performer, Lagbaja, will lead a group of artistes to perform at the forthcoming Grand Award Night of the Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa. Lagbaja is expected to thrill the audience with his Afro-Calypso genre of music, a product of various influences ranging from traditional Yoruba music to Jazz. The energetic Crown Troupe and Nerfetiti, a new sensation group with their unique style, will also perform on the occasion.

The fourth edition of Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa, now sponsored by telecommunications company, Globacom, holds on September 8 in Lagos, while the Grand Award Night event will be held at Civic Centre, Victoria Island, Lagos starting at 4.00 pm prompt. The Lumina Foundation, organizers of the event, has confirmed that former President of Ghana, Mr. John Kufour, will grace the occasion as the event chair. They have also confirmed the attendance of the Lagos State Governor, Mr. Babatunde Raji Fashola as host, while Mr. Ibikunle Amosun,

the Governor of Ogun State, is expected to be the special guest of honour. Established by the Lumina Foundation in 2005 as a biennial award for the best literary work produced by an African, the first edition of Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa was held in 2006. It honours Africa’s great writers, thus helping to make their works to be appreciated. The final short of three for the grand finale will be announced on August 28 by the board of trustees of Wole Soyinka Prize for Literature in Africa.

issues, the supernatural issues, etc; that the micro-information types of history will be all about origins, evolutionary trends, hindsight and foresight, etc, while the micro-information types of sociology will orientate the individual on human relation, its motives, interests and needs, gender problems, etc. The philosophical micro-information types will be on life, its essence, its future, how it is spent, etc; and finally the human psychological micro-information types are always about human behaviour and psychology. All this information turned into knowledge will be at the disposal of the oppressed and exploited class. Dialectical Nigerianism speculates that the revolution has already started among the pure intellectual class, who are neither part of the ruling class nor part of the working class in the sense of having sold their conscience to the devil. They could be seen in organized civil societies, who have consistently acted like watchdogs of society. They are sighted in the book clubs that have arisen in almost all the major capitals of the Nigerian state –their activities range from critiquing books that reflect Nigerian realities to poetry slams and reading sections. Everyday, new crop of Nigerians become members of these literary societies and discourse continually on the state of the nation: they are charged by the dramas that are unfolding in the oil subsidy saga; they are amazed at how corrupt men are exposed by the contradictions of their actions. Yet, the end is still not in sight for the ruling and working classes, who have unleashed the worst form of dictatorship on Nigerians through their sodalities: the revolution awaits another class –the class of the marginalized, the jobless, the poor and the oppressed. Yes, the class of educated Almajiris, whose minds have become so expanded by the critical knowledge their education shall put at their disposal. Once this class is ready, a new Nigeria shall emerge and the foundations of the Nigerian structure shall be shaken by the earthquake of its superstructure. Only then shall we attain the Pax Nigeriana of our dreams, where there will no longer be a national cake to be shared by the ruling and working class of the various ethnic groups in Nigeria as exposited by Chinua Achebe in his classic, A Man of the People. Ile, O. James is the Head, Department of English Language and Literature, Turkish Nile University, Abuja. Email: j.ile@ntnu.ed.ng

book The life-changer Rebuilding from Ground Zero by Seni Hazzan, M.B.A., C.P.A.; JIL Publishing, review New York, 2012, pp. 234 By UZOR MAXIM UZOATU

T

he drive to succeed diligently and honestly in life is an ancient and modern aspiration. It demands hard work and the application of resourceful ideas. The book, Rebuilding from Ground Zero by Seni Hazzan, the acclaimed winner of the Golden Eagle Leadership Award of Entrepreneur of the Year, is a well-packaged treatise meant to free the mind of all to explore the immense potentials and vast riches of the world. Subtitled “An Empowering Guide to Building and Securing Wealth”, Rebuilding from Ground Zero shows the ways and means by which literally “anyone today regardless of their current financial status, family background, race, education, professional experience, vocation, sex, age and physical abilities” can join the ranks of the great and wealthy. Seni Hazzan hooks the reader through his personal example. He started out with the prayer to go to America to attend Yale University. He made the application to Yale in 1994 and was offered admission but the catch was that he needed to cough out all of $100,000 as school fees, an amount that would have taken him more than 50 years of work to save up. Even so, he was undeterred. He latched on to the idea of contacting via a very expensive phone call the Director of Admissions at the Yale School of Management Mr. Richard Silverman. The only offer he could get from Mr. Silverman was the suggestion that he should apply for

the financial aid programme of the university which would avail him $20,000 over the two-year period. Seni Hazzan went further by writing a letter to Mr. Silverman asking if there was any way Yale could allow him to attend the programme “and pay the school back after graduation.” He wowed Silverman thus: “Significantly, I mentioned that if Yale University could produce two succeeding presidents of the United States, along with the lists of other great achievers who had passed through the school, I had no doubt that I too would be an alumnus that Yale would be proud of upon graduation. And that I hoped that the lack of $100,000 in ready cash would not prevent the world from enjoying the impact of my visionary role in my generation.” Silverman’s reply came some three hours after the faxed letter got to him, agreeing to assist Seni Hazzan secure a Yale Student Loan with the caveat that this would only be possible upon the applicant’s arrival in the United States and the concomitant getting of an American citizen or a permanent resident to cosign the loan. The American head of the company Hazzan worked for, Mr. Richard Kramer miraculously agreed to cosign the loan, and the rest, as they say, is history. Seni Hazzan asserts from the beginning that all great accomplishments in life start from a “Ground Zero”, with a nodding acknowledgment that “this book first came about in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2011.” A believer, Hazzan

maintains early on that “by tapping into God’s love and His divine laws, anyone can rise above any condition.” His patented short cut to wealth, called Power Pyramid of Achievement, is the principle which recognizes that “the power to get wealth is given to man so that he can use it in serving others, and in return be rewarded with the form of wealth he seeks.” How a Canadian radio company raised three million dollars in three days and three hours makes for very insightful reading. The author deploys the history-changing decision of Rosa Parks not to give up her bus seat in Montgomery, Alabama, USA as the quintessential study in decisionmaking. Hazzan argues that one can transform into a consistent and perennial achiever by following these ground rules: “Develop a compulsion for closure for everything you start by acting now; Always be clear and specific about what you want; Embark upon every action boldly; Expect success; Act now.” The benefit of serving others can be gleaned from the example of Bill Gates who “made PC use simpler for the average user

through his Windows operating system, and was rewarded for this service by becoming the richest man in the world.” Mother Teresa of course won the world and the Nobel Peace Prize for serving “the very needy and poor in more than 25 countries.” In the spirited dare of Seni Hazzan, opportunities are everywhere asking to be exploited. Coming up with a winning idea entails thinking associatively, thinking adaptation, thinking combination, thinking rearrangement, thinking substitution, thinking magnification, etc. He offers a cautionary word about borrowing in a world of speculation. The ready advice is that one ought not to be complacent as nothing is permanent. In Rebuilding from Ground Zero, Seni Hazzan has offered deep insights on making a success of life. He has deployed his extensive knowledge in personal financial management, surviving in the corporate jungle, real estate investing, etc. to offer a treasuretrove of a book. Rebuilding from Ground Zero by Seni Hazzan ought to be open on the table, and not just the shelf, of all aspiring entrepreneurs.


42

SATURDAY SUN

The State of Our States

August 25, 2012

Special Report

The Mbanefo Report at a glance Yesterday, we served you the first part of what the States Creation,Local Government and Boundary Adjustment Committee set up by the late General Sani Abacha in 1996 recommended on creation of more local government areas in Rivers State.Today,we continue with that aspect of the committee’s assignment. Continued from yesterday RIVERS STATE POPULATION: 3,983,857

EXISTING LGAs: 24

RECOMMENDED LGAs: 53

REQUESTED: 123 S/N

PRESENT LGA

PRESENT HQ

S/N

PROPOSED LGA

PROPOSED HQ

COMPOSITION

14.

KHANA

BORI

29

BABBE

BORI

BORI URBAN PLUS THE VILLAGES IN THE SOUTH WEST INCLUDING: KANI, SOKOKOR, NOTEM, UEGWERE, BETON, BABBE COURT, KONO BAUE, GBAU, KEREKE, EKEN, IBORI, IKAA, GURA, SII

30

KEN-KHANA

BAEN

MADE UP OF THE VILLAGES IN THE SOUTH EAST OF THE LGA INCLUDING: BAEN. KAZON. PUE, BANE. EWEH, KWAKWA, BUAN, KONO WATERSIDE, KOROWARI, KPONG, IY ABA

31

NYOKHANA

TAABA

COMPOSED OF VILLAGES IN NORTHERN PART OF THE PRESENT LGA INCLUDING: BEERI, LUWA, OPUOKO, BUNU BONGHA, NGOBE BEER I, NYOKUTU, TEWALUEKON, NYOWI, KPAA, SIME, OBETE, LUEBA, NONW A, AKPO, BARAKANISOGHO

32

OBIO

RUMUODOMANYA

MADE UP OF 3 CLANS ORO-ESARA CLAN - MADE UP OF SIX TOWNS: IRIEBE TOWN, OKPORO, RUMUOKWURUSHI, ATALI, OROIGWE, RUMUOKORO. ORO-EVO CLAN MADE UP OF FIVE VILLAGES APARA CLAN MADE UP OF TWO TOWNS: ENEKA AND RUKPOKWU

33

AKPOR

OZUOBA

COMPOSED OF 10 TOWNS AS FOLLOWS: OZUOBA - 6 VILLAGES RUMUOKPARALI - 5 VILLAGES RUMUOSI 3 VILLAGES RUMUALOGU 4 VILLAGES RUMUOKWACHI 3 VILLAGES ALAKAHIA 4 VILLAGES RUMUEKINI 5 VILLAGES CHOBA 8 VILLAGES OGOGORO 9 VILLAGES

34

RUMUEME

RUMUEME

MADE UP OF 3 COMMUNITIES RUMUEME COMMUNITY 25 VILLAGES EPIRIKOM COMMUNITY 3 VILLAGES RUMUOLUMENI COMMUNITY 24 VILLAGES

35

NDONI

NDONI

ALL THE VILLAGES OF NDONI CLAN 72 VILLAGES INCLUDING NDONI, ONIUKWU, AGWE, OGUSOLA UMU-AFANEZI AND OTHERS.

36

OGBAEGBEMA

OMOKU

COMPOSED OF 8 DISTRICTS OMOKU DISTRICT – 7”. COMMUNITIES OBIETI DISTRICT – 4” OGBORUS DISTRICT -6” OBAKATA DISTRICT .. - 6” ELUALI DISTRICT - 4 .. NKISSA DISTRICT - 6 .. USOMINI NORTH DISTRICT – 5” USOMINI SOUTH DISTRICT – 6”. INCLUDING EKPE MGBEDE, OKUKU, EKPE AGO, MGEDE, AGHA 7 OKWUZI VILLAGES

37

EGI-OGBA

AKABUKA

MADE UP OF 3 DISTRICTS: ETITI DISTRICT - 5 COMMUNITIES

15.

16.

OBIAKPOR

OGBAI EGBEMAI NDONI

RUMUODOMANYA

OMOKU


SATURDAY SUN

43

August 25, 2012

The State of Our States

Special Report AHIA WHU DISTRICT - 4 USO-OZIMINI DISTRICT -II

17.

18.

19.

20.

OKRIKA

PORT HARCOURT

SAGBAMA

SOUTHERN IJAW

OKRIKA

CITY COUNCIL OF PORT HARCOURT

SAGBAMA

OPOROMA

.. ..

38

OKRIKA

OKRIKA

ALL EXISTING COMMUNITIES IN OKRIKA TOWN, IBAKA-OGBOGBO, OGOLOMA AND FISHING PORTS

39

OGUIBOLO

OGU

ALL EXISTING COMMUNITIES IN OGU. BOLO AND WAKAMA AND FISHING PORTS.

40

PORT HARCOURT

CITY COUNCIL OF PORT HARCOURT

BOROKIRI, OBUMOTON, CHIRI, PORT HARCOURT TOWN. PORT HARCOURT QUAYS. KIDNEY ISLAND. BIE AMA, AND IKPU KULUBIE.

41

TARIBIE

RAINBOW

ABATTIOR, SOUTHERN PART OF TRANS-AMADI INDUSTRIAL AXIS, ORDINANCE CRISS-CROSS NEAR BEW AC THROUGH MAMMY MARKET ROAD TO MICHELLETI ROAD, MARINE BASE JUNCTION TO OLOMOKIRI AND TERMINATING AT OLOM KIRI POKU

42

SAGBAMA

SAGBAMA

MADE UP OF THE FOLLOWING TOWNS AND VILLAGES: SAGBAMA, TUNGBO, ANGIAMA, TROFANI, ANIBEZE, ADUKU-ABARI. ADAGBABIRI, TUNGBOABIRI, AGBERE, ODONI, ELEMEBIRI, EKPERIWARI, ASAMABIRI, OGBOKIRIAMA, ABUETO, OSIFO, OSEKWENIKE, IKPIDIAMA, KENNAN

43

OYIAKIRI MIEN

TORU-EBENI

MADE UP OF THE FOLLOWING TOWNS AND VILLAGES: EBEDEBIRI, OFONI, ANGALABIRI, TORU-ORUA, BULOU-ORUA, OBOGBENE, A Y AGBENE, TARIAMA, AGERESAKOKO, AGORO, AGOROGBENE, KABIAMA, OKUNBIRI, ERIAMA, OGOBIRI, DAGANA-AMA, TORU-EBENI, A Y AMA-EBENI, OSIAMA,ISONI, EGBEPULUGBENE, AKEDE, AWEGBENE,OGBONUGBENE

44

SOUTHERN IJAW

OPOROMA

CONSISTING OF THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES: AMASSOMA, OTUAN, AMATOLO, OBORO, KEMEIBIA, KOKOTOGBE, UKPTOTABE, IGBEWI, OGIDIKORO, ONDOWASI, OPOROMA, ISOKOAMA, ANGIAMA, ONYOMA, LUDUON, AGUOBIRI, AGIDIGBENE, ANGIAMAGBENE, BOLOUAGUOBIRI, SAGBEF AGBENE, OWEIKOROGHA, BENI-ANGIAMA, ANYAMA, IGEIBIRI, OZEZEBIRI, ISOWOBOU, BOUPERE, ADEGBE, OBOLOLI

45

OLODIAMA

EKOWE

OLUGBOBIRI. KOTOKOROSEI. OKOUNGBENE. ENIWARI. ABAGBENE, OGILAGBENE, KIMIGBENE. A YOUNAGBENE, BRIGBENE, ZIONAMA, KUCAROKIRI, LOLOGBENE. PEREMABIRI. EKOWE.

46

BASSAN

LOBIA

INCLUDING THE FOLLOWING VILLAGES: LOBIA. KOGBENE, AZUZUAMA, UKUBIE. TOBOBUBO. OGBOIDIOGBENE. AIOGBENE, KARINA. DENKEROGBENE, RITUAGBENE. OPOROGBENE. OGOLONGORUGBENE. ARIKARIPO. OBOROGBENE, EKENI, TOLODGBENE, SEWEGUMUGBENE. SONGOGBENE, KOLOGBENE, OLODI. EKINIGBENE, UKUBIE, ALISOGBENE

47

TIEBIDABA

TIEBIDABA

INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING COMMUNITIES: TIEDABA, OGUNGBENE, OLOBOMALOLU, LOSUKUGBENE, IKOLEGBENE, OVEREGBENE, TOLUGBENE, FISHTOWN,OSUGBENE, KOLAROGBENE,KAUBORRA, PISEGBENE, ETC.

To be continued tomorrow


44

SATURDAY SUN

ASPIRE

August 25, 2012

Veteran

We used to lure students to study fine art –Says Ademola Williams,65,retired lecturer in fine art and textile design By MAURICE ARCHIBONG (08056180050), mauricearchibongtravels@gmail.com Thousands of friends and family members of Mr. Ademola Williams (fondly called Pa Willy) converged at the Sacred Heart Catholic Church, opposite Osogbo Grammar School in the Osun State capital on August 5, for a special thanksgiving. In the African continent, where the average life-span for men is below 50, Williams, artist and lecturer at University of Benin (UNIBEN) for 30 years; truly has cause to thank God. Reason: Pa Willy as he is fondly called, attained 65 years of age on July 26; the day also marked his retirement from UNIBEN, where he served as senior lecturer and has been Head of Textile Unit since 2009. Pa Willy joined the institution in March, 1982. Earlier, he had worked as a non-academic staff at Ahmadu Bello University (ABU), Zaria. But, after bagging a Diploma in Art (the equivalent of BA, he was quick to point out), specialising in Art and Design from Bradford College, United Kingdom, Pa Willy moved on to join the academic staff of UNIBEN. Expectedly, his fellow lecturers and countless students would miss the company of this strict yet amiable senior citizen, whose decade-long sojourn in the academia actually began at ABU more than 30 years ago. However, our very first encounter with Pa Willy goes back 20 years, during a workshop at Creative Arts Centre, Owoseni Street in Benin City in 1992. This Creative Arts Centre, owned by Prof. Solomon Irein Wangboje (now of blessed memory) served as venue of a curriculum review symposium jointly organised by the Federal Ministry of Education, University of Benin and Prof. Wangboje’s centre. It was in the course of our interaction with other participants that we encountered Ms. Evie Laden, an American and Fullbright Scholar at UNIBEN. Watching Ms. Laden, clad in indigenous Edo costume, wiggle like one of the locals, to traditional Bini performances was an unforgettable spectacle for me. By some coincidence, in 1996, a few years after Ms. Laden’s stay in Nigeria under the Fulbright programme, Mr. Williams would go over to the United States, as a Fulbright scholar too. After that sojourn in the US, Williams had an exhibition on his Fulbright Experience at the USIS (United States’Information Service) office on Broad Street in Lagos. As a staff writer with the Daily Times, covering, in particular, art, culture and entertainment, we had met Pa Willy again. However, more than a decade had rolled past between that encounter and last December, when our paths crossed again. We needed to engage some artists at University of Benin and Federal Polytechnic Auchi as well as other institutions because of the crises facing the nation through a disturbing decline in the study and promotion of art. We must remind that this frightening development had emerged as dominant discourse at Tai Solarin University of Education (TASUED), during a conference on the Review of the Visual and Creative Arts Curricula, which took place from 11 to 13 November, 2008. Today, almost four years after that conference, which revolved around the theme, Designing suitable creative arts curricula for Nigeria’s development in the 21st century, with subthemes including Museum Education Curriculum, Ceramics Curriculum, Sculpture Curriculum, Photography Curriculum and Painting Curriculum; things have simply got worse as far as art education and promotion are

Williams concerned in Nigeria. Unfortunately, educationists, who should know better, have been egging ignorant politicians on; through the inherently flawed curriculum they draw up, revision after revision. This is why we went to meet Pa Willy and others. To be candid, like Nigerian politicians’ attitude to art; which call for urgent unravelling, some curios also embellish Williams’ entry into the art profession, too. Moreover, textile design, which is his area of specialisation, posts more curios because the industry is little scrutinised and ill understood, despite its potential to turn around any nation’s economy for the better. Clothing is a primary need of man. In fact, of the three basic needs of every individual, food, cloth and shelter, it must be pointed out that a homeless and/or hungry person can freely walk the street. But, not so a naked one. Sadly, Nigerians do not seem to understand or have forgotten the important role textile can be deployed to play in a nation’s economic and social life. This depressing situation is pointedly driven home by the fact that, there were only two final-year students of textile art at the University of Benin (UNIBEN) for the 2011/2012 academic session. There are just five final-year students specialising in textile in the current session, according to Pa Willy. In a developed society, this should worry most leaders, but in Nigeria the situation is almost completely unnoticed or ignored. “This number is not sufficient for a large country like Nigeria and an old university like UNIBEN,” Williams reaffirmed. “Government policy is not in favour of fine arts in education. There are reasons to worry because in the whole Edo State, there are less than 60 art teachers. And, they are teaching only JSS students. “A few years ago, our department (Fine Arts) admitted only three students because there weren’t more applicants. This is because of flawed government policy. Government has for-

gotten that there’s art in every other subject. If you are good in art, it would help you in engineering, biology, even in catering. You can’t do without art. You need Fine Art in furniture-making and, in fact, in everything you do.” Yet, Pa Willy said the problem might persist because “UNIBEN is a federal institution, and the department, on its own, cannot introduce predegree programme in fine art.” However, to lure students to fine art, the retired lecturer further revealed that the UNIBEN authorities resorted to what could be described as latent career circumlocution, playing down on fine art as a core subject to attract students from other areas, like sociology or philosophy, international relations, law et cetera. “We encourage prospective students that cannot find placement in some other areas to come and study fine art,” he said. Such was the road a student like Miss. EfieOviahon Oduware, now a textile major, was forced to travel. 000000000000.000000“Initially, I wanted to read Law,” she recalls. “But, somebody checked my post-UME result for me and came back with the information, that I had been admitted to study fine art. I remember I cried a lot that day. I cried and resolved not to take the offer. However, I was advised to, because I had passed my first attempt at university admission.” Secretly, however, Oduware still yearned to read Law, writing JAMB exam well into her third year as a Fine Arts undergraduate to see if she could still get admission to read Law.” However, after passing into her final year for BA Fine Arts, Oduware has finally decided to live with art. The experience of Odomele Uche, who had her secondary education at Command Secondary School, Lagos, also mimics Oduware’s. It was at this school that she was introduced to Fine Art during her JSS classes. But due to pressure to get into university, Uche veered into Fine Art. It is worth noting that when

we met Uche, she had not only settled for the course, she was also enjoying her studies and actually gearing up for a vibrant and successful practice after graduation. In retrospect, a fulfilled Pa Williams noted, “majority of such ‘reluctant’ students eventually end up very successful. That’s why I believe the environment we grew up in or are living in is important, when it comes to one’s choice of occupation or profession. Whatever condition you find yourself in, just be sincere to yourself and try to get the best out of it.” Pa Willy went down memory lane, recalling how he got into the art profession, first as an artist and later as art educator. “I came into contact with Art in my street in Osogbo, the home of Art. Although, I lived in Osogbo, I was not part of the Osogbo School. It was my workshop experience that made it possible for me to be engaged by ABU. The environment is stronger than everything, even talent. The environment, where I grew up, had tremendous impact on all of us. Exposure and what you studied are the things that make or mar one’s life”. After secondary school at United College of Commerce, Warri, in 1967, the young Ademola Williams returned to his hometown, Osogbo. He recalls: “My childhood friends, Muraina Oyelami, Jimoh Buraimoh and Rufus Ogundele, and I grew up in different homes along the same Gbeemu Street, near Duro Ladipo’s house, where Mbari-mbayo started. “I was informed about the Ori-Olokun Art Workshop in Ife, organised by the Institute of African Studies at then University of Ife (now OAU), under the leadership of Prof. (Solomon) Wangboje in 1968. That was my first contact with Wangboje. But, that experimental workshop was not based on visual arts alone. It also embraced music, art and drama. Ola Rotimi was in charge of dance, Akin Euba was in charge of music, while Agbo Folarin was in charge of costume and Prof. R. O. Ojo was in charge of gallery. Akinola Lasekan also taught us briefly before his death. The exercise accommodated every aspect of the Creative Arts, and our training was a very thorough one, starting at 6a.m., and closing by 12 midnight most days, with a dinner of gaari and suya inside the theatre.” When Pa Willy’s artworks first went on view in 1969, at USIS, Cocoa House, Ibadan, the exhibition had no title. It was just an exhibition of prints. “It was a group exhibition,” he says, “and four of us-Gbade Akintude (sculptor), Peter Badejo (choreographer), Rufus Orisayomi (cinematographer) and myself; were those that showed our works.” Never mind that this quartet’s outing had no title, the show was opened by a personality the entire world would later come to know, Prof. Wole Soyinka, the Nobel Laureate. And it featured the first Ori Olokun artists; and later travelled around Nigeria. It was presented at USIS Kaduna, Ahmadu Bello Way; at State Library, Jos; and, another library in Kano. Interestingly, there was no admission fee Pa Willy said sales were very good, selling a single work for ‘four guineas’. “By the way,” he explains further, “four guineas or four pounds and four shillings was a lot of money in those days; yet people bought.” His premiere as a solo artist was at the British Council, Ibadan in 1971. His first group show with his friend, Ogundele and others, also held at the same venue almost ended without a title. It was just tagged: An exhibition of prints by Ademola Williams. Despite that, he also recalled “sales were very good.” Apart from selling, he enthused that the show got copious mention in the media, especially The Sketch and Nigerian Tribune.


45 EVERY WOMAN EVERY EVERY WOMAN WOMAN

SATURDAY SUN August 25, 2012

E

The classic doctor’s bag

Stories by VIVIAN ONYEBUKWA vvnchinyere@yahoo.com

W

hether you call it gladstone bag or doctor’s bag, it is the inthing now. The fashion accessory, which was once a workingman’s asset, has today become a woman’s arm-luxury. It is no

longer a 19th century bag when men in mainstream professions, such as doctors, lawyers, electricians and plumbers primarily used it during the war. Functional, elegant, and back in our sights for 2012, the gladstone bag is an accessory worth investing in. This bag is a classic win because of its size and purposeful functionality. Sure, ladies often carry serious loads in their purses

on the daily. From iPads, smartphones, to the ever-so necessary extra pair of heels or flats, it appears that the gladstone’s return is right on time. Over the years, the shapes and sizes have changed on a monthly basis, but just recently it’s found to have stabilised itself and be classified as an accessory trend for 2012. It is a statement accessory.

…Do’s and don’ts for gladstone D

o carry this bag to work, and then to happy hour for play.

Do not use it on a night out on the town, especially if you plan to go from club to club. For a bag with such a prominent shape, it’s important to note that it has the capability of overshadowing all other accessories that are part of an outfit. It’s not a typical shapeless tote (with zero compartments) that eventually becomes a part of your outfit. Gladstones are to be treated like a classic vintage piece that need to be styled in the most trusted fashion. They’re bold, smart and ooze confidence. The most wonderful aspect of the glad-

stone is its dual-usability. One day it’s a carry-to-work bag, and another day it’s the perfect travel companion. Don’t undervalue its space, and pick one that suits your lifestyle. Due to its boxy shape, be mindful of what you’re teaming it with. It works as well with cigarette pants and a blazer, as it does with a ‘60s-style midi-length shift dress. But don’t carry it with overflowing blouses, or to the beach, for instance. When choosing a colour, go for an allseason variety. One that will last you all through 2012 fashion season. Some classic shades that’ll always work are tan, reddish brown, charcoal black, navy and plum red.


46

SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

KISS &TELL DO YOU HAVE A WILL? By RACHAEL AGUNTA and CHISOM OGUBUNKA

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ill is a written document that shows how a deceased’s property would be shared among the family members. Will is prepared by a lawyer and can be kept in a bank or by the family’s lawyer to avoid being tampered with. Death is a necessary end and must come when it shall come. Therefore, the primary purpose of Will is to ensure that your assets are distributed to whoever you choose in the proportion and manner that you choose. People believe that Will basically helps them to avert family problems when they might have passed away. In the same way, it has caused a lot of family problems in a case where the children or relatives of the deceased do not like the wish of the deceased. Saturday Sun asked some people if they have a Will. We came back with these views:

Shurabil

GBARUKO NDUBUISI No, I don’t have a Will, but I will think about it in the near future. However, it all depends. If my family is living in harmony, I may not have to write it, but if there is no peace, I will definitely write a Will to avoid future problems. Nevertheless, I am not praying for problems. BAYO AUDU Of course, I have one and I renew it yearly. I visit my family every week because I am not living with them. Of course, death can come anytime. Being on the road every time is a risk and nobody knows what would happen the next minute. So, if anything happens, my Will would be read to them. To me, having a Will is for the good of my family. CHINYERE OBIKE Since I am a woman, I have not thought of that. Moreover, it is those who believe that they will die early that keep Will. Why should I keep a Will since I still have a long way to go? So, I don’t think keeping a Will is a reasonable thing to do at this age.

Rebecca

SHURABIL ZARMA If you mean a written document that contains my property distribution after I might have died, then the answer is simply no. The reason is that as a Muslim, we do not believe in Wills and my religion does not recognize it as a good thing. We take our lives as we see it and do not care what will happen after we might have died. So, I do not have a Will. OLAKEMI GIFT I have one but I cannot disclose it to the whole world since it is supposed to be made secret.

Dan

CHIBYKE RAFAEL No. I have never thought of that since I am newly married. But I believe that as we move on and acquire more wealth, I will make a good Will, together with my wife and kids. But for now, I have not got any Will because I do not have many things to will. AUSTIN AHAM I have no Will for now. My reason is that

I still have many years to live on earth, keeping a Will is for old men that are about to die. REBECCA OLAIDE AWOLEYE No! I don’t have a Will. This is because I am a woman. It is my husband that is supposed to have a Will and not I. He keeps his Will very secret and I do not even care to know what is inside it since I am a good wife to him. INALEGWU EJEH I don’t have a Will now but I have it in mind to have one. I believe that as time goes on, I will have one for the pacification of my family. I will make it in such a way that everything will be equal. MICHAEL AGBOGU I cannot answer that question because having a Will should be between my lawyer and I. However, the most important thing is to keep my family in order and to ensure that peace exists. For now, I cannot tell you whether I have a Will or not.

Ndubisi

AYODELE CHARLES I have a Will but I cannot disclose to you what is in it. The only thing I know is that whoever does not please me before I give up will not inherit any of my property. OLATUNJI BELLO I have not given it a thought because I have not even made it in life yet. Nevertheless, I must will my property equally to my children. AMALA IGWE I have a Will and it is with my lawyer. The Will is there to guide my family because I have many property and wealth. My lawyer advised me on that and I believed him since I trust him with my wealth. I also renew it every six months. It’s good to have a Will. TADE DADA I do not have any Will because I have only one child. I believe that when I die, all my property will be given to him and my wife. There is no need for the Will again. I believe they will not have any disunity between them.

Chinyere

GBENGA TAYO I have a Will and I have willed all my property to my younger brother who is so close to me. If I have a wife and children before I die, then the Will will change but for now, it is my immediate younger brother. HUSSENI AHMED Wills are not for poor people to make. In my tradition, my property belong to my wife and children. If after my demise they cannot manage the little thing I have, that should be their headache. OKEKE PETER I have a Will because I would not want anybody to disturb my wife when I pass on or to take my property from her. She has to take care of my children and that she cannot do if she is not equipped. I have wicked brothers whom I am sure would want to drag my things with her. So, having known that, I have prepared my Will.

Aham

•NEXT WEEK’S QUESTION: How best do you like your woman to dress? Send your comments and photo to chinyere@yahoo.com


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

47

Kiddies World With Rachael Agunta, rachaelchiegeonu@yahoo.com, 08021055176

bags of big rice. to me. do iday? What of your Where What is your s ay alw I OGUO OB e? m e? na mmy? liv s u y’ mu yo dd da home tch EMMANUEL My mummy I live at wa eo. His name is vid ys at home. Emro, Iba. daddy Chioma. ur What is your staWhen last What is your What is yo ? me daddy’s na e? you lie? state of origin? mummy’s nam is My daddy’s didI don’t use to m fro e m am na I ex Her Al is me na a. lie. Asaba. ies are a common thing people engage in including adults. mummy Chiom ur oguo Why? What is the ObWhat is your Lying is a sin against God. The Bible tells us that Ananias What does yo ur yo liv of a r Because if I me fo na s do ’ daddy and Sapphira, his wife, lied and the Holy Spirit became mummy l? l lie, my oo tel sch ing? me? angry with them which led to their death. Lie can lead one to The name of na M mummy will orking. w y is e H death. While some do not tell lies, others lie as often as poismy school is mummy’s name beat me; and she What of your sible. In any case, children tell lies in order not to be beaten or use to warn us Raboni Nursery is Tina Oboguo ow mummy? ary im punished. Kiddies World spoke to some children on this issue oldHare you? Pr . t to tell lies. ng d ki an She is wor What does no What are the How old are School, Lagos. s and they responded as follows: your ? do y I am five year dd da Since ur you? What is the yo My daddy is dangers? and old. daddy I am four name of your e ar kMummy said s or as ork? w cl w e at t Wha mummy ar working going to class teacher? ur ars ol? yo ye ho of sc t anyone that u t tha yo ha W you in? aba Rago. g, who do Al in . e. ow CHIDINMA fiv kn n’t ry lie will die The name of mummy? do l se n I he I am in Nur What is he tel a liar and go is stay with w What class TV EZENYILI ir t ha ha W as a k? my school ry a is or ab w Al e to Sh Two. doing at are you in? u they gostay with my to hell. show do you Vapus Nurse Where do yo esser. We dr am in use to watch Rago? I y ar im Pr d di g and lin st sel la is n r. o. e? He he he Tw liv W brot Nursery d during this holS c h o o l , you lie? That place. When last di e th is s. n Lago ? What I have forgotte When last e? you lied today. What is the the date. y o u r did you lie? name of the placthe I lie e m na e Th s u I don’t know mummy’ What lie did yo name of your NGOZI I lied in What lie did of my school name? of the place. e WUBUZO m UK na ll? s CH te class teacher? pu Va ly Ju . e y you tell? H o w is Her name is What is th I told mumm s d to an The name of What lie t ry en se w ur y ur N yo I o J me of class I wore slipper na y at r th s you tell? a d h’ m di et i my ph r Ja P mummy ukwubuzo. d not. ? Ch di ol I ty ho le sc un s hi lost my A go w is I La r , n ol he teac Scho e and whe What does pencil us was the name of my ho e t and Th ha e W th is t d Wha ll ddy Bridget my mummy askeat equence of hool is Kristobe ur your da sc ns n yo co ve he of lo w e u m yo na o D do? ked as y r? me, I told her th e Junior Academy.the your lie? m he um ac m te s as is cl Daddy her? r What is Mummy beat I was outsid Her name is selling tiles to me, I told he t Yes, I love her playing but my no of your pro- me very well. d e y di m I t na at n th A u she ? e many people. We because prietress? Is it good to lie t sister told her th Bridget. do lose it. the is l t el ha e w no W m ry is na ve s it to er ve H lo t o, u N teache en yo w o . D e th us tru lie, to class people do? Aunty Chinyere. ve good What is your school, and your What was the u lo es to yo til u n she yo he w o e D us How old are daddy’s name? of ca r? when be teache equence They put it found out that ummy will love m I name of cons lie? her? , s, lie you? Ye he T th ba e ur in their old are you? Yes, because sh I lost it, she at you. I am five years my daddy is yo Mummy used kind be am five her. hy do you rooms, toilets beat me very I is li yi W old. Okwy Ezen and kitchen. years old and turning stick to r? of well. What class are What What is your beat me very am in love hebecause I Is it good to is It r e? m u ? na •NEXT WEEK’S QUESTION: Basic One. you in y o mummy’s od lie? go l. ll el so te w is ic e as sh B is I am in Where do Her name is mummy? No, it is not ill you do hat W W a is li e yi en Sh e? you liv One. y’s Blessing Ez good, because it again? at your dadd r. es e de liv do tra I t Where do you ha W when you tell name? No, I will What does lie, mummy Idowu, Igboy’s dd da live? y ur daddy do for not. M yo Elerin, Lagos. is she sell? sells will find out I live at Iba. a living? She t is the name h m i r ha e W th to is truth and t es Wha He go s in the the you. your K a s he of ot cl e m na ur o. yo uz at be Chukwub name of ket. school? What is mar

When last did you lie?

EFINA JOSEPH

L

How often do your parents take you out? Event

Don’t look down on your children, proprietress tells parents

I

t was music extravaganza as Queen Esther Nursery and Primary School, Olodi Apapa, Lagos, held its valedictory/graduation and prize giving celebration. The children thrilled their parents and guests with their dancing skills and presentations which was a proof of the school’s academic excellence. In her speech, the proprietress of the school, Pastor Mrs Esther Amakwe, expressed joy in the children’s performances and told the parents to expect

more from the school as what they saw was just a little of what the school offers. She attributed the success of the school to the passion she has for children. “It is the passion I have for children that is driving me to maintain the standard we have reached.” She stressed that she has a strong working team who has the same passion to nurture and make these children fulfill their destinies. Amakwe explained that environment does not deter a child rather it makes him or her. She advised parents not to look

down on their children or compare them with others. “Do not neglect your child or call him names. Respect your child and anything good you want to see in any other child, expect same in your child. Believe in your child and do not castigate him/her.” She maintained that the first hope a parent can give to a child is to believe in him/her. According to her, that a child does not get the first position does not mean that the child cannot do well. She thanked the parents for their support and implored them to be steadfast

and not get tired of investing in their children because it is a seed they would reap tomorrow. “Every good farmer would want to plant a seed in a fertile ground. Queen Esther International School is a fertile ground to sow. Therefore, the good Lord will always provide for you all so that you will be able to support us in seeing that your children become the best.” The highlights of the day were cherography dances, nursery and primary presentations, drama, debate, news broadcast and refreshments.

Send your comments, short stories and poems to the above e-mail address


48

SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

cocktailcircuit

with Omoniyi Ayedun 08027537357

The farewell cocktail for OMP 16, Lagos Business School, Ajah, Lagos held recently at the school auditorium

Dr. Constantine Tongo and Mr. Kelechi Ozuzu Esq

Mr. Tope Louis, Mr. George Toyon, Mr. Kelechi Ozuzu (Esq) and Mr. Wale Adedara

Mr. Azubuike Akwiwu (President OMP 16), Adeola Osude (Secretary), Oby Ezeamaka (Vice President) and Mr. Henry Onukwuba, Alumni Director

Mr. Kunle Akinlade, SSA Revenue Taxation, Ogun State and Mr. Uzo Ozigbo, MD, Outcom Limited

Mrs. Tala Forsuelo, Mr. Wale Popoola, Mr. George Toyon and Mr. Fola Shogbesan

Cross section of OMP 16 and officials of the LBS at the event


SATURDAY SUN

SINGLES WORLD

Dear Love Doctor,

I

’m Esther, a virgin. I recently met a guy and we started an affair. He told me that he wants to deflower me before he marries me. I am afraid that if I let him deflower me, he would leave me thereafter. Should I go ahead and let him deflower me, although I am not convinced? Esther, 07039822294.

Dear Esther, there seems to be a lack of trust between you and your new guy. You clearly don’t trust him and that is why you’re not convinced about his desire to make love to you before he marries you. It is good not to trust someone you just met, otherwise you could end up heart broken. Secondly, it was wrong for him to try to impose his will on you when you don’t yet feel ready for sex. Get to know him very well first, before getting intimate. The issue isn’t all about having sex before marriage, though. You must first discover if he loves you and if you love him too. Time will tell if both of you share an everlasting love. But for now, don’t let anyone force you into having sex against your will. If you’re not convinced, don’t do it! Take your time to know him and his family well because a new guy might just want to have sex/deflower you and dump you afterwards. Besides, how could a guy you’ve just met promise you marriage so quickly? A proposal like that sounds suspicious, although his intentions might actually be genuine. On the other hand, he could be playing on your intelligence because he feels you’re naïve and would fall for the trick. It is too early to trust him with your virginity. Let time reveal the truth about his personality.

‘My guy promised to join my church and marry me, but his family has vowed it won’t happen’

M

y name is Delight. I am 28 years old and live in Port Harcourt. I met a man in May 2010. I told him that I am a Jehovah’s Witness and he promised to become a member of the church because he wanted me for marriage. However, the more the relationship lasted, the more it collapsed. His entire family has vowed not to allow him dump his church for a girl. So, the guy started having a second plan, but still tells me that he still loves me. What do I do? Dear Delight, Love is unconditional. I think it was wrong to impose your religion on

him from the start of the relationship. Besides, being of different churches does not mean both of you can’t marry and live happily ever after. There are many couples of different faiths living happily. Religious freedom is enshrined in the constitution and to force a lover to follow your faith against his wish is a violation of your lover’s rights and an invitation to quit the affair. Marriage is based on love, not religion. If you want ‘Unity of Faith’ in marriage, it is better to marry a man within your religious circle, rather than compel another person of a different religion to convert just because he/she wants to marry you. Why don’t you marry a man within your circle? It would have been a different matter entirely if your lover chooses to convert to your religion than for him/her to be pressured to convert, as a pre-condition for getting married to you. If you had let your lover maintain his religious freedom and choose which way to go at his own time, you wouldn’t have encountered such violent resistance from his family. Put yourself in the shoes of his family. Now, they probably think you are a ‘domineering’ woman who would lord it over their brother if they let him marry you. That’s because action speaks louder than words. They now think you won’t make a good wife because of your ‘overbearing’ or ‘dominant’ nature. As a result, the love you shared and the future both of you looked forward to together have been jeopardised. Your man probably feels like his relatives do. His manly ego might have been bruised by such a demand coming from a woman. So, he is now making alternative plans because he no longer trusts you to make a good wife. Instead of trusting you, he is now ‘afraid’ of marrying you and being forced to convert, even though he claims to still love you. He now suspects your true intentions and sees your move as an indication of the ‘trouble’ he would face in future if he dares marry you. What if you marry someone of the same religion with you and that person turns out to be a bad husband? You shouldn’t judge someone by his/her religion, but by his/her personality. Never judge a book by the cover. The fact is this: marrying someone of a different faith will not prevent him from being a good husband to you. However, if you must marry a man of your own religion, first watch out for his personality. FINAL THOUGHT: The two of you seeking advice this week are facing challenges based on lack of mutual agreement/consent between you and your partners over specific issues where mutual agreement/consent is required. Sex and religious conversion ought to be based on mutual agreement or consent. Problems inevitably arise when one party tries to impose his/her will or desire on the other. And if these problems are not amicably settled, they lead to the breakdown of the relationship and the loss of a love once shared between two people. Relationships are built on trust between two parties. But the trust quickly fades away and is replaced with suspicion the moment one partner begins to apply extreme pressure on the other, especially over an issue where mutual agreement or consent is required. The crux of the matter is that both parties in a relationship need to be carried along in any issue that concerns them. Otherwise, they stand the risk of drifting apart if one party is not carried along. Download or listen to the song: ‘I wanna sex you up’ by Color Me Badd. The bad guy in a relationship or marriage is not necessarily the man or woman who doesn’t go to church, but the one who fails to carry the other along.

Men seeking relationship/marriage • Ty, 47, in Abuja, tall, sexy, needs a pretty lady for marriage. 08039498427, 08080589376.

• Felix, 35, computer engineer, in Lagos, wants a sugar mummy. 08092307433.

• Michael, 37, from Delta, in Lagos, graduate, 5.7ft, needs a graduate, pretty, working lady of 27-33 years for marriage. 08091173142, 08060464936.

• Joseph, 37, from Lagos, needs a presentable, working lady of 26-34 years for marriage. 08168299702.

• Bola, 38, Muslim, from South West, tall, slim, chocolate, graduate, in Lagos, needs a pretty, mature lady for a relationship that can lead to marriage. 08067219935. • Prince Chuks, 35, from Delta, in Lagos, 5.8ft, wants a sugar mum or single mother of 35-50 years for a serious relationship. 08167707010, 07087278694. • Wale, 33, an entrepreneur, in Lagos, needs a working lady of 20-29 years for a serious relationship. 08034892116.

• A man, 63, retired public servant, needs a lady companion of 45 years+, single, widow, divorced or separated. 08023213006.

Abuja, needs a tall, slim lady for marriage. 08151651517, 08135385306. • Prince, 31, from Abia, in PH, tall, fair, handsome, needs a presentable, working lady for marriage. 08061618737. • Obiora, 39, businessman in Lagos, fair, 5.8ft, needs a mature lady of 35-41 years for marriage. 08182485561.

• Bosun, 42, an auditor, tall, athletically built, good-looking, desires a serious, mature lady for a lasting relationship. 08089610184.

BlackBerry Pin(g) Hookup:

• Mohammed, 35, tall, dark, affectionate and loving, needs a busty, mature, homely, funloving Muslim divorcee, single mum or lady of 25-40 years for a relationship. Text 08179702597.

• Jane, 25, student of UNIABUJA, needs a responsible man of 29-35 years for a serious relationship. BB PIN 223DA37F.

• Simon needs someone to help him with a good job. 07032944123.

• Tony, 31, 6.2ft, works, from Imo, needs a beautiful girl of 22-27 years for a good relationship that can lead to marriage. 07034533909.

• Anthony, self-employed, in Nnewi, needs a mature sugar mummy. 07067371477.

• Atlas, 38, tall, dark, handsome, works in

49

...with Emeka Friendship, Dating Relationships counselling, love/sex tips &more

Relationship advice: Both parties in a relationship need to be carried along in any issue that concerns them. ‘He said he wants to deflower me before marriage’

August 25, 2012

• Benson Obi, a businessman, needs a lady for real love. BB PIN 23AAACO2. 08022293330. *Connect to Love Dr on WhatsApp or BlackBerry Pin: 21978F71 for details on how to send your BlackBerry or Smartphone hookup requests.

Lovers’ Answers Game: The rule: Ask the opposite sex one question about love, and choose your lover from the top three answers. Nkeiru, from Imo (07031904603), is asking all men: “How can a girl know someone who really loves her?” •Call Love Dr: 07031028714 to send questions or issues.

Women seeking relationships/ marriage • Dasola, 53, in Lagos, wants a man of 53 years+. 08178511150. • Gift, 33, single mother, dark, slim, wants a responsible man who will care for her. 07062638586. • Asabi Blessing, 32, needs a responsible husband. 08077165310. • Bolaji, 28, single mother, needs a caring, hard working guy of 30-36 years. 08092810451. • Ayo, 26, humble, needs a responsible man of 28-45 years for a serious relationship. 08107205835. • Angel, 21, undergraduate, slim, pretty, wants a sugar daddy. 08182791131. • Faith, 34, from Imo, in Lagos, fat, busty, sexy, needs a caring, comfortable man of 55 years for love. 08025117116, 08053407885. • Esther, from Imo, needs a honest, responsible Igbo widower of 28-30 years with little kids for marriage. 08066651155. • Oluwatobi, 27, needs a responsible, caring man of 33-50 years for marriage. 08162697503. •Jennifer, from Akwa Ibom, needs a handsome, honest man for marriage. 07069409903. • Ada, 24, single mother of one, from Enugu, wants a working/businessman of 30-40 years for marriage. 08160270707. • Linda, 29, works, needs a responsible guy of 35-45 years. 07061686459. • Kate, 31, graduate, plump, in Lagos, from Abia, needs a serious, working man for marriage. 08035831221.

Mail stories/comments to loveseekers2010@yahoo.com. Go to www.romancestory.org Call Love Doctor: 08077821830/07031028714 for relationship/marriage counselling and direct hook-up.


50

SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

Leisure World

DQMOT: Don’t Quote Me On These SMS Lingos!

Across 1) JK: Just … (7) 4) DQMOT: Don’t … me on this (5) 7) CWOT: … waste of time (8) 10) CID: Consider it … (4) 11) AR: … required (6) 13) BBB: Boring … belief (6) 14) WYWH: … you were here (4) 15) IDK: I … know (4) 16) BCNU: Be … you (6) 19) UW: You’re … (7) 21) DBEYR: Don’t believe everything you … (4) 22) ATM: At the … (6) 24) ROFL: … on floor laughing (7) 25) AYOR: At your own … (4) 27) AWTTW: A … to the wise (4)

Down 2) EMI: Excuse my … (9) 3) BAU: … as usual (8) 5) BION: … it or not (7) 6) BABY: Being … by you (7) 8) DENIAL: Don’t even notice I am … (5) 9) LQTS: … quietly to myself (8) 12) BBF: Best friends … (7) 13) CBB: Can’t be … (8) 17) IMNSHO: In my not so … opinion (6) 18) BYOB: Bring your own … (4) 20) DITR: … in the rain (7) 23) TTYL: … to you later (4) 26) DIKU: Do I … you? (4)

Solution to last week’s puzzle Across: 6) Disposal, 7) Dents, 9) Scoop, 10) Heavens, 11) Flats, 14) Dry, 15) Repute, 17) Served, 18) Manager

VICTOR AKHIDENOR, 08023438079

tit BITS

By EMEKA ANOKWURU

ORJI, DANKWABO, AHMED, OTHERS FOR ACCRA SUMMIT Chief (Dr) Theodore Orji, Governor of Abia State, Alhaji Ibrahim Dankwabo, Governor of Gombe State and Alhaji Abdulfatah Ahmed, Governor, Kwara State are among the eminent personalities that will grace this year’s integrity leadership conference on development slated for Saturday, September 1, 2012 at Paloma Hotel & Suites Conference Hall, Accra, Ghana. Dr. Richard Ikpada, Head, Africa Operations, Integrity Media Communications, Publishers of Integrity International Magazine, who confirmed this, said: “As part of our mission statement to sensitize world leaders in various positions to embrace the virtue of Integrity in diverse cadres for sustainable economic growth and social political development, and to promote peace and security in Africa at this particular time form the basis of the conference”. Prof E. T Eshett, former Deputy Vice-

Chancellor, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Imo State, will speak on the theme, “Security, Good Governance and Leadership in Africa: The Way Forward.” The lead discussants include Prof. Sylvester Okwunodu Ogbechi, University of California, U.S.A, Dr. Foloki Ebibotei, Senior Lecturer, School of Graduate Studies, University of Winneba, Ghana and Prof. David Gergen, Director, Centre for Public Service, Kennedy School of Government, U.S.A. The event will attract accomplished professionals across the African continent and beyond who are expected to rub minds on issues affecting security, leadership and good governance in Africa. Ikpada also stated that the Integrity International Magazine has set aside few deserving Africans and organizations to be conferred with awards for Dynamic Leadership through their “Courage in Character, Patriotism and Humanitarian service”. Erudite Prof. Pat Utomi, founder, Centre for Values in Leadership, is expected to chair the event while President of Nigeria, Dr. Goodluck Jonathan and his Liberian counterpart, Ellen Sirleaf Johnson are expected to grace the epic occasion.

Down: 1) Down, 2) Away, 3) Nudist, 4) Compute, 5) Bare, 8) Stand, 12) Later, 13) Saw, 16) Bear


Tragic end to cinema’s king of thrills

Zaaki Azzay’s wife cries out over threat to life AUGUST 25, 2012

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ENTERTAINER Edited by Tosin Ajirire 08056008696 (sms only)

Lolo of Wazobia FM:

My toasters are disappointed at my size


52

AUGUST 25, 2012

ENTERTAINER By CHRISTIAN AGADIBE

T

he mother of two was in a jolly mood as we drove in her car to her next engagement.

On this day, the Ogun State-born lawyer turned broadcaster, who mesmerizes her listeners with Pidgin English on Wazobia FM, was ready to field questions on her lifestyle and career. In no time, Mrs. Adebowale Omotunde popularly known as Lolo reveals to The Entertainer that men scramble to marry her, but most of them are disappointed when they see that she is a plus-size mother of two. She bares all in this interview. Excerpt: Background I was born in Lagos but I am from Ijebu Igbo in Ogun State. It’s people that started calling me ‘Lolo’. I have said this over and over again. A lot of people ask me this and I do tell them that I am a Yoruba by birth and Igbo by choice. I love Igbo culture. I love everything about them so it wasn’t a problem at all when people actually call me Lolo. I did a programme and people gave me a name. So, Lolo was one of the names people sent and I just took it. Growing up I was a very independent child. I was a tomboy, a

bad one! My parents were in Ijebu Ode; I was in primary three and was staying in the hostel, which means I had to be strong and independent, I had to hustle. I think that’s one of the reasons that made me a mean person. I have a lot of male friends than females because I am just a tomboy. I am like a boyish girl; you know that kind of a thing. So, my childhood was really funny. I was in Ijebu Ode; I did things that not an average girl would do. I climbed trees; I took part in all the sports. But I have always been an entertainer even as a child. I could sing, I could dance, I could act; all these are things I have always done from my childhood.

Dumping law for broadcasting My passion pulled me through. When you love something, it’s just there inside you. It keeps calling you even when you don’t want to answer. It just keeps calling. I have always wanted to entertain and do something like this. I like to make people laugh; I like to bring joy to people. I love to talk. That is why I first of all practiced as a lawyer for three years before my passion for broadcasting got deepened. I wanted to satisfy myself that’s why I went for my passion. Parental opposition My parents belong to the old school; they wanted me to read law. It’s law, medicine or engineering as if other professions were bad. So, I first of all read law because I wanted to satisfy my parents. Unfortunately, my father is late, if he w a s alive, i t

would have been more difficult for me to switch to broadcasting. But my mummy understands. I have done everything they wanted me to do. So, this is my time to do what I feel passionate about. Years in broadcasting I have been in broadcasting for eight or nine years. I am very happy with the job and I am so happy studying law. I do tell people that if you are passionate about something, it’s not about money. For us in the media, passion drives us first, but if you keep doing your job and you are good at what you do, it’s a natural thing that reward must come later. So, I am grateful, I am not complaining. On my voice A lot of people like me because of my voice. Actually, people tell me ‘Oh, I love your voice’. At times, women will call and say ‘Lolo, I like your voice’. I am like well that one is a gift from God. There is nothing I did to my voice to make it sound good. I think it is God’s grace and a gift, so I just try to relate to everybody normally and to those that take a step further by coming around to meet me, I just smile at them. By the time we meet one on one, they’ll probably change their mind. How I get ideas for my show I read and keep reading. I am a street girl. I listen and put my ears to the ground. I try to reach everybody. Sometimes, I could just sit down with the mallam by the roadside and I just watch the people, watch


AUGUST 25, 2012

53

ENTERTAINER how people interact. This way, you know what people are feeling, what people are saying, and which music they like. These are the ways I get my own materials because these are the people you are trying to reach. Yes, God gives me inspiration but the street is where I get everything. So, definitely my inspiration comes from the street. Between Omotunde and Lolo When I am on air, I am Lolo 1 of Wazoba FM, but when I am on my own, I am just Omotunde (Laughs). It’s two personalities roll into one. If you meet me on the street, you’ll probably meet Omotude, just a regular woman going about her business. But when I am on air or anchoring an event, I am Lolo. My male admires (Laughs) Yea, everybody desires people on radio. I get a lot of friendly requests all the time. Everybody loves me, everybody wants to marry me, and people declare their love for me. Everyday, men come to my office with gifts, begging and saying, ‘I love you, and I want to marry you’ (laughs). I just smile and try to make everybody comfortable, and I tell them calmly ‘I am sorry; I

cannot marry everyone that loves me. I can only marry one’, so I just try to relate with everyone. Basically, it is just fun on radio. I am everybody’s girlfriend on radio. I will say ‘you are my guy’, but off radio I am myself. It is Lolo you love not Omotunde. Craziest thing a fan has done to me Oh my God (Laughs). There is this crazy fan that came. I didn’t know what his idea of me was; maybe he thought I was a slim girl. He listened to me and came all the way from Port Harcourt to meet me, but when he saw me, I could see disappointment written on his face. When he saw I was a p l u s size, you could s e e t h e sadness on his f a c e (laughs). I saw the guy’s countenance and I just laughed, and I told him ‘this is me oh!’ He j u s t

smiled and said ‘oh, okay’ and he dis- I don’t care if my child goes for anyappeared quietly. I laughed. That is thing, as long as its not negative or one of the funniest things that have immoral, I will give my blessing. happened to me. Most men thought the person they hear on radio could be Going on TV that slim girl. I have always wanted to entertain. So, radio just came and it suited me perOn being mother and fectly. But my eyes are still on televibroadcaster sion. Yes, very soon I am going to galIt’s not easy. It’s a whole lot of work lop into television. That is certain by but the most important thing is priori- the grace of God. I can speak English ty. You must learn to set priority for perfectly. I can speak Pidgin. I can also yourself. I do tell people that being a try Yoruba. I am just a versatile person. mother, you make a lot of sacrifices. I don’t want to stereotype myself or Women are a motivational force. It is a box myself into one place. I always gift of God to us. The only thing is that wanted people to look at me and say, my family comes first. My children, ‘wow, this woman is just full of surprismy husband, I just try to es’. arrange everything to suit what I am doing. On Oga Madam live I am planning to stage Oga Madam live C h o o s i n g on stage at the MUSON Centre on my chil- November 4 It’s going to be really a masd r e n ’ s sive show. I have all the comedians and career musicians, and they are going to be there. Why should I Salawa Abeni is going to grace the event. do such a thing I have all the upcoming artistes that are to my child ready to perform at the show. People when I didn’t like should expect to have fun. I what was done to will be doing some comedy me by my parents? I’ll series that will blow peogive my children free ple’s mind. I am not going hand. Though, they to do regular stand up are still very young, comedy that people are I’ll help them to used to even though, I explore their have my entire stand talents. up comedians like Ali Baba and the rest of them.


54 AUGUST 25, 2012

ENTERTAINER

Tiwa Savage, 9ice hit Ibadan for Amstel Malta

S

Zaaki Azzay’s wife cries out over threat to life

H

adiza Zaaki-Azzay, wife of popular musician, Zaaki Azzay, has sent an SOS to relevant authorities over alleged threat to her life by her estranged husband. Hadiza made this plea recently at the office of Project Alert, an NGO on violence against women, stating that Zaaki should be held responsible should any harm befall her and her children. Narating her ordeal, Hadiza said it has become necessary to raise the alarm following allegation by her husband that she abducted her two children and subsequent harassment and intimidation by the police. She said: “I married Zaaki on June 24, 2004 at Ado-Odo Ota marriage registry in Ogun State. We had three children. Since the inception of the marriage, I have lived perpetually under constant assaults and threats to my life by Zaaki. “He is a man of extreme temper. He has used various dangerous weapons on me. I have fainted severally on account of the beatings. I have also been admitted in the hospital on a number of occasions. On April 16 this year, he used a hot iron on me, which nearly ended my life. I had to run out

of my matrimonial home with two of my children. Now he is accusing me of abducting my own children?” The Entertainer was also informed that the musician has resorted to the use of police from Pedro Police Station, Shomolu, Lagos to harass and intimidate Hadiza whose matter is pending at the Lagos State High Court, Ikeja in suit no: ID-273HD-2012. It was also gathered that Zaaki again petitioned the State Command in Ikeja against Hadiza for abduction of her own biological children. The NGO through Odeh has also petitioned the Assistant Inspector General of Police in a three count charge of attempt to use the officers and men of the Nigeria Police to commit unconstitutional, illegal, unlawful and unwarranted breach of the rights of Mrs. Hadiza. Director of the NGO, Dr. Josephine Effah Chukwuma, however, urged the IGP to commence investigation with the view to calling to order officers and men of the Nigerian Police under the Lagos State Command, Ikeja. As at the time of filing this report, the embattled musician could not be reached as two of his telephone numbers were switched off.

ongstress, Tiwa Savage and Abolore Akande aka 9ice have been selected to headline the Ibadan leg of the Amstel Malta Show, which holds on August 31, 2012, at the Jogor Centre, Ibadan, Oyo State. On hand to crack up guests with laughter is Seyi Law while dance group, Outrage, will set the dance hall on fire with their breathtaking choreography. As usual, versatile entertainer, Darey Art Alade, will be the anchor of the event. Speaking on the show, Adedoyin Owotomo, Brand Manager, Amstel Malta, expressed confidence that the Ibadan leg of the show would be exciting. “Amstel Malta, via the Amstel Malta Showtime activation, is committed to delivering a premium, oncein-a-lifetime experience to our target audience. This is the third edition of Amstel Malta Showtime for the year and I can

promise you that it will be a grand experience because Amstel Malta wants its target audience to be the best they can be at all times,” she said. The show will also serve as a platform for students from tertiary institutions who will slug it out in music, dance and comedy competitions. Winners in each category will get N500, 000 cash, a brand new iPad and a luxurious all-expense paid weekend getaway for two in Lagos. Runners-up will not go empty handed, as the first and second runners-up will get N150, 000 and N100, 000 respectively. The winners will also get the rare opportunity to perform on stage with the stars in their respective categories. After Ibadan, the show will move to the city of Lagos on October 5 where Tuface Idibia and Wizkid will draw the curtain on Amstel Malta Showtime for this year. come home to Nigeria in the future. Help make our homeland safe. We are ever hopeful for African peace and prosperity.’ Tupac Shakur Legacy features reproductions of handwritten lyrics, notebook pages and other personal memorabilia plus Tupac Shakur Speaks, a 60-minute CD featuring rare interviews with the late rap legend. “I feel very excited and elated. This is an inspiration for most of us who are in the business of entertainment. Though, Tupac was cut short at an early stage, we know he left an indelible mark on the sands of time. I have seen the projects he was working on before he died and also seen what his mum is doing at the Foundation and I was so inspired. As entertainers, if we do not give back to society, we have not really started,” Agwu said. He also disclosed that Crack Ya Ribs, his annual comedy show would run for the first time in New York, Houston and Dallas this year. Artistes billed to perform include D’Prince, Seyi Law, DJ Abass, Funny Bone, Senator, MC Shakara and Funny Face from Ghana.

Julius Agwu excited by Tupac’s honour

J

ulius D’Genius’ Agwu has bagged another international recognition few weeks after winning the African Achievers Awards in London. US-based Tupac Foundation recently presented the rib cracker with an autobiography of Tupac Shakur entitled, Tupac Shakur Legacy, which was autographed by Tupac’s mum, Afeni Shakur. Afeni, who also wrote the forward to the book written by Jamal Joseph, wrote thus: ‘Julius Agwu, peace, love, respect, se alaafia ni? We pray we will be able to

Art Stampede to honour Bruce Onobrakpeya at 80

C

ome tomorrow at Kongi’s Harvest, Freedom Park, veteran artist, Bruce Onobrakpeya, will be honoured by The Committee For Relevant Arts (CORA) under its art stampede platform which will take a close look at the emerging trend in “Visual Arts

Documentation”. Some of the books for discussion at the parley include Making History, African Collectors and The Canon Of African Art by Sylvester Ogbechie, Nigerian Artistry, by Pat Oyelola, New Trees In Old Forests; Contemporary

‘I can pose topless’ A

s the search for Miss Uwenjah 2012 kicks off, Mmenim Etok, one of the contestants has stated that she can go topless. Etok, who hails from Akwa Ibom State, declared during the screening that she could go topless but not completely nude when the jury asked her if she could go nude on screen.

Amazingly, the 200 level student of Madonna University threatened to quit the contest if there was a nudity clause in the terms of agreement. Reacting, she stressed that her dignity as a woman must be protected and as well respected. “Well, assuming we are going topless, it might be considered but going nude is what I won’t accept!”

Nigerian Art in Lagos Private Collections, edited by Jess Castellote, A Celebration of Modern Nigerian Art – 101 Nigerian Artists, by Chukwuemeka Bosah and George Edozie, Ben Enwonwu: The Making of an African Modernist, by Sylvester Ogbechie.

The discussion will be used as a peg to look at prospects of documenting arts generally in other format — film and audio. Onobrakpeya was cited by art historian, Dele Jegede in the ‘90s as the most published and publicized artist in Nigeria.


AUGUST 25, 2012 55

ENTERTAINER

Tragic end to cinema’s king of thrills

Hollywood has been left stunned by the suicide of one of its biggest names. David Usborne reports

T

ony Scott, the director behind a raft of action blockbusters including Top Gun and Beverly Hills Cop II, has leapt to his death from a harbour bridge in Los Angeles, shocking Hollywood. The American broadcaster ABC News reported on Tuesday that the British-born director and producer has been diagnosed with inoperable brain cancer-quoting a source close to the filmmaker. Born in North Shields, Mr. Scott was the brother of the director Ridley Scot. He was seen by

several witnesses jumping from a bridge spanning Los Angeles harbour at about 12:30pm on Sunday. His body was retrieved from the waters by police divers a few hours later. The witnesses said they saw Mr. Scott, who was 68, stopping his car, a Toyota Prius, in the middle of the bridge, scaling a high fence and then throwing himself off apparently without any hesitation. The 6,060ft Vincent Thomas Bridge rises to 185 feet at its highest point and has been featured in Hollywood films such as The fast and the Furious. It is a notorious spot in Los Angeles for suicide jumpers. The Los Angeles Coroner’s Office confirmed that his death was being treated as a suicide. “There’s nothing to indicate it is anything else at this time,” said Lt Joe Bale, although final word on cause of death will not be released until completion of an autopsy. Hollywood A-listers paid tribute to the man noted for his fast-paced editoring style and for hits with Top Gun, Days of Thunder, Crimson Tide, True Romance and Enemy of the State. Earlier this year, Mr. Scott teamed up with Ridley to produce

the anticipated Alien prequel, Prometheus. Tony and Ridley founded a production company together called Scott Free Production. Tony Scott’s repertoire also stretched into countless commercials for television as well as the development of TV dramas including The Good Wife, and Numbers, both originally made for the CBS network. Of the two brothers, it was Ridley, whose credits include Alien and Gladiator, who received the most critical acclaim, including a series of nominations at the Oscars. Tony, who specialised in high-grossing, high-octane films such as his 2000 hit

Unstoppable, was never nominated. He was nonetheless a fixture in the Hollywood community and, with his trademark cigar and frayed baseball cap, was widely liked. There was no confirmation by the Coroner’s office of reports in the Los Angeles Times that police found a note with contact details, including the phone number of his wife, inside the car and the investigator had also located a suicide note in his office. Nor, were the contents of the alleged note disclosed. Simon Halls, a spokesman for the Scotts said the family asked “their privacy be respected at this time”. The tributes came quickly. The actor Adam Goldberg, who worked with Scott on Déjà vu, said: “Tony Scot was one of the, if not the, warmest and most generous directors for whom I’ve ever worked. I’ll miss you man.” The actress Keira Knightley, who starred in his 2005 film Domino, called him “one of the most extraordinary, imaginative men I ever worked with”. The Top Gun actor Val Kilmer said: “RIP Tony. You were the kindest film director I ever worked for. You will be missed.” Director Ron Howard said: “No more Tony Scott movies. Tragic Day.” Robert Rodriguez, director of Sin City and Desperado added: “Tony Scott. Damn. Great knowing you, buddy. Thanks for the inspiration, advice, encouragement, and the decades of great entertainment.” Scott had recently completed filming on a suspense feature called Out of the Furnace. Due out next spring, it features the actor Christian Bale playing the role of an exprison inmate. The police in Los Angeles were alerted to Mr. Scott’s apparent suicide thanks to witnesses who called the 911 emergency number instantly to report seeing him fall into the water. The bridge links San Pedro in Los Angeles with Terminal Island. •Culled from The Independent

•Scott with his third wirfe Donna Scott, and their twins sons, Frank and Max


56

SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

SOCIETY PEOPLE What is Chief Razak Okoya cooking?

Gen David Jemibewon unwinds

G

eneral David Jemibewon does not need any further introduction. He was military governor of old Oyo State and Minister of Police Affairs. He has seen it all, both in his chosen career and the political terrain. Though this retired soldier has decided to shun social gatherings in recent time, he showed up last week at the Civic Centre, on Victoria Island, Lagos. He was looking very good and fulfilled. It was gathered that he now socialises once a while to ease out tension.

T

he story of Chief Razaq Akanni Okoya (CON) is one which gives Nigerians aspiring for greatness hope. This is a man who rose from nothing, as it were, to something great. He’s a business colossus, a man of means and owner of Eleganza. It’s interesting that despite not being born rich, Okoya is among Nigeria’s most successful industrialists and has impeccable taste. His birthday parties and other family functions make the headlines. We can reveal that the successful businessman is planning something big in the Lekki/Ajah axis. We will get you posted on what he’s up to.

SIFFAX boss, Taiwo Afolabi, steps out to support designer daughter

Jemibewon

Kenny Okolugbo breaks the rule at 40

S

uccessful clearing and forwarding agent and the man behind Siffax Group of Companies, Barrister Taiwo Afolabi, is sure happy about what his daughter chose as a career. He proved this recently when he supported his daughter, morally and financially, at the just concluded African Fashion Week in London. He also attended and stayed through the one-week event. No wonder, Afolabi was proud of his daughter, who showcased her designs at the show. Sources revealed that his primary objective of attending was to motivate the lady as well as give a full endorsement of her chosen career.

O

ne of Nigeria’s youngest billionaires and chairman of KEN-KOL Nigeria Limited and Ken Plaza, Sir Kenny Ekenechukwu Okolugbo, is a known name in the social circle. The handsome dude clocked 40 two weeks ago and he treated himself, a few family and close pals to a classy and high taste birthday bash. Indeed, not known for organising parties, Okolugbo broke his rule to host friends and well-wishers to show how he took this landmark birthday. In fact, the gentle and easy-going dude lavishly entertained those who attended. Those present on that day testified that it was great.

Okoya

Bisi Awoniyi celebrates 50th birthday in grand style

T

Afolabi

he Civic Centre, on Ozumba Mbadiwe, Lagos, came alive a few days back, as Mrs. Adebisi Yewande Awoniyi, chief operating officer of BiCourtney-operated Murtala Muhammed Airport 2 (MMA2) and the favourite daughter of the late Chief Sunday Awoniyi, hosted an exclusive party. It was a get-together to announce her 50th birthday. Many of her friends, colleagues at work and family members attended in large number. They, her brother and deputy governor of Kogi State, Yomi Awoniyi; CEO/MD of Bi-Courtney, Mr. Wale Babalakin, exCross River State Governor, Mr. Donald Duke; Dr. Biodun Layonu, Captain Kehinde Smith, Senator Tunde Ogbeha, Jide Ekundayo, Wale Akoni, Layi Oriowo and a host of others.

Awoniyi

Okolugbo


SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

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58

SATURDAY SUN,

August 25, 2012

SaturdayInterview Continued from Page 16 be made history. Earlier, you mentioned that maybe you should have looked into your father’s complaints before he died. You also said that the same lady wants you dead. Have you confronted her and has your family looked into the matter? There is time for everything. As I said earlier, my father’s death left me devastated. For the family, our father’s death is what hurts the most. I actually have the phones of this my family member containing the messages she sent to somebody about me. She claimed that I insulted her. Let’s assume that I insulted her, like she said. Is that enough reason for her to say I should be made history? You know what making someone history means. If someone says, ‘let her be made history,’ what does she mean? She sent the text to a friend of hers in Kaduna without knowing that her friend is close to a friend of mine. On seeing the text, my friend expressed surprise that someone could ask that I be made history. For her, I am far too kind to elicit such an utterance; so she forwarded the message to me. I actually showed my father the text message the day he called me to his office. Because people around this person know what she could do. She couldn’t deny that she sent the text that was forwarded to me. Instead, she said that she was angry because I insulted her and that was why she sent an SMS asking that I be made history. What can justify her actions? Though there are no plans to take action against her, I repeat that all the people around us know that my father died in mysterious circumstances. What do you miss about your father? Oh, I miss his beating me (laughter). Would you believe that three years ago my father beat me? He came to my house, picked my bus and Honda Space Wagon on a Friday. He promised that I would have the cars back by Wednesday. He told me he wanted to use them to “toast” a babe in Jos. After six months, I didn’t hear a word from my father. I was bent on taking the cars from him because the last car I gave him was a customised sky-blue BMW 18i, which cost me over N9 million in 2007. Guess what? My father used the car to “toast” a babe. It wasn’t the first time my dad gave a woman a car that he got from me. So, when I went to retrieve the bus and the Honda, I was angry and I had told him that I would send the police to get my cars back. We were kept malice over this issue. When I walked into his office, I was so angry that I didn’t greet him. He then asked if I thought I could just walk into his office without greeting him. He asked me: ‘do you think I am your boyfriend that you can just walk into his office without greeting him?’ Before I could say anything, he hit me.

‘My dad used my N9m car to toast a babe’ Daboh

Of course, I started laughing and my reaction infuriated him and so he descended on me. Luckily, a family friend, Pastor Peter Chu, walked in and saved me from the beating. I remember saying to him that if not for the resemblance we shared, to point that I have a birthmark on my nose just like his, I would have said he wasn’t my father. I reminded him of how he was my only opponent during my election in 2003. He was the one who printed a flyer entitled, 40 Reasons Why You Shouldn’t Vote for My Daughter. He told people to ask me for my husband. Our people still voted for me and elected me into the House of Representatives. It was an unprecedented event. Before my election, no single lady had contested for election in Tiv land. The important question is: Even if I had flaws, should it have been my father listing my sins? I have his flyer till date. I am telling you that my father was a unique man; his character was too complex to decipher.

Do you think that you both had a dysfunctional relationship? On many occasions I found it hard to believe that he was my father. I believed that he never loved me. Surprisingly, it was after he died that I met people who told me how much he loved me. I found out from his friends that he spoke about me with pride all the time. I knew they weren’t lying because they told me about some of my achievements, though I never met them before. They told me how my father boasted about me. In fact, I was told about a day my father quarrelled with a high ranking politician in my area and he told the man that he couldn’t even win an election that his daughter won. When I heard all the good things my father said about me, I felt sorry for having felt that he didn’t love me. I spoke with an uncle who explained that my father was adhering to tradition by not showing me too much love. He reminded me that in Tiv tradition, fathers don’t show who their favourite child is because by hiding his feelings, he protects that child. What was it like growing up under your father? As a child, it was horrific. It all started when my parents separated and they both wanted to have sole custody. As a kid, I lived with my dad and my fifth stepmum. She had four kids for my father and when it was time for her to go the United Kingdom, she

didn’t take me because I wasn’t her child. When she left for England, my grandmother sent for me. My father took me to Gboko to live with my grandmother; she was called Mama Daboh. She was a popular philanthropist. My grandmother fried yam to feed other people’s children and to raise money for the school fees of the underprivileged. Many top Tiv men and women will tell you that my grandmother, who was the wife of a catechist, helped in making them who they are today. I lived with my grandmother as a child and this is why, out of my father’s 21 children, I am the only one who speaks Tiv language. I even worked in her farm. After months of my living in Gboko, my mother got wind that I was nowhere near London. When my mother came to Gboko, I remember somebody intercepting me on my way to the market to say that I had to go to visit Mrs. Comfort Nyagba, a senior cousin of mine. She then took me out of Gboko to a village far from town. I didn’t know it was a decoy to hide me from my mother. In the hinterland, I was banished to kitchen because I used to bed wet; so I shared the kitchen with chickens and goats. Many times I woke up with goats or chickens standing over my head. Those tough times thought me perseverance; it gave me inner strength; I can survive even the toughest conditions. I learnt how to trek to schools for miles, though I used to live in Ikoyi. But today I would like to thank my stepmother, Aunty Nancy, for refusing to take me to England because it gave me the opportunity to become a proper Tiv woman. I am connected to my people. How did you cope during the times your dad was involved in controversies and why did he live the way he did? Yes, my late father was always involved in controversy. He was a maverick. As I said earlier, the man was unique beyond understanding. As I sit here, I cannot tell you that I knew my father. I doubt if any of his children can tell you they understood him. Having said that, I

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‘I won election despite my father’s opposition’ Continued from Page 58 must add that when people say he was controversial, we have to look at the fact that most Nigerians aren’t honest and truthful. Most Nigerians are two-faced. They say one thing with left side of their mouth, only to say something else with the right side. Politicians are worse when it comes to double speak and you know they operated in the same circles with my father. What most politicians come out to say in the media is different from what they say in the privacy of their homes or offices. My late father couldn’t understand this kind of behaviour. My father was a man who was truthful; he said things the way they were, no matter who was involved. I am not saying he was a saint. Far from it; he had flaws, just as any human being, but he was always crusading against corruption. All of the things he stood for are even more relevant today. Thank God Godwin Daboh isn’t on the list of those involved in the fuel subsidy scam. So, when people say he was controversial, it is not because he was corrupt; it is because he didn’t understand Nigerians. I always told my father that he happened in the wrong time. If we have been sincere about fighting corruption, why is the system even more corrupt as the years go by? It is only recently that people have become truly tuned to fighting corruption. But my father had been fighting corruption long before now. I have been off politics; I haven’t been commenting on politics, but I am still keen on protecting the interest of the people. I am in a way, like my dad, because I can never call something that is white as black. Today, we don’t have people who speak the truth and this is why I don’t comment on issues; so I don’t become the female Godwin Daboh. In as much as I am blunt, I try to be diplomatic unlike my father. The main reason I have stayed away from politics is that I told myself that I would rather die than jettison the fear of God. Unfortunately, these days’ politics is controlled by people who don’t have the fear of God. I feel bad when I see people doing nothing for the others; yet, they steal all the money allocated for development. As I said, unlike my father, when I see such people I don’t start talking to the media. I simply advise them to work for the people. Who says Nigeria cannot produce politicians that work for the people? We have the like of Governor Godswill Akpabio, Governor Babatunde Fashola and Governor Rotimi Amaechi. These men have evidence to show that they are using government money for the people. It is time for President Goodluck Jonathan to pluck a big cane to flog any member of his party who isn’t doing his/her job. For me, Jonathan shouldn’t be frolicking with non-performers because the bulk stops at his table. How do these people sleep, with the huge sums they have embezzled? These politicians ought to know that poverty breeds envy, anger and crime. Still talking about controversy, many would like to know what caused the disagreements during your father’s burial. There was drama, as is expected in a polygamous family. I have a younger sister, who is the sixth after me. She is a lawyer based in London. She returned to Nigeria and asked that we all followed her, as the leader of the

family. Of course, that will not happen because I am the first child. Her demand came as a comic relief. I just ignored her and continued with planning my father’s burial. If I was some uneducated, unexposed elder sister that is when a little girl will say she leads my family and I will follow. Besides my being exposed enough to know how to arrange my father’s final journey home, the Nigerian culture dictates that as the eldest child, I take charge of my father’s burial, which I did. It would have been an abomination if I didn’t. The whole thing came to a start when she fixed a burial date without consulting me. I refused to accept such an arrangement. I am not an Esau of a first born. I’m not interested in controlling what happens in the lives of my siblings, but when we have to do something that concerns my father, then, I have to lead the way. What led to the quarrel during the church service held for your father’s burial? Yes, there was a problem during the church service and it centred on the order in which my father married his wives. I want to restate the facts, as they are. My mother was the first wife and that is why I am first child. After my mother, it was Yinka Akinrele whom he wedded in Lagos. Then there was Rita Fini. After Rita was Mosun, a Yoruba woman who has two children for my father. The fifth wife was my step–mother, Nancy, and there was the sixth. When I was called to introduce my father’s wives, one of women protested when I called the names of the women I knew as my father’s wives. I resisted anyone asking me not to recognise these women. Even in certain communities, once a woman has a child for a man, she is recognised. It is the same way my father had all his children, in the sense there is only one method of a woman conceiving a child; so no Daboh child should tell me who to recognise and who not to. It is amazing that it’s women who, in my father’s life time, had controversies surrounding their standing in the family that are now trying to dictate who should be recognised as a Daboh or which woman was his wife or who wasn’t. I am Godwin Daboh’s first child and he showed me who his wives and children were, until his will is read and he indicates otherwise, I will not write off any child or wife. There is so much speculation about the content of your father’s will. Has it been read? I am not really interested in what is contained in the Will. I am blessed and I lack nothing. Can you believe that some people, especially among my step-mothers have said Godwin Daboh is not my father? I laugh because my father has already blessed me during his lifetime. If he hadn’t blessed me, I wouldn’t have succeeded in life, especially in politics because I still won my election despite his opposing me. So, I don’t need anything from my father now that he is late. If he gave me anything in his Will, it will be a bonus. In your opinion, what legacy did your father leave behind? He will be remembered for his honesty and his anti-corruption crusade. If you embezzled money, my father exposed you. As I said, though I will keep my father’s legacy alive, I will do it my own way by advising people.

Daboh

Most people don’t know that it is the friends and associates of politicians who come to my father with documents that showed how much they had embezzled. Then they pretended in public when my father took on corrupt government officials? I will never do things like most of politicians, embezzling money with impunity. I know what I am saying because I was once a member of the House of Representatives. Till date I have friends in the corridors of power; so when I say I cannot condone corruption, I don’t say it because I don’t know what it is in public office. The people in government just have to understand that Nigerians cannot continue moving around the vicious circle of poverty. Government has to create an enabling environment for people to break away from poverty. It is time our politicians stopped impoverishing the people in order for the people will continue to depend on them.

Your father was also involved in charity. Do you intend to continue from where he stopped? I have always been involved in charity. In fact, ours has been a family of charity. As I mentioned earlier, my grandmother was the Mother Theresa of Gboko. People knew my father for giving and I stood by my people during the Tiv-Jukun crises. When I was in the House of Reps, I bought my people 23 cars and 300 hundred motorcycles to empower them. I will continue with empowering the underprivileged because I don’t do it to win elections. This is why, though I am not in active politics, I still do the much I can. In fact, I give so much that my friends joke that my son is my only possession I cannot give away. I cannot help everyone, because it’s not every time that I am buoyant enough to meet people’s demands.


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Cover Story SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012, PAGE 61

Cynthia

MURDER VIA FACEBOOK:

Cynthia’s call log exposed killers •How police nabbed suspects in Nnewi, Lagos By MATTHEW DIKE

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our days after the police paraded suspected murderers of Cynthia Osokogu, in Lagos, fresh facts have emerged on how the police managed to track them down, in Lagos and Nnewi, Anambra State.

It was gathered that to get the true identity of Cynthia, after her corpse was discovered in the hotel, the police had visited the Nigerian Immigration Service office, with a Yellow Form found in her suitcase. Documentation relating to the Yellow Form revealed the victim’s identify. Sources revealed that when Cynthia’s family came into

the picture, the police collected her phone number and contacted the telecoms service provider to furnish them with the call log. It was gathered that the police paid particular attention to calls Cynthia received and made in the last two weeks. From this, the identities of owners of the phone numbers were known. Also, the police got the call logs of the numbers that called Cynthia many times, from which the girlfriend of Ezekie Odera, one of the suspects and 400 level student of Anambra State University, Uli, was contacted. Sources revealed that when the girl was called, the policeman pretended that he was the suspect’s friend sent

to deliver a message. The policeman and the girl agreed where to meet, from where arrest was effected. The girl then led the police to arrest the suspect, who, in turn led them to the home of the second suspect, Okwoma Nwabufor, a 300 level accounting student of the University of Lagos (UNILAG). Meanwhile, it was business as usual at the hotel Cynthia was killed when Saturday Sun visited. Efforts to get the comments of officials of the hotel proved abortive. The receptionist told our reporter that all enquiries about Cynthia’s case should be directed to the Area ‘E’ FESTAC Police Commander, Mr. Damian Okoro, an Assistant Commissioner of Police.


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Cover Story Rohypnol: The date-rape drug that killed Cynthia

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ohypnol is an intermediate-acting benzodiazepine with general properties similar to those of Valium (diazepam). It is used in the short-term treatment of insomnia, as a pre-medication in surgical procedures and for inducing anaesthesia. Like other benzodiazepines (such as Valium, Librium and Xanax), Rohypnol’s effects include sedation, muscle relaxation, reduction in anxiety, and prevention of convulsions. However, Rohypnol’s sedative effects are approximately seven to 10 times stronger than Valium. The effects of Rohypnol appear 15 to 20 minutes after administration and last approximately four to six hours. Some residual effects can be found 12 hours or more after administration. Since the 1990s Rohypnol has been used illegally to lessen the depression caused by the abuse of stimulants, such as cocaine and methamphetamine, and also as an aid for sexual assault. The so-called “date-rape drug” was placed unknowingly in the drinks of victims, often at a bar or party (“club drug”). Due to the strong amnesia produced by the drug, victims would have limited or no recollection of the assault.1 Important information about Rohypnol Rohypnol is not approved for medical use or manufactured in the United States and is not available legally. However, it is legally prescribed in over 60 other countries and is widely available in Mexico, Colombia, and Europe where it is used for the treatment of insomnia and as a pre-anesthetic. Therefore, it was placed into Schedule IV of the Controlled Substances Act in 1984 due to international treaty obligations and remains under that classification. Schedule IV drugs are considered to have a lower abuse potential but can lead to physical or psychological dependence. The penalties associated with the possession, trafficking, and distribution of Rohypnol are equivalent to those of a Schedule I substance (Schedule I substances include heroin, marijuana, and MDMA). Rohypnol causes partial amnesia; individuals are unable to remember certain events that they experience while under the influence of the drug. This effect is particularly dangerous when Rohypnol is used to aid in the commission of sexual assault; victims may not be able to clearly recall the assault, the assailant, or the events surrounding the assault. Rohypnol use in the US, according to the 2010 Monitoring the Future Survey, has increased by 0.2 per cent since 2009. However, use has been relatively stable from 1999 to 2010, with yearly use estimates ranging from 0.6 to 0.9 per cent of 8th to 12th grade respondents. It is difficult to estimate the number of Rohypnol-facilitated rapes in the United States. Very often, biological samples are taken from the victim at a time when the effects of the drug have already passed and only residual amounts remain in the body fluids. These residual amounts are difficult, if not impossible, to detect using standard screening assays available in the United States. If Rohypnol exposure is to be detected at all, urine samples need to be collected within 72 hours and subjected to sensitive analytical tests. The problem is compounded by the onset of amnesia after ingestion of the drug, which causes the victim to be uncertain about the facts surrounding the rape. This uncertainty may lead to critical delays or even reluctance to report the rape and to provide appropriate biological samples for toxicology testing. Rohypnol, previously available as a white tablet that dissolved without colour or taste, is now formulated as a caplet that is light green with a blue core. The manufacturer instituted this change to help identify tampered drinks at clubs. When dissolved in clear liquids the blue core will turn the clear liquid to blue. However, when dissolved in darker-colored liquids, the blue dye may not be noticeable. Generic versions of Rohypnol may not contain the blue dye. Abuse Potential While Rohypnol has become widely known for its use as a date-rape drug, it is abused more frequently for other reasons. It is abused by high school students, college students, street gang members, rave party attendees, and heroin and cocaine abusers to produce profound intoxication, boost the high of heroin, and modulate the effects of cocaine. Teenagers and young males age 13 to 30 have been noted as the primary abusers of Rohypnol. Rohypnol is usually consumed orally, and is often combined with alcohol. It may also be abused by crushing tablets and snorting the powder, or by dissolving prior to injection. Rohypnol abuse causes a number of adverse effects, including drowsiness, dizziness, loss of motor control, lack of coordination, slurred speech, confusion, and gastrointestinal disturbances, lasting 12 or more hours. Higher doses may produce respiratory depression. Chronic use of Rohypnol can result in physical dependence and the appearance of a withdrawal syndrome when the drug is discontinued. Rohypnol impairs cognitive and psychomotor functions affecting reaction time and driving skill. The use of this drug in combination with alcohol is a particular concern as both central nervous system depressants potentiate each other’s toxicity. Injection of any illegal drug puts the user at risk of contracting HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), hepatitis B and C, and other blood-borne illnesses. References • National Drug Intelligence Centre. DEA Briefs; Background, Drugs and Drug Abuse, Drug Descriptions, Rohypnol (Flunitrazepam). Accessed August 7, 2012. http://www.justice.gov/dea/concern/flunitrazepam.html • Monitoring the Future. National Results on Adolescent Drug Use. Overview of Key Findings 2010. http://monitoringthefuture.org/pubs/monographs/mtf-overview2010.pdf Accessed November 28, 2011. – Courtesy, http://www. Drugs.com

The victim and how she was killed C

Cynthia

ynthia Osokogu, 24, was the daughter of retired Army General, Frank Osokogu. She was a post-graduate student of Nasarawa State University and clothing retailer. The young lady had come to Lagos to buy some clothing materials. She allegedly linked up with Facebook friends she had cultivated over time. It was believed, however, that one of the people who eventually drugged her with Rohypnol and killed her paid for her plane ticket and promised to pay for her hotel as well. The suspect and his friend picked Cynthia at the airport, on her arrival in Lagos and drove her to the hotel in Festac, Lagos. The suspects drugged and tied her up in order to rob her. They also beat her, in order to extract information on where she kept the money she came to Lagos with. She became unconscious and they disappeared. Officials of the hotel found her body after an unknown person called the receptionist. The matter was reported to the police, which took away the body and deposited it at the mortuary. The hotel had also reviewed the CCTV footage and therefore, identified the killers.

We didn’t just check in and killed her. We were friends, we allowed her to enjoy herself. She used the condom herself – Suspect

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hen the Lagos State Police Command paraded Okwoma Nwabufor, a 300 level accounting student of the University of Lagos (UNILAG) and Ezekie Odera, 400 level student of Anambra State University, Uli, they revealed how and why they killed Cynthia Osokogu. Below is the verbatim report of the Nwabufor’s confession: Why did do kill Cynthia?

Actually I killed the lady, but it was a mistake. It was the work of the devil. I did not mean to kill her, but she died while I was hitting her. My motive of killing her was nothing else but to get out money from her. Unfortunately, she had no money in her possession. Who is she to you? In fact, she is my pinging friend. We had been talking for a few months. So, from our interactions, I noticed that she has a big boutique in Abuja. It was


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The suspects when she phoned me that she was coming to Lagos to buy some wares that the devil sold the idea that she may be having huge amount of money. I paid for the airfare to convince her that I am well-to-do. It was when I was convinced that she would make it to Lagos that I called my cousin, Odera Ezekie. It was Ezekie who brought chain and padlock. He came all the way from Anambra State University, Uli. Two of us welcomed Cynthia and we all moved to the hotel, Casmilo at Lake View, Amumo Odofin. Already, my cousin had mixed three packs of juice with sleeping pills. It was when I searched for money and I couldn’t get that got me angry. I did not know she would die. If you claim it was a mistake, why did you tie her and seal her mouth? Really, we did not plan to kill her. We wanted to rob her. She was not the first person we have done it to. We have done it to different girls, but we did not kill them. We only drugged and robbed them. Why did you hit and strip her? She was very stubborn. Even with all the drug content, she was still giving us tough time. You bit her or why bite all over her? It is true. We struggled. She was too powerful. You made love to her severally, as many used condoms were seen at the

scene? Well, she used the condoms. They are all female condoms. She has a vibrating machine or sex machine, which she used in satisfying her sex urge. At what time did she satisfy her sex urge when you had already drugged her? We did not just check in and kill her. We were friends, we allowed her to enjoy herself. She used the condom herself? How did you feel strangulating a beautiful lady you call your friend? I did not mean to kill her. It was a mistake and the devil’s handiwork. How do you feel now? I feel very bad. I am not happy and I regretted my action. Why did you take to robbery when you have a future? I can’t really say, but I regretted my action. How were you arrested? I just can’t still understand. The police stormed my place in FESTAC around 3a.m and burst my door. I wanted to escape through the ceiling but I fell down. That is all I know. What is your advice to youth out there? I don’t know what to say. Let them live right and shun crime.

When she was struggling to escape, my cousin started beating and biting her –Suspect

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zekie Odera, one of the suspects also revealed how they drugged and manhandled Cynthia. Below is the verbatim report of his confession during his parade by the police:

How did you get involved? I am very sorry about what happened. It was my cousin who called me on the phone that I should bring a chain, padlock. I respect him a lot. I also bought Rohypnol tablet, which I injected into the Ribena juice. She drank it, but the drug was not effective. So, my cousin now told me to help him tie her. I obeyed, but I did not know she would die. When she was struggling to escape, my cousin started beating and biting her. I left the hotel while she was still breathing. I thought she would recover from the beating.

How were you arrested? It was my girlfriend who betrayed me to the police. She brought the police to Nnewi, where I went to see my people. She called me that she was coming to see me and when I came to meet her, the police picked me. Well, I had no alternative. I took the police to my cousin’s house in FESTAC. How do you fee now? I feel like killing myself. I am disappointed in myself. Your cousin said two of you did same to six other victims, in four different hotels… He said we robbed four victims, not that we killed them. We only robbed them. What’s your advice to young people? They should not engage in evil practices, that is all I can say.


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Cover Story By OLA AGBAJE and CHRISTOPHER OJI

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s the police probe into the heart-rending story of Cynthia Osokogu, the only daughter of retired Major General Frank Osokogu, Nigerians have continued to comment on the gains and losses of social media. While some see it as necessary evil, others want people to beware of it. Ivy Kanu, a security analyst, said there was nothing wrong about interaction or socialisation in social media, but lamented that in Africa, especially in Nigeria, people were now using the social media for negative purposes. She wondered why, in this age when fraudsters are on the prowl, a right-thinking person would not visit a strange person in a hotel without notifying his or her relatives. According to her, people should not give out their phone numbers to strange persons. Even while chatting on facebook, they should not give out phone number, she said. She said even though people are now using the social media in a negative way, there are still good aspects of the social media, as one can negotiate business through it, but people should be very careful on those they deal with. Odita Sunday said parents and guardians should monitor their children and wards on the ways they use the social media. He said also that the government should, as a matter of urgency, start enlightenment campaign on the positive and negative aspects of the social media. “The government should also regulate the use of social media. But since the government has not started the enlightenment campaign, parents and guardians should

What we think about social media relationship – Police chief, others

Manko

How policemen nabbed the suspects – Lagos CP

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t the parade of Okwoma Nwabufor and Ezekie Odera, Lagos State Police Commissioner declared: “I commend the Area Commander, Area E Festac, Mr. Dan Okoro and his team. When the news of the gruesome murder was relayed to me by Okoro, I swore that it would not end up like other unresolved murder cases. I assigned him to personally take over the investigation. I commend him, because, the identity of the lady was not initially known. “After the lady had been killed, one of the suspects used an MTN number to call the receptionist in the hotel to ‘remove the bastard.’ It was at that juncture that the receptionist ran to the room and discovered the dead body. The hotel manager contacted my men, who raced to the scene. It was my men who took the corpse to the hospital; then ACP Okoro and his team started their investigation. “I thank God that there was CCTV camera in the hotel. It showed the faces of the suspects, but because there was no biometrics to know their identity, Okoro started working with the phone number they used in calling the reception. Actually, the caller had thrown away the SIM card. “Well, to cut the story short, investigation took Okoro to Republic of Benin, to the immigration office and Anambra State before the suspects were picked. I am very happy that my men were able to unravel the mystery behind the death. I think what we are investigating now is to know how many victims that have suffered similar fate. We will soon charge the suspects to court for murder.”

Cynthia


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Cover Story started educating their young ones on the negative impact of communicating with strange persons,” he said. Lagos State police spokeswoman, Ngozi Braide, said: “As if I new, I had issued out a release on the danger of social media because Nigerians have abused the usage. It is quite unfortunate that the social media, which was supposed to be a blessing to us, has now turned to a curse. It is a big shame. I want to advise young ones, especially the females to be careful with the people they meet online, Tube, twitter, facebook, PB messages as many fraudster’s killers, armed robbers and other criminals are now on the prowl looking for victims. I discovered that many people who fall victims are greedy ones. People should be contented with what they have. The Cynthia issue is a big lesson for young females. “You can see that the young lady was from a very responsible and well-to-do family, but I can’t still comprehend why she should visit strange people. I think our communication agencies and service providers should start enlightenment campaign with a slogan like, ‘don’t visit a strange fellow.’ More so, men are not free; some men also fell victim. My advice is for everyone to be careful and always be suspicious that the fellow who wants to meet you may be a murderer, fraudster or may have any other motive. Just don’t be comfortable. If you must pay a visit, meet at an eatery in company with your friend. For those who meet strange persons and go to bed with them, know that you are irresponsible. Religious leaders, community leaders, and families have a lot of role to play by educating their people.” Chuks Okeugiri, a legal practitioner, said: “ On the face of it, it is not dangerous to meet people, either on the facebook

or PB. On the other side, one has to be very careful in dealing with people, even the people you know, and you have to be very careful. So, you have to know the background of the person chatting with you or proposing you either for business or relationship. “If you are suspicious of the person, stop the deals and don’t go further. As an individual, people have met me with business proposals that would fetch me millions but I would laugh at them because, I knew they were not genuine. Once you align yourself in any proposal that is not genuine, you are already doomed. I want to advise people to be very vigilant, as one does not know the motive of any mind and you can never discern what a man has in his mind. For ladies, learn your lesson from the lady that was allegedly strangulated because, as a lawyer, I know that every suspect is innocent until proved otherwise in the law court.” The Medical Director of Felin Hospital and Chief Executive Officer of Felin Records, Dr. Obiefuna Nwankwo, said social media is a negative development. Nwankwo said though the idea is not totally bad, Nigerians are misusing it. He said the disadvantage has outweighed the advantage. According to him, because of poverty and illiteracy in Nigeria, people were lured and swindled of their money through social media. “In civilised countries, social media is a very good idea. My stand is that social media has more disadvantage than advantage. If possible it should be discarded,” Nwankwo said. A traditional ruler, Eze Timber Dialakwe, said social media is a bad phenomenon to Nigeria and Nigerians. Dialakwe

said it has corrupted children and adults, as people use social media to deceive others and defraud them. He said the use of social medium perfected the activities of fraudsters. Barrister Adekunle Jimoh said social media has corrupted the world. “It reduced the world into a global village and expanded the activities of fraudsters,” he said. He said many people have been lured into hotels through social mediaand ended up being killed by the same person(s) that invited him or her to the hotel. A banker with Fidelity Bank, Jams Eze, said social media has more advantages than disadvantages. According to him, it has improved communication in both business and domestic affairs. He said people could communicate from a long distance. The banker said: “Because people have been killed or defrauded through social media does not mean that its disadvantages are more than its advantages.” Lagos State Commissioner of police (CP) Umar Manko said: “I will advise everyone to be vigilant and careful how they interact in the social media. There are many characters using the social media. Some are for positive, while majority are for negative reasons. I am not addressing just ladies; men are included. They should be vigilant and report any suspicious characters to the nearest police station. Parents should educate their children on the dangers of meeting strange people; young men and women should not be secretive about their meetings with strange persons; people should be very careful with the proposals they get from people they have not known their background. It is quite wrong to meet strange people in secret or secluded areas.”

GRIEF, ANGER ON FACEBOOK N igerians from across the world cannot stop talking about the killing of Cynthia Osokogu. The facebook, on which the dead lady met her eventual killer, is awash with comments on her misfortune. Below are some of them: Anonymous: My God, what is this world turning into? I’m so sorry, my dear; that means she was hurt. She was in serious pains before she died. I wonder what was going through her mind at that moment. Please, don’t trust anybody, not even your parents. God said it also that the heart of man is desperately wicked. May her gentle soul RIP. Please, do something, maybe a campaign against violence. This is becoming too much; we young girls are no longer safe. Aviya: Too sad! May Cynthia’s soul rest in peace. Ese Etuks: I just can’t imagine what she passed through for 12 hours. Anonymous: Jesu Christi! Was rape not enough that they had to take her life as well? Ada: God will punish you both dearly! Rot in hell. Death by hanging is what suits you both. Anonymous: Wait, first they said that they fled the hotel and left her there. Then next thing they said that they dumped her body in the mortuary. Abeg confirm this story. RIP Cynthia. Please, people should be more careful. How do you trust strangers anyhow? Gb09: Oh, my heart bleeds for this poor girl. May the good Lord grant her family the fortitude to bear this loss. I’m glad that the wheel of justice has been set in motion. Unfortunately, this girl cannot be brought back. Oh no: My God! What were they thinking about and to everyone who still say that Cynthia was a runs girl, hope you feel better now. The girl just wanted a really good deal. These were 23-year-old students. What could they possibly offer her? She was a hardworking chic and that’s all the sin she committed. Just so sad! Guzy: Holy Jesus and some terrible soul had already labelled her a murderer. May God forgive us the way we post comments condemning people. My dear, rest in peace. Ladies should also be careful about accepting guys they don’t know on facebook.

411: It’s terrible what people do to their fellow human being just for money. You killed the poor girl.

Anonymous: Facebook. Do people still believe people there? May they rot in hell. Bastards!!!!! Can’t believe such happened in Nigeria. Anonymous: So pathetic! I hope they will get the punishment they deserve for this. Anonymous: I am weak. What a wicked world! Thank God they have finally been caught. This can happen to anybody. I remember all our escapades then in the university. I still thank God for His mercies. Anonymous: These people are daredevils. How do you sleep with a gal for 12 hours? God, please, help girls of nowadays.

Anonymous: Eeeeh! Something is wrong here. The suspects said: ‘When we didn’t get any money from her, we tied her mouth and strangled her and then we abandoned her in the hotel and fled.’ Police: ‘When the suspected killers strangled Cynthia, they deposited her corpse at the mortuary of Isolo General Hospital in Lagos.’ How did they abandon her body in the hotel and at the same time deposit the corpse in a mortuary? Abeg let’s just leave this matter and let the poor girl R.I.P. Sad story and sure, one has to be careful on all social media platforms. Simple!! GEM: Shame on all who called her a ‘runs girl.’ She was just a simple trusting soul. The way we all were, at least once upon a time! Anonymous: These guys are so unbelievable. Why strangle after raping her? These guys should face firing squad straight. Anonymous: People are wicked. They will rot in hell. Anonymous: With this, can I say that Nigeria is a safe place? It was not her fault, but may her soul rest in perfect peace. And as for you who posted negative comments when she was missing, what do you have to say now? Anonymous: They should show their faces, not the backs of their coconut heads. Devilish sons of perdition! May they be maimed and suffer a worse fate than she did. In fact, they should be taken to the road and let the public

Cynthia and family set them on fire. Why didn’t they just rob her and spare the poor girl’s life? This is a note of warning to all of you that worship in the demonic altar of facebook. You better learn from this and remove all your personal information and your children’s pictures from this evil meaningless website called facebook.

cover your tracks. Foolish things, in this day and age of technology.

Anonymous: At last, all those saying she went for ‘runs’ can now see she went for business. RIP, my dear.

Lawyer: I pray that this is what the judge would say: ‘The judgment of this court upon you is that you be hanged by the neck until you are dead and may the Lord have mercy on your soul.’ Foolish people. This is going to be the end of your lives.

Anonymous; How come the suspects were quoted to have killed, abandoned and fled the hotel and they are still the ones that deposited her body at the mortuary? I’m confused. Anonymous; May God have mercy on us. Facebook na wa ooo. Ahdaisy Jayde: What a nightmare! I will keep saying this! This is the end time; things are only going to get worse for those who do not have Christ! Get born again and be saved! And girls, we need to be careful! No one is trustworthy. You can’t even trust yourself, not to talk of complete strangers. Yes, we can’t be too careful but first do everything possible you can to ensure you are on the safe side. Then listen to the Holy spirit.

Jummy: Heartless people. God will avenge her blood and make you worthless guys pay dearly. This is truly a painful lesson to we ladies. RIP, Cynthia.

Agora: You need to show the faces of the accused. Publish their faces, please. I feel this is not their first heinous crime. They need to be identified. The public need to see their faces and maybe come forward with information that can help the police in solving their past crimes. They seemed like seasoned killers and prolific criminals. Death penalty by hanging should be handed to them immediately. No forgiveness. If I were to be a family member of the lady they killed, I will have them hacked to death with machete in prison. What they did was evil and they deserve their place in everlasting hell.

Mimz: So, the 12-hour rape wasn’t enough for them. They still went ahead to strangle her. This world is indeed, wicked.

Anonymous: This report alone is conflicting. First, it was said that they killed her and fled the hotel. Later, it stated that they killed and dropped her in the mortuary. Which is which?

Anonymous: This is not parading. I only see the back of one beast head. I want to see their faces, all three of them. Wicked souls. Greedy bastards. Why kill her? Tell me why. Now you know God is not asleep because you were dumb assets. You could not even

Anonymous: Oh my God! I don’t know what to say, but this world is a very wicked place. Sex for 12 hours? God! These guys are heartless. RIP to her. Return, if possible.


66

SATURDAY SUN

August 25, 2012

Cover Story

CONTROVERSY OVER CHIDERA EZEKIE’S STUDENTSHIP From EMMANUEL UZOR, Onitsha

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s Mr. Chidera Ezekie, one of the two suspects in Cynthia’s murder, cools off in police cell, a controversy is brewing on his status as a student. While Anambra State University, said he is not a student of the school, some students say he is indeed, their course-mate, but hardly at school. Our checks at the Igbariam campus of the university, where Ezekie claimed he is a 400-level Accounting student, showed the suspect’s name missing in the list of final year students. All efforts made by our reporter, who was assisted by some staff of the Department of Accountancy, to get his name in official document was unsuccessful. The name was neither in the list of the 134 regular students nor in the 166 part-time students. However, some final year students in the department confirmed that Ezekie is their course-mate. They, however, said that he was never a serious student. One of the suspect’s supposed course-mates, simply identified as Anselm, confirmed that the suspect was in his class. the student, who identified the suspect through a photograph, further disclosed that Ezekie lives in Awka and attended lectures anytime he liked. On showing seeing Ezekie’s photograph, he said: “This is Chidera. What happened? Who are you because this is somebody’s profile you are probing into like this? I mean, is anything the matter? He is in my class, though he has not been a serious student; the much I knew about him is that he lived in Awka and attended lectures anytime and any day he liked. I don’t think he attended lectures more than two times this year.” When asked if he knew what the suspect was capable of

•He’s not our student – Anambra State varsity •He’s our course-mate – Students

The suspects doing, Anselm replied: “The much I know about him is that he used to attend lectures and I don’t know much about his private life because he was not always in school and it is impossible to know whether he had valid admission because we are just students and cannot know the full details or profile of others.” The Course Representative in Accountancy Department who also doubles as the traditional ruler of the University, Val, confirmed he used to see such face but could not give full information about the suspect. Val, who is the Igwe Gburugburu of Anambra State University, Igbariam Campus, said he could not vouch for the suspect, since he did not know much about him in the department. A female senior lecturer in Accountancy Department, who pleaded for anonymity, said: “We see a lot of faces, so it will

N200 AUGUST 26, 2012 •VOL. 6 NO. 487

Confession of a female kidnapper

How I lured Delta politician with sex

Lessons marital life taught me –Kefee

be difficult to say I know him.” She, however, said she had not seen or marked any scripts bearing Chidera Ezekie in the department since 2008 when he was supposed to have matriculated. All efforts to speak with the Vice Chancellor of the university, Prof. Fidelis Okafor, and Head of Department (HOD) Accountancy, Dr. Innocent Nwogu, simply identified as Parry by the students, proved abortive, as calls put through to the former’s mobile phone were not answered, while the latter was said to be hosting an International Conference for the Department. However, the Public Relations Officer (PRO) of the school, Mr. Emma Anakwue, dismissed the claims by the suspect that he is a student of the university. He said: “Such a person could not have been our student because ANSU is deeply rooted in discipline and our students cannot be criminals. Just as you found out from the department, the said name does not exist in our lists and can never exist. Anybody can answer student of any university. A murderer cannot come from our school and as such cannot use or drag the good image of the school through the mud. “We produce students that are well-trained and wellbehaved. He should face trials for any crime he committed. He is not our student.” The question still hangs: Is Chidera Ezekie a student of the university, as he claimed and confirmed by some students or is he not, as the authorities assert?

Charles Okah cries out from prison ...Put in solitary confinement, the embattled younger brother of Henry Okah, facing trial for the October 1, 2010 bombing, complains of denial of right to worship granted to Boko Haram inmates and other inhuman treatments. “It’s like being in a Nazi gas chamber.” Expect the details

North not ready for power –Ezeife You’re wicked –OPM Pastor tells church-run schools on high fees •Says there’s money in church

IT’S ANOTHER EXCITING PACKAGE


SATURDAY SUN

August 25 , 2012

67

Letter to Gov Fashola: ‘My ordeal in Lagos police station’

Fashola By ADE OSIJO

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our Excellency, I am writing to you as one of your admirers because of your passion for justice. I could recall that when you visited Apapa, during your rally/campaign for a second term in the company of your wife (Dame Abimbola Fashola), Mrs. Remi Tinubu (now senator), along with others, I stood for hours under the scorching sun listening to your lofty promises on your agenda for Lagos State. No one is in doubt about your altruistic mission and vision. May the Almighty give you the strength and wherewithal to do all that you have set out to do for Lagos State. As I am writing this letter to you, three days after my 18-hour detention on the orders of the Divisional Police Officer of the Apapa Police station, my wife has not stopped crying at intervals over what she considered as a miscarriage of justice by the DPO, Mr. Usman Ndankabo. He kept me incommunicado from friends and family members, who did not know my whereabouts for the 18 hours he kept me in a smelly, dark cell, with 19 other ‘innocent’ citizens. It all started on Wednesday, August 8, 2012. I had rushed to the police station to lodge a complaint involving a female tenant who had threatened to stab me with a kitchen knife an hour earlier. She was bold enough to walk up to my staircase in her bid to actualise her threat, ordering me to come down if I was man enough. I had wanted to call her bluff and damn the consequence; but suddenly I remembered my seven kids - coupled with the fact that dead men do not tell tales Therefore, when her rage subsided, I rushed into the car, and drove to the nearest police station (Apapa Police Station). After introducing myself to the DPO as a journalist, a clergy and a friend of the house, he beckoned to me to sit on a chair in front of his desk. On telling him about the gravity of the situation that brought me to the station, he ordered one of his subordinates to get me a sheet of paper to write my statement. I was so impressed and began to wonder if he was bent on surpassing the records of his two predecessors whom I hold in very high regard, (Messrs Mohammed (now Commander, Area B Police Command, and Mua’zu Mohammed, DPO, Festac Police

Manko Station). Little did I know that he was awaiting the arrival of my assailant’s husband who probably had gone to mobilize to fight his ‘battle.’ In a moment, my assailant’s husband, (a traffic officer with the Apapa Local Government), Mr. Samson Akogor walked in briskly, boasting that he would teach me a lesson. Within a few moment of exchanging pleasantries with the hitherto pleasant and dutiful (?) DPO, his countenance and comportment changed. On getting to know that the council staff was his friend, he asked me to discontinue with the statement I had been asked to write. He now ordered me to report the following day. I remonstrated, and later protested that it was absurd on his part, and expedient on my part to make a documented statement for official reasons. I also pleaded with him to invite the knife-wielding tenant for counselling or caution in future circumstances. Rather, I became more humiliated by the DPO when he walked me out, barking orders at me, and threatening to hit me, shouting:” You may report me to the Commissioner of Police or Gov Fashola, I don’t care…I say get out!” “I can be very temperamental,” he boasted. I protested still and he kept walking towards me, shouting and calling on his men to push me out. He started calling me unprintable names. Nostalgically, I began to wonder if this was not the same office, where I had met and cultivated great respect and friendship with his predecessors whose exemplary conduct compelled me to write a commendation letter addressed to the erstwhile Commissioner of Police, Mr. Marvel Akpoyibo, dated November 22, 2010, with a receipt and acknowledgement copy dated November 24, 2010. Getting home, I decided to write a petition to his superiors on what I consider as an assault on my person owing to the DPO’s shameful behaviour. The following day, I got a phone call from two female officers (Inspectors Toyin and Mrs. Martha), asking me to come for an amicable settlement with the DPO who I claimed was rude to me the previous day. Inspector Martha apologised profusely and asked me to jettison the idea of reporting the DPO to his superiors at the AIG’s office in Onikan,

Lagos. In the course of my visit, Inspector Martha snatched the file I was carrying containing the petition on her boss, the DPO. She made me to give her my word that I would not go further with the matter. There and then, I gave her my word that it was over. Thirty minutes after my arrival, I waited in vain for the proposed reconciliatory meeting with the DPO to take place. Little did I know that Inspector Martha and others were perfecting strategies and a satanic agenda, aimed at making me spend 18 hours without food or water in a dark police cell. I was not allowed to call my wife. My phone was confiscated, my pair of leather slippers were confiscated and my recommended glasses. I thought all was a rude joke and a form of intimidation until a corporal at the counter ordered me to take off my shirt. Incredible! I shouted. I was woken up from my slumber when a junior officer shoved me and marched me into the dark cell, laughing at my skinny chest and taunting me that I do not even have a potbelly with my status as a landlord/journalist/prophet. Your Excellency, behold, the complainant was now made to look like the accused. I juggled my memory to search for the definition of justice. I shook my head in disbelief and tears began to well in my eyes. But I wept later that night owing to the plight of fellow citizens (about 19 in all who took their turn to narrate their plight and helplessness to me). Before narrating the plight of these helpless and traumatized folks, deprived and denied justice and access to lawyers, I deem it imperative to give more facts on the genesis of the rift with my tenant, Mr. Samson Akogor and his wife, Cecilia. I served Mr. Akogor notice to vacate his apartment three months ago owing to his excesses bordering on how he had physically assaulted me once in October last year. Since then he had been threatening to use thugs in Ajegunle to teach me a lesson. In my desire to keep out of his way, I wrote to him and other tenants he had been inciting on payment of PHCN’s monthly bills, to opt out of my line. I advised them to go to the PHCN’s office to ask for connection or a private meter. Three other tenants have complied, but Akogor bluntly refused despite a one-week grace. Based on the advice from PHCN officials that

I have the powers and their backing to disconnect the troublesome tenant from my personal line, I had to. But before the expiration of the one-week grace given to him, I had served the Area Commander Apapa Police station and his subordinate (the DPO), two days earlier with no word from their end. Also, two days earlier, I had taken a petition to the office of the Hon. Commissioner of Police, Lagos State, Mr. Umar Manko, bordering on the harassment and incessant threat to my life and family by Mr. Akogor. Back to the tales by the inmates: Mr. Dele Omosola and his 33-year-old-wife, Elizabeth, kept in the same cell, “over a misunderstanding arising from a business deal with a powerful man.” According to the couple, the powerful man had taken Elizabeth to the State Security Service cell, where she was kept for days before being brought to Apapa Police Station (in handcuffs), as a result of a business transaction involving her husband. The man was given about N650, 000 to import a car from Spain. Without taking enough time to verify the authenticity of the documents of the vehicle and the clearing papers, the owner of the car claimed that the papers were fake. After raining blows on her husband with slaps, and after making them spend days in detention, he realized that the papers were not fake after all. Case two: Twenty-four-year-old Abiodun Azeez, who was arrested by OPC men and brought to Apapa Police Station, owing to his past role in armed robbery with a gang that speacialised in using motor bikes for robbery. According to him, he had called it quits with the gang a year ago, before he was arrested. He confided in me that he was being asked to raise some money before regaining his freedom. There is also the case of a Canada returnee (John), who had a business deal with a Deputy Commissioner of Police who gave him money to import a tipper two years ago. According to him, the money was not remitted to him; but he had taken responsibility and had told the powerful boss that he was in town to offset the cost. His passport, green card and other important documents are presently with the police. I could go on with tales of those charged with late night wandering on return from their respective working places. In all the aforementioned cases and mine, no one is allowed access to any lawyer. Even when I requested that my case be charged to court, I was told to shut up. And when my wife and a friend got to know about my plight, they were being asked to cough out huge sums for my bail. When I protested, one of the officers threatened that he would make sure I cleaned up the two toilets before regaining my freedom. I protested loudly. He now asked his colleagues to let “the poor troublesome journalist get out.” Inside the Apapa Police Station, very few cases get to the court because there are ‘judges’ and ‘magistrates’ there too. Sir, I am not asking for any form of compensation. All I want is your intervention because I could have been killed and dumped in a mass grave like a criminal: since I was not allowed to contact my family before being thrown into a cell. I could also have been sent to Kirikiri prisons on a trumped-up charge of armed robbery. I am yet to overcome the trauma I went through in your Centre of Excellence (and justice). At the moment, I do not feel safe. Please, save my soul. I have been told to cry out as a way of preventing a re-occurrence. I felt like committing suicide on my release. The council staff has been going about bragging that he locked me up in a cell for a whole day. Where can the man in the street run to for justice? Can one really call the Nigerian Police a friend? I weep for Nigeria. I weep for Lagos. • Osijo is founder, Time With God Ministries International, Apapa, Lagos. adeosijo@yahoo.com


68

August 25, 2012

SATURDAY SUN

Sports SATURDAY SUN

FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup

Falconets fight Italy for q-final ticket

By EMMA NJOKU

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Chief Faneye

Abesan Dareta Cup sponsor tells Ikedia, Taiwo…

igeria’s Under-20 women team, the Falconets, will early tomorrow morning, engage its Italian counterpart in a crucial match to decide the two teams that will progress from the group to the quarterfinals at the ongoing FIFA Under-20 Women’s World Cup in Japan. The Nigerian girls currently top Group B with four points from their two previous games. They played 2–0 against Korea and 1–1 against Brazil. A draw tomorrow will see the Edwin Okon-tutored girls to the last eight, but a 3–0 loss may end the dream of the team at the World Cup, especially if the match between North Korea and Brazil ends in victory for either side. North Korea is second with three points, Brazil third with two points, while Italy has a point to place fourth in the group at the moment. Meanwhile, Nigeria Football Federation (NFF) President, Alhaji Aminu Maigari, has charged the Falconets to play aggressively with total determi-

nation during tomorrow’s clash with Italy in Kobe. “Our girls did well against Korea Republic to earn the three points and should be credited for coming out with a point in their clash against Brazil. These are big names in women’s football, but the truth is that we stopped playing after one hour against Brazil and allowed them to come at us and piled up the pressure. In football, you don’t do that. “Definitely, against Italy, we have to go all out and keep frisking for the whole of 90 minutes,” the NFF president said. The match will kick off at 8.20 a.m. Nigerian time.

Oparanozie

Give me photographs, Clubs to submit autographed jerseys to NPL jerseys, not money T ...As APFON’s AGM, Captains seminar hold in Ibadan

By EMMA NJOKU

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or more than a decade, Chief Dare Faneye has sponsored Abesan Cup, a grassroots football competition that has produced notable stars like Pius Ikedia, Taye Taiwo and Mutiu Adegoke among others. But unlike the familiar Biblical account of the 10 lepers that were healed by Jesus Christ, out of which only one returned to express gratitude, none of the players discovered from the Abesan Cup Tournament has bothered to say 'thank you' to the man that provided them with a platform to showcase their talent, let alone render any form of support to the tournament that brought them to limelight. “To be frank with you, since players like Taye Taiwo and Pius Ikedia played in this competition and became stars, I have not set my eyes on them again. I doubt if they can still recognise me if they see my face now,” Chief Faneye disclosed in a recent chat with Saturday Sunsports. “The truth is that most of them, if not all the players that have played in this competition, don't even know me. None of them has come to ask me my name. They just come, play in the competition, collect the prize money and the trophy and off they go. But I am not complaining.” Although some of the players discovered from Abesan Cup

competition are millionaires today, Faneye said he does not expect money from them, but would value very much gift items like autographs, pictures and jerseys from the players. “Sincerely speaking, I would appreciate it much if any of them could come and present an autograph, picture or team jersey to me. If only in the course of writing the history of their football career, they mention my name or the fact that they started their career from this competition, I would be glad. I'm not asking them to give me money. Though I've yet to benefit from my sponsorship of this competition since its inception.” In spite of the fact that he has not received any financial support or encouragement from any local or state government, Faneye has vowed to continue to sponsor the competition as long as he lives. “At the last awards organised by African Independent Television (AIT) in Abuja, I recall that Abesan Competition was the runner-up in the Grassroots Football Development Award Category. That, for me, was encouraging. It gladdened my heart. I think we came second behind Pepsi Football Academy. “For organising a competition that is so recognised, I think I'm happy. Besides that, I have not received any support from any government, be it from the local or state governments. But I hope

to continue to sponsor the competition with my God-given resources as long as I live. It

always gives me joy to provide an avenue for the youths to pursue their dreams in football,” he stated. 2013 Nations Cup qualifier

Keshi lists Yobo, Emenike, 9 other foreign pros for Liberia

S

uper Eagles’ Head Coach, Stephen Keshi, has called up skipper, Joseph Yobo and Russian-based powerplaying forward, Emmanuel Emenike, as well as nine other overseas-based players for next month’s final 2013 African Cup of Nations qualifying match against Liberia in Monrovia. Also listed are goalkeeper, Vincent Enyeama, defenders, Efe Ambrose and Elderson Echiejile, midfielder, Obiora Nwankwo and forwards, Victor Moses, Ahmed Musa and Ikechukwu Uche. Midfielder, Nosa Igiebor and in-form marksman, Brown Ideye, complete the list of 11 players who will team up with the home-based players that played a 0-0 draw with the Mena of Niger in an international friendly in Niamey last week.

Full list of invited foreign-based players Goalkeeper: Vincent Enyeama (Maccabi Tel Aviv,

Israel). Defenders: Joseph Yobo (Fenerbahce, Turkey), Efe Ambrose (Ashdod FC, Israel), Elderson Echiejile (Sporting Braga, Portugal). Midfielders and forwards: Nosa Igiebor (Real Betis, Spain), Obiora Nwankwo (Calcio Padova, Italy), Victor Moses (Wigan Athletic, England), Ahmed Musa (CSKA Moscow, Russia), Ikechukwu Uche (Villarreal, Spain), Emmanuel Emenike (Spartak Moscow, Russia), Brown Ideye (Dynamo Kyiv, Ukraine). English Premiership Fixtures Today Swansea City v West Ham Utd Sunderland v Reading Southampton v Wigan Athletic Norwich City v Queens Park Rangers Man Utd v Fulham Tottenham v West Brom Aston Villa v Everton Tomorrow Chelsea v Newcastle Stoke City v Arsenal Liverpool v Man City.

he management of Nigeria Premier League (NPL) has requested all the clubs in the Premier League to, as a matter of urgency, submit a jersey each with the autograph of all their registered players on the jersey. Head, IT Unit of the league management board, Abubakar Abdulaziz, who signed the letter dated August 23, 2012 on behalf of the Executive Secretary, Tunji Babalola, which was sent to all the club chairmen, stated that the request was at the instance of Supersport, the official Television Rights holder of the league. He explained that the jerseys would be used by Supersport to boost and project the image of the various clubs and the Nigerian League at large.

All the clubs are, therefore, requested to comply with the directive with the urgency it deserves. Meanwhile , the Association of Professional Footballers of Nigeria (APFON) will hold its 4th Annual General Meeting (AGM) and the 3rd Football Captains’ Seminar in Ibadan on Tuesday, September 4, 2012. The event, scheduled to take place at Kankafo Guest Inn in the Africa’s largest city, will start by 11am. Head of Competitions of the Nigeria Premier League (NPL), Auwalu Jada, who communicated all the Premier League clubs about the event through a letter he signed on behalf of the Executive Secretary of NPL, Tunji Babalola, directed the clubs to sponsor their captains and secretaries to the seminar and AGM respectively.

Akanni loses mother

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lhaja Muslimot Akanni, mother of former junior international, Waidi Akanni has passed on at the age 76. Akanni said his loving mother died yesterday morning and has since been buried according to Islamic rites. According to the former Lagos State Football Association, LSFA, boss, the eight days prayer for the late mother will be held at her residence, No. 10, Hogan Bassey

Road, Surulere, Lagos next Friday. “I did not expect this at this period of time but I have to thank the Almighty Allah for the life well spent by my mother. I can only pray for the repose of her” Akanni said. Meanwhile, some former Super Eagles players including Henry Nwosu, Victor Ikpeba, Samson Siasia among others have called their former teammate to commiserate with him over the death of his mother.


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LEAGUEUNLIMITED ...with EMMA NJOKU 08059423225 Ahead tomorrow's Federation Cup final

Heartland, Lobi Stars in war of words

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up holder, Heartland FC of Owerri and former champion, Lobi Stars of Makurdi, have been talking tough ahead of tomorrow's epic Federation Cup final billed for the main bowl of Teslim Balogun Stadium in Lagos. Captain of Heartland, Chinedu Efugh, believes that Lobi Stars won't be as difficult as National League side, Prime FC, which stretched his team into penalty shootouts in their semifinal match. “Lobi Stars won't be difficult for us to handle because we understand them very well. I see us winning the Federation Cup again in Lagos. Prime proved very difficult in the semi-final because they are not a Premier League side and we did not know them that much. That was why the game dragged into penalties,” Efugh explained. “We may not be enjoying the best of motivation at the moment, but we are determined to successfully defend the trophy we won last year,” he added. But the Vice Chairman and Technical Adviser of Lobi Stars, Dominic Iorfa, on his part, enthused: “As far as I'm concerned, we played the final of this year's Federation Cup

against Kano Pillars in Calabar on Wednesday. So, for us, (tomorrow's) match would be a mere formality. This year is for Lobi Stars and Heartland cannot stop us.

“We have beaten all the big teams in Nigeria this season on neutral grounds. I'm happy that tomorrow's match would be played on a neutral ground and

everybody would be there to watch the epic encounter. “I can only enjoin footballloving Nigerians to come and watch an exciting Federation

Cup final match (tomorrow),” the former BCC Lions' striker added. “We are going into Sunday's (tomorrow) final with increased

confidence and determination with only one thing in our minds - to retain the title we won last year” the Heartland captain stated.

Ejiogu eyes 6th FA Cup title

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oalkeeper Chijioke Ejiogu is in a touching distance for his sixth Federation Cup (formerly FA Cup) glory, as he looks to file out with Heartland FC of Owerri against Lobi Stars of Makurdi tomorrow inside the main bowl of the Teslim Balogun Stadium in Lagos. The seasoned FA Cup campaigner, whose astonishing goalkeeping ability earned him the nickname, Arugo Monkey, had featured in five finals of the Federation Cup, winning all. He was between the goalposts for Julius Berger FC of Lagos in its 3-0 thrashing of Yobe Desert Stars in the final of the 2002 edition at the National Stadium in Lagos. He helped Dolphins to triumph in three finals, including the 1-0 victory against Enugu Rangers International in 2004, 2006 and 2007 against Bendel Insurance and again Enugu Rangers respectively.

Interestingly, the last two games ended on penalties after scores at full time and regulation time stood at 2-2 and 1-1 respectively. On each occasion, Ejiogu showed why he is called Arugo Monkey by pulling fantastic saves during the penalty shootouts. The former Dolphins' safest hands frustrated ambitious Prime FC of Osogbo in the semi-finals of this year's edition, when he caught the first penalty kick of Prime FC to send jitters down the spines of

Ejiogu

the rest of the players of the Osogbo side. Ejiogu's last triumph in the Federation Cup was in 2009, when he guided Enyimba International of Aba to its second Federation Cup title. Tomorrow, the Imo Stateborn goal tender will seek to

help Heartland to retain the trophy it won last year at the same venue. “We don't wish that the match should drag into penalties, but if it does, I will do my best to stop one or two shots to help my team retain the trophy we won last year,” Ejiogu had

said. “I have featured in five finals of the Federation Cup and won all. By the grace of God (tomorrow's) final will not be different. “We want to win the trophy for the Imo State Governor, Owelle Rochas Okorocha,” he enthused.

Federation Cup final

NPL top sides throw weight behind Lobi

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eartland may not be enjoying the support of other top Nigeria Premier League sides, as it faces Lobi Stars in tomorrow’s Federation Cup final in Lagos, no thanks to the quest for next season’s continental tickets. Officials of the Owerri side disclosed yesterday that they have uncovered a plot that would see supporters of the clubs that are in contention for the league shield queuing

•We’re not bothered - Heartland behind Lobi, ostensibly because a Lobi win would see one of them picking up one of the nation’s CAF club football tickets for the 2013 soccer season. A top official of Heartland, who does not want his name in print, said one of the clubs from the south-east has gone the extra mile in mobilising its fans for Lobi ahead of tomorrow’s final at the Teslim Balogun Stadium. He pointed out that if

Heartland wins the final, it means that Lobi would fight with the last drop of its blood for a continental ticket via the league. The Makurdi side would, on the other hand, have been guaranteed a continental ticket if it smiles home with the trophy tomorrow, a situation that would equally see the club that finishes fourth on the league table to also pick up a continental ticket.


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August 25, 2012


SATURDAY SUN,

THE KALU LEADERSHIP SERIES

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August 25, 2012

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OrjiUzorKalu Former governor of Abia State e-mail: okalu@orjikalu.com

That doomsday prediction

ince the sudden doomsday prediction by an American diplomat, John Negroponte, sometime in 2010 that Nigeria would disintegrate in 2015 if care was not taken, things have never been the same again with Nigeria. In fact, life has become brutish, wild, and unpredictable since then. When the prediction was made, some people took it with a pinch of salt, while some others described it as alarmist, and called for Negroponte’s head. What those criticizing Negroponte did not probably take into consideration was that the signs were already in the horizon, which actually prompted the prediction, in the first place. John Negroponte, popularly called the “last of the Ambassadors” by Lieberman, is well known for his absolutist positions. It would be recalled that by the time the prediction was made, Nigeria was already on the brink of crisis of divergent magnitudes. First was the Niger Delta question, which was already at its peak before President Umaru Musa Yar’Adua died. The tension in the Niger Delta Region, coupled with the simmering political crises that characterised every facet of our national life, was also a factor. Remember that a former United States Ambassador to Nigeria, Mr. John Campbell, had made a similar prediction for which he was roundly condemned. The Ambassador was advised by the government of the day in Nigeria to go and mind his business and leave Nigerians alone to manage their own problems. The reaction of the government to the predictions by the former diplomats was totally not surprising. It followed a familiar pattern of ‘attack as a form of defence’. This strategy had been applied by the government at various times in the past in shielding itself from public scrutiny and deserved criticisms. The same government, however, failed to appreciate the fact that making oneself available for objective criticisms keeps one on one’s toes and makes one a better person. Leaders that are intolerant of criticisms end up worse than they were when they assumed office. And so it was with the government of Nigeria, which applied every tool of propaganda at its disposal to defend itself, even though unjustifiably. The 2011 general elections, nevertheless, triggered off the process that is about to give credence to the predictions of the diplomat. The level of violence that followed the announcement of the result of the presidential election was unprecedented in the annals of our nation. Though restricted to the North, its spontaneity was somewhat baffling. It was three days of violence and bloodletting across the North. I wonder if the country has ever had any respite thereafter. Many believe that what followed the three-day violent protests by some youths in the north has been a systemic design to cause disaffection among northerners against the administration of President Goodluck Jonathan. The twinbombing in Abuja on October 1, 2010, allegedly masterminded by Henry Okar, also points to this systemic plot to torpedo the government. In any case, what is happening all over the country, especially in the North, where violence has been taken to a dangerous level, can only lead ultimately to anarchy and disintegration, if not promptly quelled! Those sweeping the matter under the carpet do not appreciate the immensity of the animosity that is seething in the North. Some analysts have vainly pointed to the cause of the debilitating security flaws across the country to religion, while others blame it on politics. I am sure there are those who believe it is neither caused by religion nor politics. Then what is the cause? To find the right answers to this question, there is need to revisit the predictions of the two American diplomats. It is not reasonable at all to dump their predictions or dismiss them with a wave of the hand. All over the world, the practice is for such sensitive information to be properly investigated to ascertain its veracity or otherwise. And if found to be true then measures are put in place, working collaboratively with the source of the information, to proffer solutions. In the present circumstance, we dismissed the allegations ever before they could be investigated. It is not impossible that the diplomats must have had incontrovertible evidence to support their predictions, because their utterances were weighty, not outlandish. By condemning them without first knowing the truth has set us against them, thereby creating an undue disaffection between them and us. It will, no doubt, be difficult to court their friendship as easily as we would have done if we had not antagonized them. Again, being very doubtful of our real intention, they might hold us in suspicion. All the same, there is still need to try and reach them to solicit their cooperation in our concerted effort to nip the problem in the bud.

stakeholders in the Nigerian Project played to avert the threat of disintegration?” This question has become necessary, considering the inflammatory statements attributed to some of them. Let me quickly point out that I have nothing against them speaking their minds on issues of national importance. However, it is important that they weigh the likely impact of their utterances on the peace, unity and stability of Nigeria. From my assessment, the situation has reached such a point that the President should take the bull by the horns and restore order. I know he is working hard to transform the country, but that can only yield the desired result in an atmosphere devoid of rancour and violence. It is generally believed that he has refused to take drastic measures to deal with the security challenges confronting his administration for fear that innocent lives might be lost. That is okay. But as the President and Commanderin-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, it behoves him to protect the lives and property entrusted to his care, no matter whatever sacrifice it will take to do so. Nobody cares much how he goes about to achieve this onerous goal of government. What every right-thinking Nigerian is bothered about is security of lives and property. The President should know that whichever way the pendulum swings, lives must be lost. Okay, now that he has refused to come down decisively on those that cause the breach of the peace, are lives not being lost on a daily basis? Indeed, there is no day that passes without reported cases of killings around the country. It has reached a stage that life is worth nothing again. Jonathan It will be a great tragedy should the President allow Nigeria to collapse under his watch. Though he has continually In doing this, we should jettison our ego, and do what is assured us that nothing of such would happen, we need to needful to save our nation from its toward into self-destrucsee concrete things on ground to support it. It was reported tion. the other day that Damaturu, the Yobe State capital, had now Let me at this juncture make it clear that all the noise by become a ghost town as residents had deserted it for dear the various geo-ethnic groups that make up the Nigerian life. Is that not an ominous sign? Is it when the entire state is nationhood that they can survive without the other groups is nothing but balderdash. Those that make this assertion do so overrun by militants that the government would know that out of sheer ignorance, not really out of informed conviction. there is fire on the mountain? The North West Zone (except Looking critically at the composition of the various ethnic Zamfara State) that used to enjoy relative peace from religroups that make up Nigeria reveals an interesting pattern: a gious extremists has now turned into a killing field. corollary between one group and another. This is why it was Residents live in total fear of being attacked and killed. The South is not an Eldorado either as kidnappers, armed difficult to break up Nigeria by the civil war of 1967-1970. robbers and other miscreants hold it in the jugular. Imagine a Instead of disintegrating Nigeria emerged from it stronger situation where a woman was kidnapped and buried alive by and more united, despite our manifest differences. By working together to found the Nigerian nationhood our a lone assailant in Delta State! There were also cases in the past when some persons had been kidnapped, ransoms paid, forbears knew the importance of unity in diversity and the and yet they were killed. This type of incident is simply outvalue of collaboration. There was no way they would have rageous and intolerable. been able to win independence for Nigeria if they had What the president should do is to meditate deeply on the worked at cross-purpose. Instead they amalgamated their ugly spectres happening across the country and take drastic strengths and ingenuities to build a strong platform for the steps to curtail them. He should seek independent advice existence and survival of Nigeria. So, when one hears “one from selfless Nigerians on the way forward. I am sure the nation, one destiny’, it is not a fluke. It a strong affirmation of our collective belief in the existence of one, united indivis- President is naturally desirous to see the nation return to the path of peace and development. And this is why we expect ible nation, founded on truth and love. him to follow up this desire with action. Let us tell one My belief that the sovereignty of Nigeria is sacrosanct is another the truth: the way things are going, it will not be long purely an individual, patriotic opinion, but fired by an inner before the evil ones succeed in their wicked plots. Evil sense of love for Nigeria. That I believe that Nigeria is too united to disintegrate does not also mean that it cannot break thrives where there is inaction; when good men and women fail to do something. Why should we fold our arms and up if the environment is created for it to take place. I am watch a few disgruntled persons toy with our collective desworried that some surreptitious forces are working against tiny? the continued existence of Nigeria as a corporate entity. The Those perpetrating trouble all over the country should signs, as I stated in the beginning of this piece, loom menacpause and ask questions about what caused the wars in ingly in the horizon. This is not the first time I have drawn attention to the inse- Somalia, Rwanda and Burundi. We should not allow our nation to go through the same experience – it is not a tea curity in the country and the subsequent threat to its peace party. Allowing peace to reign is a better option. War causes and stability. Why I have decided to do another piece on the massive loss of human lives, destruction of property and dismatter is because of the evolving perilous signs I see everywhere, and the need to make Nigerians understand the gravi- placement of persons who are later afflicted with poverty, malnutrition and diseases, then death. In peace, we can build ty of what lies ahead should they allow the country to be a nation where progress and prosperity will interface to gendestroyed by wicked forces. erate better life for the people. I read the other day a statement attributed to the national The President and, indeed, all Nigerians must take seriousleader of the O’dua Peoples’ Congress (OPC), Dr. Frederick ly the warning that Nigeria could disintegrate on or before Fasehun, in one of the national dailies (not The Sun) that 2015 seriously by taking pragmatic steps to forestall it. Nigeria might break up before 2015. When people of his ilk The ominous signs are everywhere. I can see them clearly. speak they should be taken seriously. But beyond the fear of I am sure you do too. disintegration, lies another question: “What role have the


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THAT DOOMSDAY PREDICTION August 25, 2012 Vol.9 No.504

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FIASCOLYMPICS! PressClips BY MIKE AWOYINFA mikeawoyinfa@gmail.com 08051271177 (SMS only)

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ast week, I wrote a piece titled ‘Oh, what a fiasco!’ And I was deluged with letters upon letters from readers who shared their own thoughts about Nigeria’s Fiascolympics! Here are some of your letters. And thank you all for wishing me well on my 60th birthday. To my younger readers, I pray that you will all clock 60 and even celebrate extra more years as bonus. You will not die in your youth. You will not be victim of their bomb blast or suffer any accidental hit. You will not die untimely death until your mission on earth is fulfilled. Fiasco will not be your portion. Go out this week and prosper, in Jesus’ name: *** I agree with you my compatriot that we should go to the drawing board, but to me, not only on the Olympics, which is an infinitesimal part of Nigeria’s problems, but to the whole gamut and myriad of the nation’s debilitating problems. P.L. Osuagwu, 08093912933 Our team simply went to see the Queen. Nothing more. The nations that prepared for the Olympics got what they wanted. Pastor Livy Onyenegecha, Mbaise I want to say a very big thank you for using your column as a medium to challenge Nigerian youths. I do hope a good number of youths read it and turn over a new leaf. It’s better late than never. God bless you, sir. Peter Chukwuma. Sent by email

Nigeria is a country with black population. In fact, the most populous black country. So, how tiny black countries like Jamaica and Trinidad and Tobago are able to produce great athletes that win Olympic medals? Is it not the same blood flowing in our veins? Is our own blood counterfeit? Something must be wrong with us. Onyedichukwu Ike, 08155282975 Oh, what a fiasco! is the bitter truth, a reflection of recent happenings in our nation and the depth we have fallen. Egedegu Maxwell Yours is a new, different, creative and latest style of writing: a social crusader. But would they listen to your sermons? Dire Adarsbierin-Oba, Creative Arts Department, Unilag Your piece on Fiasco was a motivational talk. I entirely agree with you on everything you discussed. I will apply the Olympic message to my own life and plan to succeed in life. Any negative plan to stop my progress in life must surely end in fiasco. Elek Wachi, Enugu. 08052377893 Are you surprised that Nigeria didn’t win a medal? The problem is with our leadership. I blame President Goodluck Jonathan. Solomon U.C. Okezie Everybody seems to be complaining but nobody is asking the right questions. Chukwudi Iheanacho, Lagos

What the readers say Why should we not fail? Olympics is for serious people and no bribe is required for medals. Anyway, we went with enough condoms. Ken Uba, Ozubulu, Anambra State 08182362977 Thanks for making me see that I don’t need to be an athlete to win an Olympic medal but the medal of life. 08038680909 I will join you in watching the local league as from now. B.S. Mamalosho, Ilorin 08155779017 Mike, all the time we are at the drawing board. Hand no dey pain una? This is time for action. Mitchel Eze, Nnewi Enough of going to the drawing board. What we need is a new orientation of our public office holder to shun corruption because it has remained the bane of sports and other aspects of our national life. Paul Ndukauba, 08064100272 Nigeria is a nation of fraud. We want to reap where we didn’t sow. We want medals. What did we give? Nothing good comes cheap. We want medals, we prepare for it. Dan Idowu, 08051285351 Your piece on fiasco was a wake-up call indeed for me. Keep on advising us your children. And keep up the good work. Olayemi Olaoluwa, Oshodi, 08103887179

How do you expect a republic of corruption to produce medals? Where has it ever been done? Chris, 07067515592 My quarrel is that each time we talk about going back to the drawing board. Is there still space on the board for serial failures like Nigeria? Mike Nzeagwu, Ikeja, 08033291415

Your piece on Fiasco brought tears into my eyes. We have fallen, we have failed, we are unable to rise. We need God’s intervention to restore us to past glory. Ntui, Calabar, 07035104469 Unlike your counterparts in the print media whose stock-in-trade is endless lamentation, you proffer solution that will restore the lost glory of our dear nation. Idris, Kano, 08030583696 A country where no opposition party can win presidential election until after 150 years cannot win anything in the Olympics. Comrade Fred Kabongo, 07038772272 Our outing is a reflection of the rot in the country. Is it the epileptic power supply, poor road network, high level of insecurity or the level of corruption? There is no cheering news in Nigeria today other than bad news. God save us. Ibrahim K. 08078151817 We went to London 2012 with billions of naira and came back with nothing. Truly, it’s a big shame. We only succeeded in internationalizing failure. We are among the failed nations. Yes, there is still hope, but not with this PDP in power. These people are leading us nowhere, except backwards. Alfred Okoye, Ibafo, 080277731477 A big amen to your prayer on fiasco, Archbishop Mike. May God grant the prayer on fiasco, then Nigeria will begin to win Olympic gold in all areas of positive life endeavours. I missed your 60th birthday anniversary party. I join friends and wellwishers like Gov. Fashola in praying that your pen continues to flow for a very long time to come. Moses, 08036274646 Uncle Mike, they said when the head of a fish is rotten, then the entire body is beyond redemption. I wasn’t expecting gold, silver nor bronze from our overbloated Olympic bound sportsmen. But as a loyal and patriotic Nigerian, I at least expected either copper or iron from our athletes. But they won us nothing. Nath Ruskin Georgewill, Lagos, 08033426298

Oh, what a fiasco! was a graphic exposition of the abysmal failure that has been the lot of Nigeria. Akinye Rufus, Okititipupa, 08059252765

Haba egbon, that was a cheap, low punch you threw at D’Tigers. Our basketball team went there for the first time and did well considering the class of the opposition they faced. Utibe Uko, Lagos, 08023421364

Maybe we should advocate the introduction of kidnapping and 419 as part of the Olympics, so that Nigeria can win gold, silver and bronze. 08034618829

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Sun News - August 25, 2012