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Living Here A product of

July 23, 2017

SARA JOHNSON BORTON President and Publisher BERNIE HELLER Vice President of Advertising REBEKAH LEWIS HALL Special Projects Coordinator .............................................

About this section

So you’ve moved to the Midlands! We have everything you need to know about making yourself at home here, from the logistics of moving and settling in, to finding the fun. .............................................

On the cover

Staff Sgt. Matt Wesley walks with his daughter Harper Wesley during Fort Jackson’s centennial celebration June 3. Photo by Sean Rayford for The State. .............................................

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3D

GETTING SETTLED TRANSPORTATION VEHICLE REGISTRATION New residents of South Carolina have up to 90 days to renew their driver’s licenses and up to 45 days to transfer vehicle registrations. You’ll need proof of identity, U.S. citizenship and date of birth, proof of Social Security number, and two proofs of current physical address. Temporary residents – like military personnel and college students – are not required to obtain a South Carolina driver’s license. Before you can register your vehicle in South Carolina, you must pay the vehicle property taxes required in your county. You’ll also be required to pay an Infrastructure Maintenance Fee, $250 per vehicle, and title and registration fees. See www.scdmvonline.com/fees. To pay property taxes on your vehicle, take your registration and your driver’s license (with your new address) to the county auditor’s office. Lexington County Auditor’s Office: 212 S. Lake Drive, Suite 103, Lexington. 803-785-8181. Richland County Auditor’s Office: 2020 Hampton St., Suite 2067, Columbia. 803-576-2605; rcauditor@rcgov.us. DMV LOCATIONS Batesburg: 509 Liberty St., Batesburg. 803-532-5285. Blythewood: 10311 Wilson Blvd., Blythewood. 803-896-9983. Columbia: 1630 Shop Road, Columbia. 803-737-8350. Columbia: 228-A O’Neil Court, Columbia. 803-419-9403. Irmo-Ballentine: 1016 Broad Stone Road, Irmo. 803-749-9041.

THE STATE file photo

Effective earlier this year, drivers registering a car in South Carolina must pay an Infrastructure Maintenance Fee, which is $250 per vehicle, as well as title and registration fees.

Lexington: 122 Park Road, Lexington. 803-356-8537. AIRPORTS The Columbia Metropolitan Airport (CAE): 3250 Airport Blvd., West Columbia; 803-822-5025; https://columbiaairport.com; info@columbiaairport.com. Jim Hamilton-L.B. Owens Airport: 1400 Jim Hamilton Blvd., Columbia; 803-771-7915; www.flykcub.com. BUSES The COMET serves Columbia and some surrounding communities. Standard one-way fares are $1.50, with discounts for special needs, seniors and Medicare recipients. Chil-

dren 5 and younger ride free. All-day, multiday and multiride passes available at the Transit Center, 1745 Sumter St. catchthecomet.org. Megabus offers routes from Columbia to Atlanta; Durham, North Carolina; Fayetteville, North Carolina; New York; Philadelphia; Richmond, Virginia; and Washington. Buses leave from the Sumter Street Transit Station, 1780 Sumter St., Columbia. us.megabus.com. Greyhound buses leave from Columbia Bus Station, 710-A Buckner Road, Columbia. 803-256-6465; greyhound.com. TRAINS Amtrak trains leave from 850 Pulaski St., Columbia. www.amtrak.com.

GETTING SETTLED POST OFFICES BALLENTINE 1720 Dutch Fork Road, Suite A. BLYTHEWOOD 401 McNulty St. CAYCE-WEST COLUMBIA 1535 Platt Springs Road. CHAPIN 1249 Chapin Road. COLUMBIA Capitol: 1233 Marion St. Columbia: 1601 Assembly St.

LEXINGTON Downtown: 710 W. Main St. Lexington: 1830 S. Lake Drive.

Dutch Fork: 1120 Briargate Circle. Eau Claire: 4026 Lamar St. Edgewood: 2638 Two Notch Road, Suite 112. Five Points: 2108 Greene St. Forest Acres: 4840 Forest Drive. Fort Jackson: 4350 Magruder Ave. Leesburg: 7406 Garners Ferry Road. Northeast: 8505 Two Notch Road. Sandhills: 1805 Clemson Road.

GADSDEN 7731 Bluff Road.

HOPKINS 6200 Lower Richland Blvd.

SWANSEA 295 S. Church St.

EASTOVER 301 Main St.

IRMO 7821 St. Andrews Road.

WHITE ROCK 1947 Dutch Fork Road.

GASTON 220 S. Main St. GILBERT 401 Broad St.

PELION 739 Pine St. STATE PARK 20 Hinton St.


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GETTING SETTLED UTILITIES TELEVISION, INTERNET AND LANDLINE TELEPHONE SERVICES

ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS Mid-Carolina Electric Cooperative serves parts of Richland and Lexington counties near Lake Murray. Customer service: 803-7496400. Report outages: 803-7496444. Office locations at 254 Longs Pond Road, Lexington, and 7524 Broad River Road, Irmo. www.mce coop.com. South Carolina Electric & Gas serves most of Richland and Lexington counties. To start service, fill out a form online at www.sceg.com/for-my-home/ start-my-service, or call 1-800251-7234. Report outages on the website or 1-888-333-4465, downed or sparking lines; 1-800-815-0083, gas outages or leaks; 1-800-251-7234, street light or other outdoor light. Office locations in Richland County: 5110 Fairfield Road, 1213 Flora St., Columbia; 7748 Garners Ferry Road, Columbia; 3000 Harden St., Columbia. Office location in Lexington County: 425 Industrial Drive, Lexington. Tri-County Electric Cooperative serves parts of Richland and Lexington counties, including Gaston. Customer service: 803-874-1215 or 877-874-1215. Office located at 11335 Garners Ferry Road, Eastover. WATER AND SEWER Carolina Water Service Inc. serves some subdivisions in Richland and Lexington counties. 800-367-4314; customerservice@uiwater.com. City of Cayce, 1800 12th St. Extension, Cayce; 803-7969020, ext. 1; info@cityof cayce-sc.gov. City of Columbia provides water and sewer services for

AT&T: 888-757-6500, 800225-5288 or www.att.com. Comporium: Serves southwestern Lancaster County. 800-2587978 or www.comporium.com. DirecTV: 888-777-2454 or www.directv.com. DISH Network: 800-823-4929 or www.dish.com. HughesNet: 877-286-2406 or www.hughesnetinternet.net. Spectrum: 803-252-2253 or www.spectrum.net. Windstream: 866-445-5880 or www.windstream.com. TRASH AND RECYCLING TIM DOMINICK tdominick@thestate.com

Utility crews clean up in Lower Richland after Hurricane Matthew hit the Midlands in October.

customers in and around Columbia. 1136 Washington St., Columbia; 803-545-3300; customercare@columbiasc.net.

Richland County. 1710 Woodcreek Farms Road, Elgin; 803-699-2403; customerservice @niamerica.com.

City of West Columbia, 200 N. 12th St., West Columbia; 803-791-1880.

Town of Batesburg-Leesville, 120 W. Church St, BatesburgLeesville; customer service, 803-532-4601; business hours emergencies, 803-532-6410; after-hours emergencies, 803-532-4408.

East Richland County Public Service District offers residential sewer services in eastern Richland County. 704 Ross Road, Columbia; 803788-1570; www.ercpsd.net/ contact-us. Gaston Water District Company, 1133 Mack St., Gaston; 803-794-2819. Joint Municipal Water and Sewer Commission serves unincorporated areas in Lexington County. 2546 Two Notch Drive, Lexington; 803-359-8373 (including emergencies); customerservice@

CITY OF COLUMBIA provided photo

The city of Columbia last year replaced its 18-gallon recycling bins with 95-gallon carts.

Town of Chapin, 157 NW Columbia Ave., Chapin; 803-5758042; emergencies, 803-6059711; utilities@chapinsc.com.

lcjmwsc.com.

Town of Lexington, 111 Maiden Lane, Lexington; 803-358-7261.

Palmetto of Richland County, LLC provides wastewater services for part of Richland County. 1713 Woodcreek Farms Road, Elgin; 803-699-2422. Palmetto Utilities Inc. provides wastewater services for part of

Septic tanks and wells: If your property is served by a septic tank and/or well, contact the Environmental Quality Control office at the Department of Health and Environmental Control at 803-896-0620.

City of Cayce, 803-796-9020, ext. 3027. City of Columbia, 803-5453800; sanitation@columbia sc.net. City of Forest Acres, 803-782-9475. City of West Columbia, 803-796-8006. Lexington County residents who live in unincorporated areas have access to weekly garbage pickup through Advanced Disposal (803256-7276; www.advanced disposal.com) or Waste Industries (803-935-0249; www.waste industries.com). See www.lex-co. sc.gov to determine which company serves your area. Richland County provides weekly pickup for household garbage and yard waste and biweekly pickup for recyclables. The annual solid waste fee for curbside collection is included in each property owner’s tax bill. 803-929-6000.


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GETTING SETTLED LAW ENFORCEMENT For emergencies, dial 911. LEXINGTON COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT 521 Gibson Road, Lexington; 803-785-8230; www.lexingtonscsheriff.com

North District Headquarters: 111 Lincreek Drive, Columbia; 803-781-4173. South District Headquarters: 102 Airport Road, Pelion; 803-785-7688. West District Headquarters: 4079 Augusta Highway, Gilbert; 803-785-7508. RICHLAND COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPARTMENT 5623 Two Notch Road, Columbia; 803-576-3000; www.rcsd.net; sheriff@rcsd.net

Region 1 (Bluff Road/Garners Ferry) substation: 2615 Lower Richland Blvd., Columbia; 803-576-1470. Region 2 (Two Notch Road/Clemson Road) substation: 2500 Decker Blvd., Columbia; 803-567-3444. Region 3 (Monticello Road/Wilson Boulevard) substation: 6429 Bishop Ave., Columbia; 803-576-2215. Region 4 (Broad River Road/St. Andrews) substation: 1019 Beatty Road, Columbia; 803-576-3490. Region 6 (Blythewood) substation: 118 McNulty St., Suite B, Blythewood; 803-576-3004. Region 7 substation: 1405 Screaming Eagle Road, Elgin; 803-576-1420. CAYCE PUBLIC SAFETY 1800 12th St., Cayce; 803-794-0456; www.cityofcayce-sc.gov/publicsafety.asp COLUMBIA POLICE One Justice Square, Columbia; 803-545-3500; http://columbiapd.net

C. RUSH online@thestate.com

Officers stand with their hands over their hearts while the S.C. Honor Guard presents colors during the beginning of the S.C. Law Enforcement Memorial Ceremony.

BATESBURG-LEESVILLE POLICE 660 W. Columbia Ave., Batesburg-Leesville; 803-532-4408; www. batesburg-leesville.org/police -department

FOREST ACRES POLICE 5205 N. Trenholm Road, Columbia; 803-782-9444; www.forestacres.net

CHAPIN POLICE 157 Columbia Ave., Chapin; 803-345-6443; www.chapinsc.com/158/ Police-Department

IRMO POLICE 1230 Columbia Ave., Columbia; 803-781-8088; www.townofirmosc.com/ Police.aspx

GASTON POLICE 186 N. Carlisle St., Gaston; 803-796-8503; http://gastonsc.org/ home/police-department

LEXINGTON POLICE 111 Maiden Lane, Lexington; 803-3596260; www.lexsc.com/155/Police SWANSEA POLICE 320 W. Third St., Swansea; 803-568-3366; www.swanseapd.net WEST COLUMBIA POLICE 200 N. 12th St., West Columbia; 803-794-0721; https://westcolumbiasc. gov/police-department PALMETTO POISON CENTER 800-222-1222; poison.sc.edu; palmettopc@cop.sc.edu

ANIMAL SERVICES Lexington County Animal Services: An animal control officer is on call around the clock, but officers can only respond to emergency calls after normal business hours and on the weekends. Emergency calls include injured animals, animal attacks and other public safety organizations requesting assistance. 321 Ball Park Road, Lexington. 803-785-8149. animalservices@lex-co.com. Richland County Animal Care: Richland County Animal Care offers 24-hour emergency service. 400 Powell Road, Columbia. 803-929-6000. animalcare@rcgov.us.


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POINTS OF INTEREST PUBLIC LIBRARIES LEXINGTON COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

803-785-3519. Bookmobile: 803-785-2649; www.lex.lib.sc.us/files/ bookmobileroutes.pdf.

www.lex.lib.sc.us Hours of operation vary.

Main branch: 5440 Augusta Road, Lexington; 803-785-2600. Batesburg-Leesville branch: 203 Armory St., Batesburg; 803-532-9223. Cayce-West Columbia branch: 1500 Augusta Road, West Columbia; 803-794-6791. Chapin branch: 129 NW Columbia Ave., Chapin; 803-345-5479. Gaston branch: 214 S. Main St., Gaston; 803-791-3208. Gilbert-Summit branch: 405 Broad St., Gilbert; 803-785-5387. Irmo branch: 6251 St. Andrews

RICHLAND COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY

www.richlandlibrary.com Branches open at 9 a.m. Monday through Saturday. Closing times and Sunday hours vary.

TIM DOMINICK tdominick@thestate.com

Richland Public Library’s Ballentine branch opened in June with a “treehouse” and puppet stage in the children’s area and an artists’ space.

Road, Columbia; 803-798-7880. Pelion branch: 206 Pine St., Pelion; 803-785-3272. South Congaree-Pine Ridge

branch: 200 Sunset Drive, West Columbia; 803-785-3050. Swansea branch: 199 N. Lawrence Ave., Swansea;

St. Andrews and Wheatley branches are closed for renovations. See buildingyourlibrary.com.

Main branch: 1431 Assembly St., Columbia; 803-799-9084. Ballentine branch: 1200 Dutch Fork Road, Irmo; 803-781-5026. Blythewood branch: 218 McNulty Road, Blythewood;

803-691-9806. Cooper branch: 5317 N. Trenholm Road, Columbia; 803-787-3462. Eastover branch: 608 Main St., Eastover; 803-353-8584. North Main branch: 5306 N. Main St., Columbia; 803-754-7734. Northeast branch: 7490 Parklane Road, Columbia; 803-736-6575. Operations center: 130 Lancewood Road, Columbia. Sandhills branch: 763 Fashion Drive, Columbia; 803-699-9230. Southeast branch: 7421 Garners Ferry Road, Columbia; 803-776-0855. St. Andrews branch: 2916 Broad River Road, Columbia; 803-772-6675. Wheatley branch: 931 Woodrow St., Columbia; 803-799-5873.


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GOOD TO KNOW SPECIAL LIBRARIES Columbia residents have renowned libraries that offer resources and events year-round. Here’s a look at a few of them: USC LIBRARIES Every University of South Carolina alum knows about the Thomas Cooper Library, sitting behind its picturesque fountain in the center of campus. But USC is home to several libraries, which offer a wealth of history, research, exhibits and events. In addition to the Thomas Cooper Library – open to the community during the day – here are a few other USC libraries of note. Details about all USC Libraries can be found at http://library.sc.edu. South Caroliniana Library: Built in 1840 and located on USC’sHorseshoe, this is the nation’s oldest freestanding academic library and one of the premier research archives and special collections repositories in the Southeast. Its collections include rare diaries, maps, books, pamphlets and newspapers; records of churches, plantations and businesses; early photographs, postcards and engravings; and oral histories that document our state’s past. The library is closed for renovation, but researchers and the public can access collections by calling 803-777-3132. The Music Library: Located on the second and third levels of the USC School of Music, this library contains books, scores, journals, audio and video recordings and special collections. Its 60,000 recordings are in all formats, ranging from the Edison cylinder to digital. Moving Image Research

MATT WALSH file photo

USC’s South Caroliniana Library.

Collections: Located at 707 Catawba St., this library preserves films and videos produced outside the American feature film industry, making them available to present and future audiences. MIRC’s founding collection is a true national treasure – the Fox Movietone News Collection – and consists of 11 million feet of silent and sound films documenting global events from the 1920s to 1940s. MIRC hosts an online video archive at http://mirc.sc.edu, so many digitized films can be accessed online. Members of the public can schedule appointments with staff or curators at 803-777-6841. The Ernest F. Hollings Special Collections Library: Located within Thomas Cooper, this library houses two departments. A The Irvin Department of Rare Books and Special Collections holds more than 250,000 books and includes more than 50 historic collections that include the Nuremburg Chronicle, the King James Bible, and the Blaeu Grande Atlas to the Federalist Papers. A The South Carolina

Political Collection has served as the state’s repository of political memorabilia for more than 25 years. Collections include manuscripts, electronic records and audiovisual materials documenting the activities of South Carolina’s leaders in Congress and the General Assembly, the state’s political parties, and other individuals and organizations playing major roles in politics and government. S.C. STATE LIBRARY The South Carolina State Library offers research resources for the general public as well as: A The Rare Book Collection includes roughly 2,000 items, ranging from political speeches and periodicals to historical scientific works and literature. Half of the collection comes from the personal library of A.S. Salley Jr., South Carolina’s first historian and archivist. A Photograph and state and federal documents collections, as well as a collection of published materials about South Carolina subjects.

— LEZLIE PATTERSON, SPECIAL TO GO COLUMBIA


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POINTS OF INTEREST STATE HOUSE

C TIM DOMINICK tdominick@thestate.com

In honor of National Hospice Month last November, Agape Hospice Care displayed 180 umbrellas at the State House to represent its 420 Midlands patients during the previous year.

olumbia was created as a capital city. The state Legislature created a new state capital in 1786 and named it “Columbia.” The city was designed in 2 square miles, broken into 400 blocks. Half-acre lots were sold to potential residents and speculators. It was home to the state’s second State House. South Carolina’s first State House was in Charleston. The Columbia State House was made of wood with a brick basement at the corner of Senate and Richardson (now Main) streets. The General Assembly first met in its Columbia State House in 1790. When General William T. Sherman and the Union army captured Columbia on Feb. 17, 1865, the old State House was destroyed by fire. A monument stands on the State House grounds where the old building stood. Construction on the new State House was postponed because it also was set on fire. The State House features reminders of Sherman’s damage. Sherman’s army blasted cannons at the new State House, but the shells did

TRACY GLANTZ file photo

only slight damage. Brass markers identify where those shells struck the facade. Construction on the existing State House ended in 1903. From 1995-98,

the State House underwent renovations.

— JAMIE SELF

SOURCES: The S.C. State House and City of Columbia websites


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GETTING SETTLED FIRE STATIONS COLUMBIA FIRE DEPARTMENT 803-545-3700; https://colafire.net

Station No. 1 (Headquarters): 1800 Laurel St., Columbia. Station No. 2 (Olympia): 1015 Ferguson St., Columbia. Station No. 3 (Industrial Park): 2740 The Boulevard, Columbia. Station No. 4 (Northeast Columbia): 446 Spears Creek Church Road, Elgin. Station No. 6 (St. Andrews): 1225 Briargate Circle, Columbia. Station No. 7 (North Columbia): 2622 Main St., Columbia. Station No. 8 (Atlas Road): 933 Atlas Road, Columbia. Station No. 9 (Shandon): 2847 Devine St., Columbia. Station No. 11 (Belvedere): 30 Blume Court, Columbia. Station No. 12 (Greenview): 6810 N. Main St., Columbia. Station No. 13 (Eau Claire): 4112 N. Main St., Columbia. Station No. 14 (Dentsville): 7214 Fire Lane Drive, Columbia. Station No. 15 (Cedar Creek): 8300 Winnsboro Road, Blythewood. Station No. 16 (Harbison): 131 Lake Murray Blvd., Irmo. Station No. 17 (Upper Richland): 300 Camp Ground Road, Columbia. Station No. 18 (Crane Creek): 7401 Fairfield Road, Columbia. Station No. 19 (Gadsden): 122 Gadsden Community Center Road, Gadsden. Station No. 20 (Ballentine): 10727 Broad River Road, Irmo. Station No. 21 (Spring Hill): 11809 Broad River Road, Irmo. Station No. 22 (Lower Richland): 2612 Lower Richland Blvd., Hopkins. Station No. 23 (Hopkins): 1631 Clarkson Road, Hopkins.

TRACY GLANTZ tglantz@thestate.com

Columbia firefighters conduct training earlier this year at vacant houses along South Saluda Street.

Station No. 24 (Sandhill): 130 Sparkleberry Lane, Columbia. Station No. 25 (Bear Creek): 1613 Heins Road, Blythewood. Station No. 26 (Blythewood): 435 Main St., Blythewood. Station No. 27 (Killian): 9651 Farrow Road, Columbia. Station No. 28 (Eastover): 504 Henry St., Eastover. Station No. 29 (Congaree Run): 115 Old Congaree Run Road, Eastover. Station No. 30 (Capital View): 8100 Burdell Drive, Columbia. Station No. 31 (Leesburg Road): 1911 McCords Ferry

Road, Eastover. Station No. 32 (Jackson Creek): 9213 Two Notch Road, Columbia. Station No. 33 (Gills Creek): 5645 Old Forest Drive, Columbia. Station No. 34 (Elders Pond): 321 Elders Pond Drive, Columbia. LEXINGTON COUNTY FIRE SERVICE 803-785-8287; www.lex-co.sc.gov

Station No. 1 (Headquarters): 436 Ball Park Road, Lexington. Station No. 2 (Hollow Creek): 117 Beulah Church Road, Gilbert. Station No. 3 (Round Hill): 2703 Two Notch Road, Lexington. Station No. 4 (Boiling Springs): 2639 Calks Ferry Road, Lexington. Station No. 5 (South Congaree): 300 Oak St., West Columbia. Station No. 6 (Pelion): 940 Pine St., Pelion.

Station No. 7 (Mack Edisto): 2142 U.S. 178, Swansea. Station No. 8 (Gilbert): 103 Main St., Gilbert. Station No. 9 (Oak Grove): 447 Oak Drive, Lexington. Station No. 10 (Lexington): 112 Park Road, Lexington. Station No. 11 (Chapin): 440 E. Boundary St., Chapin. Station No. 12 (Gaston): 1701 Busbee Road, Gaston. Station No. 13 (Edmund): 5715 Edmund Highway, Lexington. Station No. 14 (Fairview): 2907 Fairview Road, Leesville. Station No. 15 (Lake Murray): 902 U.S. 378, Lexington. Station No. 16 (Swansea): 350 W. Third St., Swansea. Irmo Station: 6017 St. Andrews Road, Columbia. Irmo North Lake Station: 117 Lincreek Drive, Columbia. Station No. 18 (Sandy Run): 752 Calvary Church Road, Swansea. Station No. 19 (Pine Grove): 665 Old Barnwell Road, West Columbia. Station No. 22 (Amicks Ferry): 960 Amicks Ferry Road, Chapin. Station No. 23 (Crossroads): 2720 Wessinger Road, Chapin. Station No. 24 (Red Bank): 1385 S. Lake Drive, Lexington. Leesville Station: 431 E. Church St., Leesville. Batesburg Station: 537 W. Church St., Batesburg. Station No. 27 (Samaria): 5321 Fairview Road, Batesburg. Station No. 28 (Sharpe’s Hill): 3124 S.C. 6, Lexington. Station No. 29 (Cedar Grove): 134 Cedar Grove Road, Leesville. Station No. 30 (Corley Mill): 121 Riverchase Way, Lexington. Cayce Station: 2 Lavern Jumper Road, Cayce. West Columbia Station: 610 N. 12th St., West Columbia.


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GOOD TO KNOW A HUB FOR TRAINS

D

owntown Columbia commuters do well to keep an eye out for trains. While various train crossings are sprinkled across the region, one of the greatest concentration of tracks can be found between the University of South Carolina campus and WilliamsBrice Stadium. Columbia is a hub for both Norfolk Southern and CSX Transportation, two of the four major railroad companies in the United States. That makes for regular train stops, particularly along Assembly Street and in surrounding areas, including Olympia Mills. Some of the most troublesome back-ups are generally closer to the switching yards – where trains are more prone to slow down, stop and back up

while they switch out freight cars. Norfolk Southern’s local switching yard is off Shop Road, near Owens Field in Columbia. CSX’s yard is off State Street in Cayce. Among the long-considered options for improving the decades-old problem of active train tracks intersecting with busy downtown traffic are: A Consolidating some of the rail lines that carry CSX and Norfolk Southern trains. A Closing some of the streetlevel railroad crossings on Assembly Street and in the mill village neighborhoods. A Elevating some rails to bridges over busy streets. A study in 2009 produced several options for consolidating and relocating railroad tracks along Assembly and Huger streets and in the nearby neigh-

JEFF BLAKE file photo

A CSX train passes a switching signal.

borhoods. But a lack of funding – $100 million or more – kept the project from moving forward. The city at the time unsuc-

cessfully sought funding for rail relocation from the State Infrastructure Bank and the first proposed Richland County

transportation penny sales tax. Now, enough growth and change have happened at downtown’s southern edge that the impact study must be updated before the city can again consider a solution. There are no restrictions on how many trains run through an area each day, and companies are not required to publish a schedule. The state and many cities, including Columbia and Cayce, limit the time – locally, to five minutes – that trains legally can block an intersection once they come to a complete stop. But the penalties are quite low. But commuters who experience an excessively long stop can call the number posted at the rail crossing to alert officials of a delay.

— THE STATE ARCHIVES


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POINTS OF INTEREST FORT JACKSON

J

ust over 100 years ago, with World War I raging in Europe, many Americans believed the United States would soon be drawn into the fight. Many also saw that the country was unprepared for war. Among the most pressing needs: training camps for soldiers. Columbia Chamber leaders thought their city would be ideal for such a camp. So they proposed to the Army that land formerly owned by the late Wade Hampton be selected for training. The chamber led a fundraising drive that quickly raised $59,000 to purchase the property east of Columbia from the Hampton estate, according to a history of Fort Jackson prepared for its 50th anniversary. On May 19, 1917 – just a month after Congress declared war on Germany – Maj. Douglas MacArthur announced that one of the Army’s 16 new camps would be constructed near Columbia. “Columbia put up a good fight for the camp, and deserved to win,” The State newspaper declared. In June of that year, a contract was awarded to Hardaway Contracting Co. of Columbus, Ga., to build the camp. During the next six months, Hardaway built 1,519 buildings at the camp, including theaters, stores, barracks, training facilities, stables and garages, according to the 50th anniversary history. An airfield also was built, and railroad lines were laid. Just more than two decades later, more than 500,000 soldiers were trained for combat in

. ......................................................

Fort Jackson’s impact Fort Jackson’s far-reaching impact on Columbia and its economy has been validated in everything from thwarting big-time U.S. defense cuts to being a tool in promoting the Midlands as an ideal place to live and retire. Fort Jackson – which celebrated its centennial in June – pumps more than $4 billion a year into the Midlands economy, according to a USC study released in April. That makes the fort, the Army’s largest basic training center, a vital cog in the local economy.

SEAN RAYFORD online@thestate.com

Pvt. Quinton Wright of D Company, 2nd Battalion, 193rd Infantry, tries on a uniform during downtime at Fort Jackson.

It also is an important cog in the overall $24.1 billion economic impact the military exerts on the Palmetto State each year. USC’s Moore School of Business produced the study on the economic impact of the military in South Carolina. .......................................................

SEAN RAYFORD online@thestate.com

SEAN RAYFORD online@thestate.com

Private Jamie Udet of D Company, 2nd Battalion, 193rd Infantry, laces up a pair of boots.

Soldiers participate in the Centennial Run at Fort Jackson, where the Army has been training soldiers since World War I.

World War II. Since then, soldiers have trained at the fort for every major U.S. conflict, including those in Korea, Vietnam,

Fort Jackson capped off its 100th birthday with a command performance by country music stars Hunter Hayes and Kellie Pickler.

and the Persian Gulf. In between those wars, soldiers trained at Fort Jackson have helped keep the peace.

An estimated crowd of 12,000 had jammed Hilton Field – the fort’s main parade ground – by 6 p.m., when the U.S. Army

Golden Knights Parachute Team kicked off the festivities. The nation’s largest training base gave all 5,000 of its soldiers in training the night off. That was unusual because, in the fort’s other big celebrations, such as the Fourth of July, soldiers in the first phase of their training do not get to attend. In addition to the concert, the new soldiers were treated to their own individual pizzas.

— JEFF WILKINSON


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POINTS OF INTEREST MILITARY LANDMARKS

SEAN RAYFORD online@thestate.com

McEntire Joint National Guard Base, located in Eastover, is seen from the air.

Columbia and Midlands residents often bill the area as the most military-friendly community in the country. And it may be. South Carolinians are historically supportive of the military. The area has a large veteran and retiree population. The region is home to three major military installations. And Columbia hosts the headquarters of the S.C. Army and Air National Guard.

home to the F-16 jets of the S.C. Air Guard’s 169th Fighter Squadron, called the Swamp Foxes. It is also home to fleets of S.C. Army National Guard Apache and Blackhawk helicopters. The base is not open to the public, but the S.C. Military Museum is located behind S.C. National Guard Headquarters on Bluff Road in Columbia, near USC’s Williams-Brice Stadium.

Fort Jackson in Columbia is the nation’s largest basic combat training base. It also is home of many other commands, such as the U.S. Army Chaplain Center and School and the U.S. Army Drill sergeant school. It is an open base with four museums and even a public water park.

Shaw Air Force Base in Sumter is home of the 20th Fighter Wing – the largest fighter wing in the country – comprised of three squadrons of F-16 Fighting Falcons. It is also home to U.S. Air Force Central and U.S. Army Central, which plan, supply and execute combat and training in the Middle East and Southwest Asia. It is closed to the public.

McEntire Joint National Guard Base in nearby Eastover is

— JEFF WILKINSON


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POINTS OF INTEREST UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH CAROLINA 2016-2017 SCHOOL YEAR In the fall of 2016, the University of South Carolina estimated that the Columbia campus would serve more than 31,000 students – with their approximately 52,000 devices connected to campus networks via 4,064 wireless access points. The 5,100-member freshman class (many of whom are now rising sophomores) included 60 high school valedictorians. Professors planned to use 3,933 textbook titles during the fall semester. Some of the more unusual classes included Psychology of the Zombie Apocalypse, Drinking in Culture: Anthropology of Alcohol, and Action Heroines. In May, USC conferred degrees on 6,800 undergraduates. THE HORSESHOE The tree-covered, brick sidewalk-lined Horseshoe is the birthplace – and the center – of the 216-year-old University of South Carolina. Ten of the 11 buildings that bound the Horseshoe are listed in the National Register of Historic Places, including the nation’s first freestanding college library. According to university archivist Elizabeth Cassidy West, co-author of “On the Horseshoe: A Guide to the Historic Campus of the University Carolina,” the Horseshoe Wall was constructed in 1835 and 1836 – not to keep people out, but to try to keep students in. They had a habit of sneaking off campus to visit Columbia’s taverns, which was against the rules. The brick wall was originally around 7 feet high and enclosed the campus on Sumter, Pendleton, Bull, and Greene streets. There was one opening in the middle of the Sumter Street side, but the students just climbed the wall to contin-

ue their nocturnal pursuits. The wall did help save the campus in February 1865 by keeping the flames out during the burning of Columbia. LAW SCHOOL UNVEILED USC in May unveiled its new, $80 million law school building – a swanky, 187,500square-foot facility that occupies nearly an entire city block at Bull and Gervais streets. The building is expected to help the USC School of Law recruit “top-flight” students and faculty, dean Robert Wilcox said. Wilcox also expects it to help with the law school’s No. 88 national ranking in the widely watched U.S. News and World Report rankings. “You don’t go up in a ranking just because you have a new building,” Wilcox said. “But you go up in a ranking if you can bring in the students you need and if you can do the research you need and if your academic program is good enough to really raise your reputation. “We have a feeling that as people come into the school – we host some conferences here TIM DOMINICK tdominick@thestate.com and things – while the building doesn’t count directly into the The USC Horseshoe is the birthplace of the university – and it remains a favorite destination for students. numbers, it will have an impact on the reputation.” A few things to know about new medical school. The USC Foundation in the law school’s new digs: December purchased 5 acres A The building features 17 of land along Harden Street classrooms, ranging in size from the S.C. Department of from 20 to 95 seats, and two Mental Health. The university realistic courtrooms, includpaid $600,000, money doing one that also can be used nated to it by Bob Hughes, as a 300-seat auditorium. the property’s GreenvilleA The judge’s bench in the based master developer. larger courtroom is the origi“He was giving us the land, nal heart-pine S.C. Supreme in effect, “ USC Foundation Court bench from the 1870s. director Russ Meekins said. A New students began using Hughes has pledged eventhe building for summer tually to donate 16 acres of classes. the property to the state’s flagship university, which MEDICAL SCHOOL PLANS plans to build a $200 million The University of South GERRY MELENDEZ gmelendez@thestate.com Carolina’s real estate arm has medical school and health sciences complex there. started buying pieces of the The central courtyard at the School of Law’s new Gervais Street building — THE STATE ARCHIVES Bull Street property for its features granite benches from the old state penitentiary.


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GOOD TO KNOW USC SPORTS While Gamecock fans have known for years, a recent list of 2017’s Best & Worst Cities for College Basketball Fans confirmed that Columbia is among the best mid-sized cities for college basketball fans, listing it at No. 17. WalletHub compiled the list, comparing the 291 U.S. cities with at least one Division I college basketball team. It considered the performance of the city’s teams, number of championship wins, number of regular season championship wins, minimum season ticket price, fan engagement on Twitter and Facebook and stadium capacity. Columbia definitely compares favorably using those criteria – and the ranking was released before the women’s team won the national championship and the men’s team made it to the Final Four. And there are other reasons Columbia is a great city for college basketball. Here are a few: The games are fun. Even folks who may not be huge basketball fans enjoy attend-

TRACY GLANTZ tglantz@thestate.com

A Gamecocks fan celebrates during the USC women’s national championship basketball game.

ing USC games, where they might leave with the promise of a free Chick-Fil-A

sandwich, a stuffed cow, a T-shirt or a coupon for free food from Fatz. The Vista. The entertainment district is an easy walk from Colonial Life Arena, making it an obvious destination for food and drink before and after the game. Whether you want fine dining or a deli sandwich, numerous Vista restaurants can serve you. Thirsty Fellow. How many college arenas have a restaurant and bar in the parking lot? OK, not literally, but the favorite pre- and post-game spot for many is definitely in the thick of those coming and going to the games. Colonial Life Arena has been home to the Gamecocks since 2002. With seating for 18,000, it also has various food choices from cotton candy to chicken and waffles. It’s easy to navigate and exhibits the rich history of Carolina basketball. Fans. Yes, the fans make it fun for the fans. The USC women led the nation in attendance for the second year in a row after the 2015-16 season averaging 14,364. “We have the best fans in the country,” women’s head coach Dawn Staley said in early 2017.

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USC football schedule Midlands residents love to tailgate at USC football games. Home games are at Williams-Brice Stadium, 1125 George Rogers Blvd. Here’s their 2017 schedule: Sept. 2 vs. N.C. State (in Charlotte) Sept. 9 at Missouri Sept. 16 vs. Kentucky Sept. 23 vs. Louisiana Tech Sept. 30 at Texas A&M Oct. 7 vs. Arkansas Oct. 14 at Tennessee Oct. 28 vs. Vanderbilt Nov. 4 at Georgia Nov. 11 vs. Florida Nov. 18 vs. Wofford Nov. 25 vs. Clemson .....................................................................................


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POINTS OF INTEREST MUSEUMS COLUMBIA MUSEUM OF ART The museum offers regular talks and tours of current exhibitions, as well as classical and jazz musical performances and Arts & Draughts outreach events to appeal to new audiences. Admission is $12, adults; $10, seniors 65 and older and members of the military; $5 for students; and free, children 6 and younger and members.

life in the South, and USC’s museum management certificate program is taught on-site. 816 Bull St. 803-777-7251 artsandsciences.sc.edu/ mckissickmuseum

1515 Main St. 803-799-2810 www.columbiamuseum.org EDVENTURE CHILDREN’S MUSEUM “Eddie” is the first thing you see when you enter the museum. The model of a 10-year-old boy is big enough for adults and children to explore, and visitors can climb Eddie’s vertebrae to his brain and explore his heart, stomach and intestines. Admission is $11.50, children and adults; $10.50, seniors 62 and older, members of the military with ID and educators with ID; free, members and children younger than 2. Memberships start at $129 a year.

GERRY MELENDEZ gmelendez@thestate.com

Pam Borawski, who leads the State Museum’s ghost tours, stands in the elevator where Bubba the Ghost has been seen.

211 Gervais St. 803-779-3100 edventure.org S.C. STATE MUSEUM The State Museum, located in a former textile mill on Gervais Street at the Congaree River, offers daily planetarium and 4-D theater showings, as well as exhibition-related programming and special events. Second Shift Twosdays offer general admission of $10 for two people when the museum

C. RUSH online@thestate.com

An EdVenture Children’s Museum employee dips marshmallows in liquid nitrogen during an event.

is open late, until 8 p.m. General admission is $8.95, adults; $7.95, seniors 62 and older; $6.95, children ages 3-12; and free, children 2 and younger. Add-ons include blockbuster exhibits, planetarium and 4-D shows.

The State Museum houses the Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum, with a stunning number of artifacts from the Civil War, including numerous actual battle flags.

BRETT FLASHNICK Courtesy of Historic Columbia

Historic Columbia is restoring the gardens surrounding the Hampton-Preston to their antebellum glory.

301 Gervais St. 803-898-4921 scmuseum.org Confederate Relic Room and Military Museum, 803-737-8095 www.crr.sc.gov

MCKISSICK MUSEUM The McKissick Muesum, located on the University of South Carolina’s Horseshoe, was established in 1976 to consolidate various departments’ object collections. The items and exhibits tend to focus on

HISTORIC COLUMBIA’S HOUSE MUSEUMS Historic Columbia maintains several historic homes as museums, providing a glimpse into the lives of the people who lived there. Among the house museums: The Roberts Mills House, named for its architect, was one of the few private residences Mills designed. After the original owner died, it housed seminaries until Historic Columbia saved it from demolition in 1961. 1616 Blanding St. The Hampton-Preston Mansion has been a private residence, a governor’s mansion, the Union Army headquarters, a convent, a home for educational institutions and a commercial space. 1615 Blanding St. The Mann-Simons Site was the location for a series of residences and commercial pursuits owned and operated by the same African-American family from 1843 to 1970. An outdoor museum on the grounds features “ghost structures” representing buildings where they once stood. 1403 Richland St. The Woodrow Wilson Family Home was the home of the 28th president for three years during his childhood – and the state’s only remaining presidential site. 1705 Hampton St. 1601 Richland St. 803-252-7742 www.historiccolumbia.org


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POINTS OF INTEREST PARKS

ILLUSTRATION BY SUSAN ARDIS sardis@thestate.com

1

Dreher Island State Park, 3677 State Park Road, Prosperity.

2

SCE&G sites on Lake Murray: Both on North Lake Drive, on either side of the Dreher Shoals Dam. “Lake Murray beach,” 1888 N. Lake Drive, Lexington; Irmo-side park, 2101 N. Lake Drive, Columbia.

3 4 5

Saluda Shoals Park, 5605 Bush River Road, Columbia. Harbison State Forest, 5600 Broad River Road, Columbia. Cayce and West Columbia Riverwalk, Alexander Road, West Columbia, and Old State Road, Cayce.

6 7

Sesquicentennial State Park, 9564 Two Notch Road, Columbia. Congaree National Park, 100 National Park Road, Hopkins.

CITY OF COLUMBIA PARKS

8

Crooked Creek Park, 1098 Old Lexington Highway, Chapin.

9 10 11 12 13

Gibson Pond Park, 241 Gibson Road, Lexington. Virginia Hylton Park, 111 Maiden Lane, Lexington. Friarsgate Park, 1712 Chadford Road, Irmo.

Seven Oaks Park, 200 Leisure Lane, Columbia.

Carraway Community Park, 212 Hudson St., West Columbia.

22 23 24 25 26 27

Bluff Road Park, 148 Carswell Drive, Columbia.

14 15 16 17

Ridgewood Park, 805 Crest St., Columbia. Trenholm Park, 3900 Covenant Road, Columbia. Meadowlake Park, 600 Beckman Road, Columbia.

Forest Lake Park, 6820 Wedgefield Road, Columbia.

18 19 20 21

Blythewood Park, 126 Boney Road, Blythewood.

Killian Park, 1424 Marthan Road, Blythewood. North Springs Park, 1320 Clemson Road, Columbia. Polo Road Park, 730 Polo Road, Columbia.

Caughman Road Park, 2800 Trotter Road, Columbia. Hopkins Park, 150 Hopkins Park Road, Hopkins.

Eastover Park, 1031 Main St., Eastover.

Guinard Park, 301 Knox Abbott Drive, Cayce. St. Andrews Park, 920 Beatty Road.

(not shown on map) Arsenal Hill, 1800 Lincoln St. Earlewood Park, 1111 Parkside Drive Emily Douglas Park, 2500 Wheat St. Finlay Park, 930 Laurel St. Greenview Park, 6700 David St. Hampton Park, 117 Brandon Ave. Heathwood Park, 800 Abelia Road. Hyatt Park, 950 Jackson Ave.

Lorick Park, 1600 Lorick Ave. Martin Luther King Jr. Park, 2300 Greene St. Maxcy Gregg Park, 1655 Park Circle. Mays Park, 4100 Trenholm Road. Melrose Park, 1500 Fairview Road. Pacific Park, 200 Wayne St. Pinehurst Park, 2300 Pinehurst Road. Riverfront Park, 312 Laurel St. St. Anna’s Park, 1315 Liberty Hill Ave. Sims Park, 3500 Duncan St. Woodland Park, 6500 Old Knight Parkway.


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POINTS OF INTEREST LAKE MURRAY

ILLUSTRATION BY SUSAN ARDIS sardis@thestate.com

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rom pontoon parades to bass boats and Bomb Island, Lake Murray has something for everyone who loves nature and the water. The reservoir about 15 miles northwest of Columbia is known for its excellent fishing and boating. It has been a stop on the Bass Masters and the Forrest Wood Cup professional bass fishing tour. Large striped bass are also plentiful for those who want more bang for their bite. And there’s plenty of room for recreational water sports. The adventurous can try water skiing, tubing, wakeboarding, or wake surfing, while the more laid back may boat to one of the many islands to swim and relax on the shore. Bomb Island, near the center of the lake, was used by Doolittle’s Raiders as a target for dropping bombs in preparation for their famous 1942 air raid on Tokyo. The island, also known as Doolittle Island, is designated as North America’s first official sanctuary for purple martins. SCE&G, which manages Lake Murray, maintains two recreational areas on each end of the dam; the southern one has a large beach area for swimming. Dreher Island State Park offers campsites with facilities and lakeside villas. The park, which has picnic tables and shelters for daytime outings, is considered the dividing line for the lake’s two personalities. East of the park, the “big water” is surrounded by lakefront homes among the priciest in the Midlands. West of the park, the lake narrows and twists. Homes in that area tend to be modest weekend getaways and country retreats.

— TIM DOMINICK AND TIM FLACH


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GOOD TO KNOW 5 WAYS TO ENJOY LAKE MURRAY

ROB THOMPSON rthompson@thestate.com

Patriotically decorated boats of all shapes and sizes line up at Bomb Island for the start of Lake Murray’s Independence Day boat parade.

1

HIT THE BEACH: The beach on the south side of the dam offers swimming, picnicking – and a sandy beach. Both parks are open through Sept. 8. Admission is $3 for most vehicles. www.sceg.com/about-us/lakes-and -recreation

2

EXERCISE WITH A VIEW: The Lake Murray dam – its official name is the Dreher Shoals Dam – is an engineering marvel. And one of the best ways to see it up close is by walking, biking or running along the dam walkway. The distance is 1.7 miles each way, for a total walk of 3.4 miles. 2101 N. Lake Drive; www.lakemurraycountry.com

3

BIRD WATCH: Nature is all around at Lake Murray, particularly of the feathered variety. One of the most anticipated events of the year is viewing the thousands of purple martins, which usually roost at Bomb Island. The migratory birds that winter in South America typically come in July and early August.

4

GET BACK TO NATURE: Dreher Island State Park’s 348 acres span three islands. Take a hike on Little Gap Trail, launch a boat from one of more than a dozen ramps, visit the tackle shop

JEFF BLAKE jblake@thestate.com

Thousands of purple martins roost at Lake Murray before migrating to South America.

for fishing supplies, or reserve a campsite or lakeside villa. Admission is $2 for adults, $1.25 for senior South Carolina residents, and free for ages 15 and younger. 3577 State Park Road, Prosperity; southcarolinaparks.com/dreherisland

5

HAVE A FESTIVE FOURTH: Few throw an Independence Day party like Lake Murray. The celebration includes a daytime boat parade, with boats of every shape and size streaming along the waters in a festive show. Watch evening fireworks from a boat or the parks at the dam. www.lakemurray country.com


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POINTS OF INTEREST CONGAREE NATIONAL PARK, HARBISON STATE FOREST, SESQUICENTENNIAL STATE PARK

J

ust because a couple hours’ drive can get you to the mountains or beaches doesn’t mean you have to leave the Columbia area for a good ol’ outdoor adventure. At Congaree National Park, the nation’s largest intact tract of old-growth bottomland hardwood forest, you’ll find some of the tallest trees in eastern North America. Take in the 26,000acre national park by trekking parts of over 25 miles of hiking trails and 2.4 miles of boardwalk. Bring your own canoe and explore Cedar Creek on a marked canoe trail. Camp, fish or take part in a number of guided programs throughout the year. Fun fact: Congaree is one of only a handful of known locations in the country to witness the annual light show put on by synchronous fireflies. For a

TRACY GLANTZ tglantz@thestate.com

Synchronous fireflies at Congaree National Park.

couple weeks around early June each year, hundreds of fireflies mysteriously sync their flashing in a display that draws numerous spectators. Just a 15-minute drive from downtown, Harbison State Forest offers more than 2,000 acres of forestland with more than 31 miles of roads and trails weaving through the pine and hardwood forest. Walkers, jog-

THE STATE file photo

Fishing on the lake at Sesquicentennial State Park.

THE STATE file photo

Trail running at Harbison State Forest.

gers, hikers, cyclists, kayakers and canoers frequent the park, which makes for an easy day trip

for urbanites and suburban dwellers alike in the Columbia area. Sesquicentennial State

Park near Sandhills lets you hike, bike, fish, canoe, kayak, paddleboard, camp and even hold overnight group gatherings at its retreat center. You’ll find 12 miles of trails, a 30-acre lake, five picnic shelters and a 2-acre fenced dog park encompassed by the 1,400-acre park.

— SARAH ELLIS


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POINTS OF INTEREST RIVERS

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south end. Parking areas are at 435 Meeting St. and the Capital Square Shopping Center. 121 Alexander Road, West Columbia. Fort Granby. The ruins of this British fort, first established in 1780 and used during the Revolutionary War, can be found along Taylor Street in Cayce. The fort started out as the home of James Cayce, but the British took it over, fortified it, and garrisoned 350 soldiers there. It was captured by Patriot forces in 1781.

olumbia sits at the confluence of two rivers – the wide and smooth Broad and the rocky and cold Saluda – and the Congaree, which is formed where the Broad and Saluda join near the Elmwood-Interstate 126 bridge. Each river has its own personality and opportunities for a good time in the tri-city area consisting of Columbia, West Columbia and Cayce. It also has one link connecting them all, Three Rivers Greenway. The walking path is composed of the Columbia Canal and Riverfront Park, West Columbia Riverwalk and the Cayce Riverwalk and is 8.5 miles long. THE BROAD The Broad starts in the mountains of North Carolina and winds its way south, flattening as it goes, until it reaches the city limits of Columbia at the Broad River Correctional Institution, flowing under Interstate 20 and into downtown. ALONG THE WAY Riverside Golf & Recreation Center. The nine-hole golf course and driving range offers beautiful views of the river. When you get frustrated chasing tiny white golf balls, relax by renting a standup paddleboard or kayak. You can even go kayak fishing. Garner Lane, just off I-20. www.riverside golfandreccenter.com Columbia Rowing Club. Offers classes in rowing and hosts the University of South Carolina Crew and rowing crews from northern colleges and high schools who travel south to train. 1871 Omarest Drive. www. columbiarowingclub.com Columbia Canal and Riverfront Park. Park rangers from the city’s Parks and Recreation Department patrol the paved trail that meanders along the Columba Canal for 21⁄2 miles. When the Rocky Shoals spider lilies are in bloom, take a kayak tour with the rangers – or let the rangers walk you through the history of the

GERRY MELENDEZ gmelendez@thestate.com

Mowgli joins Alston Grapengeter and Val Feliciano as they head down the Congaree River in July.

canal. The world’s first fully electrically operated textile mill and Columbia’s first hydroelectric plant are located in the 167-acre park. Two entrances: North access at 4210 River Drive, South access at 312 Laurel St. www.facebook. com/Columbias-Riverfront-Park THE SALUDA The Saluda originates in the South Carolina foothills and runs through a couple of dammed lakes – Lake Greenwood and Lake Murray – before reaching Columbia. The Saluda’s path below the Lake Murray dam is narrower than the Broad’s, and the river level rises and falls as SCE&G releases water from the dam. These releases are why the temperature of the water on the Saluda is usually cooler – between 65 and 75 degrees – the perfect home for trout and striped bass. ALONG THE WAY Saluda Shoals Park. This 400acre park features paved and unpaved trails for hiking, biking and horseback riding; a public

landing for small watercraft; the Environmental Education Center; a splash pad; picnic areas and the Barking Lot dog park. Daily admission fees. Park passes available for purchase. Entrances: East, 6071 St. Andrews Road; West, 5606 Bush River Road. www. icrc.net/saluda-shoals-park The rapids. Access is no longer available from the Riverbanks Zoo parking lot, so you’ll have to pay to park at Palmetto Outdoor Center on Candi Lane or risk getting towed. The large granite rocks in the Saluda have long been a summer hangout for Columbians who want to chill, work on their tans and the occasional kayaker navigate the series of rapids just above the zoo also can be entertaining (Mill Race Rapids have been rated Class IV for whitewater by American Whitewater). Be careful, though. Along this portion of the Saluda are monitors tracking the water levels in the river. Alarms sound when fast, high rising water is detected after a release upstream from the Lake Murray dam. Anyone in the

river or along the banks should move to higher ground. THE CONGAREE The Congaree is formed by the confluence, or coming together, of the Broad and Saluda. The headwaters of the new river are a bit rocky, but the Congaree widens and flattens out just beyond the Blossom Street Bridge. The river continues its slow progression south, winding through Congaree National Park, before emptying into Lake Marion. ALONG THE WAY West Columbia Amphitheater & Riverwalk Park. This is the first public landing spot just below the confluence, at the base of the Gervais Street Bridge. The Amphitheater hosts live music, such as the Rhythm on the River concert series, and is a great place to sit and watch the people and the river drift by. The Riverwalk starts at Riverside Drive, passes under the Gervais and Blossom street bridges before connecting to the Cayce Riverwalk at its

ETC. Beginning on the Saluda and running through Columbia on the Congaree are seven public landing sites where you can launch a small boat, kayak, canoe or inner tube. On the Broad, put in at the north access point of Riverfront Park and drift downstream. Keep in mind that the Jordan Memorial Boat Ramp (on the left side floating down the Congaree, at the end of Rosewood Drive) and the Thomas Newman Public Boat Landing (on the right side, at Granby Landing Road) are the last public landings for 47 miles. “Unless you’re planning on spending the night in the swamp, you better take out in Cayce,” said Congaree Riverkeeper Bill Stangler. River rentals: Places you can rent canoes, kayaks and inner tubes or schedule a trip on the rivers in Columbia include Palmetto Outdoors, Adventure Carolina, River Runner Outdoor Center, Phoenix Adventures and Carolina Outdoor Adventure. Fishing trips: Let an expert take you to where the fish are hiding in the rivers. Frank’s Fly Arts and Saluda Valley Guides specialize in fly fishing and float trips. Nature lovers: View a bald eagle’s nest along the Saluda near the confluence, find spectacular blooming spider lilies among the rocky islands in the Saluda and lower Broad, and watch out for the alligators. Contact Riverkeeper Stangler: congareeriverkeeper.org

— SUSAN ARDIS


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POINTS OF INTEREST RIVERBANKS ZOO Main entrance, 500 Wildlife Parkway, Columbia; Botanical Garden entrance, 1300 Botanical Parkway, West Columbia. www.riverbanks.org

THE PAST YEAR’S ZOO NEWS A President and CEO Satch Krantz retired in June after 44 years with the zoo, 41 of those at the helm. Under his leadership, the number of animals has increased from 388 to 2,278, not including the 11,000 invertebrates; member households have increased from 200 to 43,000; and attendance increased from 322,028 at the end of the zoo’s first full year (fiscal year 1975) to 1,280,911 at the end of fiscal year 2016. During his tenure, he helped

deliver a baby giraffe in the middle of the night and dove into the sea lion pool to rescue a newborn calf who sank to the bottom. A The main entrance to the garden at Riverbanks Zoo reopened to traffic in November after being closed for 13 months because of flood damage. While Botanical Parkway was closed, motorists cut through neighborhoods off Sunset Boulevard (U.S. 378) in West Columbia to reach the garden on the lower Saluda River. The road was closed after a crossing over a creek caved in during flooding created by record rain. A The zoo has lost two elephants in the past year. Petunia, 44, was euthanized in December after suffering from medical conditions. Penny, 37, died unexpectedly in May. Two elephants, Robin and Bell, remain.

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OVER THE RIVER It’s kind of cool that the zoo spans the river – and you can, too. After wandering among the wild animals, schedule a wild ride on the Zip the Zoo zip line that takes you through the treetops and across the Saluda River, from the Botanical Garden to the Zoo. DID YOU KNOW? Each year, Riverbanks welcomes more than 1 million guests. Its record single-day attendance – set on April 14, 2017 – was 14,382 visitors. For comparison: In 2014, the Census Bureau estimated West Columbia’s population at 15,920 and Irmo’s at 11,893. Every year, zoo visitors eat more than 3 tons of hot dogs, consume 191,000 gallons of soft drinks, use 941 miles of toilet paper and fill more than 60,000 trash bags.

— STAFF REPORTS

C. RUSH online@thestate.com

Avacyn Driggers plays in the foam pit during Boo at the Zoo. Tickets for the 11-night Halloween event go on sale Sept. 1.


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POINTS OF INTEREST BASEBALL TEAMS AND STADIUMS

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olumbia is rich with baseball viewing opportunities – residents can watch baseball for nearly eight months of the year.

COLUMBIA FIREFLIES SPIRIT COMMUNICATIONS PARK Professional baseball returned to the Capital City in 2016, with the Fireflies playing at Spirit Communications Park – and their second season was even bigger, with Heisman trophy winner Tim Tebow playing for the New York Mets’ Class A team in the South Atlantic Leauge. But the Tebow hype was short-lived; he was promoted to the Class A-Advanced St. Lucie Mets of the Florida State League at the end of June. Also in 2017, the Fireflies unveiled their own beer in collaboration with River Rat Brewery, a Healthy Choices Grab & Go Cart, and a Mist Zone where hot fans can cool off. The team hosted the South Atlantic League All-Star Game and Home Run Derby and welcomed its first local player, Gene Cone, who graduated from Spring Valley High School. On deck for the 2018 season are 16 large fans in the concourse and a resurfaced concourse floor. SOUTH CAROLINA GAMECOCKS CAROLINA STADIUM At South Carolina baseball games, much of the appeal is in the familiar – the Gamecocks taking the field after the theme from “2001” blares, or fans jumping to “Sandstorm” after every USC home run. Gamecock fans play Bingo during the game, trying to win a gift certificate to a Homegrown Hospitality restaurant. They cheer for a 12th strikeout for a Chick-fil-A sandwich. They pose for photos with Cocky, the NCAA national championship trophies or the seats from the famed Rosenblatt Stadium, where USC won the last national championship played before the stadium was demolished. LEXINGTON COUNTY BLOWFISH LEXINGTON COUNTY BASEBALL STADIUM When fans see the Lexington County Blowfish play, they find a Blowfish brand of fun. “We are always looking for ways to make Lexington and Lexington County stand out,” owner Bill Shanahan said. During the 2017 season, the team unveiled its Total Eclipse Centerline jersey, to be worn at least once in every city where the team plays. The team will wear the jerseys on the season’s final night – Saturday, Aug. 5 – and then the jerseys will be auctioned off. Proceeds will go to science projects in Lexington County elementary schools. The ballpark also added its own shaved ice flavor: the Blowie Snowie.

— STAFF REPORTS

TIM DOMINICK tdominick@thestate.com

Fans and friends watch a Columbia Fireflies game on a Wag-Along Wednesday at Spirit Communications Park.

PROVIDED PHOTO

The Blowfish’s eclipse-themed jerseys will be auctioned off.

GERRY MELENDEZ file photo

Julia Liddle watches a baseball game with Cocky at Carolina Stadium.


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Living Here, 2017  

A guide to making Columbia and the Midlands of South Carolina your home. An advertising section produced by The State newspaper.

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