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www.thestar.com.au TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2016 - $1.40

Band Band attracts attracts 400 400

Revving up at Mirboo North

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MEDICAL ALERT: Health funding shortfall impacts patients

SHORT STAFFED

By Brad Lester

SOUTH Gippsland’s hospitals are facing a health emergency as they struggle to adequately staff urgent care centres due to shortfalls in government funding.

The urgent care centre at South Gippsland Hospital at Foster has recently been on bypass after nurses from the ward were unavailable to service the centre. The Star continues to receive public concerns about the availability of the urgent care centre at Leongatha Hospital at times. Yarram and District Health Service will next month consider whether to close its urgent care centre as a result of a shortage of doctors. The urgent care centres are not fully staffed emergency departments, but rather staffed by nurses on the wards at the hospitals and supported by oncall doctors. The only fully staffed emergency department in South Gippsland is at Wonthaggi Hospital, which not only services South Gippsland but also Phillip Island – which is without emergency medical services – and north along the coast of Western Port Bay. Continued on page 8.

School celebrates KORUMBURRA Primary School’s Grade 6 students were thrilled to help commemorate the school’s 125th anniversary during their final year. Staff and students, past and present, joined the Korumburra community at a special event to mark the occasion at the school on Saturday. Pictured at front, from left, are Shu Misawa, Chris Axford, Mac Jiang, Travis Hall and Raj Lamers, with fellow Grade 6 students. Read more on page 9.

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PAGE 2 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 3

Bikes benefit Mirboo North MIRBOO North became a sea of bikes when thousands of motorcyclists gathered in town on Saturday for the 3rd Blessing of the Bikes and United 4 All Ride. One of the organisers, Sabine Widmer of Inline 4 Cafe, hailed the event a success. “We estimated there to be between 7000 and 8000 bikes here. It was bigger than last year,” she said. This year’s blessing focused on motorcycle safety and awareness, and the United 4 All Ride was organised by the Gippsland Motorcycle Club and Inline 4 Cafe to remember riders who have died while riding. The ride started at Officer. Music was held on the main stage, along with talks by members of the motorcycling fraternity, including racer John Woodley, and Marcel Widmer of Inline 4 Cafe spoke of the impact unnecessary road deaths have on family and friends, supported by Victorian Assistant Police

Commissioner Doug Fryer, Senior Constable Allan Piening, Pastor John Robertson and the Reverend John McMahon. Riders zoomed into town from five directions, enjoying the scenic rides each route offered. Mirboo North has always been a thoroughfare and stopover for many tourists, especially the motorcycle fraternity, and traders took advantage of the massive crowds by opening until the event finished. More motorbikes will ride through Mirboo North and South Gippsland this week in the leadup to the Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix at Phillip Island, with the highlight being the Barry Sheene Tribute Ride this Thursday. See full story on page 47. The blessing was sponsored by the Transport Accident Commission and included a memorial service to riders who have died. The next event has already been confirmed for October 14, 2017. Street transformed: Mirboo North’s main street was packed by thousands of motorcyclists ► More photos on page 46. and riders at the 3rd Blessing of the Bikes on Saturday.

Foster pushes for new school By Sarah Vella FOSTER is in need of a new primary school as its old buildings continue to deteriorate and cause safety concerns for students and staff.

and the staff to have a great school to reflect what is on the inside,” she said. Mr O’Brien said it was clear the school needed to be on the list for an upgrade. “I was there again last week at the invitation of Matt Wallis, the school council president and with Ms Gurnett. We examined the issues that are of most concern to the school community,” he said. Mr O’Brien said he was pleased to be part of a strong community campaign that delivered $4 million for a new Yarram Primary School earlier this year. “Foster is of a similar vintage and also has to be updated,” he said. “From what I have seen of schools in my electorate – and there are about 45 – Foster is probably the primary school after Yarram that is in the poorest state of repair. It needs funding and the government should begin planning for that now.”

Addressing parliament last Wednesday, Gippsland South MLA Danny O’Brien said the school was in a poor state and plans to rebuild must be included in next year’s budget. Built in 1965, the school contains asbestos, has several leaky roofs and continually needs to be repaired. School principal Lorraine Gurnett said the last condition assessment of the school in 2012 provided questionable results. “I have spent $60,000 since then replacing Another success: from left, Blessing of the Bikes organiser Marcel Widmer, owner of Inline leaking roofs and mitigating the impacts of the 4 Cafe with close friend John ‘The Rev’ McMahon, a youth specialist and consultant with asbestos in the school,” she said. Peter Stevens Motorcycles, celebrate the amazing turnout at Saturday’s event. “Some of the pebble bricks on the outside of the school are falling off and the glue that holds them in place also contains asbestos. “The school is just old.” Work has been done on the older buildings in the past to open the classrooms up, however Ms Gurnett said the rooms were small. She said the presence of asbestos in the school was the most pressing problem. “Safety is my number one concern,” she said. A new school would also create a better working environment for both students and staff. “It would be lighter, brighter and more conducive. It would allow us to operate in a more flexible way,” Ms Gurnett said. “I have been spending good money after bad LEONGATHA to keep the school up to its current standard. I CHEMIST ON DUTY don’t want my school to look bad. “That money could be better spent buying equipment for the students.” Ms Gurnett said for a small, rurally isolated community, it would be great to show the students the school can be a centre for excellence, no matter how isolated it is. New school please: Foster Primary School principal Lorraine Gurnett and students, from “It would show them what is possible. It would be lovely for the children, the community left, Luella, Becky, Taj, Brynley and Dominic are hoping their school can be replaced in the

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PAGE 4 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Aussie pride: from left, Trevor Yong, Genevieve Moore, Luke Dearlove, Chris Pappas, Joanne Street and Lloyd Morcom provide many laughs in FAMDA’S Australia Day. Photo by Yianni Banikos.

FAMDA’s Australia Day simply hilarious By David Tattersall AUSTRALIA Day, FAMDA’s latest offering, is a complete contrast to the company’s past few productions, which tended to be somewhat gritty, realistic and sometimes confronting dramas.

The audience at the opening night at the Foster War Memorial Arts Centre, last Friday rocked with laughter throughout the play as Jonathan Biggins’ wicked satire skewered Australian attitudes to everything from conniving shire councillors to global warming and endangered frogs blocking development. The play is a satirical look at the inner workings and tensions in an Australia Day planning committee. Playwright Jonathan Biggins, Australian actor, comedian and satirist, has drawn upon his experiences as an Australia Day ambassador in regional New South Wales to write with affection and much humour about a committee of people with diverse interests, ages and backgrounds which is planning the Australia Day celebrations for a small country town. There is Brian, the mayor and owner of the local hardware store, preoccupied both with a planning application from a bigger hardware chain which could spell the end of his business, and his hoped-for Liberal party pre-selection, his loyal deputy Robert, Maree, the CWA representative, who is rather at sea with modern communications technology, and Wally, local builder and “unreconstructed ” male who has no time for new-fangled notions about multiculturalism. Into this mix of local identities, toss primary school teacher Chester, representing the local schools, whose parents were Vietnamese boat people, and Helen, an ambitious and politically correct member of the Greens, who has moved to the area recently with hopes of using the Coriole Shire council as a stepping stone into parlia-

ment. The first half of the performance is set in the Coriole Scout Hall where the committee holds its meetings, and the second half takes place in a marquee on the footy oval about six months later on Australia Day, where almost everything that can go wrong, does go wrong. Director Andrew Oldroyd has put together a talented group of people for this production, despite the fact two cast members are making their stage debut in this play, and he, the cast, and FAMDA must be congratulated for making a polished production out of this hilarious play. Standout performances were given by Joanne Street (Helen, the Greens councillor) and Lloyd Morcom (Wally, the very non-PC builder), very ably supported by Chris Pappas (mayor) and Genevieve Moore (Maree, the CWA rep.). Newcomers Trevor Yong (Chester Lee, the schoolteacher) and Luke Dearlove (Robert, deputy mayor) gave solid performances that belied the fact this was their stage debut. The final five performances of this side-splitting comedy at the War Memorial Arts Centre, Foster, are on Thursday, October 20, and Friday, October 21 at 8pm, Saturday, October 22 at 2pm and 8pm, and Sunday, October 23 at 2pm and bookings are at www.trybooking.com/MWKY or Main Street revelations, Foster. There is limited seating, and tickets are already selling fast, so don’t leave it until too late. And please be aware that the play contains coarse language and adult themes.

Making a point: Trevor Yong as Chester the school teacher and Joanne Street as Helen the Greens councillor discuss plans for a celebration in FAMDA’S Australia Day. Photo by Yianni Banikos.

” er p a sp ew n y it n u m m co r ou “Y

36 McCartin Street, Leongatha 3953 Postal : PO Box 84 LEONGATHA 3953 Telephone : 5662 2294 Fax : 5662 4350 Web : www.thestar.com.au Editor Brad Lester : news@thestar.com.au Advertising Manager Joy Morgan : advertising@thestar.com.au Find us on Facebook Produced and published by Giles Newspapers Pty Ltd and printed by Latrobe Valley Express, Morwell. Registered business. ACN 006507580 | ABN 61 318 952 541 Print Post 336735 10006 HOUSE1627


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 5

Brass band fills arts centre NEARLY 400 people applauded the Wonthaggi Citizens Band as the group performed a stunning Annual Variety Concert on Saturday night. Held at the Wonthaggi Union Community Arts Centre, the concert was led by band’s musical director Craig Marinus and featured popular pieces from movies such as James Bond, Austin Powers and Chariots of Fire. Toe-tapping numbers When I’m 64 and Puttin’ On The Ritz had the audience bopping along and they were equally impressed by the band’s pieces played at the recent state championships in Ballarat, A Scottish Hymm, the march Justice With Courage, and the 18 minute long major work Sinfonietta No. 1 by Dutch composer, Johan de Meij. A highlight was a comical video band

members made of themselves in a running race, shown on a screen while the band played Chariots of Fire. The video can now be viewed on Youtube at www.youtube.com/ watch?v=AyASVagZhqE The band was joined by guest artists Tom and Corey Green, and the Newhaven College Boys Vocal Group. The band’s training band, Wonthaggi Youth Brass, also performed under the direction of Paul Berger.

In tune: Wonthaggi Citizens Band musical director Craig Marinus leads the band through one of many stunning numbers at the Annual Variety Concert on Saturday night. Photo by Foons Photographics.

Farmers remain cautious By Sarah Vella SOUTH Gippsland dairy farmers are feeling the benefits of a cracking start to spring and a recent lift in international markets, but are remaining cautious about the months ahead. International dairy commodity prices have staged a significant recovery in recent months, as global supply and demand slowly return to a more balanced outlook, according to Dairy Australia’s latest situation and outlook report. However, low farmgate prices continue to squeeze margins, which have had an impact on national milk production. The October situation and outlook report revealed decreased milk production from Australia, New Zealand and Europe is helping ease the

downward pressure on global commodity pricing caused by oversupply in recent years. Dumbalk dairy farmer Damian Murphy said international markets are showing positive signs. “Prices have taken a turn for the better, however everyone is still being cautious until we have seen it stick around for a bit longer,” he said. “We rely heavily on China, but there are other markets coming in as well. It is not all about China at the moment. The EU is slowing down and South East Asia is a pretty good market for us as well.” Dairy Australia senior analyst John Droppert said Australia’s milk production is forecast to drop 5 percent over the full season for 2016/17 as a response to low milk prices and tight margins. “The pain that many farmers in southeast Australia experienced last season and the ongoing challenges around margins will prove significant obstacles for some processors in securing

supply in the short term,” he said. “The first two months of this season have seen significant year-on-year declines in national milk intakes averaging 9 percent.” Mr Murphy said production on his farm has decreased slightly this season. “We are producing a bit less because we have been a bit more selective about which cows stayed and which ones went,” he said. “At the minute, we might be down but with the way the season looks we might get a long spring and make up milk in early summer, which will help as well.” Persistent rain has had an impact on the current season and has been welcomed after a dry 2015. “We have had a terrific season, it was really what we needed, grow grass cheaply and keep the cost of production down,” he said. “We have been able to do that which has made

a huge difference to cash flow this year. With other inputs coming down, that has impacted as well. “After last year, I am happy for the rain to continue for a while. I think most people would like a fine four days to get some silage off, but after that, it can rain again.” With some positive signs showing through for the dairy industry, Mr Murphy is feeling better about its outlook. “I think generally, the industry just got down and got back to work. There is not much talk about milk processors, people are just getting on with it,” he said. “It is a busy time on farm so everyone is just concentrating on that. “We have seen some positive signs come through and with the season the way it has started, it gives me a bit more confidence moving forward.”

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PAGE 6 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Native plants bloom for show FOR quality native plants to spruce up the garden, the Native Flower Show at the Leongatha Recreation Reserve was the place to be on the weekend. For two big days, a stunning range of native plants sourced from several local nurseries were

on sale for excellent prices. The Australian Plant Society South Gippsland branch has been running the Native Flower Show since 1988, and it continues to be a community highlight. Originally held in Koonwarra, the sale moved to Leongatha several years ago and has continued to be a popular event. Coordinator Coral Hughes

Floral expertise: Megan Hewett from the Melaleuca Nursery at Inverloch and South Gippsland Group member Hartley Tobin were on hand to advise the community about the perfect native plants at the Native Flower Show.

said it was nice to see familiar faces return from previous years and this year’s sale was every bit as good as the last. “We are appreciative of the car club for lending us the space and we are pleased with the amount of interest shown by the community,” she said. “The space was virtually full at the beginning of the day. The plants were selling fast.” The South Gippsland Conservation Society was on deck to sell books on gardening and native plants, and the South Gippsland Group took the opportunity to promote the Black Spur Wetlands proposal by the Nerrena Landcare Group. The proposal aims to value and re-establish the wetlands. It’s been a busy few months for the South Gippsland’s Australian Plant Society. Members recently went on an excursion to the Victorian Volcanic Plains, where they viewed some magnificent and established native plants. A day trip in November will take the group to the Dandenong Ranges and Mount Evelyn. For more details, the group meets most months in the Leongatha Uniting Church hall.

Green thumbs: Diane Garner and president of the Australian Plant Society South Gippsland Group Jim Lyons with some of the beautiful native plants that were on sale last weekend in Leongatha.

Good Read: from left, the South Gippsland Conservation Society’s Pam Pritchard and Cheryl Tyler were selling gardening books at the Leongatha Native Flower Show on Saturday.

Growing team: healing team members from left, Sandy and Barry Tapp, Errol and Kerry Jackson, Gail Newman, Lyn Souter and Paul Brailey will be looking for more people to gain qualifications at a training day on November 5. The day will be held at the Christian Revival Church in Hughes Street, Leongatha,

Help to heal BE a part of a modern day miracle. The Leongatha Healing Rooms will host a training day at the Christian Revival Church in Hughes Street, Leongatha, on November 5. The Healing Rooms is a quiet and soothing place for people to go and pray for health, and the team is looking for more members to help those in need. This session will qualify people to turn to prayer and help heal those who are sick or in pain. The cost of the training day is $65 for newcomers, and free for those who want upgrade their qualifications. All team members must be certified, and this training day will help people understand the rules and regulations, and confidentiality clauses, so more people can become actively involved. “What people need to be wary of is that we are

not primarily there to counsel people. We seek God and believe for healing, and it has worked so far. We have seen miracles performed,” team member Terry Aeschlimann said. Mr Aeschlimann said the exciting part of the training day is the afternoon, when participants will come together and pray. “It gives people confidence when they try it and see miracles happen. It’s worth going just for that experience. It’s an opportunity to be involved in modern day miracles. It’s a bit of positivity in this negative world,” he said. Rob Newton of Healing Rooms Australia will also be preaching at the Healing Rooms on Sunday, October 23. He will be available to speak to interested parties about the healing ministry between 1pm and 3pm.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 7

Candidates harassed Stalking claims mar election’s final days

By Brad Lester THE South Gippsland Shire Council election will finish on a sour note as the most controversial campaign in many elections when voting closes this Friday. Candidates have told The Star they have been subject to harassing phone messages, and have been stalked in the street and at their homes. They believe opposing candidates and their allies are to blame. The latest concerns come as the local government watchdog, the Local Government Investigations and Compliance Inspectorate, confirmed it was investigating a current complaint at South Gippsland Shire Council. A spokesperson was unable to comment on the nature of the complaint, but it is more than likely related to the satirical election form guide released on Facebook and distributed in hard copy that likened the election to a horse race and advised punters on the candidates most likely to perform and therefore worth a bet. Candidates unfavourably viewed by that form guide have made their objection to the document known. Councillor and candidate Don Hill confirmed he had submitted a formal complaint. “I lodged my complaint, as have others, and I have received notice back from the inspectorate that it is investigating,” he said.

• Cr Don Hill.

• Cr Andrew McEwen.

A spokesperson for the inspectorate said it “is investigating a complaint in relation to electoral campaigning by a candidate for South Gippsland Shire Council”. “The inspectorate deals with complaints or requests for investigation in strict confidence and does not provide comment on investigations that are yet to be finalised,” the spokesperson said. “The inspectorate has no further comment to provide regarding this matter.” A spokesperson for the Victorian Electoral Commission said election material was not permitted when it misled voters about how to vote correctly and did not

• Cr Jim Fawcett.

carry an authorisation line listing the authorising person’s name and address. The form guide stated “Punters are advised to disregard horses on a How to Vote ticket of five or more”. Candidates Cr Hill and Andrew McEwen, current councillors and closely aligned, have both authorised how to vote cards listing multiple candidates. Cr Hill’s card featured the preference choices of fellow Tarwin Valley Ward candidates Di Tod, Kim White, Rosemary Cousin, Philip Murphy and Ben Corcoran. They all preferenced Cr Hill second. Cr McEwen’s card listed the preference choices of fellow Strzelecki Ward candidates Viv Pepper, David

Wanless, Frank Hirst and David Amor, who all preferenced Cr McEwen second. The form guide also did not carry authorisation and that is the subject of criticism by Cr Hill. The form guide referred to him as The Brumby and “unbroken”, among other unflattering comments. Cr Jim Fawcett was described as The Professional and “outclasses the field”. “I think it was a bit of fun and it’s come and gone,” he said of the guide. “I appreciate they gave me a tip as being one of the likely candidates for Tarwin Valley.” Cr Fawcett denied he nor his allies among candidates were involved in producing the guide, but said the peculiarities of the campaign did not stop at the document. “Two or three other candidates have been saying they have been followed. It’s a weird election where the candidates are not talking about what they can do. They are attacking other people,” he said. “The rants on Facebook that some of the candidates have been putting out are vitriolic. “I find it a bit upsetting the way people are wanting to play it.” Whatever the result of the election, Cr Fawcett said the new councillors would have a better understanding of “what went wrong with the last council” and be able to deal with personality differences. The creator of the form guide remains a mystery.

Police wield tasers WONTHAGGI Police are now equipped with tasers as part of a rollout to all 24 hour police stations. The tasers fire electrodes into an offender threatening police and shock them, causing the offender’s muscles to contract, rendering them incapacitated. Every officer in South Gippsland and Bass Coast has undertaken a half day training course to use the tasers, and Wonthaggi’s uniform and highway patrol officers have had additional training. Deputy Commissioner Wendy Steendam said police would now have the option to resolve incidents dealing with violent people and those threatening self harm. “Unfortunately over recent years there has been an increase in incidents where police have been confronted by armed and violent people and those who are drug or alcohol affected,” she said. “These are often physical confrontations where police, members of the community and the individuals themselves are at risk of being injured. “They (tasers) can only be used when it’s believed it will prevent death or serious injury. In many cases, the presentation of a conducted energy device alone can help safely diffuse a situation.” Acting Senior Sergeant Andy Boldiston said an officer would be justified to use a taser if they felt there was a serious risk to a person’s safety or wellbeing. “These situations are no common place here, but if a situation was to arise and the mobile team wasn’t available, we would have to rely on a team from Latrobe, which would cause a big delay,” he said. “We had our baton and our capsicum spray, but we had nothing in between that and a firearm for high risk situations. Now we have the option to incapacitate.”

S/S Boldiston said unlike the spray, an offender would be affected by a taser 100 per cent of the time. “You can’t learn to ignore a taser. It affects the muscles and instantly incapacitates,” he said. “These tasers are also fitted with a light and a digital camera to record incidents. The camera starts recording until the taser is turned off, which gives greater transparency.” The footage from the tasers is downloaded in Morwell, independent of Wonthaggi police.

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PAGE 8 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Students escape tram collision BASS Coast Specialist School principal Edith Gray said she was incredibly proud of the students who continued to stay on camp after a tram collided with one of the school’s buses in Melbourne last week.

side the students’ accommodation on the corner of Collins and King streets in the CBD when the tram collided with the bus. Four students and four staff were on the bus. The driver was taken to the Royal Melbourne Hospital and two students were taken to the Royal Children’s Hospital. The bus driver was turning to park the bus outOne of the students returned to camp and the other was released from hospital on Friday after extra observation. Ms Gray said many people stepped in to help at the scene, and Bass Coast Shire Council provided another bus to ensure children returned home after camp on Friday afternoon. Eighteen students and nine staff attended the camp. Some students witnessed the accident from the second bus. “The best thing was all of our students decided to stay on camp,” Ms Gray said. “I was proud to see them keep going and complete all the activities, even after what they had been through. “We sent counsellors down to speak with the students who were either involved or witnessed the accident, and we spoke to all the parents to reassure them everyone was okay.” Students and staff explored the sights of Melbourne on foot for the remainder of the camp, and Bus crash: a tram collided with a bus carrying staff and students from Bass Coast Specialist enjoyed visits to the Queen Victoria Market and School last Wednesday. The bus driver and two students were taken to hospital but did not sustain serious injuries. Photo courtesy of ABC News. the National Art Gallery.

Health funding shortfall

Continued from page 1. The Star asked South Gippsland Hospital, Foster, chief executive officer Peter Rushen if the urgent care centre model in place across Victoria works adequately to ensure patients receive care when they need it. He said, “There are increasing demands on urgent care centres and our capacity to respond is becoming more difficult. We endeavour to support our community at all times and this has not changed. Unfortunately we are finding demand from other areas is impacting on our service.” Mr Rushen said there had been recent occasions where the Foster urgent care centre had needed to go on ambulance bypass but still assessed patients who self-presented. “If the hospital is busy there is not enough nursing staff available. We are not funded for additional nursing staff to cover the urgent care,” he said. The Foster urgent care department provides a 24 hour, seven day a week service supported by doctors from the Foster Medical Centre, including ‘on call’ after hours. Mr Rushen said patients are required to pay the doctor if they attend. Usually nurses review each patient attending and determine what degree of urgency there is. “Even with the doctor attending we do not deal with all cases. In some cases patients can be admitted to the hospital for further treatment and as we have a CT scanner in some cases we are able to undertake more diagnostic reviews before a decision is taken or if serious, like a cardiac case, they are stabilised and immediately shipped out either by road or helicopter,” he said. The Star recently reported some patients have been unable to receive treatment at the Leongatha Hospital urgent care centre due to the centre being on bypass or staff being too busy. Gippsland Southern Health Service may consider improvements to the way the urgent care centre operates. Chief executive officer Mark Johnson is inviting patients with concerns about their treatment to contact him or the service’s executive director of nursing Vicki Farthing. He urged people requiring emergency care to telephone 000 instead of presenting at urgent care centres. “That would be the quickest way of obtaining an assessment of whether you need an emergency service and to make sure the patient is transferred to the best place to receive emergency or urgent care, dependent on their needs,” he said. Gippsland South MLA Danny O’Brien raised the Yarram urgent care centre issue in parliament last Wednesday. “The problem that Yarram has as a community is that it has struggled in the last couple of years to attract new GPs to the town,” he said. “That has impacted on the hospital services to the extent that with one private GP no longer offering visiting medical officer services to the hospital, there is now only one GP in town who is prepared to man an on-call roster at the hospital.” Bass Coast Health chief executive officer Jan Child said the Wonthaggi Hospital’s emergency department had received a small increase in extra pre-

sentations, but these were “not placing any undue pressure” on the emergency department. “Our emergency department (ED) is well placed to serve the local and the broader sub-regional community and has the appropriate skillset and staffing levels, although our clinicians would love a new ED to do the work from,” she said. A spokesperson for the Minister for Health and Ambulance Services, Jill Hennessy, said as part of the development of the State-wide Services and Infrastructure Plan, the government was looking at access to urgent care.

“Many smaller regional communities simply don’t have the population and number of specialists available to safely manage major emergencies in all local communities 24 hours a day, seven days a week. This is the case at Leongatha,” the spokesperson said. “Leongatha residents should be assured that in an emergency they have access to a local ambulance service staffed by highly trained paramedics with branches in Leongatha along with nearby towns Korumburra, Wonthaggi, Foster and Mirboo North.”

Praise for doctors, nurses THE Star last week asked readers via Facebook to share their experiences of Leongatha Hospital’s urgent care centre on Facebook. Responses included a cancer patient being refused help and a patient being sent home with a fractured neck without an x-ray. However Leongatha resident Neena Allen praised the staff at the urgent care centre, pleased with the level of care they offered her late husband Graham Allen on three occasions as he endured Motor Neurone Disease. “We were always heard and the staff were willing to learn about Motor Neurone Disease and that made Graham feel safe,” Mrs Allen said. “We felt emotionally supported, as well as the medical side of things.” Mrs Allen said during his last visit to the Leongatha urgent care centre, her husband waited for a doctor for less than half an hour and said nurses were attentive.

“The nurses have a professional capacity to assess what is urgent and what is not, and sometimes you just have to wait. It’s not a perfect world,” she said. “At least the doctors are willing to cover that service because if they were not, we would not have a choice but to travel to other hospitals.” Mrs Allen said the dedicated staff of the Leongatha urgent care centre often bore the brunt of people’s frustrations “when the system doesn’t work perfectly or there are extended waiting times”. “But let’s remember we are all on the same side. I’m sure they would love adequate funding too. We have an invaluable resource with our small rural hospital and medical clinic providing so many services so we don’t have to travel,” she said. “Let’s support our doctors and nurses who do a wonderful job despite budgetary constraints.” Mr Allen died from the disease in February this year.

Community Energy Fund to be launched A LOCAL fund to support community energy in southern Victoria is the aim of the latest initiative from the Energy Innovation Co-operative (EICo-op). The Southern CORE (Community Owned Renewable Energy) Fund will be launched at the AGM of the EICo-op on Sunday, November 6, 2016, at the State Coal Mine, Wonthaggi. Donations into the fund will be made available to communities wanting to install renewables, enabling them to cut power bills and put vital investment back into their core activities. Bass Recreation Reserve committee, for example, is looking to install solar to cut lighting and water pumping costs so the netball, football and cricket clubs can spend more money on what’s important to them – coaching and playing sport. “We aim to support two community renewable projects and one conservation project to begin with,” said chair of the EICo-op, Moragh Mackay. It is hoped the first conservation project will be at the State Coal Mine Wonthaggi as part of the Old Energy New Energy project that the EICo-op is working on with Parks Victoria. “Once these sites are up and running we will invite more proposals and fund more projects,” Ms Mackay

said. The EICo-op is working on this initiative with the Bass Coast Community Foundation and the Communities Making Energy Together affiliation of Bass Coast and South Gippsland shires, Westernport Water, Mirboo North Energy Hub and several community members. This partnership brings a broad base of support to communities for researching, deciding on and funding fit for purpose renewable energy systems, making this challenging job a little easier. “How the Southern CORE Fund will work and how people and community groups can get involved will be the substance of a short presentation at the AGM,” Ms Mackay said. “We will also provide detail on the Old Energy New Energy project, which involves creation of a renewable energy hub at the mine. “After the presentations and lunch, we’ll take a walk around the site and anyone interested might like to take a tour down the mine while they are there.” Community power projects let communities take control of their energy supply, help clean up Australia’s energy system, reduce greenhouse gas emissions and create jobs in regional communities across the country. “It makes economic sense for our region to back community energy projects,” Ms Mackay said.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 9

Korumburra Primary turns 125 KORUMBURRA Primary School celebrated its 125th anniversary on Saturday. Former and current teachers, students and families gathered to reflect on the school’s rich history. The contents of the 1991 time capsule were on display, as well as the items that will be placed in a new time capsule. This time capsule will be buried at the school later this year. Current principal Nathan Pirouet said the afternoon fulfilled expectations and he was thrilled with the turnout of around 300 people. “Seeing our students take guests on tours of the school and connect with the history was great,” he said. “It was a marvellous day. It’s fantastic that 125 years later this school continues to thrive. We now have 500 students and 240 families. We continue to provide an important focus on literacy and it’s great to see that our students are so proud of our school. “I was also impressed with the speakers and the interesting stories they had to share. It was great to reflect on their positive school experiences.” Honoured guests included South Gippsland Shire Council mayor Cr Robert Newton and Gippsland South MLA Danny O’Brien. Attendees also had the opportunity to hear from current assistant principal David Gray, Grade 6 teacher and former student Nick Besley, and former assistant principal and former student Greg Twite. Mr Pirouet thanked the volunteers within the school community, whose great contributions helped bring the celebration together. More photos online at www.thestar.com.au

Special guests: from left, South Gippsland Shire Council mayor Cr Robert Newton, Korumburra Primary School assistant principal David Gray, Gippsland South MLA Danny O’Brien, former assistant principal Greg Twite, principal Nathan Pirouet and his daughter Ruby, and Grade 6 teacher Nick Besley welcomed the school community – past and present – to Korumburra Primary School’s 125th anniversary on Saturday. Right, School pride: Korumburra Primary School principal Nathan Pirouet and students, from left, Jahri Hogan-van Rooij, Ysabella Graham and Jean Cause were excited to take guests on guided tours at the school’s 125th anniversary on Saturday.

Contribution: from left, assistant principal David Gray, Sharon Jones, Lynne Dowell, Vicki Sullivan, Sam Davies, principal Nathan Pirouet, Brenda Jones and Wilma Walls (front) dedicated their time to put together the 125th anniversary of Korumburra Primary School on Saturday.

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PAGE 10 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

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COME along to the High Tea Pretty and Pink event at Loch on October 25. The Loch Community Development Association and McGrath Community Friend Foundation are hosting the inaugural high tea in support of Breast Cancer Month. The McGrath Foundation helps families of people experiencing breast cancer by placing breast cancer nurses in communities. The high tea will be held at the Loch Public Hall, Smith Street, Loch, from 1.30pm. THE inaugural Tarwin Flower Show will be held at the Tarwin Lower Mechanics Institute Hall on Saturday, October 29. Open from 9am to 4pm, judging will take place at 11am. Entry is via a gold donation. Check out the entries in the categories of exotic flower, native flower, curiosity specimen and floral arrangement. There will be adults’ and children’s sections, and prizes. Register your entries by Friday, October 21 with Tracey on 0402 995 063. On Monday, October 31, the famous Tarwin Lower Market will be held next to the hall from 8am to 2pm. See numerous stalls of new and old wares, produce, clothing, plants and food. Check out the new barbecue menu too. To book a stall, phone Anita on 5663 7345. FIREFIGHTERS will descend on Meeniyan this Sunday, October 23, for a wildfire training exercise to be held by the Country Fire Authority. The event will help prepare firefighters for the summer fire season and brigades from Dumbalk, Fish Creek, Foster, Hedley, Inverloch, Milford, MeeniyanStony Creek, Pound Creek, Port Welshpool Coast Guard, Toora, Tarwin Lower, Welshpool and Yanakie will be taking part. Firefighters will respond to simulated events. DAY for Daniel on Friday, October 28 is a National Day of Action to raise awareness of child safety, protection and harm prevention. It aims to educate children and adults about keeping kids safe through child safety and protection initiatives. Wear red and educate is the theme as schools, kindergartens, businesses and communities across Australia conduct child safety activities to help children recognise, react and report if they feel something is not right.

All students, parents and teachers are encouraged to wear red to take part and contribute to raising awareness. KORUMBURRA Primary School held its annual

art show at Federation Art Gallery last week. The theme was ‘Global Designs’ and the art featured creative and colourful work. The show featured work by every student – nearly 400 pieces of art.

Inspiring: Powlett River Primary School’s Grade 4 student Marney Jordan-Ferguson talked to the junior student about how she lives with cerebral palsy to celebrate World Cerebral Palsy Day recently. Marney talked about how cerebral palsy is the most common childhood physical disability, affecting an average one in every 500 people. Marney amazingly learnt to walk when she five years old after the doctors told her she may never walk or talk properly. Marney celebrated World Cerebral Palsy Day by skipping for the first time in her life.

Golf club eyes men’s shed THE men of Leongatha South may have another social outlet. The Leongatha Golf Club will host a meeting on Wednesday, October 26 at 5pm to gauge interest in establishing a men’s shed at the club. While any men’s shed based at the club is likely to have male golfers as members, the club would like to encourage and engage with men from the local farming community. The focus of a men’s shed based at the golf club is yet to be finalised and would be dependent upon the interests of those who attend the scoping meeting. One focus that is likely will be men’s health as this now underpins most men’s sheds. The club is at 855 Koonwarra-Inverloch Road, Leongatha South and light refreshments will be provided at the meeting. For further information and to register your interest, please contact golf club general manager Josh Hall on 5664 3314, Peter Waters on 5674 2092, or Barbara Look, community strengthening officer at South Gippsland Shire Council, on 5662 9319.

Beautiful quilts: Leongatha South’s Wilma Norton enjoyed success at the Royal Melbourne Show recently. Her stunning quilts received first, third and highly commended awards. Wilma’s family congratulated her and was extremely proud of her achievements.

Looking back: Robert Sage (pictured) will present a local church history at the Ecumenical Pleasant Sunday Afternoon at Scots Pioneer Church on Sunday, October 30 at 2pm. Sue Stott will play the organ and flautist Emily Chadwick will present a special musical feature. The occasion will include a memorial tribute to the late Margaret Castle, who gifted the church for the community’s benefit. Reverend Paul Bauer will lead devotions and a dedication of a plaque to Ms Castle, and community singing will be held before afternoon tea is served. The church is at 1230 Mardan Road, Mardan South.

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Garage sale backs medical services THE South Gippsland Hospital Murray to Moyne team has raised much needed funds in the past five years

for medical equipment and more recently to refurbish the patient lounge area.

effort for the hospital by holding a monster garage sale together with the Foster Medical Centre to raise funds for its Emergency The team is kicking off its next Medicine Fund. The joint event will take place on Melbourne Cup weekend, October 30 from 8am in the carpark behind the hospital Community Health Centre, Foster. Samantha Park, Murray to Moyne team rider, said, “There will be something for everyone and good bargains to be had on the day. We already have a wide range of goods such as books, kitchenware, toys, furniture and clothing. If you have goods to donate they can be delivered to the hospital during the week before Community support: Samantha Park and Dr Alison Wilde October 30, and we hope everysorting through some of the goods already donated for the one will come and support these garage sale to be hosted by South Gippsland Hospital and great causes on the day.” For more information please Foster Medical Centre. contact Sam Park on 5683 9780.

Mirboo North run for farmers GIPPSLAND Farmer Relief Incorporated (GFR) is offering a free social day for the dairy farming community in these challenging times.

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The GFR Inc. All Abilities 5km and 10km Fun Run/ Walk is being conducted with the Mirboo North branch of the Bendigo Bank. The event will be held on Saturday, November 5 from 9am at the old Darlimurla Train Station at Mirboo North. The station is accessed from Darlimura Road via both

the Strzelecki Hwy and via Boolarra. The five kilometre run will start from 9am and the 10km run from 11am. The start and finish is at the Old Darlimurla Train Station. Free car parking available. A free barbecue of sausages and burgers and soft drinks will be provided at the main park at Boolarra. All runners/walkers will receive a medal of participation. Bookings are essential and must be made no later than October 28. All enquiries can be made by phoning 0475 632 162.


“THE STAR� Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 11

Making a point: from left, Chris Cantlon, David Rasmus and Brian Hess of the South and West Gippsland Transport Group welcome council candidates’ support for the return of rail services. They are at the Korumburra Railway Station.

Candidates back rail’s return MOST candidates in the South Gippsland Shire Council election support the return of rail services to South Gippsland. That is according to a survey conducted by the South and West Gippsland Transport Group. Twenty of the 32 candidates standing took part in the survey, which also asked candidates if they supported the funding of an integrated transport plan for South West Gippsland at a cost of $30,000 to $40,000, in conjunction with four other local councils. The group’s acting chair David Rasmus said, “Our next major goal is to secure the newly elected council’s formal support for the integrated transport plan funding, in conjunction with the region’s other local councils. “This is a precursor to lobbying for a major transport infrastructure and investment plan and commitment for this region from the State Government.� The South and West Gippsland Transport Group was founded as a community action group in 2011. “Our sole interest is in achieving a positive transport outcome for the residents and the businesses in our shire and region,� Mr Rasmus said. “We have been lobbying local, state and federal government and candidates of all political persuasions in all elections from the outset. “Earlier this year we started an online petition for the return of rail to Leongatha which was

signed by 2403 supporters. This petition was delivered to South Gippsland Shire Council and the Legislative Assembly of Victoria. “We also submitted proposals for improved transport in South Gippsland - including returning rail to Leongatha - to all candidates for McMillan at the federal election.� Mr Rasmus said without an integrated transport plan - essentially a feasibility study - first being undertaken, the State Government was unlikely to seriously entertain an investment in regional transport infrastructure in South Gippsland. “We are the forgotten region and if we don’t stand up for ourselves and bring this issue to the forefront in Spring Street, no one else will,� he said. “South Gippsland was not even on the State Government’s radar in the recently published Regional Network Plan.� He said where rail and integrated transport has returned and/or been further optimised in other regional areas such as Ararat and Bairnsdale, more people choose to move there, property prices rise and more rates are collected. “More services and businesses are attracted to the area or are convinced to remain and are made viable. But here in South Gippsland we are stagnating, shops are closing, services are leaving, and we are turning into an economic backwater, all the while being asked to pay more for less,� Mr Rasmus said.

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PAGE 12 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

OPINIONS

I’m not a “stooge”

IT seems that some sitting councillors believe there is a conspiracy or ‘subtext going on below the surface’ in this council election, with “single-issue candidates” having been “encouraged” to be “dummies” in order to get other councillors re-elected. I am unaware of any conspiracy. The reason why South Gippsland has a record number of candidates nominating in the forthcoming election is because many care deeply about the community, and many have perceived a culture of complacency, a lack of transparency and openness, a wastefulness, and a lack of both respect and real forward thinking occurring over the last four years of this out going council. This is the reason I nominated. I, like many, have also sadly experienced council employees’ inflexibility and lack of consideration amounting to serious unprofessionalism, that has caused anger, frustration and even despair. Many in the community also perceive a majority of councillors who simply want to preserve the status quo, and who have repeatedly voted down others with more progressive and genuinely caring concerns. While councillors cannot directly impact council employees’ actions, they have a duty to direct and influence the CEO as to the overall culture and behaviour of council employees to ensure council serves the community’s best interest. However, from the Foster and Korumburra candidate forums it’s heartening to see so many excellent council candidates who are genuinely concerned that we as a community can do better. I do most sincerely hope the wider community reads these progressive and genuinely disinterested candi-

dates’ 200 word statements that will by now have arrived in mail boxes all over the shire, and vote accordingly. For the record, before nominating for the Tarwin Valley Ward, I knew none of the sitting council members personally (though had met Cr Hutchinson-Brooks and Cr McEwen each once). After nominating, I was approached by two sitting council members and invited to share a mail-out of preferences in order to save time and costs. In talking with them, I realised we share many common goals and aspirations and have directed my preferences accordingly. Di Tod, Koorooman.

Own thinker CLEARLY Andrew McEwen does not think he can get elected on his own merits and has organised a group of candidates to all give him their next preference. I received a ‘how to vote’ card from Andrew which showed how to vote by him plus four other candidates. Another candidate sent a separate how to vote which again gave Andrew his next preference. All six of them put the two current serving councillors last on their cards. For my part I will be voting using the exact reverse of Andrew McEwen’s card. My research also indicates Don Hill has behaved in the exact same manner in the Tarwin Valley Ward. Graeme Coates, Bena.

Desperate deeds I HAVE been informed that someone created a Facebook page in relation to

E D I T O R I A L

No room for shortcuts ONE does wonder why schools have to fight so long and hard to get funding. Then again, it’s the same with hospitals. Yet education and health would have to rank the two most essential services people need, regardless of whether they live in the country or city. The Star today reports that Gippsland South MLA Danny O’Brien is lobbying the State Government for funding to rebuild Foster Primary School. This follows his successful campaigns for money to rebuild part of Korumburra Secondary College, where works are now underway, and Yarram Primary School. At Foster, the school is falling apart, with buildings containing asbestos and roofs leaking. With the Federal Government willing to spend $170 million on a plebiscite to determine if the Australian public wants marriage equality, one does wonder why those communities dependent on quality education and health infrastructure have to wait or lobby for funding when the money is obviously in government coffers. The plebiscite, while tackling a significant social issue, may not necessarily result in changes to government policy given it would be non-binding, so what is the point. As The Star reports today, some members of the gay community believe politicians should vote on the issue in parliament rather than undertaking a costly public vote that could cause gays anguish. The Leongatha community, and particularly the dedicated board and management of Gippsland Southern Health Service, had to deal with broken pipes and other deteriorating infrastructure for years before the government finally funded a new hospital. Now urgent care centres at the region’s hospitals are in need of more funding to meet community demand. Shortcuts can’t be made with education and health, and let’s hope Foster Primary School receives money for planning for a rebuild in the next state budget and funding for urgent care centres is addressed.

Letters guidelines ALL letters should be kept to 400 words or less. The Star reserves the right to edit all letters for length and style. Writer’s details, including full name, address and phone number (not for publication), must be included.

Letters to the Editor

the current election that is in breach of the Electoral Act. Whilst masquerading as humour the contents of the page are in fact an expression of support for some of the former councillors. Not only is the dissemination of such materials without the name and address of the author being displayed illegal, but it also highlights the hypocrisy and cowardice of the persons behind it. The Old Guard on the council has apparently criticised those who have issued how to vote cards yet they have participated in an attempt to achieve the same result under another guise. Section 83 of the Electoral Act requires that the name and address of the person who authorised the material needs to be contained in the material. Section 84 prohibits the dissemination of material that is misleading or deceptive. Neither the Facebook page nor the parts of it published in another newspaper complied with the requirements of the act. I have lodged a complaint with the Victorian Electoral Commission. It will be interesting to see the outcome of the investigation. I believe that some candidates displayed the material on their office windows and that they have been told to remove it. Another candidate has apparently been seen distributing the material to office premises. It is inconceivable that those candidates, who have been on the council for some time, did not know that they were breaching the act. Their conduct reflects their cynicism and contempt for the system and the lengths to which they are prepared to go in order to be re-elected. That conduct also explains the failure of council over the last four years and highlights the choice that has to be made by the voters: either vote for a continuation of such conduct or bring in change. Vincent A. Morfuni, North Melbourne.

Why our rates go up CANDIDATES for council receive many requests from pressure groups to fill in questionnaires and surveys through the election period. I respond to as many as possible. I completed a survey from Music Victoria. Responses are published on its website. Many candidates across Victoria also responded. Two questions were: (Q6) If elected, would you be willing to undertake a music audit to identify your music community. (Q7) Would you then support the development of a music strategy for your shire. Most candidates naturally said yes to both questions. I was just one of three candidates for the whole of Victoria who answered no to these questions. Here’s why. Firstly, I am not opposed to mu-

sic in any way - far from it. If I was a candidate in Northcote or St.Kilda, I might have answered differently. But we are a farming shire and our local economy is struggling. That is our core responsibility. The easy option for our shire when officially asked, is do a music audit, create a strategy and appease a pressure group. We start off with say a $20,000 audit. It doesn’t sound much. It gets buried in the council agenda and councillors vote for it. Money is spent on consultants to make a report. They traverse Victoria making audits and it’s good business - for them! In their report, they cross out the words Southern Grampians or Golden Plains and replace with South Gippsland. Human nature dictates the consultant feels silly writing a report telling our shire to do nothing at all. They must come up with a spending plan. Invariably, they recommend we add another staff member to payroll. Of course as we add each extra staff member, over time we need a bigger personnel, accounts, IT and records office. We need more managers to oversee all this progress. We get more council cars, more telephones, more iPads. The spending manifests and up go the silent majority’s rates. I told Music Victoria that our shire already has music venues established in our shire. We have Moss Vale Park. Come and use it. We have a multitude of country halls from Nerrena to Dumbalk to Mount Best. Hire them out and use them. Fifty years ago people and communities didn’t need the shire to organise a music event or an old time dance. A decade ago we had two music shops in Leongatha. Today there are none. We need an economic development taskforce investigating why we are losing so many of our shopkeepers. We have to get our commercial centres going again. Enough is enough. The silent majority is telling me it wants our money spent on our local roads. They want the basics done. People are fed up with rate rises going through the roof. People want a more caring bureaucracy. The culture of indifference has to stop. When we get our local businesses vibrant, then perhaps we can look at music. But not before. Philip Murphy, candidate for Tarwin Valley Ward, Mardan.

Trust is key TRUST is the tissue that binds people to believe. If trust is lost it leads to discontent and scepticism and underlines the need to look for change. This community has lost trust in a broken system called the South Gippsland Shire and its councillors. How could I disagree with such a sentiment? I was a victim of such a bureaucracy and disinterested coun-

Email: letters@thestar.com.au Post: PO Box 84 Leongatha 3953 Fax: 03 5662 4350

cillor attitudes. Ratepayers are entitled to feel that their representatives have their best interests at heart. But I also believe the communities in the South Gippsland Shire must have trust in a bureaucracy that serves them. It is broken; however, it can be repaired as long as the elected councillors undertake a programmed strategy of reform to address the present and future needs of its people. Council is about services to the community it also has a fundamental responsibility to ensure the physical and mental health of its citizens. People are worried about the lack of vision but look for a methodology of change that will result in a prosperous future for you, for your children and their children. I am suggesting short, medium and long term strategies with tangible outcomes. I cannot begin to understand the total concerns of every community in the shire, however the answers normally rest within those communities. They have the answers, what councillors and the bureaucracy need to do is to listen and work together to fix it. Some of the short term fixers are: to give rate relief, distribute the rates income equitably, streamline and flatten out the staff structures in council and work with the CEO to establish real priorities and fix them. Remove any notion of a new council precinct and look at better ways to operate within the shire. The medium strategy is to change the ‘them and us’ culture and to provide effective long term service provision without the waste. Council needs to address the future and plan for it with outcomes that matter and take into account the communities it serves. Sound progressive thought is required. Sell our shire as a place to come and visit to stay and live. Long term outcomes are always difficult to predict. The age of globalisation, digitisation, and the future strains on the earth’s resources with overpopulation and the ever increasing world social issues including transmigration must all be considered. We must not rely on state and federal agencies to do our thinking for us. We must be progressive, use our wonderful resources and develop structural building blocks that ensure our future. We have a great climate, productive soils, energetic and capable people, inquisitive intelligence and the know-how. We just need to funnel it to achieve the best outcomes. So it does not matter who you vote for but please remember your vote at this election will be the beginning of something great unless you decide to vote for the same old crew that got you into trouble this time. Vote wisely and I leave you with my message: To do nothing is social negligence, so do something and vote

for vision, prosperity and a future for your children. You must leave a message that makes you the catalyst, that will change our shire to be the best place to live. Frank Oostermeyer, candidate for Coastal Promontory Ward, Dollar.

Too many chiefs at shire THE September meeting of South Gippsland Shire Council lasted 17 minutes and was a perfect example of the incompetence, dysfunction and contempt for ratepayers I have noticed at the many meetings attended. The mayor was told to stop Cr Davies from electioneering and Cr Fawcett ‘self-congratulated’ the council on the financial results for the year, which I thought was yet another example of the rubbish displayed over last four years. I think the financial results for the year ended June 30, 2016 say much about the incompetence and abandonment of management of this outgoing council to a bunch of bureaucratic fat cats who, to me, had a ball with ratepayers’ money. The number of senior officers other than the CEO increased from nine to 11 and salaries in this area alone increased by $279,000, which is 21 percent. If I add payroll on-costs and other ‘inducements’, this could well double or more but of course that is kept secret. The rest of the fat cat population numbers is kept secret but the total may well be an astronomical high of 30. The newly elected council will have to deal with the fact that out of an income from rates and charges of $38.6 million, the employee costs of $24.1 million must be accounted for. With a rate cap of 2.5 percent on this income and a future a blow-out in these employee costs, money must be found in other areas. Unfortunately other areas are not going well either with, for instance, consultants, projects and legal fees increasing from $671,000 in 2015 to $1,264,000 in 2016, an increase of $593,000 or 88.4 percent in one year. With one of the lowest satisfaction ratings and one of the highest council rates, this council is the worst I have ever come across. And I hold the ‘voting bloc’ firmly responsible for that in every aspect. Every time councillors McEwen and Hill proposed lower rates, better accountability, less secrecy, better management, no $32 million wastage on new offices – amongst others - they were outvoted. I am delighted to notice many of the new candidates for council have recommended members of this ‘voting bloc’ are put last. I hope that ratepayers will agree. Gus Blaauw, Venus Bay.

VOXPOP! VOX What do you do to keep fit during the week?

“I go surfing. I try to go twice a week.” Noah, Wonthaggi Primary School.

“I go bike riding to Harmers Haven, through the wetlands or along the rail trail.” Luke, Wonthaggi Primary School.

“I do little aths at the high school, as well as dancing and netball. I enjoy little aths because it gives me freedom in what I do.” Maya, Wonthaggi Primary School.

“I do dancing and I like it because it’s a lot of fun.” Jess, Wonthaggi Primary School.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 13

Generations: children of former Mary MacKillop Catholic Regional College students are now wearing the uniform with pride.

College to celebrate THE community of Mary MacKillop Catholic Regional College will commemorate the school’s 30th anniversary this weekend, October 22 and 23. An anniversary dinner will be held at the Wonthaggi Workmen’s Club on Saturday evening to mark the milestone. Overseen by master of ceremonies Margaret Dekker, guests will enjoy the recollections of former principals Ed Carmody and Michael Delaney, together with former students Kate Lindsay (deBondt) and Courtney Blair, musical performances by students, and be introduced to the inaugural group of MacKillop Achievers, recipients of a new award that recognises the accomplishments of selected former students. Twelve students who have attended the col-

lege throughout its 30 years will receive the award at this year’s dinner. Sunday’s festivities start with a celebration of the Eucharist in the College multipurpose hall at 11am, followed by the official naming of college buildings and a tree planting. The community is invited to share in a family barbecue provided by the parents and friends association. Coinciding with Sunday’s events is the annual College Expo, an exhibition from the many learning areas of the college. Visitors can explore the college, view displays, participate in workshop activities and attend performances by students. For more details, visit http://www.mackillopleongatha.catholic.edu.au/ or contact the school on 5662 4255.


PAGE 14 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

National forum showcases local feats SUCCESSFUL partnerships between communities and councils in South Gippsland were the toast of Australia at a national forum at Inverloch last Tuesday, October 11.

Sharing ideas: from left, outgoing executive officer of Mirboo North and District Community Foundation Derrick Ehmke and incoming executive officer Ruth Rogan, chat with Bass Coast Community Foundation executive officer David Wall and chairman of Leongatha and District Community Foundation Rob Bacon at the National Community Foundations Forum last Tuesday, October 11 at Inverloch.

Representatives of community foundations across the country heard how local councils had worked with community foundations to save the Mirboo North Childcare Centre and also train young drivers in Bass Coast Shire. These topics were among the highlights of the National Community Foundations Forum held at Inverloch RACV Resort, jointly hosted by Mirboo North and District, and Bass Coast community foundations. The foundations raise and invest funds that are dispersed into their respective communities. A new foundation servicing Leongatha is in the formative stages. Bass Coast Community Foundation executive officer David Wall said the forum opened many possibilities. “This brings the 30 community foundations represented here together so there are 30 different ways of operating,” he said. Outgoing executive officer of Mirboo North and District Community Foundation Derrick Ehmke said 92 delegates attended. He was accompanied by incoming executive officer Ruth Rogan, a lawyer formerly of Ireland and a resident of Mir-

Leaders together: Bass Coast Shire Council chief executive officer Paul Buckley (left) discusses the role local government can play with community foundations with South Gippsland Shire Council chief executive officer Tim Tamlin. boo North for four years. Bass Coast Shire Council chief executive officer Paul Buckley noted the shire was the second municipality in Australia most reliant on tourism, after Uluru. The Mirboo North and District Community Foundation’s director Wendy Major spoke of the foundation’s involvement with saving childcare services in Mirboo North in 2013, after UnitingCare Gippsland withdrew, citing the centre was unviable. “The foundation board recognised the impact of the loss of the childcare centre,” she said, noting parents would have taken their children to childcare

centres in other towns, shopped there, and even possibly left Mirboo North. The foundation underwrote existing losses and further losses for the first two years of a new provider operating, funded repairs and provided new equipment ahead of YMCA Ballarat taking over. Delyse Graham of the Bass Coast Community Foundation told how the group provided $40,000 to the Bass Coast L2P program to fund the purchase of vehicles in which volunteer drivers have taught 170 young people how to drive. The program is run through council.

Dedicated volunteer honoured LEONGATHA’S Marjorie Jarvis recently received the Council of the Ageing Senior Achiever Award as part of the Victorian Senior of the Year awards at Government House. Ms Jarvis has been actively involved with supporting the South Gippsland community her entire adult life. In 1972, she was the foundation president of the Woorayl Lodge Nursing Home Auxiliary and still volunteers with the organisation 44 years later, working hard to raise funds to support residents and their families. “I’ve been community minded all my life,” she said. “I enjoy doing it, staying busy and helping out where I can.” She was a member of the Leongatha Auxiliary for the Royal Victorian Eye and Ear Hospital until it ceased in 1999, raising more than $61,000 to support people with eye and ear problems. She volunteered with Red Cross and Meals on Wheels until she was in her late 70s. She is also an active member of the Country Women’s Association and the Senior Citizens Club. “I was very excited when the (South Gippsland) Shire nominated me for the award, and I was thrilled to bits when I received it,” Ms Jarvis said. “Winning this was my proudest moment. I have a son and a daughter who were able to come to Government House

with me. They were also thrilled that I had received the award.” Although the award is judged on a nominee’s volunteering efforts past the age of 60, Ms Jarvis has been an avid South Gippsland volunteer for

most of her life. Some of her other achievements include her involvement on the Berrys Creek school committee and mother’s club, and her fundraising efforts to help build the Berrys Creek hall.

Worthy recipient: Leongatha’s Marjorie Jarvis received the Council of the Ageing Senior Achiever Award from Minister for Housing, Disability and Ageing Martin Foley at Government House recently.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 15

Save at Marriotts’ Super Saturday Sale PUT off the gardening this Saturday – at least until after you have been into Marriotts Motorcycles and Power Equipment in Leongatha. The massive business has the biggest range of power equipment for the garden in South Gippsland and this Saturday, October 22, is the Super Saturday Sale. Customers will find an amazing variety of deals across the store, with discounts of around 50 percent in some cases. The whole shop event will encompass superb gear by reputable manufacturers Stihl, Toro, Cub Cadet, Greenfield, Rover and Masport, with sales representatives from those companies available to chat with custom-

ers in-store and offer advice. “This is a store-wide power equipment sale, from mowers to brushcutters, to hedge trimmers and pressure cleaners and ride-on mowers,” sales manager Jim Welsh said. Specials will also be offered on push mowers, compost shredders and gardening tools, including battery powered garden shears. Stihl is offering an extensive range of spring saver deals, including brushcutters from $179 – the cheapest they’ve ever been – and hedge trimmers are $229. Plus chainsaws, blowers and push mowers will be discounted. A zero percent interest rate will be offered on Toro ride-on and push mowers for 1000 days. The ride-on mowers offer the

choice of a close trim to save mowing time in the long run or a high cut to help mow large open areas fast. Ride-on mowers can be equipped with such accessories as baggers and recycling mulch kits, and they can tow. Marriotts MPE manager Tim Marriott promised amazing deals on the day, as well as a sausage sizzle. “It’s our big start of season sale. We will have clearance offers on old stock as well as super dooper deals on new stock,” he said. The sale is on this Saturday, from 9am to 3pm at Marriotts MPE, 34 Anderson Street, Leongatha. Don’t miss out.

Caravan parks at a loss By Sarah Vella ONE Yanakie Caravan Park annual has claimed the South Gippsland Shire Council is set to lose more than $800,000, due to the reduction in annual site holders. Rod Francis said at out of over 100 annual permit holders at Yanakie, he estimated only around 25 remain, of which he is one. And he is planning to leave too, eventually. Council’s other park at Port Welshpool has also suffered from the loss of annual permit holders. “Families have lost everything and apparently over grand final weekend, when Yanakie is normally busy, it was deserted,” Mr Francis said. With only a handful of annual permit holders staying on at the park, Mr Francis said the council has “virtually destroyed” it.

“They have destroyed what was a profitable caravan park. I don’t know how it will survive, to be honest.” he said. “The council is talking about spending over $500,000 on its caravan parks next year. Who for? There is nobody there.” Council’s 2016-17 budget has allocated $84,000 to replace cabins at Long Jetty, and $91,000 for electrical work and tree removal at Yanakie. There is also an allocation carried over from 2015-16 of $376,000 to upgrade the toilet block at Long Jetty. Annual siteholders at the Long Jetty and Yanakie caravan parks were given 18 months to get their vans up to code after the council took over management of the parks in 2013. This came with an increase in annual permit fees of around 40 percent. Council did not have any new comments to offer about the caravan parks at this time.

First class: Jim Welsh, sales manager at Marriotts Motorcycles and Power Equipment, demonstrates a quality Stihl brushcutter. Grab a deal this Saturday.


PAGE 16 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October eerr 18 18, 8, 20 22016 16

Hats off: there is even a dedicated costume sewing room at The Shed in Won- Very proud: designer and builder Tad Hendry and Gwen Derrick, members of the Wonthaggi Theatrical Group, outside the group’s new home, The Shed at the State Coal Mine in Wonthaggi. thaggi, constructed by local builder and theatre group member Tad Hendry.

Theatre fires up at coal mine QUITE simply known as The Shed, the new home of the Wonthaggi Theatrical Group represents a whole lot more and is injecting new life and creativity into the State Coal Mine. Like a phoenix rising from the ashes, this inspiring performing arts hub continues the “loving and friendly” connection the performing arts has always had with the local miners in Wonthaggi. Passionate and long serving Wonthaggi theatre group members Tad Hendry and Gwen Derrick are very proud of their “Shed” and see it as a legacy for future generations. They are both thrilled the group has built its new home at the coal mine and see the group’s story coming full circle with the devastating fire in 1980 destroying the original Miners Union Theatre built in 1924 and now a new hub has risen at the State Coal Mine. The Star of the day reported the fire: “The Wonthaggi’s Miners Union Theatre in Graham Street was destroyed by fire early Friday morning. “All that was left of the building was the brick facade at the front and along the side-the timber area was completely gutted. “The alarm was raised just after midnight and three units from Wonthaggi, two from Inverloch, one Dalyston one from Kilcunda attended the blaze. “It took nearly two hours for about 50 firemen to contain the fire and men were still mopping up at 10am Friday. “The Wonthaggi Borough Council was in the process of buying the theatre from the Wonthaggi Theatrical Group. “It is understood the council was buying it for $44,000 and the building was to be converted into a community arts centre.” Talking to The Star at The Shed last Thursday, Gwen said she remembers the fire vividly as she lived close by and was awoken by the bright light of the fire through her bedroom window. She saw the beloved theatre burn to the ground and with it a rich history that encompassed many happy events, including concerts, meetings, dancing, boxing bouts, garden and vegetable shows, and in 1969 the Wonthaggi theatre group’s first performance.

Gwen said, “We had nothing when we started and it all began after seeing one of Leongatha Lyric theatre’s productions, Naughty Marietta (in 1969). “Bill Mitchell, our only constable and artist, and I both thought Wonthaggi could have something like this, and the seed was planted.” As devastating as the fire was, Gwen and Tad believe it made the group even more determined to not just succeed, but thrive. After some 50 years of struggle and hundreds of hours of hard work, they are proud to see the group flourishing and a new home established that will serve the community for generations to come. They both agreed The Shed would not be where it is today without the help of so many including coal mine manager Braxton Laine, Parks Victoria, former local MP Ken Smith, current MP Ryan Smith and group member Wayne Moloney. And taking pride of place over the entrance to the performance area is the original Union Theatre clock, salvaged from the ashes. After many homes and much research, the clock has finally found its home at The Shed, “where it belongs”, maintains Gwen and Tad. Very much the quiet achiever, Tad wouldn’t admit to it but every inch of The Shed has his mark on it from the industrial design of the shed, in keeping with the period style buildings at the coal mine to the stunning art deco interior, beautiful foyer and bar and even the toilets, are impressive. Then there is the spacious performing and rehearsal space, office, meeting room and construction area, upstairs a costume sewing room, costume storage space and on the third level a large props storage area. Looking around the construction room where Tad has devoted many hours over the years creating award winning sets for productions, many times directed by his talented wife Karen Milkins-Hendry, an amused Tad said group members always like having a bit of fun. Over the years, unbeknown to most, he always makes sure there is a little Gwen Derrick sign in every production, very much akin Alfred Hitchcock, who quietly made some 39 cameo appearances in 52 of his films. So next show be sure to try and spot where’s Gwen Derrick! Gwen said, “Tad has tried to give people a whole

Nuts and bolts: Tad Hendry in the construction space at The Shed where he spends hundreds of hours creating award winning sets for the Wonthaggi Theatrical Group’s productions. theatrical experience from the moment they walk through the front doors of The Shed.” As for the doors, Tad said he has made replicas of the doors from photos taken of the original union theatre. He said, “The next step will be heating and air-conditioning and we hope to have this installed by Christmas. “We still need lighting bars, a bio-box and tiered seating for 200 but this will all be a lot of money, at least $200,000 for the seating alone.” Tad said they will be looking at getting some funding and grants to assist. The Shed is already in full use with the theatre group rehearsing or working on Monday, Thursday and Sunday, the Bass Coast Ballet School there weekly Tuesday, Wednesday and Saturday mornings and the local U3A group regularly meeting there. The group’s first production, Little Shop of Horrors in 1962 at the Wonthaggi Union Arts Centre, was a huge success, clearing some $23,000. The group has since gone from strength to strength staging some brilliant plays and musicals, including the award winning Les Miserables musical that Tad said received a standing ovation on opening night from the 400 strong audience. Then there was Cabaret, Jesus Christ Superstar and Pippin, to name a few. The company decided it was apt to stage its first show again, Little Shop to mark the opening of The Shed on September 22.

Youth award: the Gwen Derrick Youth Development Fund is awarded to a young production member annually. And no surprise, it proved another winner for the group and the stage is now set for a bright future with production already underway for the next two big shows for 2017 being Miss Saigon in May/June and Chicago in August. Shows for 2018 are still being reviewed but for the group’s 50th milestone year in 2019 Les Miserables will be making a return. The Wonthaggi group is always welcoming new members, both for acting and the all important back stage work, so if you are interested there will be an information session for Miss Saigon on Sunday, November 6 at 4.30pm.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 17

Donations help people die at home THE Jelbart family knows more than most the value of Gippsland Southern Health Service. Grandmother Dorothy, and parents Max and Barbara all received palliative care from the health service and last Tuesday, October 11, the family returned the favour. The Jelbarts and the Powlett River Downs Campdraft Club donated $5000 each to the health service to buy two pressure care mattresses to enable people with terminal illness to die in their homes. “The mattresses are designed to treat pressure injuries in people who are high at risk of developing them, particularly patients coming to the end of their lives who are bed ridden,” health service clinical nurse and consultant palliative care Mary Ross-Heazlewood said. “In order for people to die at home it’s about the support, keeping them comfortable to help with their independence and it helps the carers because the mattresses assist patients to get in and out of bed on their own.”

Two of Max and Barbara’s sons, Tim and George Jelbart, attended the presentation last Tuesday. “It’s good to be able to give back to the community and be a part of it,” Tim said. The Jelbarts’ donation was a combination of a family contribution and donations given at the memorial service to their late father Max. A separate joint donation by the Jelbarts and the campdraft club was made to the health service after the death of Barbara Jelbart in 2014, and funded the purchase of two electric king single beds for use in the community. Barbara had used a standard size bed and Max’s mother Dorothy also used one in 2013 before she died. “Max said make sure you get it extra long because he may need it one day and unfortunately he did,” the campdraft club’s Glenn Park said. The Jelbarts have supplied hundreds of cattle to the campdraft for some 18 years. “It’s a huge ask and a fantastic effort from the Jelbart family,” Glenn said. The next Powlett River Downs campdraft will be held on the last weekend in February, 2017.

Comfort first: front, Tim Jelbart (left) of Leongatha South and George Jelbart of Surrey Hills gather with Powlett River Downs Campdraft Club members, back, from left, Wayne Cook, Glenn Park and Alan Mitchell, with Gippsland Southern Health Service’s clinical nurse specialist Jan Cox, occupational therapist Eliza Huntley and clinical nurse consultantpalliative care Mary Ross-Heazlewood. They are pictured with a pressure care mattress the Jelbarts and campdraft club bought.

Candidates hear coastal plea cants, residents and council applying to the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal. The detail will be worked out through the amendment process but the objective of the overlay schedule is to protect the valued character The alliance wants a schedule to the design of the townships as identified in the local policy and development overlay for small coastal towns framework. developed to specify conditions where a permit is not required. This will help ensure the character of the towns is maintained by the design of building or works. Two of the 24 candidates sent apologies and indicated their support for more prescriptive height and design controls in the towns. Any applications to vary these, as of right conditions, would be assessed against specific decision guidelines. Conditions that exempt a building or works would relate to height, set back, site coverage, landscaping, front fences, colours and materials. This would encourage developers to undertake a construction that is sympathetic to neighbourhood character, as having to apply for a permit is onerous. Four did not reply to the invitation, including Island candidates Kimberley Brown, Rodney Spottiswood, Ruth Partridge and Val Ogier. Only one of the 18 candidates – Cr Phil Wright – opposed the alliance’s proposal outright. Cr Neil Rankine supported the intent but believed a much wider housing strategy was necessary. Candidate Les Larke also wanted a comprehensive review of Bass Coast Shire’s planning scheme. Julian Brown gave qualified support. The proposed schedule will provide specific guidance as to how to assess applications that seek to vary these conditions, to determine what is acceptable and what is not. This will reduce the need and the cost to appli-

EIGHTEEN of the 24 candidates running for Bass Coast Shire Council attended the Small Coastal Township Alliance meeting at Kilcunda Hall recently.

Plant enthusiasts: Allan and Judy Morcom will open their garden to the public as part of the Inverloch open gardens day to be hosted by the Inverloch Uniting Church on Saturday, November 5.

Open gardens will inspire INTRIGUING coastal gardens will be on show next month in Inverloch. The Inverloch Uniting Church has arranged gardens to be on show as part of its annual open gardens. Among those gardeners taking part are Allan and Judy Morcom. Their one acre creation is largely natives arranged in a series of beds, with a bush-like setting providing privacy at the rear of the property. “We wanted colour and different greens, and lots of flowers as well. There are a lot of layers,” Allan said. “All gardens keep changing. You think you finish but you don’t actually finish.”

Visitors will find a mix of groundcovers and higher bushes, artistically pruned to create layers of varying foliage, plus a well designed vegetable garden and orchard comprising blueberries, apples, nectarines, limes and lemons. A fernery with pond makes for a peaceful setting and children will be delighted by the timber cabin complete with outdoor campfire. “We’ve been here nine years and have largely created the garden ourselves,” Judy said. A plant stall will be held at the church. The gardens will be on show on Saturday, November 5 from 10am to 4pm and entry is $10 per person and includes morning or afternoon tea. Collect a map from the church in William Street, opposite the post office.


PAGE 18 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Photographer works magic for charity WONTHAGGI photographer Trevor Foon spent four months building a camera from recycled materials to produce a single photograph for a national charity. Years of co-owning a family business in pho-

tography has forced Mr Foon to watch equipment become redundant as technology evolves. This inspired him to build the camera. “I wanted to make something that would last through the ages,” he said. Mr Foon said he loved the concept of creating something with

historical significance, and found the right materials to tie this concept into the construction of his camera. “I made it all by hand from an old solid jarrah step from our building’s staircase, which over 100 years old,” he said. “It took me four months of designing, adapting,

testing and refining until I made it work the way I needed it. Everything used was recycled, collected or revamped from leftover materials.” The auction, run by the Australian Institute of Professional Photography – the country’s largest photographic membership body – is aimed at raising

One of a kind: from left, Nick Ghionis, Joanna Bettegacci, Wonthaggi photographer Trevor Foon and Jerry Ghionis with the charity image created by Trevor. Nick and Jerry are professional wedding photographers and brothers, and modeled for the charity image. Joanna bought the image during the auction.

money for charities each year. This year, Mr Foon volunteered his time to produce an image he took with his newly purpose built camera to raise money for the Centre for Eye Research Australia. The imaged was auctioned for $7500. “The process I used to create the auctioned image is called wet plate process, which was invented in the 1830s,” Mr Foon said. “It involves pouring a solution of collodion directly onto a sheet of black coated metal and then dipping into a bath of silver salts. The plate is put into the camera while still dripping wet with chemicals. Once exposed, it is developed immediately. “The resulting image is made of pure white metallic silver on the black plate surface.” Once varnished to protect the silver from tarnishing, the image has an expected life in excess of 200 years. “The metal fittings are also made with the instruction of my dad who was a fitter and turner in his days before he turned to photography. The lens and bellows were the only items I didn’t make,” Mr Foon said. Images produced with

Crafted: Wonthaggi photographer Trevor Foon created this camera by hand and produced an image that was auctioned for $7500. The proceeds raised money for Centre for Eye Research Australia. this type of camera are very unique. Multiple copies aren’t possible unless the plate is copied and then paper prints are made. This is what makes this tin type plate so valuable. The size of the camera dictates how large the plate will be, so Mr Foon said he built his camera specifically to accommodate a plate of size 8x10 inches. “It’s a nice big size to make a statement when displayed. I wanted to make something that was functional, and that might be kept and treasured sometime in the future when I am finished with it,” he said. “So why use a slow,

messy, smelly, unpredictable historic process in this day and age of digital perfection? One – it puts the craft control back into the photographer’s hands. Two – the images have a depth and clarity impossible to reproduce on paper. Three – the images look soulful; and four – there is an element of pure magic seeing the image emerge from a tray of chemicals, as much for the photographer as for the participants. “Every image I make is an original. It’s not a snapshot and takes a lot of consideration before the plate is ready. Every image I make is going to be special and something that will last for generations.”

Children show the way THREE primary schools are working together to develop a series of maps identifying safe walking routes to school as part of Walk to School 2016. The VicHealth Walk to School maps and signs were available for students from the start of term four.

Supported by South Gippsland Shire Council’s Walk to School team with funding from VicHealth, students from St Lawrence’s Primary School, Leongatha Primary School and South Gippsland Specialist School identified safe routes to school and created a map for fellow students. The schools are three of 13 already registered for the

Get moving: Leongatha Primary School children, including Sylus, Hannah, Kiti and Devinaty, are encouraging other children to find safe routes to walk to school.

Walk to School program in South Gippsland. The new maps show: crossing points for students including the monitored school crossings and the new traffic lights at the intersection of Long Street and South Gippsland Highway, Leongatha; safe routes for each school from around town; and coloured signs along each route to guide the way. “We hope that with the beginning of term four families will choose walking instead of driving their children to school,” council’s Walk to School project support officer Irene Desiatov said. “Find a safe route and use it.” Families from outside Leongatha can drop their child at a point along one of the safe routes to walk some of the way to school. Council’s social planning officer Vicki Bradley said Walk to School month was about developing healthy physical and mental habits for life. “Students of all ages gain confidence in walking to school by using the safe routes to schools maps or following the coloured signs,” she said. “Walking to school can reduce barriers to physical activity and improve safety awareness and reduce traffic around schools. We hope the maps, signs and warmer weather means students will walk to school on a regular basis, even after Walk to School month has ended.” For more information contact council on 5662 9200 or go to the Walk to School website at www. walktoschool.vic.gov.au.

Great effort: from left, Dumbalk and District Progress Association vice president Ed Hanley, president Toine Bovill, treasurer Joy Dyson, secretary Bev Hanley and project manager Walter Aich are excited to be officially opening the Dumbalk Community Centre this month.

Centre a real asset for Dumbalk By Sarah Vella DUMBALK’S former kindergarten and infant welfare centre is now the town’s community centre and after several years of renovations and hard work, it will be officially opened this month. The opening will be held on Wednesday, October 26 from 1.30pm. Dumbalk and District Progress Association secretary Bev Hanley said once Dumbalk’s school closed, the kindergarten closure was the logical progression, with the infant welfare centre closing years earlier. She said once that happened, the building was sitting unused, which is when the South Gippsland Shire Council decided it would sell the building. “The progress association was determined to try and save it,” she said. Mrs Hanley said the Dumbalk com-

munity was concerned that if it sold, it would be lost forever. The association convinced council not to sell the building and was granted a lease on a yearly basis. Project manager Walter Aich said the rolling lease was a good start, but without a secure tenure it was difficult to obtain grants to renovate the space. “The council eventually agreed to give us a three year lease, which expired in August. We now have security of tenure for the next nine years,” he said. “We are grateful to the council for that support.” Mr Aich said once the lease was secured, it was a matter of chasing funds for the refurbishment. What were originally two separate buildings is now a single building, with rooms for visiting professional services, including medical, as well as a large function room and office space. It also has a new toilet and change room area, including an Australian standard disabled access toilet.

The renovations didn’t happen without their fair share of challenges. “What was meant to be an $80,000 project turned into a $120,000 project, which was supported largely through the Foundation for Rural and Regional Renewal, which provided a $61,143 grant,” Mr Aich said. Other contributors included the progress association, council, the Mirboo North and District Community Foundation, and donations from organisations and individuals. “We also benefitted from an enormous amount of donations in kind from local tradespeople and the community as well,” Mr Aich said. Progress president Toine Bovill said the project is not finished yet. The community centre is already home to community activities, meetings and events and there are plans to extend its usage further. “It has a very different function to the hall. A lot of people think Dumbalk has the lot, but the community worked hard for it all,” Ms Bovill said.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 19


PAGE 20 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Esso backs out of oil ESSO Australia confirmed it has received outside interest in the Barry Beach Marine Terminal, after recently announcing it would be looking for an external operator.

Above, Emergency guys: from left, Yanakie CFA captain Sean Taylor, Hedley CFA captain Ian Conn, Port Albert Coast Guard deputy commander Bill Knibbs and Esso Australia’s Cliff Kratzing at the Esso Australia stakeholder and community liaison lunch recently at the Foster Football Club rooms.

On fire: Foster CFA captain David Jones, Gippsland South MLA Danny O’Brien and Welshpool CFA’s David Grylls caught up in Foster at the recent Esso Australia stakeholder and community liaison lunch.

Teacher time: from left, Welshpool and District Primary School principal Gabbi Boyd, Toora Primary School principal Andrea Penrose and Alberton Primary School principal Malissa Nicol enjoyed catching up at the Esso Australia stakeholder and community liaison lunch at the Foster Football Clubrooms recently.

Dalyston dancers benefit from federal funding THE Dalyston Hall received $7727 from round two of the Federal Government’s stronger communities program. This money will go towards four reverse cycle air conditioning units. “I am delighted the Dalyston Hall committee of management will be able to install four reverse cycle air conditioners with this funding,” Flinders MP Greg Hunt said. “This will allow the Dalyston dancers to continue to kick up their heels on the dance floor.” Dalyston Hall committee of management secretary Grant Davies said this would make an enormous difference, especially in the middle of summer and winter. “We are very pleased to have this support from the Federal Government, allowing us to use the hall year round in comfortable conditions,” Mr Davies said.

Mr Hunt said community groups in the electorate were sharing in grants of $150,000 per year over two years through the Coalition Government’s stronger communities program. “The grants fund small capital projects that deliver social benefits to a variety of groups by supporting participation and contributing to the vibrancy of our local communities,” Mr Hunt said. “Congratulations to all the groups that secured grants through round two of the stronger communities program. “I look forward to seeing local projects taking shape across the electorate as a result of this terrific initiative.”

All year round: the Dalyston dancers will be able enjoy the Dalyston hall in all conditions after receiving $7727 from the Federal Government – and Flinders MP Greg Hunt (pictured) - to install four reverse cycle air conditioners.

Below, Happy: Jean Liley from the Prom Coast Seachange Festival committee and Richard Jones, president of the Rotary Club of Foster had a delicious meal, provided at the Esso Australia stakeholder and community liaison lunch.

“No definite decision has been made at this stage, we are still working through the process,” Barry Beach Marine Terminal superintendent Mark Duthie said. He was speaking at the annual Esso Australia stakeholder and community liaison lunch at the Foster Football Clubrooms recently. Mr Duthie said Esso will be making several changes in the near future, which he described as “inevitable”. He said Esso was aware any changes it makes at Barry Beach will have an impact on the local area, however ultimately, any changes it does make will be for the better. The decision to look for another operator for Barry Beach was deemed necessary due to significant underutilisation of the facilities at the site, particularly now the Kipper Tuna Turrum project is finished. “We are now running a single vessel, once a week to service all of the platforms. There are resources at Barry Beach we are not using,” he said. Mr Duthie said Esso aims to bring in a new operator that will manage and potentially bring new business to the site, while still fulfilling Esso’s needs. “It is a great asset for Gippsland, particularly South Gippsland and provides an opportunity for freight to come in and go out via Gippsland,” he said. “We hope whoever takes it on will bring this to fruition and expand the business. Bringing in more business means more jobs and support for industry and could open up economic opportunities for the region.” Mr Duthie said if an external opera-

tor managed Barry Beach, there was the potential for new jobs at the site in the future. “If we keep operating the site, there probably won’t,” he said. If Esso does relinquish management of Barry Beach to a third party, the company still plans to maintain a presence in South Gippsland and continue to contribute to the community. Mr Duthie said if another operator cannot be found, Esso will continue to operate it in its current capacity. “We are not going to develop it into a main port. We will do what we are doing now,” he said Barry Beach is not the only asset Esso and its parent company, ExxonMobil is trying to offload. Some of its oil fields, licences and associated offshore infrastructure in the Bass Strait are up for grabs, as is the company’s office building in Southbank. ExxonMobil operations manager Andre Kostelnik said the company is in the process of transitioning from an oil business, to a gas business. Oil production in the Bass Strait has shrunk from 500,000 barrels a day in the 1980s to less than 20,000 barrels per day now. Mr Kostelnik said gas used to be a by product of oil production, however it is now seen as a cleaner, more affordable and reliable energy source. “We are committed to Gippsland (but) we need to make sure we are not underutilising assets. We are making changes to strengthen our business,” he said. “There are many thousands of jobs that rely on the gas we produce here in Gippsland.” When asked if Esso would consider renewable energy, Mr Kostelnik said “no”. “It is not what our core business is. It is to make the most of oils and gas resources in Bass Strait,” he said.

Getting the good oil: from left, South Gippsland Shire Council councillor Moyha Davies, Toora Fire Brigade’s Ray Argento and Barry Beach Marine Terminal superintendent Mark Duthie at the Esso Australia stakeholder and community liaison lunch in Foster.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 21

Tasmania inspires Scouts AFTER weeks of fundraising, the 2nd Korumburra Scouts set off to Tasmania for a week of fun recently. They visited Seahorse World, Launceston, Port Arthur and hiked to Cape Huay where they saw amazing views and tackled the 4222 stairs. The troop travelled across Bass Strait on the Spirit of Tasmania and enjoyed face painting, games and movies. At Seahorse World, they saw and held Tasmania’s pot bellied seahorse, starfish and sea urchins, and also toured the Beaconsfield Mine. At Port Arthur, the scouts boarded a boat cruise to the old boys’ prison and the Isle of the Dead, while at Hastings Caves they learnt about rock formations. The Scouts walked above the treetops at the Tahune Air Walk, and wobbled the platforms to scare the leaders. To raise funds for the trip, the group held

Serene location: 2nd Korumburra Scouts savour the views at the top of Cape Hauy, in the Tasman National Park, Tasmania. discos, sausage sizzles and a market night, staged raffles and sold first aid kits and chocolates. On the first night, they were met by the Devonport Scouts who had prepared a cooked dinner.

Come along: shoppers will never know what they will find at the Car Boot Sale and Market to be held by Chairo Christian School this Saturday, October 22.

Find a surprise at Chairo’s Car Boot Sale and Market THIS Saturday’s (October 22) annual Car Boot Sale and Market at Chairo Christian School is part of Garage Sale Trail, Australia’s big day of ‘good stuff’. There will be more than 10,000 garage sales happening around the country on the day. Garage Sale Trail is a simple way of bringing communities together and promotes the reuse and recycling of valuable resources rather than sending them to landfill before their time. Chairo’s event will run from 8.30am to 1pm at 101 Horn Street in Leongatha. There will be loads of

Business as usual at Cardell Accountants AFTER 15 years of providing accounting and audit services for Cardell Accountants to the local community, Barry Hughes has recently retired. Barry initially worked with Bob Cardell to grow the practice to what it is today. Both Barry and Bob were community minded, highly intelligent and had conservative ethical principles which continue on today as part of the firm’s culture. Barry’s contribution and humour will be missed. Cardell Accountants is pleased to advise Jason Kennedy and John Kilsby have recently successfully completed the Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand post graduate training program. Both are now qualified Chartered Accountants, bringing their qualified expertise to the firm. The team at Cardell Accountants is now led by partners Marcus Bond and Lyndal McKenzie. Mr Bond has also recently completed his studies, allowing him to provide financial advice on Self-Managed Superannuation Funds and related matters. This means the practice is compliant with the requirements of FOFA for accountants, which came into effect from July 1, 2016, enabling the continued provision of advice to clients. Such advice has become more pertinent in the light of the changes to the superannuation regime currently being considered by the government. The firm held its Annual Charity Day on Saturday, August 6.

Staff volunteered their time by coming into the office and working unpaid. Mr Bond stated, “As a team we recognise that we are in a fortunate position where donating some weekend time can make a real difference to the life of others.” This year the recipients were Crohn’s and Colitis Australia and the Wonthaggi SalvationArmy. More than $3000 was raised. In the past seven years, Cardell Accountants has donated $22,780 to various charities.

Helping charity: from left, Andy Postlewhite, ministry assistant at Wonthaggi Salvation Army, thanks Connie Butterfield, practice manager at Cardell Accountants, for the firm’s financial support of the army.

preloved and recycled goods for sale, together with craft, local produce and baked goods. Some stalls will be run by students and local churches, and there will also be party plan consultants selling new goods. With hot food available and free activities for children, including face painting, jumping castle, popcorn and fairy floss, the Chairo Car Boot Sale and Market will be a worthwhile and enjoyable outing for all ages. To book a stall, contact Karen on 5662 4355. Car boots and stalls are $15, while indoor stalls for selling new goods only are $20.

Gippsland Nationals celebrate 100 years Experienced team: from left, recently retired partner Barry Hughes, newly Chartered Accountants John Kilsby and Jason Kennedy, and partners Marcus Bond and Lyndal McKenzie, of CardellAccountants.

IT was 100 years ago that a small group of Victorian farmers united because they believed regional Australia was too important for politicians to ignore.

Happy birthday: National Party life members Meree Bath and Lindsay Cameron blow out the candles during the celebration of The Nationals’ 100 years. tives, supporters and of course our hard working and passionate volunteers.” The morning tea included a ‘Question and Answer’ segment which revealed highlights, low points and laughs experienced during the Members political journeys. “The Nationals really are like a big family and it is important we honour our supporters

both past and present who have helped keep our party strong in Gippsland,” Ms Bath said. “For 100 years we have been providing strong representation for our regional communities, fighting for our fair share of government support and ensuring Spring Street is well aware of the value country people contribute to our state, and we will continue to do this into the future.”

CAR410026

And it was this passion for regional Victoria that was the common theme of speakers at The Nationals 100 years of unbroken political representation celebration at Traralgon recently. “It was a fantastic celebration with speakers including our iconic past members in Peter Nixon and Peter Ryan as well as current members of parliament Federal Member for Gippsland Darren Chester, Senator Bridget McKenzie and Member for Morwell Russell Northe,” Member for Eastern Victoria Region Melina Bath said. “Much of our great talent originates from Gippsland so it was great to get together at the old courthouse in Traralgon and celebrate our party’s representa-


PAGE 22 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 23

STAR Real

THE GREAT SOUTHERN STAR

Outstanding development opportunity Page Page 28 28

Leongatha


PAGE 24 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

STAR Real

ADVERTISING FEATURE

Live the dream – an exceptional property

T

HE quality of this architecturally de- access in from the double garage and also out to signed home on approximately 2.5 shady front verandas. A large study/home office (or fifth bedroom) comes off the family room. acres simply stands out. It has its own access, ideal for home business/ Private amongst superb, colourful gardens,

the location is perfect for those seeking a country lifestyle with the benefits of town facilities just minutes away. Features of this wonderful home are many, including large windows in most rooms framing beautiful garden views, gas ducted, solid fuel and open fire place heating and spaciousness throughout that most can only dream of. Approximately 35sq of living (50sq under roofline,) the floorplan includes two huge north facing living areas. An open plan family room incorporates an updated kitchen, dining and sitting areas, direct

GJG2190011

Welcome home.

Wednesday 12noon - 3pm and Saturday 2pm - 4.30pm or by appointment 5952 2150 113-115 Parr Street, Leongatha

consulting purposes. A separate lounge is large enough to also accommodate a three quarter sized billiard table. To one end of the home is a parents’ retreat that needs to be seen to be believed –a sitting area, large walk in robe and ensuite bigger than most family bathrooms are featured. The second or guest bedroom also has an ensuite. Two more bedrooms both have built in robes. Excellent shedding includes one 20ftx30ft and another 30ftx40ft shed with three extra high roller doors for caravan storage. There There’ss also a chook shed, an enclosed vegetablee garden and small fencedd paddock. A bore for garden wa-tering and plenty of rooff surface provide a constantt Insight Real Estate water supply. Leongatha If rural life amongst a garden paradise is on thee 5662 2220 agenda, inspection of thiss remarkable property is a must. 4 3 5 Discover a lifestyle youu will love.

LEONGATHA

165 Racecourse Rd

$685,000


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 25

STAR Real

ADVERTISING FEATURE

Fantastic location T

HIS home would be great for a young family or someone looking to get into the property market. You are positioned across the road from sporting facilities and close to the main streets of Leongatha. This neat and tidy two bbedroom home can easily be tturn into three bedrooms by cconverting the second living aarea into a bedroom. The bedrrooms have built in robes.

LEONGATHA

49 Roughead Street

Elders Real Estate Leongatha Jean O’Loughlin 0428 571 083

$299,000

2

1

4

The kitchen has electric cooktop and oven and leads into the dining area. There are ceiling fans in all rooms and a split system for heating and cooling. The bathroom has a separate bath, shower and a separate toilet. The yard is fully fenced and there is access down the side and back lane. The house is complete with a good sized yard, double garage and a double carport. If you would like to inspect this property or have any questions, please contact Jean O’Loughlin on 0428 571 083.


PAGE 26 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

STAR Real

ADVERTISING FEATURE

Prime location A

ONCE in a lifetime opportunity to purchase a prime site in the heart of Leongatha, this huge 1945m2 block of land is perfectly located a stone’s throw from the central business district. The property has the unique added benefit of having sealed roads at each end that provides endless options to develop. You have the choice of developing the whole site or part develop subject to S.T.C.A and live in the attractive existing home while still having oodles of space. The comfortable home comprises of three bedrooms with built in robes plus a study, a large functional kitchen and open plan dining and living. Externally, the house has attractive verandahs, double carport that gives direct access into the home, a single garage and large separate work shop.

This property provides endless opportunities and is well worth an inspection. The property is open for inspection on Saturday, October 22, from 11am to11.30am.

AUCTION LEONGATHA 14 Ogilvy Street November 19 at 12pm on site

Stockdale and Leggo Leongatha Mike West 0409 583 692

3

1

3


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 27

STAR Real

ADVERTISING FEATURE

Not to be missed T

HIS beautiful contemporary home is only six years old and priced to sell.

Situated at the end of a cul-de-sac and tucked away on a corner block, you will feel like you have your very own private location right in the middle of town. It is close to the schooling precinct, and within walking distance to the shops as well. Upon entering the home, you will be drawn into the expansive lounge/dining/kitchen area, which is beautifully offset in a split level space. The fully appointed modern kitchen features a dishwasher, double sink, gas cooking and rangehood, complimented by a large free standing breakfast bar. The cathedral style ceiling also allows for plenty of beautiful north facing light to flood the kitchen/dining area, and the house is suitably heated and cooled by way of a large split system. Landmark Harcourts Included with the property is a four kilowatt solar system with 16 Leongatha panels. Glenys Foster There are three generous bedrooms, all with built in robes and the master bedroom has a walk in robe and a beautiful modern bathroom. 0477 622 297 This home is beautifully finished with quality fixtures and fittings and the soft colour palette is very appealing. Don’t miss the opportunity to inspect this property, you will not be dis3 2 2 appointed.

LEONGATHA

13 Silverback Place

$340,000


PAGE 28 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

STAR Real

ADVERTISING FEATURE

LEONGATHA 49-55 Brown Street Alex Scott and Staff Leongatha 5662 0922

$649,000

4

2

6

7850m residential land with clinker brick home T

With four bedrooms, including main with ensuite, and two living zones plus a fully enclosed ‘outdoor room’, the home offers great family living. A double garage adjoins the house, and a 6m x 9m lock up workshop/garage with a double carThe genuine clinker brick home is cleverly lo- port in front offers plenty of shed space. cated on half of the block, leaving the balance of For those enjoy their sport, the full size tennis the land vacant for easy development. court at the back of the block will be the perfect place. The gently sloping land is approx 1.9 acres and zoned residential one, making it ideal for those who would like to further develop. One of the best opportunities to come onto the market in recent time, don’t miss out on investigating all that is on offer here.

HIS is an outstanding opportunity to acquire a large residential allotment with immediate development opportunity, or simply to enjoy living with wide open spaces at a town address.

Regional growth increases REGIONAL Victoria is increasingly attractive to investors and home buyers, as home prices in and around Melbourne continue to increase. This includes first time investors as there are a number of regional areas, including many closer to Melbourne that can be purchased at a relatively affordable price. This is underlined by the regional Victorian median house price of $347,000, compared to the Melbournewide median of $725,000. Those considering investing in any form of property across the state, will often see some terms used to discuss the investment’s performance - namely capital growth, investment return and gross rental yield. The term capital growth is often used in real estate to describe the increase in the price or value of a property. Gross rental yield is a term that describes the rental return on a property investment. To calculate the amount you divide the yearly rental income by the purchase price of the home. Meanwhile, the term investment return includes capital growth and rental yield. It enables investors to establish the return on their investment over a period of time – be it a quarter, a year or a number of years. Investors looking for comparative data on the investment potential of different homes will find the Real Estate Institute Victoria’s website a useful source of information.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 29

Clean tanks mean safe water THE dry season is fast approaching and now is the perfect time to get water tanks cleaned out before summer. The Watertank Clean-

ing Company specialises in cleaning water tanks with minimal disruption to supply, owner Adam Riddle explained. “Now is the best time for people to get their tanks cleaned out before the water level gets down,”

he said. “As the weather warms up, the water level gets down and only then do people realise how dirty their tanks are.” Established in 1996, the Traralgon based Watertank Cleaning

Spreading understanding: Wonthaggi North Primary School students Tamika (left) and Levi (right) with their science teacher Marissa Cashmore were among the students to submit entries to South Gippsland Water’s poster competition as part of their science focus on water and sustainability, as part of National Water Week.

Company has devoted itself to providing optimal support for its customers from Phillip Island and Mallacoota to Lakes Entrance. “We vacuum out the sediment and sludge and remove all bacteria from the tank. We are very careful so as not to stir up the water and our customers only lose an average of a foot of water during the clean,” Mr Riddle said. Most water tanks only require a vacuum to rectify any bacterial and dirt problems, however if any debris is found within the tank the Watertank Cleaning Company can sterilise the water with consumer friendly chemical solutions. “We are also more than happy to help customers with minor tank repairs and installing lids and liners on tanks,” Mr Riddle said. “We can repair wall and base cracks in concrete water tanks and organise steel galvanised iron lids to be fitted to open concrete tanks.” The company also endeavours to create as little disruption as possible. “Our customers can

Terrific tank clean: Adam Riddle cleans out tanks all over Gippsland using a contamination free vacuum system. Customers can rest assuring knowing their drinking water is clean after a visit from the Watertank Cleaning Company. drink their water as we are driving off the property,” Mr Riddle said. Mr Riddle advised residents to get their tanks cleaned out prior to summer.

“People service their cars regularly so they should try to service their tanks regularly too, especially considering they are putting water from the tank into their body,” he said.

“The way we see it, the prevention is always better than the cure.” The company is now offering water testing to ensure South Gippslanders remain healthy.


PAGE 30 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Don’t replace it, coat it LEAKING water tanks are time consuming and costly, but can be easily rectified by the team at Bass Coast Waterproofing without having to replace the tank.

Good as new: Wooreen farmer John O’Loughlin said he is glad his old tank, originally built in the 1950s, was able to be restored with the help of Bass Coast Waterproofing.

The Bass Coast Waterproofing protective coating products are a range of sprayed-on polyurethane/polyurea elastomers that provide a flexible bond to metals, wood, concrete and fibreglass. The coating can be applied in thickness from one millimetre to over 50mm, and can stretch to accommodate expansion and contraction of the substrate without adhesion loss. It is dry to the touch within 10 seconds, providing full and unrestricted use in less than 24 hours. Wooreen farmer John O’Loughlin has had a concrete tank treated by Dick Pendlebury from Bass Coast Waterproofing and couldn’t be happier with the result. His home made, open topped concrete water tank from the 1950s was “leaking like a sieve” and needed to either be fixed, or replaced. “I saw an advertisement from Bass Coast Waterproofing in the paper and gave Dick a call,” Mr O’Loughlin said. “He gave me a quote, which was basically the price of two poly tanks of equivalent size. But to weigh it up from there, new tanks require the ground to be levelled, new plumbing and so on. “It would have worked out dearer to replace it. I didn’t have to change any of the existing plumbing and it solved all of the leakage issues.” Mr O’Loughlin said one of the reasons he was so keen to repair his old tank was because of ease of cleaning. “Because it is an open topped tank, I can just jump in and clean it, as opposed to poly tanks that just have a small man hole,” he said. “That was a big thing for me. Once a year I can get in there and clean it out.” Mr O’Loughlin said the job was done and due to rain, part of the process had to be repeated, which was done at no extra charge. He said if the need arose, he would definitely use Bass Coast Waterproofing again.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 31

Keeping fit: from left, St Joseph’s Primary School, Wonthaggi, Grade 2 students Kai HeenVital for life: National Water Week is a time to remember to not take the value of water for an, Augustus Finsterer, Eva Brown and Mia Duggard walking through the school’s entrance as part of the Walk to School initiative. granted.

Water nurtures the world NATIONAL Water Week is again making a splash across Australia inspiring people, communities and organisations to work together to build community awareness and understanding around water issues and opportunities for growth and innovation. This year’s National Water week’s theme is ‘Water - life - growth’, encouraging sound water practices and investment in water sources to ensure current water sources are not exhausted in potentially challenging times ahead. National Water Week provides an opportunity for people to be reminded about the value of water and to teach others that water must be used wisely if there is to be enough to meet the needs of future generations. While the week is dedicated to encouraging communities to take action to protect vital water sources, it’s also a celebration of innovation and water achievements that have and will contribute to Australia’s sustainable future and economic prosperity.

Why ‘Water - life – growth’? Water is used every day. We use water to hydrate ourselves when we’re thirsty, to keep the plants alive in our gardens, to shower, brush our teeth and wash the dishes. But water plays an even bigger role in our daily lives than we might think. Water is vital to make sure the different industries we all rely on are supported sustainably, like agriculture to grow the food we eat. Water is fundamental to make sure the environment is healthy, and to make cities and communities happy places to live. If we want life and growth in the future, we need to make sure we use our water wisely today. The Australian Water Association encourages everyone to get involved. The Australian Water Association is the national coordinator for National Water Week and works with their members, interested organisations, schools and communities to promote National Water Week events, activities and educational resources, and increase involvement across the country.

Walk, ride or scoot to school KEEPING active and healthy is the theme of the month at St Joseph’s Primary School, Wonthaggi. The students of St Joseph’s are participating in the State Government’s Walk to School initiative during October. Everyone is encouraged to take part by riding,

scooting or walking to and from school. Even those who travel to school by bus or car are encouraged to be involved by walking part of the way. This aims to promote healthy exercise habits by becoming aware of the way everyone chooses to travel.

Story time: from left, pre-Prep students Euan, Lewie and Oliver choose some books to read during Wonthaggi Primary School’s Leap into Learning program.

Children ready for school start NEW Prep students are already starting to adapt to school life at Wonthaggi Primary School. The school runs four Leap into Learning sessions a week, which now run for three hours but will gradually be extended as students get used to the school routine. Around 50 pre-Preps attend a maximum of two sessions per week to put them on the right track before they officially start school in 2017.

The sessions are taught by experienced early children’s learning teacher Angela Smith and focus on oral language to help students with their speaking skills before they start school. “The children in the program are ready to go once school starts. We start the program at 9.15am so the students are used to the routine and are prepared for a normal school schedule,” principal Leonie Anstey said. “Each year we are continuing to see increases in our new Preps’ literacy and numeracy skills.”

Tarwin Lower Red Cross DURING winter on August 2, members attended the treasurers training day at Leongatha and were taught how to fill in appropriate forms that have to be forwarded to headquarters. The annual meeting was held with no change in officebearers, president is Glenda Arbuthnot, vice president Lilly Farrar, secretary Margaret Fisher, vice secretary Val Latham and treasurer Deb Birkett. A lunch box of fish and chips was enjoyed following the meeting. September was a short meeting with coming events discussed. Mrs Arbuthnot welcomed new member Pauline Hetherton who is transferring from Upper Beaconsfield. The Big Cake Bake Day raised about $150 to

be sent to headquarters. Guest speaker was Susan Davies from Energy Innovation Co-op who talked about moving towards zero emissions and how to reduce electricity bills by using heavy drapes with pelmets and checking for draughts, as well about solar panels. “We all learnt a lot on the day, especially how to read our power accounts,” Mrs Arbuthnot said. Christmas hamper raffle tickets will be on sale from November and drawn on Tuesday, December 6 at the Christmas lunch at the Tarwin Lower Community Centre with a meeting before hand at 11am. There will be no meeting in November due to being the typical meeting date falling on Melbourne Cup Day.


PAGE 32 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Backyard Bl tz

Beat the aphids scourge by Karen Haw, Town Centre Nursery, Mirboo North

liser but more like a vitamin pill for plants. The safest and most effective of all insect pest sprays if pyrethrum. This is an extract from a plant and is an instant, contact WE think of spring as a relief from the killer of aphids. The aphids that attack citrus cold wet winter but this spring has given appear almost black. In fact they are called black citrus aphid us four seasons in a week. Just when we think there is better weather on the ho- and they appear every November and Derizon, we are hit with another cold wet and windy blast. cember, always on young shoots of lemon, A result is loads of growth, green, sappy and lus- another citrus tree. The problem with citrus is the problem is often not noticed until the cious, just what the bugs love. First problem, aphids. Aphids, also known as tree is suffering from sooty mould which is plant lice, are small sap sucking insects and member a black covering on the leaves as a result of of the super family Aphidoidea. Many species are the sticky residue left by ants that are atgreen but other commonly occurring species may be tracted from the aphids. In this case it is better to spray with white white and woolly or black. Aphids are among the most destructive insect oil or pest oil. Among the most difficult to pests on cultivated plants. The damage they do to get at are cherry aphids because they keep plants have made them enemies of farmers and gar- well hidden. They infest and feed off young growth at the tips of branches, but are able to deners the world over. Their success is due in part to the asexual repro- cunningly distort and roll the leaves to form ductive capabilities of some species. Some rose vari- protective ‘tents’. We only see the odd looking, ball-like eties are particularly attractive to aphids. Any rose plant that happens to be struggling be- clumps of leaves at cherry branch tips. cause of poor soil or insufficient sunlight is bound to However, once unrolled, the great clusters of black, shiny aphids can be seen massed become massively infested. It is important to keep plants in optimal health, within. This protective leaf cover helps to shield feed well in spring and use sea weed solution regularly, but remember seaweed solutions are not a ferti- these sap-sucking pests from birds and other predators. It also deflects contact sprays such as pyrethrum. A simple remedy is to snip off all infested leaf clumps and destroy them.

Tis the season: Joy Koh from Mirboo Nth happy with her purchase of the new daisy Sunny Day, ready for spring planting.

How to Get Rid of Aphids

How to Prevent Aphids

• Try spraying cold water on the leaves. Sometimes all aphids need is a cool blast to dislodge them. • If you have an aphid invasion, dust plants with flour. It constipates the pests. • Use commercially available biological controls or by spraying with insecticidal soap or horticultural oil. • You can often get rid of aphids by wiping or spraying the leaves of the plant with a mild solution of water and a few drops of dishwashing detergent such as Ivory. • Stir together one quart of water, one teaspoon of liquid dish soap and a pinch of cayenne pepper. Do not dilute before spraying on plants. • Organic controls include soapy emulsion, horticultural oil (read the directions), and pyrethrum spray. Soapy water should be reapplied every two to three days for two weeks. • Use homemade garlic or tomatoleaf sprays.

• For fruit or shade trees, spray dormant oil to kill overwintering eggs. • Buy beneficial insects, such as lady beetles, lacewings, and parasitic wasps, which will feed on aphids. These are usually ordered via mail. Check the Internet for labs. They should keep the aphid populations controlled in the first place. • You can also plant flowering groundcovers in home orchards to attract predators. • Companion planting can be very helpful to keep aphids away from your plants in the first place. For example: • aphids are repelled by catnip; • aphids are especially attracted to mustard and nasturtium. You can plant these near more valuable plants as traps for the aphids. Nasturtiums spoil the taste of fruit tree sap for aphids and will help keep aphids off broccoli; and • Garlic and chives repel aphids when planted near lettuce, peas, or rose bushes.

ou


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 33

The Good Life

Your LOCAL guide to Art and Entertainment

Fete excitement at St Laurence’s THE St Laurence’s Primary School parish fete is back on for 2016. This year’s fete will be held this Saturday, October 22, from 9am until 1pm, at the Leongatha school. “After a year’s hiatus, there has been enough parish and school support to get this key fundraising and community engagement activity back on the calendar,” fete coordinator Sam Wright said. “The fete is a key way for all our school and parish families to come together and share their time, talent and treasures with the community. The fete fosters positive relationships and creates opportunities within the St Laurence’s community to come together. “It is also a great day to pick up a bargain, share in some wonderful foods and crafts, and let the children run free and burn up their energy on a number of rides and activities.” There will be plenty of fun to have on the day with go karts, jumping castles, sideshow alley rides, an animal farm, a bungee run and mini golf. Food and drinks will be provided, including a Devonshire tea. Ride bands will cost $20 each on the day, but pre sale ride bands can be picked up from St Laurence’s Primary School’s office for $15. There will also be a major raffle with fantastic prizes up for grabs thanks to the support of local businesses. “We are once again grateful for the generous support of many businesses and families with their donations,” Mr Wright said. If you feel you could help in any way or would like to introduce a new stall, activity or craft idea please feel free to contact any of the people on the committee or by sending an email to parishschoolfete123@gmail.com. Be sure you don’t miss out on the fun of this year’s St Laurence’s Primary School parish fete.

Plenty of fun: from left, St Laurence’s Primary School students Jacob, Lara, Isabella and Samuel are excited about the St Laurence’s Primary School parish fete to be held this Saturday, October 22, at the Leongatha school.

Concert impresses who is a dual enrolment with both Newhaven ColThe band included students passionate about lege and Bass Coast Specialist School. “This is a band for students who appreciate learning music, including a singer named Aaron, music. They may not have necessarily learnt an instrument before, but they are willing to learn,” Newhaven music teacher Samantha Rayney said. “They practice together for a bit over an hour every week. This group has been together for a year.” The band is given the opportunity to learn about all music across a range of genres. At the Bass Coast Specialist School concert, they performed three originals and three covers, including Rise Above from the 2011 Spiderman: Turn off the Dark musical, sung by Aaron. The experience also gave them the chance to practice setting up and being organised. “The concert was wonderful. Every student was so excited to be here,” Ms Rayney said. “This was the second time the group has performed together.” The concert also helped continue the ongoing contact Newhaven College has with Bass Coast Specialist School, which is teaching the students to interact positively. “The relationship across the school has been long term, and has allowed us to have more dual enrolments like Aaron,” Ms Rayney said. “The students are really starting to come out of Music talent: from left, Sidney Williams, Angus Baird and Vashti Kontos performed for their shells and have made amazing connections. The students are proud to be part of this group.” Bass Coast Specialist School recently.

BASS Coast Specialist School was treated to a musical showcase from the Newhaven College SM Year 7 and 8

band recently.

Counting down until Push Start WITH just under a week until the Push Start Regional Final, South Gippsland FReeZA Committee is pleased to announce Melbourne alternative rock band One More Weekend will open the event. One More Weekend is about to drop a new album, begin a Victorian Tour and South Gippsland is lucky to have them confirmed as the headlining act. The Push Start Regional Final is shaping up

to be a great event of free music and a chance to support Gippsland’s young musicians. Everyone is invited to come along, pick their favourite band and help start the career of the next generation of musical talent. The Push Start Gippsland Regional Final is on Saturday, October 22 at Leongatha Memorial Hall from 1pm. All ages are welcome to attend and the event is free entry. This year Gippsland has four contenders for the title of Regional Winner, who will battle it

out for a spot at the Push Start Final at Moomba Festival in Melbourne, 2017 and a chance to win further prizes. If you are a young person aged 14 to 25 and would like to be involved in creating new events for young people in South Gippsland, contact council’s community strengthening officer Sophie Dixon on 5662 9200 for more information about the South Gippsland FReeZA Committee.


PAGE 34 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 35

Show ready to roll By Sarah Vella THE Foster and District Agricultural Show committee has welcomed the appointment of Roger Nicholson to the position of secretary, after Denis O’Neill decided to retire from the post at last month’s annual general meeting. Mr Nicholson is keen to help make next February’s show the biggest yet, with plenty of family friendly attractions and a bumper crowd. “We had around 1500 through the gates this year. We are hoping to get that up to 2000 for our 110th show in 2017,” he said. “I think people come to the Foster Show because it is a true country show.”

Mr Nicholson moved to the area from the city seven years ago and worked locally during those years. Now retired, he decided it was time to give something back to the community. “I decided to take the role of secretary on. The committee has been really good, Denis has done a great job over the last five years,” he said. “Foster is a great place, with plenty of other volunteer opportunities. I knew some of the people tied up in (the show) and knew they needed help.” Already in the throes of confirming attractions for the show, Mr Nicholson said the program would be available in November. This year, the focus will be creating a family friendly show, with plenty of child friendly activities and attractions, including a giant slot car track and possibly a gladiator arena.

“We are still working on it, but I think the children will absolutely love it,” Mr Nicholson said. All of the usual activities, like the ever popular dog high jump, sheath tossing, dog trials, show jumping and other horse events, poultry and cattle will all be back in 2017. Donkeys will also feature in the show, after being absent for a few years. Mr Nicholson said the future of the show is looking bright, with plenty of local interest and people keen to be involved with the committee. “One of my goals will be to bring a younger generation through. Even if we have a junior committee, that is the sort of thing we need to do,” he said. “I will see if I can make a change over the next five years. We want to take the show to another level.” The show will be held at the Foster Showgrounds on Saturday, February 25.

New blood: the Foster Show committee has welcomed the addition of Roger Nicholson to the position of secretary, after the retirement of Denis O’Neill at last month’s annual general meeting.


PAGE 36 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Volunteers in the driver’s seat THE Volunteer Transport Team at Bass Coast Health (BCH) is accelerating its services.

Healthcare on wheels: some of the volunteers of Bass Coast Health’s Volunteer Transport Team. Back, from left, John Walsh, Ben Bek, Chris Graf, Roger Lee and Brad Proudlock. Front, Mick Kelly, Rob Spittal, volunteer coordinator Mandy Gilcrist, Don Burke and Geoff Speckman.

The team was excited to see an additional car added to its fleet recently. “We are really thankful- the car is a much needed resource,” volunteer coordinator Mandy Gilcrist said. “We have approximately 30 volunteers who give of their time transporting numerous elderly and disadvantaged patients to essential medical appointments in the metropolitan area. “Some of our clients are unable to use public or community transport or do not have friends or relatives to help, so this service is vital. “We were very fortunate that our CEO Jan Child recognised the importance of this service and gave her full support to expanding the amenity.” Ms Gilcrist said demand for the service was growing, so being able to own

an extra car could not have come at a better time. “We are also very keen to recruit extra volunteers to help meet this demand,” she said. Volunteer driver of three years, Brad Proudlock stated, “This would have to be one of the most rewarding ways of giving back to our community. It gives me a lot of satisfaction assisting people who otherwise would not be able to attend their medical appointments. “It’s an amazing team effort by all involved in the program. The new car will enable the team to increase its services across the shire and I predict we will increase transport to 100 clients per month!” Those interested in becoming a volunteer should contact Mandy Gilcrist on 5671 3372, Monday to Fridays. Volunteers of all ages and backgrounds are welcome to enquire.

Lileys farming for the future FISH Creek Landcare has again hosted a successful farm walk day. On October 8, Joan and

Rob Liley hosted a farm walk on their property Mount Lavinia. About 20 people enjoyed an informative morning learning about

the Lileys farming enterprise. Joan and Rob purchased their property 41 years ago and have worked hard to establish

a successful sustainable farming business. Being long term locals, Rob and Joan had planned to buy a farm and had been looking around for a suitable location. They settled on Mount Lavinia due to a number of reasons, including north facing land to maximise sunlight and abundant water supply.

The discussion focused on Rob and Joan’s approach to farming which balances sustainable practices, ecological and economic benefits. They spoke about initially preserving the remaining indigenous vegetation with fencing and more recently re-vegetating degraded areas- using both planting and direct

seeding. Rob explained the benefit of establishing a relationship with the food company JB Swift. This requires significant effort to meet the stringent regulations imposed by the company, however the financial rewards make this a profitable farming venture. It also fits with Joan and

Rob’s beliefs of how to care for the land. The over-riding take home message for participants was that owning land is a privilege and it is a land owner’s responsibility to farm in a way that looks after the environment. Sustainable farming practices and profitable farming are not mutually exclusive.

Opening doors: Rob Liley offers an insight into his farming enterprise as part of the Fish Creek Landcare event.

MPs told: wear pants over marriage equality ELI Anthony McCall was born at Bass Coast Health on October 2 to Ella Law and Mark McCall of South Dudley. Eli is a brother for Indi, 14 months.

Milpara Community House news STARTING Your Business Right is a great Small Business Victoria Workshop being held Tuesday evening, October 18. This week we have two great information sessions to help you with Christmas. Chris from Consumer Affairs Victoria (CAV) will be conducting a session on Online Shopping and Laybys. She’ll be covering safety tips and your rights under consumer law. There will be plenty of time to ask questions and Chris will be available after the session for other CAV enquiries. This session is Tuesday, October 18. Wednesday, October 19, we have our Christmas Budget Blowout session full of useful tips and strategies. Our new course Make a Website Using WordPress starts Tuesday, October 18. Computers Beyond Basics Wednesday,

October 19. Excel and Work on Thursday, October 20. We still have places in all our computer classes. Learn to make a beautiful unique hooked rug from recycled fabrics at our Rug Making Workshop on Saturday, October 22. Proceeds from the workshop will go towards supporting missionaries and children in Southern Asia and Uganda. Summer is a beautiful time of the year. There is nothing nicer than sharing a fresh fruit platter with family and friends. So we are having a Fruit Platter Demonstration where Shahni will demonstrate fruit sculpting. Our next Hobby Painting and Table Top Gaming day will be Saturday, November 5. We’re hoping to include a Dungeon and Dragons introduction on the day. If you’d like more information please call 5655 2524.

By Brad Lester MPs should vote on whether to introduce marriage equality into Australia, according to a gay man from South Gippsland. Labor last week announced it would opposite a plebiscite on marriage equality. The vote had been scheduled for Saturday, February 11, 2017, and proposed to ask voters, “Should the law be changed to allow same-sex couples to marry?” If the plebiscite had been held and passed, the government had promised the parliament would legislate to amend the Marriage Act 1961 to enable same-sex couples to marry. Phil Ashton, a gay man from Mirboo North, said MPs should take a conscience vote on whether to introduce marriage equality in Australia. He said a plebiscite was a “nonbinding, expensive and divisive straw poll”, and would spark a hate campaign.

• McMillan MP Russell Broadbent. “It is the campaign itself, the extreme hate that will flow from just a tiny minority, and that will cause so much hurt and damage. That is of the greatest concern to LGBTI people in the community,” he said. “Vulnerable members of our community should not be subjected to a government funded hate campaign. Parliamentarians should do the job they are elected and paid to do, and should reflect the general mood of the country

by passing a Marriage Equality Bill as soon as possible.” Mr Ashton said marriage is a civil act, not a religious one, and a legally binding contract between two people. “It was only in 2004 that the Marriage Act was changed by parliament and then prime minister John Howard to define marriage as between ‘one man and one woman’,” he said. McMillan MP Russell Broadbent said the Federal Government would uphold its pre-election promise to hold a plebiscite, despite some public concern over the cost. “It gives everybody a say. It’s the rawest form of public opinion that we have. Everybody then has a vote,” he said. Mr Broadbent said his personal view was that the Marriage Act remained unchanged. “Marriage is between a man and a woman, end of story,” he said. The Federal Government has budgeted $170 million to run the plebiscite. ‘Yes’ and ‘No’ advertising committees were to receive $7.5 million each to run advertising campaigns.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 37


PAGE 38 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Quality continues: Hustler Equipment will continue to produce standout agricultural maLaugh a minute: an absolute hit with the crowd, Brian Nankervis (right) shares a joke with chinery after acquiring Robertson Manufacturing. Hustler machinery is available from newly appointed South Gippsland Landcare Network chair Frank Dekker and coordinator Gendore Tractors and Machinery in Leongatha. Kate McKenzie.

Laughter to celebrate Landcare Balers a hidden fire danger By Frank Mickan, Agriculture Victoria

AN evening of celebration and laughter was had on Saturday, October 10 for the South Gippsland Landcare Network’s Annual Dinner to celebrate 30 years of Landcare in Victoria. The night, which incorporated the AGM, included guest speaker Brian Nankervis and was held on a pleasant spring night at the Woorayl Golf Club, Leongatha. Network board chair Mark Walters welcomed all in attendance and thanked the affiliated groups and members of the network, along with the board and staff for their hard work and enthusiasm over the past 12 months. The AGM elections were then held with eight vacancies out of 10 positions on the board. Seven nominations were received from Ray Saunders, Libby Anthony, David Layton, Jean Carnell, Mark Walters, Helen Hasty and Frank Dekker. Ray is a member of the Tarwin group, Libby and Helen are members of the Mardan Mirboo

All together: comedian Brian Nankervis had the crowd join hands in a light hearted ode to the late Joan Kirner at the South Gippsland Landcare Network event. Mrs Kirner, former Victorian premier, was a driving force behind the establishment of Landcare in the 1980s.

North Group, David is a member of the Fish Creek group, Jean and Frank are members of the Hallston group, and Mark is a member of the Poowong Landcare group. Network member Margaret McDonald and Russell Swan of (Tarwin Valley group returned for their second year on the board. As the number of nominations was less than the number of vacancies, all seven nominees were duly elected to the board with one position vacant. Frank Dekker was elected as chair, Mark Walters was elected as vice chair and Margaret McDonald was elected as treasurer. Retiring board members, including Sally Jelbart, Mark Uren, Arie Bos, Phil Piper, Rosemary Trease and Dawn Marotti, were thanked for their volunteer contributions to the network. Network coordinator Kate McKenzie presented on the significant achievements of the network over the past year. To mention some of the impressive results, the network has enabled the planting of 56,526 indigenous plants and the erection of 15,673.4 metres of stock proof fencing to protect remnant vegetation and revegetation. Mrs McKenzie emphasised how the Landcare groups and members inspire and motivate the network staff and board. She also thanked former project officer Nicole Walsh for her hard work and enthusiasm with the network, wishing her every success with her new role as biodiversity officer with the West Gippsland Catchment Management Authority. She ended by thanking past network coordinator Jenny O’Sullivan, network partners and local businesses for their support, in particular the West Gippsland Catchment Management Authority. Following dinner, comedian Brian Nankervis created a party atmosphere to celebrate 30 years of Landcare with mini version of television music trivia show Rock Wiz. The group’s music knowledge was put to the test with a ‘boys versus girls’ completion. Mr Nankervis had the room in hysterics with his poems and candid behaviour. Thanks to the Woorayl Golf Club, Mama Van food truck, Brian Nankervis and Semken Landscaping for making the night such a special one. For more information about the network or to become a Landcare member please visit www.sgln. org.au or email sgln@landcare.net.

Candidate backs youth transport LOOKING after local youth is a priority for South Gippsland Shire Council Strzelecki Ward candidate David Amor. He said for children living in the smaller towns around the shire, transport is limited. Mr Amor would like to see South Gippsland Shire Council consider a designated bus line to safely transport children into the major towns. Mr Amor grew up on the outskirts of Wonthaggi and would generally only go into the town once a month. He is committed to ensuring children do not miss out on opportunities now. “A new bus service would give them the op-

portunity to do things like go to the cinema or catch up with mates if they don’t have a licence. Parents could rely on this bus system, knowing their child is safe,” Mr Amor said. “There are a lot of things in the major towns that the people who live there take for granted and the unique towns on the outside are often forgotten. This is an opportunity to allow everyone to enjoy these facilities. “Council needs to have a focus on all of South Gippsland and its amenities, which doesn’t just mean the larger towns. It’s the smaller towns that need to be taken care of as well.”

EACH year we hear about hay stack fires in sheds and paddocks and unfortunately, equipment. However, not so commonly thought of are baler fires. During every hay harvest, the Victorian Country Fire Authority (CFA) attends several baler fires, many of which could have been avoided or at least with reduced damage. Balers are often burnt-out in these fires, but sometimes the tractor is also partly or completely destroyed, neither cheap pieces of machinery. No doubt, there are other unreported costs such as paddock fires caused by the baler fire spreading into nearby windrows and surrounding dry paddocks, especially if there is wind. Plus there is always the dangerous prospect of personal injury. Most baler fires are caused by over-heating of damaged/worn bearings and often not noticed until the hay bale and baler are well alight, unless the operator just happened to turn around when fire first started. What should be known by farmers and contractors, it is compulsory by law in Victoria for all tractors to have a water extinguisher with a minimum nine litre capacity attached to the tractor during the fire restriction period. This can be either a pressurised water extinguisher or a knapsack, although the latter are difficult to attach on many late model tractors. This simple tool is a no brainer when operating equipment with hot bearings in hot dry, windy conditions in dry flammable grass. An extinguisher could be critical to nipping a baler fire in the bud or at least delaying it spreading too much before

the CFA arrives. Another recommendation includes carrying a minimum two kilograms of dry powder extinguisher for several reasons. These are useful for electrical and hydraulic oil fires, often starting as a result of the baler fire melting wires or hydraulic hoses. Embers often are blown into nooks and crannies around and under the tractor cabin and other hard-to-get-at places. Spraying water into these spots sometimes does not reach all crevices or deep enough where dust and loose dry material has built up. The water can sometimes evaporate before extinguishing the fire in some locations. A powder extinguisher will spread further and is more effective in these scenarios. Electrical shorts can also start fires and even though the electrics are usually automatically shut down on many of the latest model tractors, fires can sometimes short circuit this safety process. Water won’t extinguish these fires. Separate the tractor from the baler as quickly as possible, because baler fires can get out of control quickly. This rapidly generates extreme heat, so approaching the drawbar is almost impossible (without severe risk of burns) and metal components heat quickly making uncoupling of hydraulic hose very difficult and extremely dangerous. If there is no extinguisher available, this is a must, to avoid destroying the tractor as well. Clean the tractor each day to minimise build -up of flammable material, this will occur during the harvest operation, but the less build-up the better, particularly near hot parts like the engine manifold, exhaust and turbocharger.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 39

Hustler merges its way into greater possibilities HUSTLER Equipment, based in Hastings, New Zealand, has been designing and manufacturing farming equipment since 1961.

Saving time, money: the Hustler Super Comby feedout machine makes life easier on the farm. to greater possibilities. For growth, for enhancement, for more learning, a stronger and tougher Hustler is set to conquer the

farming equipment world. Visit www.hustlerequipment.comfor further information.

MANKS SILAGE AND HAY CONTRACTORS

• Silage • Round baling • Small squares • Knived • Innoculated • Mowing • Teddering • Raking • Satellite wrapper • Hay & Silage transport • Oversowing • Power Harrowing • Fowl manure spreading

MAN2630006

sure his legacy will be left in good hands. He made the right decision with Hustler. Hustler Equipment officially acquired Robertson Manufacturing effective May 16, 2016. A more powerful Hustler is coming your way to explore more Fifty five years later, the company continues to possibilities. Acquiring Robertson Manufacturing will boost lead the way in balefeeding technology. Fuelled by its mantra “Rethinking the Everyday”, Hustler’s product line up further with the silage Hustler combines its love for machines with creativ- wagons, comby feedout machines, tip trailers and many ity, an understanding of farming, and the passion for more. Robertson’s machines have always been complediscovering better ways to do everyday tasks. The top range of Huster agricultural equipment is mentary of Hustler’s current range, and with the brand’s available from Gendore Tractors and Machinery in unceasing inventiveness and meticulous craftsmanship, notable product enhancements can surely be expected. Leongatha. The secret behind Hustler’s success is how it has And as they say, the more the merrier. Hustler warmly welcomes Robertson Manufacset itself apart from the rest by listening to customers’ feedback, incorporating innovative features, and set- turing into its growing family and is set to build an even stronger brand and reach in New Zealand and ting the industry benchmark. As a result of its products’ exceptional fea- globally. Noticeable branding changes may be implementtures designed and built to make farming life efficient, convenient and enjoyable, Hustler has al- ed upon acquisition, but the Robertson quality and ready become a world class brand in many farms designs will always be there. There will never be trailing efforts, only enhanceglobally. Aside from its goal of continued expansion of its ments and improvements will be executed. Current users of Robertson machines need not global dealer network further, Hustler keeps a constant driver for innovation while pushing for excel- worry as well. Transition will be completed as smoothly as poslence in what they do. Their wide array of exquisitely designed products sible and excellent customer service will be available speak for themselves. Whether a farmer is feeding as a standard practice of Hustler. With no hesitations, Hustler continues to step up bales, round or squares, or wanting a machine to bed its game with an outstanding vision of opening itself hay or straw, Hustler has the equipment for it. Whether a farmer wants a simple yet heavy duty bale feeder or a more complex machine to handle any form of bale, Hustler has got the range covered. Hustler also has bale handlers, boom sprayers and more. About 16 years after Hustler was established, Don and Delma Robertson founded Robertson Manufacturing in 1977. A neighbor in Hinds, Mid-Canterbury asked Don to build a machine so he could feed his sheep more efficiently through winter. By the time this wagon was completed, word had spread around the neighborhood and more were requested. Don is proud to have personally designed and manufactured the first silage wagons in the South Island of New Zealand. Over the years the business has steadily grown and the team has adapted and built everything the local farming community requested. Hustler Equipment and Robertson Manufacturing started working together back in 2006 to come up with a specially designed product for the market. Both companies were doing well in their field and they both have unique product offerings and brand philosophies that are relevant to the agricultural sector. Who would have thought that 10 years later, a remarkable amalgamation would take place? Before his imminent retirement, Don has decided to turn over his company to a trusted brand to make

Malcolm: 0417 532 262 Shane: 0408 334 627 Matthew: 0408 586 687 Home: 5657 7263


PAGE 40 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Farming Insight

AI improves stud genetics By Sarah Vella USING artificial insemination in stud sheep herds can give breeders an opportunity to optimise genetic selection and maximise desired outcomes. Athlone Southdown sheep stud farmer Ben Hatch used AI on 50 ewes this year, because it gave him access to genetics he was not able to get otherwise. He used semen from two rams, one which is deceased and another which is older and unable

to cover ewes. “It allows me to go back to older genetics, get genetics in from other studs, or even overseas,” he said. “One of the rams we used, Southern Pastures Muscles, is a ram that is long, thick and deep and packed full of meat.” The first step of the AI process is to implant the ewes with CIDRs. “When the CIDRs are removed, the ewes are given a hormone injection to make them cycle and ovulate. The ewes need to be ovulating at the time of insemination,” Mr Hatch said.

In lamb: AI technician David Kennett from Genstock, left uses laparoscopy to inseminate one of Ben Hatch’s stud Southdown ewes at Athlone. “The sheep were sedated, lifted into a cradle and then the AI technician used laparoscopy to inseminate each ewe.” Out of the 50 sheep inseminated, 43 were returned positive pregnancy tests. This is the second time Mr Hatch has used AI on his stud flock and plans to do it again, using more ewes next year. It is an expensive procedure at around $25 to $30 per head, but Mr Hatch said the cost was justified. “We can use semen proven to provide the genetic gains I am looking for and it is a relatively cheap way to access them,” he said. “The other benefit of AI is that it allows me

to try something out for a year and if it doesn’t work, I am not stuck with an expensive stud ram that doesn’t perform.” When breeding stud sheep, Mr Hatch said he is after a ram that produces feminine ewes and masculine rams. “The females are retained for the stud and the males are sold as terminal rams into the prime lamb market,” he said. Mr Hatch has already selected the rams he hopes to use in his AI program next year, which will include different genetics from New Zealand. “I have chosen rams that have proven cold tolerance and produce meaty lambs,” he said.

• VLE Leongatha

Vealers in hot demand THERE were approximately 1330 export and 300 young cattle penned representing an increase of 340 head week on week. There was a full field of buyers present but not all operating fully in a generally firm market for the prime drafts while secondary cattle eased in places. Quality was good in the grown steers and bullocks while the larger selection of young cattle and the cows were more mixed. A better run of vealers and yearling trade steers sold to solid demand while the yearling heifers to the trade eased 12c/kg. Grown steers and bullocks sold from firm for most to a few cents easier. Heavy weight manufacturing steers eased 7c/kg. The plainer offering of cows sold at firm prices which pushed the estimated carcass value a little higher while the heavy weight bulls sold just slightly dearer. Heavy weight vealers suited to butchers sold from 370c to 397c/kg. Yearling trade steers made between 360c and 390c/kg. Yearling heifers to the trade sold mostly between 322c and 360c after a top of 386c/kg. Grown steers made from 336c to 360c/kg. Bullocks sold from 336c to 355c/kg. Heavy weight Friesian manufacturing steers made between 267c and 279c with the crossbred portion between 278c and 332c/kg. Most light and medium weight cows sold between 180c and 254c/kg. Heavy weight cows made mostly from 232c to 286c/kg. Heavy weight bulls sold from 270c to 315c/kg. The next sale draw - October 19: 1. Alex Scott & Staff, 2. Elders, 3. SEJ, 4. Rodwells, 5. Landmark, 6. Phelan & Henderson & Co.

Prime Sale - Wednesday, October 12 BULLOCKS 15 C.T. Ferguson, Longford 4 M. Baryczka, Airly 12 S.W. & B.M. McLaren, Woodleigh Vale 12 F. & B. Parini, Korumburra 11 Jones Family Trust, Longford 9 B. & A. Hollonds, Sale

551.3kg 643.8kg 701.3kg 641.3kg 677.7kg 566.1kg

360.0 355.0 349.6 348.6 348.6 348.0

$1984.80 $2285.31 $2451.57 $2235.40 $2362.56 $1970.07

STEERS 1 T. & M. Dwyer, Leongatha 375.0kg 2 B.S. Cantwell Lstk, Toora 317.5kg 1 G.J. & C.M. Alford, Woolamai 435.0kg 1 T. & M. Dwyer, Leongatha 370.0kg 1 P. J. & J.M. Keily, Yarragon 295.0kg 2 G.T. Cummaudo, Mirboo North 385.0kg HEIFERS 2 T. & M. Dwyer, Leongatha 340.0kg 3 B.S. Cantwell Lstk, Toora 318.3kg 1 A. & L. Hancock, Nyora 405.0kg 3 G.J. & C.M. Alford, Woolamai 391.7kg 1 G.T. Cummaudo, Mirboo North 340.0kg 1 A. & S. Turton, Korumburra South 330.0kg COWS 1 Woodland Springs Angus, Ryanston 615.0kg 1 Tarwin Cove Boat Storage, Inverloch 520.0kg 2 N. Wolfenden, Cowes 587.5kg 1 N.J. Rivett, Glen Forbes 545.0kg 2 C. Kelly Farms, Leongatha 612.5kg 4 D. Pilkington & F. Toohey, Waratah Nth 637.5kg BULLS 1 L.M.B. Timmins P/L, Meeniyan 440.0kg 1 G.J. & J.M. McGrath, Jeetho 890.0kg 1 K. & F. Whelan, Outtrim 955.0kg 1 P.H., N.F., D.P. & M.L. Moore, Yarram 1020.0kg 1 J. Barry, Devon 1005.0kg 1 I.J. & A.C.N. Hancock, Jeetho West 805.0kg

396.6 390.6 390.0 390.0 385.0 375.0

$1487.25 $1240.16 $1696.50 $1443.00 $1135.75 $1443.75

396.6 390.6 390.6 389.6 389.6 385.6

$1348.44 $1243.41 $1581.93 $1525.93 $1324.64 $1272.48

285.6 284.0 280.6 277.6 276.6 276.6

$1756.44 $1476.80 $1648.53 $1512.92 $1694.18 $1763.33

315.6 314.6 312.6 312.0 310.0 309.6

$1388.64 $2799.94 $2985.33 $3182.40 $3115.50 $2492.28

Store sale Thursday, October 13 Steers: Covino Farms, Giffard, 15 x $1880; A. & P. Brown, Wattle Bank, 15 x $1840; D.J. & K.M. Kuch, Darriman, 18 x $1800; K. Davis, 13 x $1790; C. Barter, 6 x $1780; T. & J.A. Christensen, Glengarry, 13 x $1780. Heifers: E.W. & J.T. Reid, Giffard West, 1 x $1560; H.C. & J.G. Taysom, Yinnar South, 5 x $1460; M.D. & A.C. Stothers, Kilmany, 6 x $1440; C.A. Jeffery, Driffield, 10 x $1350; Covino Farms, Giffard, 1 x $1330; M.E. & K. Triantafyllou, Woodside, 17 x $1300. Cows: R.E. Goodwin, Allambee East, 1 x $1300. Cows and calves: S. Fairbrother, Boolarra, 1 x $2325; Jayden Boulton, Sale, 8 x $1910; S. Russell, Dumbalk North, 3 x $1910; M. Wynne, Maffra, 9 x $1810; R.L. Olsen, Poowong East, 10 x $1800; C.A. Jeffery, Driffield, 4 x $1760.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 41

Farming Insight Whites inspire Brazilian farmers MORE O than h 40 Brazilian ili dairy d i farmf ers visited the White family farm, Dilee Holsteins, at Leongatha South recently, to hear about their dairy operation. The visiting farmers were from the Federation of Agriculture and Livestock of Minas Gerais State (FAEMG). The State of Minas Gerais is in the north-east of Brazil. The representatives from FAEMG participating in the tour were rural union directors and large milk producers. After touring New Zealand they attended the farm of Les, Dianne, Russ and Amy White, before heading to Bundoora Agricultural College in the afternoon. The next days were spent on dairy farms in Shepparton and in New South Wales. “South Gippsland turned on a beautiful day for their visit to view and hear about our dairy operation,” Les said. “Although the language barrier was hard, we certainly gauged their reaction to the difficulties we are having with the low milk price.” Michelle Axford from the Australian Dairy Herd Improvement Scheme explained how information collected through herd recording, classification, workability scoring, mating and health records is used to produce Australian breeding values for cows and bulls. Australian breeding values are then used by farmers to select the best animals for their breeding program. An easy way to find bulls is using the Good Bulls app that is available for smart phones and tablets from www.adhis.com.au. Michelle also explained how genomics is now

Farm visit: 42 Brazilian dairy farmers visited the Leongatha South farm of Les, Dianne, Russ and Amy White recently, to learn more about the Australian industry. regularly used by farmers to select which heifer calves will be kept for replacements and which ones will be sold. Genomics uses DNA information from young animals to predict its performance against large

reference populations of animals with known performance in Australia. The reliability of genomics in a calf is equivalent to a cow with eight lactations worth of information or a bull with 35 daughters.

Financial facts for farmers A FINANCIAL literacy workshop for farmers was held by the Southern Gippsland Agricultural Climate Resilience Project in Inverloch recently. A range of agricultural industries were represented in the room, with dairy, beef, sheep and potential poultry and horticultural farmers present. Warren Blyth from Meridian Agriculture led the 15 participants through the four hour workshop. Presented as an overview of farm financial and enterprise planning and risk management, the workshop gave farmers the tools to go home and look at their enterprise in greater economic detail and devise a business plan. The need to have a plan was understood by most participants, however most did not have one and lively discussion among the attendees suggested it was something they would go home and do. “Consensus was that it was hard to take advantage of opportunities or respond to risks if it could not be measured against a business plan,” Southern Gippsland Agricultural Climate Resilience Project officer Jill Vella said. The next topic covered was dollars in/dollars out. Mr Blyth explained the Malcolm/Krause diagram which simply breaks down farm gross income, variable costs, overhead costs, interest, tax and depreciation. A number of case studies were presented to illustrate how farmers can manage fixed and variable costs to impact profitability.

Money matters: a group of local farmers attended a financial literacy workshop in Inverloch recently, hosted by the Southern Gippsland Agricultural Climate Resilience Project and presented to by Warren Blyth from Meridian Agriculture, far right. The participants were encouraged to cost their agement and understood that it very much depended on an individual’s attitude to risk,” Mrs own labour into their equations. “The options available to increase income Vella said. were also discussed with stocking rates, genetics, skimping on inputs, animal health, enterprise mix, operator skill set and marketing all being factors affecting the bottom line,” Mrs Vella said. “The use of software packages to measure production and cash flow were encouraged so that at any time you know how your business is tracking.” The last session after lunch dealt with risk and DAIRY farmers interested in ensuring they have the basics correct in cow nutririsk management. “We talked about the definition of risk man- tion and summer feeding are invited to

Looking forward to summer

Help for farmers DAIRY farmers in the localities surrounding Leongatha will be assisted through a partnership between Leongatha Community House and Gippsland Farmer Relief Inc. Leongatha Community House will accept donations of non-perishable foods, toiletries and personal hygiene items, and domestic cleaning products for inclusion in the Relief Packages provided by Gippsland Farmer Relief Inc. to struggling dairying families. Jan Stirling, local coordinator for Gippsland Farmer Relief Inc., said, “We are delighted to partner with Leongatha Community House, which shares our belief in the importance of local responses to

local concerns. We encourage local residents who might need some support or information to visit the house and see what’s on offer. And, of course, to leave their donations.” “Leongatha Community House provides a range of programs and activities for all members of our community”, said Pam Gaskell, house president. “Acting as a collection point for Gippsland Farmer Relief Inc. is one way we can offer support to residents in rural areas who can’t directly access what the house has to offer. This is the first step in what we hope will be a long term and effective partnership with Gippsland Farmer Relief Inc.” Donated items can be delivered to Leongatha Community House at 16 Bruce Street Leongatha between 9am and 3.30pm Mondays to Fridays.

a Young Dairy Network evening in Fish Creek this Thursday. Held in conjunction with Alltech and Murray Goulburn, the evening will focus on getting the best performance possible from summer forage crops. Topics to be covered will include cow requirements, feed sources, rumen health, crop options, feed quality of crops and cow and grass signals. There will be a great panel of presenters including Alltech dairy technical specialist Don Blackwell, Alltech Gippsland sales representative Jake Frecklington and Murray Goulburn technical sales agronomist Scott Travers. The evening will be held at the Fish Creek Football Club, Terrill Park, Fish Creek on Thursday, October 20 from 6.30pm for dinner. The dinner will be provided free of charge. Please RSVP to Irene Baker on 0428 889 337 or irene@gippsdairy.com.au


PAGE 42 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

public notice

public notice

Tarwin Lower Hall 29 River Drive

MARKET MONDAY OCTOBER 31 7.30am to 2pm Numerous stalls of new and old wares, produce, clothing, plants, food and BBQ Stall Bookings Anita 5663 7345

Official Opening Invitation Dumbalk Community Centre

public notice

situations vacant

MARINE LICENCE COURSE

WANTED INTERSTATE B DOUBLE TIPPER DRIVER

Vic. Boat Licence with Jetski endorsement

Wed 26th October

INVERLOCH

Time: 1.30 - 3pm 20 Miller Street Dumbalk Afternoon Tea provided RSVP by 21st October to Toine 5664 1258 bovill@aussiebb.com.au

Saturday, November 5 1pm - 5pm

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING Inverloch Community House Inc Members, volunteers and other interested parties are advised that the Annual General Meeting of the Community House will be held on

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18, 2016 Starting at 7pm sharp

BOOKINGS ESSENTIAL Phone Bob: 0417 524 005

Experienced preferred Excellent remuneration Contact 0419 319 261

Approved TSV course www.abcboating.com ABN 43080057923

situations vacant MANAGER, small busy post office South Gippsland. Minimum 5 years experience and current Auspost training, $26/hr. Closes November 14. Email resumé cover letter mylocalpostoffice1@ gmail.com

Email your adverts to The Star

situations vacant

situations vacant

SALVOCARE EASTERN Case Manager Family Violence Outreach Service – Leongatha FULL TIME – Ongoing SalvoCare Eastern Family Violence Outreach Service provides support and assistance to women and children affected by Family Violence who are leaving violent and abusive relationships. The Case Manager must be able to work collaboratively with clients to empower them to identify and achieve realistic goals, whilst maintaining clear boundaries relating to their role. For further information and to apply please visit www.sarmy.org.au/divisions/evd

ads@thestar.com.au

Followed by an information session on community gardens

Venue: Inverloch Community House, Inverloch Hub, 16 A’Beckett Street, Inverloch (Entry via Reilly St) To receive the Annual Report, Financial Report, and elect the Committee of Management There are vacancies on the Committee of Management and nominations are welcome. Forms are available at the Community House

South Gippsland Shire Council

Caravan Park staff Caravan Park Cleaners Caravan Park Maintenance Officer Casual - seasonal positions Port Welshpool & Yanakie locations Enquiries to Jock Wilson, Caravan Parks Coordinator on (03) 5662 9200. Please refer to our website www.southgippsland.vic.gov.au for further information. Applications close Friday 28 October 2016 at 5.00pm.

www.southgippsland.vic.gov.au

JOINERY MACHINE OPERATOR (CNC ROUTER) An opportunity exists for a suitably qualified person to join our Kitchens Production team. You will be responsible for the day to day running of our CNC router producing kitchen components. The successful applicant will have excellent communication skills, punctuality, reliability and be able to work in a busy team environment. Applicants should have competent computer skills with the ability to learn in house programs. Capeview is committed to providing you with ongoing training and support to ensure your success. Applications close on Tuesday 25th October 2016 and should be forwarded to: Peter Sheerin C/- Capeview Building Products, P.O Box 115 Wonthaggi 3995. Email: peter.sheerin@cv-bp.com.au

Bass Coast Health Clinical Services

Registered Nurses Nurse Pool – Up To 0.84 EFT, Permanent Medical Ward – Up To Full Time, Permanent Sub-Acute Ward - 0.84EFT, Permanent

Classified advertising closes 12 noon Mondays

situations vacant

situations vacant

SHOP MANAGER –

VOLUNTEER WITH HONORARIUM South Gippsland Conservation Society Inc seeks a Shop Manager for the Bunurong Environment Centre Shop in Inverloch, 8-10 hours a week. Tasks include management of shop stock, banking, rostering volunteers, monthly Executive meeting and some computer work. The position is not salaried, but an honorarium is paid to cover costs incurred and in appreciation of the time involved. Enquiries to Pauline Taylor at shop@sgcs.org.au or Dave Sutton on 0419 230 110. Applications with CV must be received at daves@dcsi.net.au by 5pm Thursday 27 October.

We are seeking dynamic nurses for the above positions. Positions are on-going and permanent. Requirements: • Demonstrated commitment to excellent patient/resident care • Well-developed clinical skills • Ability to time manage and work in a busy ward environment • Demonstrated ability to work collaboratively and consultatively as part of a multidisciplinary team • Excellent written and oral communication skills • Prepared to work rotating day/night/weekend shifts • Satisfactory Police Check • Current registration with NMBA The position description can be downloaded from our website: www.basscoasthealth.org.au / employment / current vacancies. Applications, including a cover letter and 2 professional referees should be addressed to: Melissa Lowe, Clinical Services. Post: Bass Coast Health, PO Box 120, Wonthaggi, Vic 3995 Email: melissa.lowe@basscoasthealth.org.au Applications close 5pm Monday 24th October 2016

Mary MacKillop College South Gippsland Is searching for suitability qualified teachers (full time/part time by negotiation), with the ability to teach

Religious Education Year 7 -12 Mathematics Year 7 – 11 English Year 7 – 11 (3 positions) These positions are a 12 month replacement with the possibility of on-going employment

School Counsellor (3 days 0.6FTE) This position is ongoing The successful applicants will have a demonstrated commitment to Catholic education and are committed to creating and maintaining a child safe environment. It is a condition of employment that all employees of the college be suitable to work with children and adhere to the Child Safety Code of Conduct and Child Protection Policy. visit www.mackillopleongatha.catholic.edu.au for more information Written applications, including the names of three referees, should be included on the application form and emailed to the Principal’s Secretary (jdamon@mmcrc.catholic.edu.au) as soon as possible but no later than the close of business Tuesday 25 October 2016

Most photos that appear in The Star can be purchased by calling 5662 2294


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 43

situations vacant

situations vacant

RESEARCH AND EVALUATION POSITION Gippsland Centre against Sexual Assault (GCASA) has an exciting opportunity available based in Morwell, Gippsland. This is a result of organisational growth and planning for future sustainability. GCASA is funded to provide crisis intervention, individual counselling and group work, professional consultation, community education and community development activities throughout the Gippsland region. All positions come with a competitive, above award package. The Research and Evaluation role will support the Clinical Manager through contribution to clinical governance with a focus on quality improvement processes in research and evaluation for clinical practice and prevention focusing on; Workforce Development, Sector reform, research and Knowledge Exchange & Translation into Practice. This role is 0.8EFT for a 12 month fixed term contract. Applications close at 5pm, 4th November 2016 and should be emailed to Fiona Boyle, CEO: mail@gippscasa.org

for sale

for sale

for sale

for sale

BILLIARD TABLE ¾ - 9’x4½’ slate based Harry Evans, complete set of equipment and light hood. Excellent condition. 5674-2929 or 0427-742929.

FIREWOOD - local messmate/stringy bark, cut, split, dry. Discounts on bulk loads. Free delivery available. Pick up or delivered. $100 per cubic metre. Ph: 0437-176187.

HAY - 16 quality round bales, $30 inc GST (ONO). Ph: 5664-3302, 0439-646794.

METAL filing cabinet, 3 drawers $60; cross country trainer $80; treadmill, heart pulse and fat burn, with incline, safety switch, $500; twin, wood, dog kennel $90. Ph: 5638-8113.

FIREWOOD, redgum & local wood, Ph 0408980-711, A/H 56625175.

situations vacant

G E N E R A T O R Powertech portable, 2 KVA electric start, 2 hours work, $700. 0418384468.

situations vacant

CASUAL Personal Carers, Enrolled Nurses and Registered Nurses We are searching for motivated, enthusiastic and caring individuals to join our care team at Foster in the roles of Personal Carer, Enrolled Nurse and Registered Nurse. If you are a team player with excellent interpersonal skills call us now for a position description. Applications close 5pm Tuesday 1 November 2016 All enquiries and applications to: Carina Ross, Quality Care Administrator T: 03 5682 0800 E: carina.ross@promcountryagedcare.com.au

situations vacant situations vacant

situations vacant

for sale

MOWERS We stock the largest range of New push and ride-on mowers in South Gippsland, including - Honda,Victa, Greenfield, Deutscher, Cub Cadet, MTD, Masport, Toro, Yard Machines & Rover from $149. Professional repairs and service for ALL mower makes and models. Also stocking a large range of parts and accessories. We also have a large range of secondhand mowers available.

meetings

SLEEPERS, treated pine, 200 x 50 x 2.4 $12.10 each, 200 x 75 x 2.4 $16.75 each, 200 x 75 x 3.0 $ 20.90 each. Free delivery for pack lots. Phone Joe 0417530662. TIMBER Kiln dried blackwood, silver wattle, cypress, celery top pine, most sizes for furniture and craft, also slabs and structural pine. Ph: 5681-2261.

livestock BULLS for hire or for sale. Friesian, Angus, Hereford, Limo or Jersey. All sound young bulls. Hire or sale. Phone 0447-331762.

www.marriottsmpe.com.au

CHAROLAIS BULL (Poll) 3 yo, medium frame, excellent temperament. Photo available. $3,000. 0408149802.

situations vacant

situations vacant

MOTORCYCLES & POWER EQUIPMENT

Cnr Allison & South Gippsland Hwy, Leongatha. L.M.C.T. 2714

Ph: 5662 2028

situations vacant

We have some exciting positions available to join our busy Leongatha based team. Workshop Administrator Responsible for scheduling and planning of service jobs, ordering, receipting and invoicing machinery, Health & Safety and general administration. Service Technician We are looking for a qualified Diesel Mechanic, preferably with experience servicing Agricultural Machinery. For further information on either position please visit www.claasharvestcentre.com or forward your resume and covering letter to growwithus@claashc.com.au

used vehicles BARINA hatch, 2007, blue, 5 speed manual, new tyres, 11 months reg. (UXL259), RWC, 56,000km, $5,995. Ph: 5664-0051. NISSAN PATHFINDER 2001 4WD, automatic, new tyres, 11 months reg. (QRX137), 300,000km, sunroof, very reliable, $4,995. Ph: 5664-0051.

wanted to buy

Pine Plantation WITH / WITHOUT LAND Email: pinetreevic@gmail.com Phone:

QUAD BIKES, going or not. Try me before you trade. Cash buyer. Ph: 0427-554174.

Want to join an organisation that supports your personal and professional environment? At the WGCMA we pride ourselves on providing an encouraging work environment that helps staff reach their potential.

The CLAAS Harvest Centre network is a leading provider of agricultural machinery throughout Australia and New Zealand and enjoys brand partnerships spanning more than 40 years with premium manufacturers including CLAAS, AMAZONE and Seed Hawk.

AT THE INLET HOTEL INVERLOCH

FRIESIAN heifer calves, minimum six weeks old. Ph: 0447-398822.

Part Time (12 month maternity leave contract)

South Gippsland

6.30pm meal followed by the meeting at 8pm

ANY OLD farm four wheelers, good or bad, 4WDs or trucks. Will pay cash. Phone Matt 0401194601.

Leongatha

Workshop Administrator & Service Technician

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27

0437 317 879

South Gippsland Landcare Network Coordinator

Recruiting Now!

SGWAAC 2016 AGM

garage sales

The South Gippsland Landcare Network in partnership with the West Gippsland Catchment Management Authority are seeking applications to fullfil the role of the Landcare Network Coordinator position on a part time basis for a fixed term until January 2018. Working within one of the State’s most diverse and progressive regions, this position will bring about environmental change by providing operational and strategic support to the South Gippsland Landcare Network and its community. This role will provide leadership, strategic coordination, project management and technical support to the landcare network. It will require a passionate and skilled person with a general knowledge and understanding pertaining to the support and coordination of community based organisations as well as expertise in natural resource management and environmental issues. The remuneration range being offered for the position is $75,496 - $109,406 including superannuation. A copy of the Position Description can be obtained via our website www.wgcma.vic.gov.au or by emailing reception@wgcma.vic.gov.au with the job title in the email’s subject line. Applicants must address the Key Selection Criteria, demonstrating their ability to undertake the role.

HUGE GARAGE SALE 18 Norview Drive LEONGATHA Saturday October 22 8am - 1pm Ex-market brand new jewellery, kids clothing, décor, wooden toys, plus craft, Stampin up, homewares, baby goods, bonds, lawn mower, books, DVDs, furniture, wedding decorations, plants, vintage and collectables, plus much more

Saturday October 22 7am start MOVING HOUSE

GARAGE SALE The “STAR” can help you promote your event with our

$27.50 GARAGE SALE KIT KIT INCLUDES 5cm x S/C advert (valued at $33.00) • 2 x A4 Garage Sale Signs • Garage Sale Tips (dos and don’ts) • Sheet of Price Stickers • Star Carry Bag

Total package valued at $41 ADVERTISE by calling 5662 5555 or emailing classifieds@thestar.com.au or call in to 36 McCartin Street LEONGATHA to pick up your kit when you place your advertisement

Garage Sale 37 Miller Street Dumbalk

SATURDAY & SUNDAY October 22 & 23 8.30am - 4pm 5664 4261 Collectables and more, plaster cornice and ceiling rose moulds (negotiable) Several other garage sales in same street

MOVING HOUSE SALE

8am-1pm

Garden tools Household goods

22nd OCTOBER MG TRADING 40 Princes Street Korumburra

Applications addressing Key Selection Criteria should be marked; ‘South Gippsland Landcare Network Coordinator’ c/o Organisational Development and Support Coordinator amiet@wgcma.vic.gov.au and must be received by 4.00pm Friday October 28th 2016.

93 Bridge Street Korumburra SATURDAY OCTOBER 22

ZO641649

7 Turner Street LEONGATHA

25 Elmore’s Road KORUMBURRA

GARAGE SALE

T: 1300 094 262 | F: (03) 5175 7899 E: westgippy@wgcma.vic.gov.au

GARAGE SALE

Massive Car Park Sale

For further information contact Belinda Brennan Partnerships and Engagement Team Leader on 0409 004 901 or via email: belindab@wgcma.vic.gov.au

Martin Fuller PO Box 1374, Traralgon Chief Executive Officer VIC 3844 | www.wgcma.vic.gov.au

garage sales GARAGE SALE at Households of 1, 2, 3, 4 Eden Crescent, Leongatha, Saturday, October 22, 8.30am 1.30pm. Books, household items, tools, furniture, and plenty more.

9am - 4pm Furniture, books, tools, vintage clothes, gardening gear, and much more www.garagesaletrail.com.au

SATURDAY OCTOBER 22 8am - 4pm

marriage celebrant

Jo Fennell 0437 465 399

johanne4@bigpond.com

Jenny Milkins All areas - 5672 3123 jenny_milkins@hotmail.com

Classified advertising closes 12 noon Mondays


PAGE 44 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Lions gather in Inverloch births

deaths

PAYNE (Davies) Congratulations Jess and Josh on the birth of Aria Florence, 10.10.16 at Leongatha Hospital. Granddaughter for Jill and Rob, niece for Bec and Jarrod, great granddaughter for Marg and Ted.

MILLETT (nee Brickle) - Mary. Passed away suddenly after a long illness at Leongatha on October 15, 2016. Formerly of Leongatha South. Loving wife of Stan (dec), mother of Dianne, Jayne and Melissa. Much loved Nana to Maddison and Alexander. A sad loss to us all.

deaths HARRISON - Harry. Leongatha Golf Club extends sympathy to the Harrison family on the passing of member Harry. Harry joined Leongatha Golf Club in 2009. He will be missed by all at the club. JOYCE (nee Wuchatsch) - Elizabeth Barbara. Passed away peacefully at Leongatha Hospital on October 13, 2016. Aged 89 years. Formerly of Korumburra and Dumbalk. Loved wife of Stan (dec). Dearly loved mum of Kay and Paul, Pat and Adrian, Ray and Toni, Peter and Pat, and Michael. Cherished Nan of 7 grandchildren and 10 great grandchildren. Reunited with Dad. Loved always.

deaths

Please see Herald Sun for funeral details.

funerals JOYCE - A Graveside Funeral Service to celebrate the life of Mrs Elizabeth Barbara Joyce will be held at the Meeniyan Cemetery on Tuesday, October 18, 2016 commencing at 11am.

Email your adverts to The Star ads@thestar.com.au

LIONS Clubs from across the region gathered in Inverloch for a convention and annual general meeting last weekend. Arriving on Friday, 250 people from 67 clubs as far as Mallacoota registered to be involved in the convention over the three big days. To commemorate the event, 18 displays were put together to reflect the work of Lions. This year’s theme was Dinosaur Dreaming. Some events included a Christmas cake competition, a barbecue on the opening night, and the junior public speaking competition for primary aged children.

“Students from grades 3 to 5 have competed in the junior public speaking competition and this was the grand final. These students were absolutely magnificent and extremely confident,” Inverloch Lions Club’s Klaus Edel said. The annual general meeting was an opportunity to discuss the activities of Lions clubs and reflect on those who have departed Lions in the last 12 months. These people were acknowledged with a photograph and speech about what they had achieved during their time with the organisation. “As an annual general meeting and a convention all in one, it’s an excellent way for delegates to meet and for the

clubs to renew friendships,” Mr Edel said. “Every year, the convention is held

in a different location. Last year it was held in Lakes Entrance and next year it will be in Stratford.”

Mobile black out hits Meeniyan By Tayla Kershaw A TELSTRA blackout frustrated residents and business owners in Meeniyan last week. Mobiles, ATMs and wireless EFTPOS machines were all rendered useless, causing town wide disruptions. “It was pretty annoying and hard on sales,” Brown Wigg sales representative Marcus Brickle said. “We had to ask people to pay with cash and we couldn’t use our mobile phones. We do a lot of trade with our mobiles.” According to Mr Brickle, the Telstra disruptions began at 10am Tuesday and remained until 4pm Friday. Brown Wigg reported the outage to Telstra on Wednesday, but Telstra did not acknowledge the problem at the time. “We were told by Telstra there was no problem in our area and we should take our device into a local Telstra shop to be fixed,” Mr Brickle said. “However, the outage was right through Meeniyan. Those with hardwire EFTPOS were alright, but others went

through the same trouble during their business days.” Telstra told The Star mobile services were affected in Leongatha South, Buffalo, Tarwin, Stony Creek, Fish Creek and Meeniyan due to a problem with the main base station in Koonwarra. The mobile base station upgrade at Koonwarra did not go to plan and had a cascading effect on surrounding mobile towers in the region, which affected the ability for customers to make and receive calls. Telstra apologised for inconvenience this caused. Compensation for affected businesses and customers is assessed on a case by case basis and Telstra encouraged its customers and businesses who might want to have this conversation to email TelstraEastVic@team.telstra.com. Mr Brickle said the outage was annoying for those paying large amounts, but business was not affected too badly as Brown Wigg has many account holders. It is business as usual for Meeniyan this week, as there have been no further problems since the Telstra service was reinstated.

deaths

Catch up: from left, former district governor and Korumburra Lions Club member Norm McPherson and Inverloch Lions Club life member Neil Everitt attended the welcome barbecue on Friday night for the Lions convention.

Honoured guests: from left, convention chairman Klaus Edel welcomed district governor Anita Culpitt and district cabinet secretary David Culpitt to Inverloch on Friday night for the Lions convention.

Cannabis haul POLICE found cannabis plants at a Wonthaggi property during a search on October 11. A 32 year old Wodonga man was arrested and charged with drugs offences and bailed to Korumburra Magistrate’s Court in March next year.

Paul & Margaret Beck Proprietors

Caring for our Community, personal dignified service to all areas 5662 2717

Musical burglary A GUITAR and computer were stolen from a studio in Leongatha between October 10 and 11. A brushcutter was also taken from a shed at the property in Sapphire Court. Between October 4 and 15, thieves forced entry to a shed at a premises in Beilby Avenue, Inverloch, and stole a brushcutter, chainsaw and blower.

Pre-need Funeral Plans available

Golf club hit

Office and Chapel: 24 Anderson Street, Leongatha hfs1@vic.australis.com.au

BURGLARS stole power tools from the Lang Lang Golf Club during a theft overnight between October 10 and 11. They forced entry to a shed and stole two Stihl chainsaws, three Dewalt drills and unleaded fuel. The offenders also gained entry to the site office and removed two CCTV cameras and the CCTV system hard drive.

MEMBER OF AUSTRALIAN FUNERAL DIRECTORS ASSOCIATION

Accident injury: a Leongatha woman suffered a broken ankle following a crash at the new traffic lights in Leongatha on Friday. Scott and Sharon Anderson With care & dignity we serve South Gippsland and Phillip Island Main Office: WONTHAGGI / INVERLOCH 5672 1074 176-178 Graham Street, Wonthaggi 3995 Fax: 5672 1747 email: randm33@bigpond.net.au PHILLIP ISLAND 5952 5171 15 Warley Avenue, Cowes 3922 (by appointment only) Pre-paid & pre-arranged funeral plans available CARING & PERSONAL 24 HOUR SERVICE www.handleyandandersonfunerals.com.au MEMBER OF AUSTRALIAN FUNERAL DIRECTORS ASSOCIATION

Crash breaks woman’s ankle A LEONGATHA woman suffered a broken ankle during a crash in Leongatha on Friday. The 62 year old entered the newly altered intersection of Koonwarra Road and Bair, Long and Ogilvy streets from Ogilvy Street, when the crash occurred at 11.30am. Police said a car driven by a 21 year old woman female was making a right hand turn from Bair Street into Koonwarra Road when she turned in front of the oncoming car driven by the Leongatha woman. The offending driver received a penalty notice for failing to give way. Police remind drivers that Bair Street drivers no longer have right of way when travelling into Koonwarra Road and even when they have the green light, they still need to give way to oncoming traffic and pedestrians crossing Koonwarra Road.

formation provided builds police’s intelligence base. Police request the public provide the registration number, colour and make of the car and then any information regarding description of the driver. The public is permitted to video record hoon driving on a mobile phone or another device for police to view, but police urge the public to not put themselves in harm’s way when doing so. Police are concerned about the danger hoon driving poses to passengers, but even more so to other road users or people that may be in the vicinity.

Animal cruelty HEARTLESS crooks killed four birds in a Wonthaggi backyard over the weekend. They killed three chickens and a duck, possibly by drowning them in a small swimming pool, between Friday night and Sunday afternoon. The house was in McKenzie Street.

Public help catch hoons

Pair assaulted

POLICE in Leongatha and South Gippsland have charged several drivers in recent weeks with hoon offences with help from the public. Police appealed to the public to ring 000 any time they see hoon driving, including in the early hours, as police may be in the area. Even if police cannot respond immediately, any in-

A MAN was remanded in custody in relation to an assault at a Wonthaggi caravan park on Friday. At about 1.30am, a 38 year old man and a 37 year old woman were injured as a result of the assault and required hospital treatment. Police arrested a 24 year old man soon after and he was charged with several offences and remanded in custody.

Surfboards stolen TWO surfboards were stolen from underneath a house in Cowes between October 2 and 12. The house was in Rose Avenue. One board measured eight foot six inches, was white and carried the writing “Mouse God” in a black circle. The second board was the same but seven feet two inches long.

Shed heist A LARGE amount of property was stolen from a shed in Cowes recently. Electrical tools, two surf boards and three wet suits were taken from the rear shed of a holiday house in Jennifer Avenue between September 23 and October 15. Between October 12 and 14, thieves entered an unlocked garage and stolen a tent and tools from a unit in Settlement Road, Cowes.

Vehicles hit SIX unlocked vehicles were broken into Corinella overnight between October 9 and 10. In Cutty Sark Road, an unknown offender entered an unlocked Ford sedan and stole cash and CDs. In Smyth Street, a small bag was taken from an unlocked Holden sedan. Cash was taken from a Holden sedan and Holden station wagon in Moorings Road. In Wright Street, a wallet was taken from a Toyota ute and a Honda sedan was broken into but nothing was stolen.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 45

Laughs a minute at Rotary trivia night LEONGATHA Rotary Club held an entertaining music trivia night fundraiser at Leongatha’s Football Grandstand function room on Saturday night.

Fun galore: from left, Leonnie McCluskey, Gordon Morrison and David Panther soak up the atmosphere of Leongatha Rotary’s music trivia night.

More than 150 Rotarians and Leongatha’s finest trivia buffs attended the event, and there was even a Pavarotti impersonation and a little Nutbush on the dance floor thrown in for good measure. Raffles and auctions were held, with prizes given by local businesses. More than $5000 was raised on the night and will go to local Rotary projects, including South Gippsland In the groove: dancers could not resist performing Nutbush at Rotary’s Entertaining evening: from left, Marj Pearson chats with Lindsay and Specialist School, a defibrillator at Robyn Moore at Leongatha Rotary Club’s music trivia night on Saturday. music trivia night. Woorayl Lodge and local cancer care projects.

Right, Right answers: from left, displaying their musical knowledge at Leongatha Rotary Club’s music trivia night on Saturday were Lyn Martin, Alex Thornton and Kerrie Thornton.

Social event: from left, Neil and Judy Langstaff enjoy time with Joan Fawcett at Leongatha Rotary Club’s music trivia night on Saturday.

Diabetes ball raises a record $60,000 THE Royal Children’s Hospital Inverloch Diabetes Ball held at the Inverloch Community Hub on Saturday, October 8 raised a record $60,000 for the hospital’s diabetes unit. The event is organised by the Beauglehall family of Inverloch, whose eldest daughter Carla Poletti was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 11. This year is the 20th year the family has raised funds for the hospital and it has collected more than $800,000 over that time. “This money makes the big-

gest difference in helping and changing the lives of people with type 1 diabetes,” Carla said. “This money doesn’t go to administration and unknown costs. It goes straight from us into the hands of the hospital and funds a complications clinic for type 1 diabetic children. “Without this money, the clinic wouldn’t exist. It’s purely funded by us, the Inverloch community. “Since funding this program, complications such as blindness, kidney disease - the dreaded list goes on – have gone from 30 percent to one percent. We are making a difference. We are

making a change!” Carla thanked her mother Kerrie for her part in helping to organise the ball, to try and make Carla free of diabetes. The event featured a sitdown meal, raffles and auctions,

and dancing to the band Stiletto Groove. Professor George Werther and 16 doctors and nurses from the Royal Children’s Hospital were first in line to buy their tickets to the function.

Party time: Rod and Jen Curnow had fun at the Royal Children’s Hospital Inverloch Diabetes Ball at Inverloch on Saturday, October 8.

Official group: Professor George Werther and wife Mary from the Royal Children’s Hospital’s diabetics unit enjoyed the festivities of the Inverloch Diabetes Ball on Saturday, October 8.

Formal welcome: Kerrie Beauglehall and grandson Nate Family event: Carla and Paul Poletti with sons Nate and Zac Poletti on the red carpet at the Royal Children’s Hospital Indress up for the Royal Children’s Hospital Inverloch DiabeNight out: Rod and Joyce Purvis relax at the Inverloch ball. verloch Diabetes Ball on Saturday, October 8. tes Ball at Inverloch.


PAGE 46 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Bikes galore at Mirboo North

Riding in: motorcyclists came from all parts to visit Mirboo North on the weekend for the Hundreds: the town of Mirboo North was buzzing with visitors on Saturday for the 3rd Blessing of the Bikes on Saturday. Blessing of the Bikes event. See story page 3.

Creative writers praised SHORT stories and poetry were praised at the ninth annual Coal Creek Literary Festival, held on October 9. Sandy Point’s Diana Cornwell’s short story Heading North received the Bert van Bedaf Memorial Award in a competitive field of impressive short stories. Inverloch’s Jellie Wyckelsma won the open po-

etry award for her beautiful poem, Sometimes. The short story category was judged by experienced Australia publisher Peter Sharpe and award winning poet Julie Maclean judged the poetry. The Literary Festival committee was thrilled with the intake of competition submissions, with some 80 percent of applicants from the local community. The competition for the 10th Literary Festival will open in November, and on-

TIDES Here is an easy guide to tides in your area. To determine tides for a particular area, add or subtract periods of times as shown below. Earlier Minutes Apollo Bay ...........................25 King Island (Grassy) ...........10 King Island (Surprise Bay)....40 King Island (Franklin) ...........40 Lakes Entrance .................... 170 Lorne ...................................... 20 Mallacoota Inlet.................... 158 Rip Bank ................................ 15 Snowy River Entrance ......... 170 _______________________ Cape Schanck, Flinders, Mornington Ocean Beaches, Seal Rocks, Venus Bay, Waratah Bay, Woolamai ....... nil _________________________ Later Minutes Altona ................................... 195 Barwon Heads Bridge ........... 15 Carrum ................................. 195 Corinella ................................. 68 Cowes Pier............................. 50 Dromana .............................. 195 Frankston ............................. 195 Geelong ............................... 210 Hastings ................................. 66 Hovell Pile ............................ 195 Inverloch Pier ......................... 15 Melbourne ............................ 200 Mornington ........................... 195 Newhaven Jetty ..................... 30 No. 1 West Channel (Annulus)........................... 50 No. 2 South Channel Light .... 70 No. 8 South Channel Light .. 150 Port Albert Pier ...................... 90 Portarlington Pier ................. 190 Portsea Pier ........................... 80 Port Welshpool (Rabbit Island .................... 10 Queenscliffe Pier ................... 30 Rhyll ....................................... 60 Rosebud............................... 195 Rye Pier ............................... 170 St. Leonards Pier ................. 190 Sandringham ....................... 195 Sorrento Pier........................ 130 Stony Point ............................. 40 South Channel Pile Light ..... 190 Swan Island Dock ................ 120 Tooradin ............................... 105 Warneet.................................. 84 Williamstown ........................ 200 Welshpool Pier....................... 90

At Point Lonsdale

OCTOBER Time

height (metres)

Add one hour for daylight saving

19 WED

20 THUR

21 FRI

22 SAT

23 SUN

24 MON

25 TUE

0252 0826 1453 2041

1.73 0.47 1.57 0.12

0342 0914 1538 2130

1.78 0.45 1.58 0.09

0430 1000 1622 2218

1.78 0.45 1.57 0.10

0517 1045 1707 2306

1.73 0.46 1.53 0.16

0605 1131 1755 2354

1.65 0.49 1.47 0.25

0657 1219 1847

1.56 0.53 1.39

0042 0752 1309 1950

0.35 1.47 0.57 1.32

All times shown in 24 hour clock 0001 - 1200..................AM 1201 - 2400..................PM

line submissions will now be accepted. The winning pieces are featured below.

Heading North by Diana Cornwell Ella pulled the cover off the steering wheel, unlocked the door of the engine control panel and switched on the instruments. Standing behind the wheel she could now see on the chart plotter where their boat was tied up in the marina – and the coastline for about a hundred miles in each direction. Time to head north again, she asked herself. But where would they go this time? Lizard Island, maybe? They’d been there several times before so she could picture the anchorage, in a sheltered bay off a lovely sandy beach fringed by palm trees. Lots of really good fishing and crabbing around there. And there were sure to be other boats anchored there too, so there’d be people to chat to and help out if needed. Then they could sail north around the top to Dar-

win again: she remembered the time they’d worked there for a few months to save some money before sailing north to Indonesia and then Thailand. Her hand hovered over the key to switch on the motor. All she had to do was turn it and the engine would roar into life. Then if Stan came up and cast off the mooring lines they could motor out of the marina, put the sails up and head north once again. She turned her head and looked down the steps into the cabin. Stan was asleep in his chair with his feet on a plastic crate, his mouth hanging open and his hands resting, shaking in his lap, something that she knew was only going to get worse as the Parkinson’s progressed. She looked at the withered frame of her once fit and energetic husband: how had it come to this? A welfare worker, Maureen, had come to visit them that afternoon. She was a big lady dressed in a tight skirt and smart shoes and had trouble getting up onto the boat, let alone having to twist her body through the

canopy entrance and into the cockpit. After she struggled down the steps into the cabin she looked around in obvious amazement and horror at the tiny cabin that Ella and Stan had called home for the last 30 or so years. Maureen took no time in offering her opinion that people of their age and health shouldn’t be living under such conditions and that she’d organise for Stan to go into the local high care aged facility and Ella into the low care unit next to it. Her loud voice cut across Ella’s protests. She’d go back to the office and organise it for the straight away, she announced. Ella made a decision. No bloody way, they weren’t ready for that yet. They’d do one more trip north. She turned the key. The engine coughed once and then jumped into life. Her hand hovered over the gear lever. “Stan, Stan,” she called out. “Wake up, quick! Come and give me a hand, you lazy bugger. We’ve gotta get out of here. We’re heading north.”

Poets: from left, Inverloch’s Jellie Wyckelsma accepts the open poetry award from judge Julie Maclean at the ninth Coal Creek Literary Festival. Sometimes by Jellie Wyckelsma Sometimes I dream to be back in a different world, safe sitting in the family kitchen where some cupboard doors have different colours, an unfinished paint job, the old fridge hums, the kitchen tap drips Eating, sipping tea, talking and listening to each other Dad sits at the head of the table Mum dishes up more food than any of us could eat Then a dense fog descends on the kitchen scene, the memory of it all fades away, the dream becomes a blue party balloon escaping from a child’s hand, misty eyes know it’s drifting higher and higher, irretrievable, vanishing into space.

Dodgy highway to be fixed THE Ruby straight section of the South Gippsland Highway between Leongatha and Korumburra will be resealed over the summer months following representations from Gippsland South MLA Danny O’Brien. Mr O’Brien raised in Parliament in August concerns about the poor state of the rebuilt section of road which some local residents have dubbed “the rollercoaster”. “I took the issue up with the roads minister because I had a number of people comment to me, and had noticed

myself, that this newly rebuilt section of road was in poor condition already,” he said. “The surface is uneven and quite bumpy. I don’t believe this is good enough given the money spent on this new piece of road, which ironically enough was the site of the minister’s announcement last year of state-wide funding for roadworks. “I’ve now received a response from the minister which advises the reconstruction works on the highway were impacted by cold and wet weather in May which prevented the pavement from being completed to VicRoads’ ‘satisfaction’.” The minister has advised VicRoads has been monitor-

ing the work over winter and as summer approaches will remove the existing seal and relay the top layer. “I’m no engineer or expert and I’m not sure if that will be enough to fix the underlying problems with this road, but at the very least it’s a start,” he said. “I also note comments from the government in local media that they too were unhappy with the standard of work, so I’m hopeful the new work to be completed over summer will be done to a higher standard.” Mr O’Brien said the South Gippsland Highway was a key focus for him and it needed additional funding spent. “I’m pleased the Federal Government has committed

Safer roads: Gippsland South MLA Danny O’Brien has secured the resealing of the Ruby straight section of the South Gippsland Highway. $25 million dollars to upgrade the South Gippsland Highway and I look forward to State Labor matching this commitment as soon as possible, particularly given the windfall achieved by the Port of Melbourne lease which has given the government nearly a billion dollars to spend on country roads,” he said.

“We have also launched a campaign ‘Fix Country Roads, Save Country Lives’ and I encourage local residents to report poor sections of road to me so that we can forward a list of works to the State Government. Photos and locations should be sent to me at danny. obrien@parliament.vic.gov. au.”


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 47

| SPORT

thestar.com.au

Sheene tribute ride this Thursday

HUNDREDS of motorcyclists will ride through South Gippsland this Thursday (October 20) during the Barry Sheene Tribute Ride in the lead-up to this weekend’s Australian Motorcycle Grand Prix at Phillip Island.

“Being welcomed back as the amMiller, an incredible young talent, we could make a positive impact to the help us reach our $1 million tar- lives of those affected. Research has bassador for the YAMS Foundation for get at this year’s event,” Jude said. shown very promising results over the a second consecutive year is a huge The Phillip Island not for profit or- past five years, increasing the survival honour,” he said. “I am thrilled to continue my supganisation was established by Jude in rate from 20 percent to nearly 50 permemory of her beloved granddaughter cent, however there’s still a long way port of YAMS and the work Jude and her team do. It’s a worthwhile local Khalilla, who tragically lost her battle to go,” Jude said. Rider Jack Miller is stoked to see charity which helps make a difference with neuroblastoma, a deadly childJude only $52,000 away from her ul- to young children who are affected by hood cancer. neuroblastoma.” “YAMS Foundation gave me hope timate goal. The ride will leave Bairnsdale at 8.30am and Morwell at 11.30am, passing through Leongatha via the Strzelecki Highway, then on to Inverloch, Wonthaggi and finishing at the Phillip Island Grand Prix circuit with a lap of the famed track. The ride could arrive in Leongatha around 12.15pm, then in Inverloch shortly after 12.30pm. Motorcycle fans are expected to line the streets of Mirboo North, Leongatha, Inverloch and Wonthaggi to watch the riders pass by, led by a police escort. The Australian Grand Prix Corporation has again announced the You Are My Sunshine (YAMS) Foundation as the official charity for the race. With the charity in its fifth consecutive year and racing towards its $1 million fundraising goal, YAMS Foundation chairperson Jude Donahoo was thrilled to name Australian rider, Jack Miller, as the official charity ambassador. “The finish line is now in sight Hundreds out: many people are expected to line the streets as the Barry Sheene ride hits Leongatha and Inverand I can’t wait to have Aussie Jack loch this Thursday around lunchtime before heading to Wonthaggi en route to Phillip Island.

Since the inception of YAMS in 2009, more than $945,000 has been donated toward neuroblastoma research being undertaken at the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre. For more information and to buy tickets for the race, head online to: www.motogp.com.au. VicRoads is urging all drivers to plan extra travel time and be aware of increased traffic on the roads ahead of the Phillip Island MotoGP this weekend. From Friday, October 21 to Sunday, October 23,VicRoads has worked closely with event organisers to ensure all road users travel to and from the event safely. VicRoads will be monitoring traffic flow and road conditions in the lead up to the event and throughout the duration of the weekend. From Sunday, October 23 the ‘blue line’ treatment will be in place to cater for the large traffic volumes leaving Phillip Island after the event. This will be in place from Phillip Island Road at the intersection of Back Beach Road and continues to the Bass Highway via the new link road. This treatment improves traffic flow to accommodate for the increase in road users heading back to Melbourne after the event. VicRoads asks motorists to be mindful of the blue line marking and drive accordingly to the changed conditions.

Shield round two: Tevuro, Piper, Naomi and Aliesha competed at Casey Fields.

South Coast Athletics

Kiara Brusamarello: competes in the Girls Winding up: Jack Coldebella puts a big effort in during the Boys Under 8 Turbo Javelin.

EIGHT South Coast athletes participated Under 12 Triple Jump. in round two of Shield competition held at Casey Fields on Saturday, October 15. Events included the 100m sprint, 1500m, javelin and long jump.

Wonthaggi Little Athletics THIS week was the first regular meeting

Left, At the ready: Tevuro competes in the of Wonthaggi Little Athletics where athjavelin. letes are awarded points for their times

and distances.

Leongatha small bore rifle results RESULTS for - 2016 TRV 50m BENCH Pennant - Section E. Round 3: Lake Gillear 698.018 def by Wangaratta 726.022; Ballarat East B 730.025 d Leongatha B 698.013, Kyabram B 720.019 (bye). Best shooter for Round 3 is

Keith Smith (Ballarat East B) with 248.014. Round 4: Lake Gillear 722.022 (bye), Kyabram B 725.021 d Leongatha B 703.012, Ballarat East B 736.031 d Wangaratta 715.020. Best shooter for Round 4 is Phillip Merigan (Ballarat East B) with 248.016.

Ladder Ballarat East B ...............................16 Kyabram B .....................................12 Lake Gillear .....................................8 Wangaratta.......................................8 Leongatha ..........................................4

We shoot Wednesday nights at 8pm at the rifle club on the recreation reserve. Any inquiries please call Rob Spratt 5664 2358.

As such, all participants recorded initial results which they can aim to better in the coming weeks. Results can be accessed through the Timing Solutions website. Athletes who have not yet registered will not have their results available until registration has been completed. Registration is

done through the Little Athletics Victoria website. Unfortunately the track was still very boggy so the program had to be modified substantially. Hopefully the track will dry out over the next month so the track events can be run properly. If the weather looks unfavourable, parents need to check the Team App or the Wonthaggi Little Athletics Facebook page for information about washouts.

Korumburra Volleyball ROUND 12 Results A Grade: Champions d Nads (3:0) 25:18, 30:28, 15:6. Warriors d Giants (2:0) 25:18, 25:21, 24:25. Bugs d Saints (2:1) 25:7, 25:11, 22:25, 4:4. B Grade:

Gems d Albatross (2:1) 25:18, 18:25, 25:14, 11:6. HELP d Knights (3:0) 25:12, 25:11, 25:9. Falcons d Hulls Angels (3:0) 25:21, 25:22, 24:17. Panthers d Orsum (3:0) 25:16, 25:14, 25:12.


PAGE 48 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

SPORT | GOLF Leongatha Golf SATURDAY was the second round of the Club Championships with all grades in an interesting position. With the third and final round to be played next week, Tom Sorrell leads A Grade by three strokes from Russell Williams. In B Grade, David Forbes recovered from a disastrous nine on the par five sixth hole to card a creditable 88 and be equal leader with Brendon Simon with a two round total of 173. C Grade is led by David Vorwerg on 18, two shots clear of John McLennan, and in D Grade Henry Sedelies and Hugh Goodman lead the way, both on 56 points. In the daily competition, Mathew Bowey took the A Grade honours in a countback with a net 76. Philippe du Plessis took out B Grade and the Super Comp with a net 73, Merv Stubbs won C Grade with net 75 and youngster Oscar Harry won D Grade with a net 70. Balls were won by Peter Buttinger, Daniel Poynton, Peter Brownlie, Geoff McDonald, Jason Dennerley, David Forbes, Rod Mackenzie, Geoff Maher, Bruce Hutton, Tom Sorrell, Andrew Henley, John McLennan, Brendon Simon, Anthony Sparks, Rob Martin, John Eabry and Bryan McCorkell. NTPs were Rod Hopcraft on the fourth hole, Nathan Wardle on the seventh, Henry Sedelies on the 14th and Frank Gill on the 16th.

A small field contested a 4BBB Stableford Competition on Tuesday of last week. Winners were WendyAnne Parker and Terry Grace with 42 points. DTL balls were awarded to Mark Warby, Ray Barbour, John McInnes, David Forbes, Antony Roberts and John Simon. NTPs were John McInnes on the fourth hole and Terry Grace on the 14th. On Thursday, Michael Thomas, playing off one, had 33 points to win A Grade in a countback, Steve Fisher won B Grade with the best score of the day of 37 points and Antony Roberts won C Grade also in a countback with 33 points. DTL balls were awarded to Colin Bear, John McInnes, Peter Buttinger, Peter Waters, Andrew Smith, Arthur Nilsson, John McLennan, Ian Baker, Brian Fennessy, Josh Hall, Jon Smith, John Eabry and Peter Walsh. NTPs were Paul Luck on the fourth hole, Josh Hall on the seventh, Steve Fisher on the 14th and Michael Thomas on the 16th. Thursday was also the third and final round of the Mark Edwards Thursday Championship. Craig Hams and Paul Luck were equal leaders after two rounds, both on a total of 71 points. Craig sitting on the best second round score of 37 but unable to play the 3rd round and so relying on his first two round total. Paul tried to better his

thestar.com.au first two round scores but came in a little short. Best round of the day was 37 points by Steve Fisher but alas this was only backed up by a 27. Then out of the blue, the last card processed, came a 33 by John McLennan which when added to his exceptional first round of 39 points made a best two round score of 72 giving John the title of Thursday Champion for 2016 by one stroke ahead of Craig Hams and Paul Luck.

Leongatha ladies WEDNESDAY, October 12: Winner: Trish Owen (15) 17 points on a count back. Down the Line: Dot Stubbs 17, Coral Gray 15, Toni West 14 and Wendy Parker 13 on a count back. Nearest the Pin: Toni West. Saturday, October 15: Saturday Championships Stableford round two: Winner: Jessica Harry (38) 29 points on a count back. Down the line: Wendy Parker 29, Coral Gray 28 and Rita de Bondt 25 on a count back. Nearest the pin: Dot Stubbs.

Woorayl WHO won the trophies provided by Gendore for our par event? A Grade went to Trent Walters with +1, B Grade was won by Ed Poole with +6 and C Grade went to Bob Beilby with +2. Down the line balls to B. Hogan, R. Gourlay, B.

Stubbs, T. Ryan, C. James, J. Newton, G. Fennell, C. Turner and J. Diaper. Nearest the pins to Mick Herrald and Don Perrett. The ladies event was won by Sue Wakefield, with a ball to Ann Poole and the ball raffle was won by B. Wilson syndicate. The Thursday competition went to Daryl Hunt with 35 points, with a ball to Bob Beilby. Next week is a stableford.

Woorayl ladies

ber 15 for the foursomes championships, with trophies supplied by Burra Sports and Cycles. Championship winners: scratch M. Wrigley, S. Harland 78 OTS; handicap C. Wilson and P. Vanagtmaal 67½ net. A Grade: G. Wilson (16) , P. Vanagtmaal (14) 67½; R. Ludenia, M. Webb 70½; M. Wrigley, S. Harland 72½; R. Rees, R. Spokes 75. B Grade: R. Newton (17), I. Cash (14) 76½. Nearest the pin: 1st N. Spargo, 10th B. Clasby, 13th B. Pope. Tuesday’s winner was M. Giles 38 pts and Thursday’s winner P. Vanagtmaal 33 pts.

THE spring showers that have been prevalent for the last few weeks did not stop the Woorayl ladies taking to the course for the annual presidents versus Korumburra captains team trophy day on Wednesday, October ladies golf 12. U N F O R T U N AT E LY, However, the rain rain prevented golf last did set in eventually and Wednesday, yet again. forced an early finish when the greens became unplayable. The president’s team was the victor for the day. The winner for A Grade was Elly Berryman and runner up Anne Grist on a countback from Heather Sullivan with the B Grade winner Inge Gilliam and runner up Jo Fennell. The annual general meeting was held during the week and the office bearers for 2016 were reelected for another season. The club is looking for the sun to shine next week with the Ladies Club Championships commencing.

It was decided to reduce the Burgess trophy to two rounds and to cancel the October Monthly Medal. The weather has been against the golfers for the past five months and golfers look forward to warmer weather and less rain, with summer not too far away. There was a lovely day for golf on Saturday and it was great to have so many women on the course. The continual rain over the last weeks has made the course heavy underfoot, although the wind had managed to dry out some of the wetter patches. Div 1 (0-21) was won by Chris Rickard (19), with 27 points and runnerup was Lynete McIvor (18), with 25 points. Deb Wrigley (26) won Div 2, with 22 points and Sharon Adams (37) was runner up with 21 points.

th

NTPs were won by Deb Wrigley on the first, Judy Webb second shot on the seventh, Lynete McIvor 10th and Lee Clements on the fourth and 13th. Marg Young and Lynete McIvor thoroughly enjoyed the day at Gardiner’s Run when they played in the final of the Doris Chambers Foursomes event. They did well with their golf, had great weather and a delicious lunch, to finish the day off nicely. The field is lookingp good for the Ruby Stephen’s Day, to be held on Friday, October 28. The aim of this special event is to enjoy the day and the company of fellow golfers. Being a three person Ambrose competition ensures plenty of good fun within each team.

Korumburra THERE were 30 players on Saturday, Octo-

Winning pair: Bruce Betts and Col Stewart won the 4BBB Par event at the Meeniyan Golf Club on Saturday.

Meeniyan golf

Tough competition: winner of this year’s G and P West Canadian Foursomes Anthony and Elizabeth Gedye with sponsor Pat West and place getters Glenyce and Ross McRobert.

Canadian Foursomes event down to the wire A FIELD of 22 teams contested this year’s G and P West Canadian Foursomes at the Leongatha Golf Club on Sunday, October 16. Event sponsor Pat West teamed up with her grandson Tim West to challenge the field on a drying course with slick greens tempered by blustery conditions.

The event went down to the wire with Elizabeth and Anthony Gedye, with a combined handicap of 22.5, finishing on top with a net 69.625. They were closely followed by Glenyce and Ross McRobert (14.25 h/c) with a net 73.75 and Karen and Colin Bear (22.5 h/c) another shot away third with 74.625 net.

MEENIYAN golfers were pleased to see a bit of sunshine by Thursday this week; even better on Saturday. Unfortunately the same can’t be said for Tuesday when three brave souls hit off for a social round. It was about the same time the phones went out. Ten players came out on Thursday to play a round of stableford. After six weeks away, Bob McGeary found form again this week and took out the comp with 38 points, and dropping a stroke on his handicap. It was very pleasing to see John Hyett pick up runner up on a count back from the birthday boy Reg Hannay. Saturday was a 4BBB Par competition and it was great to see 20 players come out for the day. President Paul was nowhere to be seen, taking a well earned break for the weekend in Lakes Entrance. The club welcomed

Steve Wright from New Zealand who partnered with Phil Johnston and together they nearly took out the prize. No one however, could catch the consistent Col Stewart and Bruce Betts who came in with a magnificent +11 score. It was great to see Graham Roberts out and about and playing good golf. He partnered with Bob McGeary and were just pipped for runners up by +1. Col Olden and his team had been able to get on course and get some mowing done. The course played well although still a bit heavy in some parts. Results: Thursday, October 13: Stableford. Winner: Bob McGeary (15) 38 points. Runner up: John Hyett (36) 34 points. Nearest the pin: second Bruce Betts and eighth Lloyd Hemphill. Best nine: Col Stewart (26) 20 points. Saturday, October 15: 4BBB Par. The sponsor for the day

b

Thursday winner: Bob McGeary won the Stableford event at the Meeniyan Golf Club. was Frank Piele. The club thanks Frank for his generosity. Winners: Col Stewart/Bruce Betts, +11, Runners up: Phil Johnston/Steve Wright, +8. Nearest the pin: 11th Graeme ‘Truckie’ Hughes. Pro pin: eighth Graham Roberts.

b


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 49

GOLF | SPORT

thestar.com.au Mirboo North Golf Club

Wednesday, October 12: washout. Thursday, October 13: course closed for green renovations. Friday, October 14: Chook Run Stableford. Winner: Jake Chaseling 20 points. DTL: B. Fuller 18, G. Nott 15, K. Esler 15. Saturday, October 15: Two Person Ambrose. Winners: P. Spencer and S. Canning 63.25. NTPs: fourth J. Freeman, sixth N. Thompson, 13th B. Knee, 15th K. Drangsholt and 17th J. Simpson. DTL: N. Thompson and B. Robinson 66.75, G. Clavarino and G. Prue 67.75, P. Robertson and N. Chandler 68. Putting: N. Thompson and B. Robinson 24. Ladies’ winner: Jocelyn Town 29 points. DTL: Barb Britten 28 points. Thanks go to Phil Schofield for sponsoring. Friday, October 21 will be Doreen Black Plate Day and the course will closed until 2pm. The Friday Chook run will start after 2 pm.

THURSDAY results: Competition: Stableford. October 13: Day winner: Russell Pentland (18) 40 points. DTLs: John Blunsden 37, Joe Kus 37 and Ian Evison 33 C/B. NTP sixth: Joe Kus. Saturday results: Competition: Stableford. October 15 Day winner (A Grade): Gary Renwick (15) 41 points. Winner B Grade: Chris Bracecamp (21) 38 points. DTLs: Tom Traill 39, Ray Matthews 37, Mal Payne 37, Chris Long 37 and Bevan Pinner 36 C/B. NTP second shot on the first hole: Gary Renwick. NTP fourth, sponsor Gippsland Solar: Ron Funnell. NTP sixth, sponsor 1st Tee Motel: Mal Payne. NTP 13th, sponsor C and D Earthworks: Ian Blencowe. NTP 16th, sponsor Ken Graeme Motors: Neil Rutledge. Lang Lang golf Next week is men’s and DATE: Tuesday, October 11: ladies’ Singles Stableford. Event: Par and Two Ball Ag-

Mirboo North Golf Club JOCK Bond Memorial Day results; Competition: Mixed Canadian Sponsored by the Bond Family. October 16: Scratch winners: Bevan and Lyn Pinner 86 gross. Handicap winners: Ray and Maree Thompson (14 ¼) 73 ¾ net. Visitors winners: Steve Kohut and Jeanete Mitchell (11 5/8) 76 3/8 net. DTLs: Mary Beruldsen and Doug Taylor 74 ¼ net, and Tom and Sue Traill 76 net. NTP fourth: men’s Garry Shandley and ladies’ Jeanete Mitchell. NTP sixth: men’s Tom Traill and ladies’Sue Traill. NTP 13th: men’s N/A and ladies’ Maree Thompson. NTP 16th: men’s Hal St Ellen and ladies’ Jennie St Ellen. Bruce Evans and Toni Buxton-Bailey had an Eagle on the first.

Foster Golf Club THE course has responded well after the recent wet period. Greens renovations have been completed and appear to have come through well and will lead to improvement over summer. Paul Spencer’s handicap gets lower and lower but he keeps coming up trumps. He won on Tuesday then backed it up with partner Stu Canning on Saturday. They won the Two Ball Ambrose event with a net 63.25. Members draw: Neither N. Shaw – Friday: $1150 or J. King – Saturday: $860 were here to collect. Golf Results: Tuesday, October 11: Stableford winner: Paul Spencer 35. NTP: Fourth: T. Jones; 17th: C. Gray. DTL: N. Cooper and C. Gray.

gregate Par. Field: 45 Winner: Leslie Anderson (19) +1. Runner up: David Fahey (24) Sqr. Two Ball winners: Chris Macgeorge (25) and David Fahey (24) +7. NTPs: Fifth Chris Clark 291cm; 12th Robert Scott 600cm; 15th David Lovie 1200cm. DTL: Bob Sandiford -1; Doug Collins -2; Dick Ogilvy -2; Richard Oldham -2; Howie Limbrick -3; Chris Clark -3; Ladies - 12-10-16 - Stableford, A Grade: Cheryl Stockdale (23) 33; B Grade: Cheryl Owen (33) 34; NTP: Yvonne Trask, Maureen Hams, Carolyn Cripps. DTL: Sue Van Gaal, Kirra Moon- Curry, Date: Saturday, October 15. Event: Saturday Competition – Par. Field:175 Grades A Ben Spierings (10) 1; Grades A Peter Sellers 0; Grades B Bill Taberer (17) 2; Grades B Bill Johnson 1; Grades C Michael Insall (27) 3; Grades C David Taggart 2. NTP fifth Peter Buckley - 101cm; NTP ninth Graham Andrews - 284cm; NTP 12th Trevor Cridland 231cm; NTP 15th Simon Tayler - Hole in 1! NTP 18th Ben Spierings - 168cm. Ladies Pat Randall (24) 1; NTP fifth Lee Andrews - 56cm; NTP 12th Cheryl Stockdale - 500cm l. 1 Ball C David Wylie 1; 1 Ball B Duke Spierings 1; 1 Ball C Glen Hoskin 0; 1 Ball C Adam Simpson 0; 1 Ball C David Oswald 0; 1 Ball A Andrew Cavigan 0; 1 Ball A Brett Dyer -1; 1 Ball B Brian Barnes -1; 1 Ball C Terua Kihi -1; 1 Ball A Craig Hunter -1; 1 Ball B Phil Conroy -1; 1 Ball C Scott Rushby -1; 1 Ball B Trevor Cridland -1; 1 Ball B Ian Stewart -1; 1 Ball B Bill Stainsby -1; 1 Ball B Rod Cameron -1; 1 Ball C Henk Mauriks -1; 1 Ball B Shane Sparks -1; 1 Ball A Daryl Barker -1; 1 Ball C Mark Ando -1; 1 Ball B Steve Pollock -1; 1 Ball B Scott Walker -1; Ball B Brian Hall -1c/b.

New skills: from left, Nic Dudman, Madeline Buckley, Simone Collis, Kolinda Milat, Tanya Kee, Sarah Binstead, Charlotte Brewis, professional golfer Trevor Hollingsworth, Wes Steendam and Rosey Angwin were out on the Meeniyan golf course for the club’s give golf a go day.

Meeniyan gives golf a go MEMBERS of the Meeniyan Golf Club – lead by Sue Hoskin and aided by golf professionals Trevor Hollingsworth and Darren Cole – will be sharing their passion for golf to encourage people of all ages to take up their sport of golf on Sundays and Wednesdays for the next three weeks. Meeniyan Golf Club has been running these beginner clinics for almost 10 years and during this time 150 people have attended the clinics and have been encouraged, inspired and cajoled to take up golf. Further clinics will be held during October. Contact Sue Hoskin 0429 932 467 for more details.

LDCA ladders A Grade Division 1 Korumburra ...........................24 OMK........................................24 Won Club ................................12 Kilcunda-Bass.........................12 Town.........................................12 Inverloch ..................................12 Phillip Island ..............................0 Nerrena .......................................0 A Grade Division 2 Poowong-Loch ........................24 Imperials .................................12 MDU ........................................12 Koonwarra-L/RSL .................12 Glen Alvie ................................12 Won Miners ................................0 Foster..........................................0 B Grade Division 1 Phillip Island...........................24 MDU ........................................18 Won Club ................................18 Town ........................................18 OMK ........................................12 Inverloch ....................................6 Nerrena .......................................0 Kilcunda-Bass ............................0 B Grade Division 2 Korumburra ...........................24 Poowong-Loch ........................24 Koonwarra-L/RSL .................12 Foster.......................................12 Glen Alvie ..................................0 Won Miners ................................0 Imperials ....................................0

C Grade Division 1 Won Club ................................18 Phillip Island...........................12 Town ........................................12 Nerrena .....................................6 Inverloch ....................................6 MDU ..........................................6 OMK ..........................................6 Korumburra ................................6 C Grade Division 2 Won Club ................................18 Glen Alvie................................18 Poowong-Loch ........................18 Phillip Island...........................18 Kilcunda-Bass ............................6 OMK ..........................................6 Koonwarra L/RSL......................6 Korumburra ................................6 Under 16 East Zone MDU ........................................12 Nerrena ...................................12 OMK........................................12 Korumburra .............................0 Koonwarra L/RSL......................0 Town...........................................0 Under 16 West Zone Won Club ................................12 Poowong-Loch ........................12 Glen Alvie................................12 Inverloch ...................................0 Phillip Island ..............................0

On the green: from left, Tanya Doolan refined her putting skills with a helping hand from Meeniyan Golf Club’s Dot Christie.

Expert advice: from left, new golfers Nic Dudman, Rosey Angwin and Simone Collis were shown around the course by golf professional Trevor Hollingsworth at the Meeniyan Golf Club on Saturday.


PAGE 50 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

SPORT | BOWLS Inverloch UNFORTUNATELY the weather turned nasty and our first Monthly Triples was not played. On Wednesday, October 19, a reminder of a ladies meeting to be held at 11am prior to social bowls at 12.30pm. Thursday Social bowls had 32 entrants playing two 14-end games of three-bowls pairs. Four teams managed to win both games.

Winners with 38 points, were Nic Van Grunsven (skip) and Allan McLean. Runners-up with 37 points were John Madden (skip) and Doug Archer. No social game next Thursday, October 20, when Inverloch hosts the monthly Turkey Triples event. Social bowls returns the following Thursday, October 27. Here are the results of Saturday Pennant, Round 2:

Winners: of Inverloch’s Thursday Social Bowls were Nic van Grunsven and Allan McLean.

Runners-up: on Thursday Social Bowls at Inverloch were John Madden and Doug Archer.

thestar.com.au Division One: Wonthaggi 83 defeated Inverloch Blue 68. No winning rink. Inverloch White 77 defeated Korumburra 72. Best winning rink: Gavan Butler, Andrew Rowe, Nic Van Grunsven and Paul Davis Division Three: Meeniyan 83 defeated Inverloch 56. No winning rink. Division Four: Corinella 76 defeated Inverloch 65. Best winning rink: Huie Nation, John Arnold, Arthur Moule and Allan Johnstone. Division Five: Toora 84 defeated Inverloch 55. No winning rink. Our Try Bowls Day was held on Sunday, October 16. We had several groups try their hand at bowls under the guidance of our club members. We are happy to report there were several new membership applications resulting thanks to the effort of all involved. Thanks Terry and your group of helpers on a very successful afternoon. Don’t forget the annual Melbourne Cup Day event on Tuesday, November 1. Bowls start at 9.45am and two games will be played before we all enjoy a chicken plated lunch. Then back onto the green for the final game. There will be a hat parade and we can be certain that hats from the Miller Collection will be available for hire. Non-bowlers are welcomed to join us for lunch. Please see the sheet in the clubroom for further details. Names required to assist with catering.

SGBD Tuesday pennant bowls Round 3 - October 11 Division 1: San Remo 14/74 (13 shots) d Inverloch 2/61 (M. Forrest 28 d L. Dowson 24, S. Carvosso 28 d J. Brown 15, C. Thorn 18 lt C. Hughes 22). Leongatha 14/76 (14 shots) d Foster 2/62 (J. Miller 22 d M. Climas 17, T. McCormack 28 d G. Facey 18, R. James 26 lt B. Tyers 27). Corinella 16/91 (47 shots) d Korumburra -/44 (M. Hoy 22 d M. Goad 20, J. Carter 38 d J. Nicholl 13, C. Lincoln 31 d J. McVeigh 11). Phillip Island 14/70 (2 shots) d Wonthaggi 2/68 (R. Eames 25 d K. Simpson 16, P. Francis 25 d M. McBain 21, D. Wagner 20 lt P. Wintrup 31). Division 2: San Remo 14/87 (26 shots) d Inverloch. 2/61 (J. Grindlay 25 d N. Martin 19, J. Farquhar 38 d D. Patterson 14, J. Blackwell 24 lt. M. Flett 28). Port Welshpool 16/68 (11 shots) d Tarwin Lower 0/57 (L. McLaine 23 d S. Browne 20, M. McDonald 21 d B. Martin 18, B. Crawford 24 d H. Twite 19). Wonthaggi 16/83 (37 shots) d Toora -/46 (S. O’Donnell 24 d B. Curram 16, S. Hamilton 31 d K. Barwick 15, J. Kellow 28 d R. Richardson 15). Lang Lang 14/71 (9 shots) d Meeniyan 2/62 (J. Prowd 29 d K. Brown 16, R. Geyer 26 d A. Maruzza 20, B. Kitchin 16 lt. B. Dyke 26). Division 3: Phillip Island 16/110 (74 shots) d Loch -/36 (L. Waters 30 d V. Kennedy 10, D. Reynolds 52 d H. Garnham 4, C. Hoffman 28 d M. Cochrane 22). Leongatha 14/69 (10 shots) d Korumburra 2/59 (M. Jepson 29 d M. Brown 15, B. Thompson 21 d M. Hams 16, M. Rayson 19 lt S. Martin 28). Mirboo North v Fish Creek - washout = 8 points each.

Ladders

Give it a go: at the Try Bowls Day at Inverloch, John Arnold introduced “Try” Bowlers, John and Rick to the game with a few instructions on how to roll the bowl.

Division 1 Leongatha ............................+57 Wonthaggi............................+71 Phillip Island ........................ -22 Corinella...............................+20 Korumburra ........................... -37 Inverloch .................................. -5 Foster ...................................... -25 San Remo ............................... -59 Division 2 Lang Lang ...........................+27 Port Welshpool....................+20 Wonthaggi............................+69 San Remo.............................+37 Toora....................................... -30 Tarwin Lower ........................ -60 Inverloch ................................ -33 Meeniyan ............................... -30

38 32 25 21 21 19 18 16 36 34 32 29 21 15 13 12

Coach needed for women’s footy team AFTER a huge week for women’s football with the inaugural women’s AFL draft the big news continues with the inaugural Bass Coast women’s football team well un-

der way. After lodging an application with AFL Victoria the team wants to recruit people (players, coaches, trainers, officials) from all over the local area to be involved in the team. A Facebook page has been started “Bass Coast Women’s Football Team 2017” so poten-

tial players can keep up to date. “We are now looking to recruit a team coach. We are keen to see if there is anyone in the community who would like to do it. It could be a male or a female just someone who is passionate about footy,” said Ella Angarine, who is helping get the new team up and running.

Footy getting bigger: Greater Western Sydney priority pick and Darebin Falcons premiership player Jess Dal Pos caught up with some of the local women involved in setting up the new team recently; Emma Volard, Jess Dal Pos, Kelly O’Neill, Mollie Bloch, Ella Angarane and Tess Angarane.

Expressions of interest close Monday, November 7. A position description is available and if you would like more info contact Ella Angarane 0438 722 639 or e.angarane@live.com “Bendigo Community Bank San Remo and Magic Lands Rubbish Removals are on board as sponsors but we are looking for further sponsors to help set up the new team and so we can make footy an affordable sport with cost not a barrier for women to take it up,” Ms. Angarane said. The team will be based at Dalyston but will look to have home games around the area in line with the local youth girls teams, to promote women’s footy and also provide a pathway for the youth girls. The Bass Coast “A” Team will play in the new South East Women’s league against other newly established teams in the outer Easter suburbs and Mornington Peninsula, about an hour’s drive away. The season will start in mid April and will most likely be 14 games plus finals.

Division 3 Phillip Island .......................+89 Leongatha ............................+12 Mirboo North......................+25 Fish Creek............................. -21 Korumburra ........................... -17 Loch........................................ -88 Division 4 Wonthaggi............................+45 Tarwin Lower....................... -17 Corinella................................. +7 Phillip Island ........................ -11 Inverloch ................................ -13 Foster ...................................... -11

34 32 30 22 18 8 33 26 21 16 16 14

South Gippsland pennant bowls Results Round 2 Saturday, October 15 Division 1: Leongatha 15/79 (24 shots) d Phillip Island (B) 1/55 (R. Trotman 28 d J. Newcombe 17 , A. Easterbrook 31 d D. Major 18, J. Hall 20 drew D. Hanlon 20). Lang Lang 14/69 (16 shots) d Phillip Island (W) 2/53 (S. Bencraft 21 d R. Poole 18, G. Cobbett 32 d S. Cunningham 13, I. Alkemade 16 lt D. Oakley 22). Inverloch (W) 14/77 (5 shots) d Korumburra 2/72 (M. Yates 26 d B. Dilg 24, G. Butler 31 d A. Robertson 20, R. Davis 20 lt S. O’Loughlan 28). Wonthaggi 16/83 (15shots) d Inverloch (B) -/68 (R. Hogan 27 d M. Coram 22, R. Aitken 28 d R. Burge 19, G. Jackson 28 d G. Scott 27) . Division 2: Fish Creek 15/74 (12 shots) d Toora 1/62 (T. McLean 23 d D. Galloway18, D. Christie 26 d T. Corcoran 19, R. Mortlock 25 drew A. Spooner 25). Wonthaggi 16/75 (25 shots) d Tarwin Lower -/50 (P. McBain 22 d S. Graham 20, A. Sartori 20 d R. Saunders 19, A. Bolding 33 d R. Griffiths 11). Corinella 12/68 (1 shot) d Mirboo North 4/67 (S. Holmes 31 d N. Whitelaw10, B. Edwards 16 lt P. Stimson 33, S. Bray 21 lt T.Whitelaw 24). Loch 13/71 (7 shots) d San Remo 3/64 (A. Center 30 d B.Anketell 19, G. Hodge 22 drew G. Cohen 22, F. Byrne 19 lt R. Naylor 23). Division 3: Port Welshpool 12/67 (2 shots) d Foster 4/65 (M. Reiley 32 d F. Riati 12, R. Greaves13 lt P. Facey 30, P.McPhail 22 lt I. Park 23). Leongatha 12/71 (3 shots) d Phillip Island 4/68 (J. Pendergast 24 d S.Farelley 14, A. Rayson 25 lt N. Waters 30, L. Wilson 22 lt K. Gill 24). San Remo 12/78 (10 shots) d Wonthaggi 4/68. (D. Mulcahy 37 d R. Snooks 13, R. Hill 22 lt D. Stanes 25, P. McWilliams 19 lt R. Thorn 30). Meeniyan 16/83 (27 shots) d Inverloch -/56 (A. Hanks 20 d T. Scott 19, D. Kuhne 34 d J. Thornton 16, M. Brown 29 d N. Everitt 21). Division 4: Wonthaggi 14/88 (9 shots) d Tarwin Lower 2/79 (G.Clarkson 38 d J. Fedley 33, J. Kellow 31 d T. Biddulph 19, H. Woolfe 19 lt P. Henwood 27). Corinella 14/ 76 (11 shots) d Inverloch 2/65 (P.Wright 29 d B. Hensley 22, G. Rigby 26 d R. Paynting 21, A. Hughes 21 lt N. Nation 22). Korumburra (G) 14/89 (33 shots) d Leongatha 2/56 (E. Kealy 24 d G.Drury 21, D. Maxwell 44 d E. Thompson 11, J. Coulson 21 lt T. Heywood 24). Phillip Island 14/82 (5 shots) d Korumburra (M) 2/77 (L.McGhee 38 d C. Underwood 14, D. Hoffman 29 d L. Eastman 28, T. Breasley 15 lt R. Lomagno 35). Division 5: Foster 16/77 (19 shots) d Fish Creek -/58 (R. Parsons 23 d R. Barham 18, B. Roffey 23 d K. Flanders 21, W. Thorne 31 d J. Lindeman 19). Toora 16/89 (34 shots) d Inverloch -/55 (R. Low 25 d K. Cousens 19, N. Curram 35 d D. Turnbull 17, S. Blancato 29 d P.

Dalmeu 19). San Remo 14/73 (20 shots) d Lang Lang 2/53 (C. Thorn 23 d W. Miller 22, J. Cohen 33 d I. Worthington 11, S. Carvosso 17 lt J. Thwaites 20). Phillip Island 16/76 (24 shots) d Loch -/52 (K. Gray 20 d B.Tobin 19, K. Linton 35 d J. Kennedy 14, K. Lacco 21 d J. Garnham 19). Meeniyan 14/78 (6 shots) d Mirboo North 2/72 (M. Scott 32 d G. Roberts 23, D. Harrison 23 d L. Roberts 21, C. Densley 23 lt B. Bright 28.

Ladders Division 1 Leongatha ............................+59 31 Korumburra ....................... +11 18 Phillip Island White ....................17 Phillip Island Blue ................. -6 17 Wonthaggi ................................ -1 16 Inverloch White ..................... -11 15 Lang Lang .............................. -19 14 Inverloch Blue ....................... -33 0 Division 2 Fish Creek ...........................+26 29 Corinella ..............................+37 28 Toora ....................................+24 17 Wonthaggi............................. -11 16 Tarwin Lower ....................... -12 14 Loch ...................................... -29 13 Mirboo North ........................ -14 6 San Remo ............................... -21 5 Division 3 Meeniyan .............................+37 28 San Remo .............................. +9 16 Foster .................................... +4 16 Phillip Island .......................... -2 16 Leongatha ................................ -3 16 Port Welshpool ....................... -5 15 Inverloch ............................... -20 13 Wonthaggi ............................ -20 8 Division 4 Corinella ..............................+25 30 Leongatha ............................ -13 18 Korumburra (M)................+18 16 Tarwin Lower ........................ -1 16 Wonthaggi .............................. -14 16 Korumburra (G) .................. +19 14 Phillip Island .......................... -15 14 Inverloch ................................ -19 4 Division 5 Toora...................................+107 32 Meeniyan .............................+29 28 San Remo ............................+23 28 Phillip Island ......................+15 18 Foster ....................................... -4 18 Fish Creek ............................+30 16 Lang Lang .............................. -11 16 Inverloch ............................... -37 2 Mirboo North ........................ -79 2 Loch........................................ -73 0

Leongatha TUESDAY, October 11 saw our Division 1 ladies at home to Foster and as I have no individual scores I understand Leongatha ladies won the day. Division 3 was home to Korumburra and won the day, 69 shots to 49: M. Jepson (s) won 29 to 15 shots, Bev Thompson (s) won 21 to 16 shots, M. Rayson (s) lost 19 to 28 shots. The next round sees Division 1 away to San Remo and Division 3 at home to Phillip Island. Saturday, October 15 saw our Division 1 men at home to Phillip Island Blue and won the day 79 shots to 55: R. Trotman (s) won 28 to 17 shots, J. Hall (s) drew 20 to 20 shots and Alan Easterbrook (s) won 31 to 18 shots. Division 3 was home to Phillip Island and won 71 shots to 63: A. Rayson (s) lost 25 to 30 shots, L. Wilson (s) lost 22 to 24 shots and J. Pendergast (s) won 24 to 14 shots. Division 4 played Korumburra Gold at Korumburra and lost 56 to 89 shots: G. Drury (s) lost 21 to 24 shots, T. Haywood (s) 24 to 21 shots and E. Thompson (s) lost 11 to 24 shots. The next round sees Division 1 away to Inverloch White, Division 3 away to Inverloch and Division 4 at home to Wonthaggi. Sunday, October 23 will see rounds one and two of the club’s ladies championships in action and it is a uniform event with a 10am start. Sunday, October 16 sees rounds one and two of the club’s men’s championships in action and also a 10am start and uniform. Until the next report, good bowling - ‘Jackhigh’.

Meeniyan FOR the third week in a row Tuesday pennant has been marred by poor weather. Last week division two travelled to Lang Lang. Playing under trying conditions they won one rink but went down overall. This week they are hoping for better weather, playing Wonthaggi at home. In contrast Saturday week two pennant continued to be played in ideal conditions. At home to Inverloch division three had all rinks winning with a 27 shot margin. Away to Mirboo North division five had a much closer game winning two rinks with a six shot margin. Next week both teams are away- threes play Phillip Island and fives play near neighbours Fish Creek. Upshot 2.

Fish Creek TUESDAY play was abandoned after seventeen ends, due to extremely cold and wet weather. This week Fish Creek is home to Loch. Once again the Saturday players were more fortunate with the weather with Division 2 recording a win, but unfortunately Division 5 were not as fortunate. The teams for Saturday, October 22 are as follows: Division 2 – Playing at Coronella – Bus departs from the Club Rooms at 11h00 T McLean (S), A Kerr, R Grylls (TM), and R McKenzie D Christie (S), N McKenzie, M Heywood and C Bell R Mortlock (S), R Knight, C McGannon and B O’Keefe Division 5 – Playing playing Meeniyan at home – Members meet at the club at 12h15 J Lindeman(S), N Buckland (TM), R Poletti and J Laurence K Flanders (S), D Stefani, R Constantine, and M Angwin R Barham (S), R Staley, P Deane and A Masson Members not chosen to play, are encouraged to be at the club, in uniform, in the event of an emergency and are again invited to make up teams amongst themselves to play as bankers on the vacant rinks. There will be a General Committee Meeting at the Fish Creek clubrooms on Wednesday 19th starting 7 p.m. The Christmas dinner will be held at the Fish Creek Club on Saturday, December 10 and will take the place of the December Casserole evening. A two course meal will be served and to facilitate catering, and due to limited seating, admission will be per tickets sold in advance only. For further information or the purchase of tickets, kindly contact Chris McLean or Eileen Bell.

Buffalo indoor Wednesday, October 12 BOWLING at Buffalo this week saw 10 bowlers with a few people watching on. It was good to have Connie, Maureen, Ian, Gwenda and Mark join us for the evening. Two games of 10 ends were played and at the end two teams won both games. Charlie, Connie and Maureen combined well to win 21-11 and 12-10 (12 ends) while Mary and Ian also won both games 8-6 and 17-6 (11 ends). Toni and Peter Tiziani narrowly lost both games 6-8 and 10-12 (9 ends), and Bill, Mark and Gwenda also lost 11-15, 6-17 (8 ends) but everyone enjoyed the night. Winners for the night were Charlie, Connie and Maureen, next Mary and Ian followed by Toni and Peter, and fourth Bill, Mark and Gwenda. Social bowls Buffalo hall on Wednesday at 7.30pm, all welcome.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 51

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thestar.com.au

Allambee Mirboo & District tennis INVERLOCH won all its sets against Leongatha North in Section 1. Good to see Shane Harris and Dale O’Neill in these two teams. Phillip Island were winners although Koony won a ladies set. Inverloch and Phillip Island

are stand out teams early in the season. In Section 2 Outtrim won by 20 games against Leongatha Gold with Maurita Carlisle playing with her daughter Emma. Korumburra won by 10 games against Leongatha Green with young players in both teams. Koony won by three games against Baromi

Black, Baromi Yellow won 5/4 games, level against Berrys Creek. In Section 3 Parrots won the match against Baromi. Tamsin McCormick and Kelly McCarthy won the set against Zara Littlejohn and Luke Marshman with some good rallies. A season of this tennis will see Zara and Luke

winning. Rachel Carlisle play well with her partners to win her sets. Baromi won two sets. Section 3 is a good step for the junior players. The Hawks and Eagles match was won by Eagles by 14 games. Hawks won two sets. Alicia Marshman and Tamara Treacy won their sets. Saturday tennis has

become a family sport again, so pleasing for everyone, clubs and the association.

Results Section 1: Inverloch 9.72 d Leongatha North 0.27, Phillip Island 8.70 d Koonwarra 1.35, Leongatha - bye. Section 2: Koonwarra 5.52 d Baromi Black 4.49, Korumburra 6.63 d Leongatha Green 3.53, Baromi Yellow 5.55 d Berrys Creek 4.55, Outtrim 7.64 d Leongatha Gold 2.44, Hallston - bye. Section 3: Eagles 5.40 d Hawks 2.26, Parrots 5.44 d Baromi 2.26.

Ladders

Return to tennis: after starting the season with a bye, mother and daughter pair Tamsin and Tahlia McCormack were thrilled to get back on the court for Baromi. They played against Leongatha in the second round of the Section 3 competition.

• South Gippsland Bridge Club

Inverloch hosts bridge birthday event INVERLOCH hosted a big day for bridge coinciding with its birthday celebrations with a pair’s event being contested. A larger group than usual including several guests, gathered for bridge and a well provided club birthday celebration on Friday 14th. North/South First with an excellent 61.90 percent was the team of Barbara Axten and guest, Curt Fisher. Curt is visiting Inverloch and is joining in with the bridge club and playing some fine bridge. Second with 57.74 percent was the consistently reliable team of Arendina Drury and Jack Kuiper. Third with a fine 52.38 percent were Clive Hope and Bron Sund and close by in fourth with 50 percent were Ellie McIntyre and Althea Drew. East/West First was the ever consistent team of John Sullivan and Alan Johnston with a very sound 62.20 percent, second were our guests from Phillip Island, Deborah Anglim and Moyu Crowley with an excellent 57.74 percent. Third was the ever reliable and experienced pair of Hannah Martin and Margaret Munro with 51.19 percent and fourth were Faye Rowlands and Pat West with 49.70 percent. On Tuesday, October 11 at Tarwin Lower a pair’s event was contested. Some great scores were recorded in this event. North/South First were Faye Rowlands and Pat West, always

in the top group with a splendid 62.17 percent. Second were John Sullivan and Alan Johnston, deservedly in the spotlight with fine play once more, achieving 57.41 percent. Third was the steady pair of Kathryn Smith and Colin Cameron with 51.85 percent with Frank Arndt and Clive Hope coming home in fourth with 49.74 percent. East/ West First with the outstanding score of the week and a rarely achieved, stunning 70.24 percent, was the family team of Philip and Neville Chapman. Well done to a hard working, deserving pair. Second with a fine 56.55 percent were John Cocking and June Metcalf. John Sutton and guest scored a most creditable 55.36 percent to take third place. Dawn Jolly and Ruth Stevenson showed their skill and experience with an excellent 52.98 percent. On Monday, October 10 at Meeniyan there was another pair’s event. Horns were locked at Meeniyan with a three way tie for the honours of the night. Barbara Axten and Pat West, and June Metcalf with Colin Cameron and Faye Rowlands and Frank Arndt all tied for first place with 56.25 percent. Clive Hope and Susan Ruffin were next with 47.92 percent. Remember the annual congress of bridge will take place at the Daker’s Centre in Leongatha on November 5 and 6. Great prizes and great bridge assured Enter on line at bridgeunlimited.com

Section 1 Phillip Island........................18.0 Inverloch ..............................14.0 Leongatha North ...................9.0 Leongatha ..............................7.5 Koonwarra...............................6.5 Section 2 Outtrim ................................17.0 Baromi Yellow......................15.0 Hallston ................................13.5 Berrys Creek........................13.0 Korumburra ........................... 11.0 Koonwarra.............................10.0 Baromi Black ..........................9.5 Leongatha Green .....................6.0 Leongatha Gold.......................2.0 Section 3 Parrots ..................................12.0 Eagles ................................... 11.0 Hawks .....................................8.0 Mardan...................................7.5 Baromi.....................................6.5

Pink stars: from left, Rachel Carlisle and Zara Littlejohn teamed up to play doubles for Leongatha in the Section 3 match on Saturday.

Mirboo North & District junior tennis ANOTHER good day of weather for our juniors with a few matches decided by just a couple of games. Good to see our C Grade juniors all playing singles, hopefully they are enjoying their tennis. Just a reminder that scoresheets need the players’ full names (first name and surname) and results to be forwarded to the score secretary by 12 noon the day after the match.

Results - Round 2 October 15 A Grade: Fish Creek 4 sets, 29 games d Leongatha North 2

sets, 24 games; Wawrinka-Leongatha 4 sets, games d Mardan 2 sets, games; DjokovicLeongatha - bye. B Grade: Baromi-Black 4 sets, 25 games d Fish Creek 2 sets, 24 games; WilliamsLeongatha 4 sets, 31 games d Kerber-Leongatha 2 sets, 14 games; Mardan 4 sets, 27 games d Baromi-Yellow 2 sets, 15 games; Barty-Leongatha 3 sets, 29 games d Nadal-Leongatha 3 sets, 26 games; FedererLeongatha - bye. C Grade: Murray-Leongatha 3 sets, 22 games d Berdych-Leongatha 1 set, 19 games; Tsonga-Leongatha 2 sets, 20 games drew TomicLeongatha 2 sets, 20 games;

Fish Creek 6 sets, 28 games d Mardan 0 sets 0 games.

Ladders A Grade Fish Creek ....................................... 9.0 Leongatha North ............................ 8.0 Djokovic-Leongatha....................... 6.5 Wawrinka-Leongatha .................... 6.0 Mardan ............................................. 5.5 B Grade Barty-Leongatha .......................... 10.0 Fish Creek ....................................... 9.0 Mardan............................................ 8.5 Nadal-Leongatha ............................ 8.0 Williams-Leongatha ......................... 7.0 Baromi Black ................................... 7.0 Kerber-Leongatha ............................ 7.0 Federer-Leongatha ........................... 5.0 Baromi Yellow ................................. 2.0 C Grade Fish Creek ..................................... 13.0 Tsonga-Leongatha .......................... 7.5 Tomic-Leongatha ........................... 7.5 Murray-Leongatha ........................ 6.0 Berdych-Leongatha .......................... 5.0 Mardan ............................................. 2.0

Giants bag new recruits KORUMBURRA Bena has wasted no time in getting a competitive football team on the park after signing two new recruits last week. Giants’ president Ross Besley has confirmed to The Star the club has signed Fish Creek premiership player Ash Snooks and Foster player Michael Cooke. “We have appointed a special recruiting team and at the moment we are talking to a lot of players; not unlike many other clubs,” Mr Besley said. “We are pleased to have

secured two quality players already with more to follow.” The players both formerly played at the club; Snooks a handy on-baller, Cooke a midfielder or key forward. Korumburra Bena is out to prove they’ll put a quality side on the deck when it debuts in the new West Gippsland Football Netball League in 2017 and hope to indicate to all the decision to move from the Alberton Football League was the correct one. It is believed the signings occurred soon after an informal sausage sizzle amongst past and current players recently.

Standout performers: athletes to represent St Laurence’s Primary School, Leongatha at the Gippsland Regional Athletics were, back, from left, Heidi Tieman, Ashlin Guymer, Alex Battersby, Holly Belsar and Will Croatto and front, from left: Harry Hoekstra, Ada Hill, Kade Jarvis, Rachel Carlisle and Bella Kent.

St Laurence’s proud of athletes THIRTEEN students from St Laurence’s Primary School, Leongatha, competed at the Gippsland Regional Athletics last Tuesday, October 11. Ashley Snooks: a damaging midfielder and former Fish Creek best and fairest player, Snooks is back at the Giants’ camp.

Despite terrible weather, the students performed admirably with 10 students qualifying for the state championships to be held on Monday, October 24 at Lakeside Stadium, Albert Park. Children from Under 10s to 12-plus competed. Making it through were Bella Kent (first, long jump

and 80m hurdles), Ashlin Guymer (first in Under 10 long jump and high jump), Will Croatto (first, Under 11 high jump), Ada Hill (second in both 800m and 1500m), Harry Hoekstra (second, Under 10 high jump), Alex Battersby (second, Under 12/13 shot put), Kade Jarvis (second, Under 11 hurdles) and the Under 12/13 girls relay team of Heidi Tieman, Rachel Carlisle, Holly Belsar and Bella Kent won. The school is extremely proud to have 10 students from only 220 enrolments representing the school at state level.


PAGE 52 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

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thestar.com.au • Leongatha Table Tennis

Smashers smash the A Team JUST like the mighty Bulldogs in another sport, The Smashers fought the odds and defied the critics in clawing their way to a grand final win.

Athletics stars: from left, Wonthaggi Primary School’s April and Vu will compete at state level athletics after performing well at regionals recently. April came first in high jump and Vu came first in discus and hurdles.

Wonthaggi athletes to compete in States TWO Wonthaggi Primary School students excelled to the state athletics after fantastic performances at regionals last Tuesday (October 11). April placed first in the high jump, while Vu brought home blue ribbons in discus and hurdles. The States will be held at Albert Park, Melbourne, in two weeks. To get to this stage, the girls had to win their events at a school level,

district level and division level before moving on to regionals. The girls participated at regionals in Newborough, and although it was wet the girls enjoyed the day. April blitzed the high jump, showing fantastic natural talent as she has never had athletics training or participated in little aths. Vu did an amazing job in discus and hurdles, and is a well known face at little aths in Wonthaggi. “I’ve been doing little aths since I

was in the U/6s. I’m now in U/12s,” she said. “I like doing athletics because it’s just me out there. It’s my own game and I can focus on myself.” April said she has enjoyed participating in this year’s athletics competition because she enjoys being outside and being active. Wonthaggi Primary School is proud of the girls’ efforts and looks forward to their participation at states.

Worthy winners: for her efforts in finishing 11th in Group A in the high jump at the Rio Olympics Eleanor Patterson has shared in the August Open Gippstar award.

Eleanor shares Gippstar August win CONGRATULATIONS to our joint Gippstar Open monthly winners for August, Eleanor Patterson of Leongatha and Keith Ferguson of Longford. Eleanor Patterson from Leongatha was one of the August ‘Open’ Award winners. Eleanor participated at the Rio Olympic Games in the Women’s High Jump Qualifying Round – Group A and finished 11th, having successfully jumped the height of 1.89 metres. Earlier in 2016 Eleanor finished 1st in the High Jump at the 2016 Australian Athletics Championships (Sydney) gaining her a place in the Olympic team. The second ‘Open’ winner for

August was Keith Ferguson from Longford. Keith also participated at the Rio 2016 Olympic Games, in the sport of Skeet Shooting. On Day 1 Keith scored 72 (11th) in the Skeet Men’s Qualification and on Day 2 Keith scored 120 (10th) in the Skeet Men’s Qualification. The August Gippstar Junior Award Winner is Darcy Wade from Stratford, for his efforts in Modern Pentathlon and Tetrathlon. Darcy was a Gold medallist in the Open Youth category in the Modern Pentathlon Queensland State Championships. Darcy also competed at the International Pony Club Tetrathlon Championships held in Ireland, placing 4th overall in the Senior Boys

Individual Tetrathlon and was also a member of the World team that placed 5th in their category. Please note that you can now nominate for the following categories in future Gippstar awards; Team of the Year, Club of the Year, Special Achiever Award, Gippsland Sporting Champion. These annual awards can be nominated at any time during the current Gippstar year. If you would like to recognise the sporting achievements of a Gippsland athlete or any of the above categories, nomination forms can be downloaded from the Gippsland Sports Academy website www.sportgippsland.org.au.

Yes, Smashers, Michael Brandon and Liam Gourlay fought off the highly fancied A Team, James Rowley and Lachie Griffiths to take a place in history as the 2016 B Grade Premier team in Leongatha Table Tennis. It looked grim for Smashers as James creamed Liam in three games straight in the first rubber. Michael levelled the score at one all when he also had a 3-0 win over Lachie. Liam then had a 3-0 win over Lachie to give Smashers a 2-1 lead. In the last of the singles, Michael and James faced off, with James having to win to keep the match alive. He roared out of the blocks to take the first game easily, 11-7, but Michael dug in hard and with great determination reversed the score in the second game. With growing confidence and the scent of victory in the air he played fantastic table tennis to take the next two games, 11-9, 11-6 and stole the win for Smashers. Great play by all concerned and a big thank you for the umpires who performed so well. In A Grade, top team Cheetahs beat second placed MTM by a convincing 8-3, and are red hot premiership favourites. Jeff Jennison is all smiles this week after winning two singles, a first, in defeating Michael Bracecamp and Trish Denier. In the match between Milko’s and MBN, Bryce and Archie both won their three singles, winning the match 8-3 and securing third spot on the ladder. Young gun Archie Paxton defeated the very experienced Neil Chilver, 11-9, 6-11, 10-12, 11-8 and 11-6. The DKM and Hopefuls match was the closest on the night with DKM winning 7-4, which lifts them from the wooden spoon position into fourth place with one match to play. The match between Michael Westaway and Alan Fletcher was a beauty with Michael winning 11-8 in the fifth. Cheetahs lead the table on 24 points, 85 rubbers, 281 games, TMM 22, 81, 274, MBN 8, 70, 258, Milko’s 8, 66, 240, Hopefuls 8, 66, 230, DKM 8, 61, 235. Allan Robic has a stranglehold on the top player award with 39 wins, Michael Grist 33, Bryce Holwerda 30, Kevin Dowling and Neil Chilver

Reason to smile: Smashers Michael Brandon and Liam Gourlay won Leongatha Table Tennis’ B Grade premiership.

Nearly there: Leongatha Table Tennis’ B Grade runners-up were Lachie Griffiths and James Rowley of A Team.

Showing style: Smashers’ Michael Brandon in action during the B Grade grand final.

Long reach: Smashers’ Liam Gourlay reaches during the B Grade grand final. both on 26. These are prior to the match report above. A Grade finals start in two weeks and the

presentation night is on Tuesday, November 15 at 6.30pm at Leongatha RSL.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 53

CRICKET | SPORT

thestar.com.au • LDCA B Grade

MDU steals the show

MDU took a massive win over Kilcunda Bass by more than 100 runs.

Batting first, MDU set the pace of the match. Timothy Harris was the star batsman with 35 runs, but the majority of MDU’s batsman scored more than 20 runs each. Kilcunda Bass bowler Daniel Blackney upped the pressure by taking three wickets, but MDU were sitting comfortably with 7/186 after 40 overs. Stephen Leman – 16 runs – and Daniel Ferguson – 15 runs – were Kilcunda Bass’ best, but MDU’s bowlers took control of the game. Many of the bowlers and fielders dismissed at least two batsmen, and Cameron Harris was the star of the show after taking four wickets. MDU won the match and Kilcunda Bass left the field all out for 74. Phillip Island continued its winning streak after defeating Inverloch on Saturday. Batting first, Phillip Island was quick to set the standard. Opening batsmen Scott Boyack and Matthew Parsons made 37 runs and 73 runs respectively, and were the standouts during the game. Inverloch bowlers Lucas Anderson, Josh Williams and Clayton Fisher took out a wicket each, and there were a couple of catches out on the field, but Parsons stayed in the game and left the field not out.

Phillip Island’s final score was 3/179 after 40 overs. Inverloch stepped up next and the standout batsman was Fisher with 21 runs. Phillip Island’s bowlers held strong, and Blake Christopher, Peter Cleary, and Boyack each took out two wickets. Inverloch left the ground 7/94 after 40 overs. The Wonthaggi Workmens took out an impressive win over Nerrena. Workers were the first out to bat and Scott Williams put on an impressive display, making 59 runs. Opening batsman Chad Harvey also performed well, making 34 runs. Nerrena bowlers Charlie Dougherty and Nicholas Battersby were not letting the Workers have an easy win, taking seven wickets between them. This was well supported by Shaun Helms, who took three catches against the Workers. The Workers were all out for 204 after 37.3 overs Nerrena’s star batsmen were James Kelly and Cameron Baudinette, who made over 20 runs each. However, the Workers were fired up and matched Nerrena’s fielding efforts. Bowlers Mark McCall and Rob Geyer took out seven wickets between them, and there were plenty of catches taken on the field. Nerrena was all out for 142 after 38.2 overs. OMK was pipped at the post by Town by just six runs.

OMK had a strong start with opening batsman Luke Jones making 54 runs. Russell White also performed well with 33 runs. Town had its eyes on the win, and bowlers Jareth Hume and Ashley Hickey took out five wickets between them, not letting OMK run away with the game. Finishing the innings, OMK was left with a score of 8/165 after 40 overs. Town batted second, and strong performances from Hume, Hickey and Sam Clark pushed them over the line. OMK bowler Dylan McMeekin took out three wickets and fielders Justin Greenwood and Jacob Lamers put up an excellent fight, but Town stole the win. After 38.4 overs, Town was all out but won the game with a score of 171. PHILLIP ISLAND d INVERLOCH 1st innings Phillip Island S. Boyack c. R. Sparkes b. J. Williams........................37 M. Parsons n.o..........................73 A. Finlayson c. D. Cashin b. C. Fisher ...........................21 B. Christopher lbw. b. L. Anderson ........................3 C. Wilson n.o............................28 Extras ......................................17 Total .............................3/179 (cc) Bowling: L. Anderson 1/29, J. Bowring 0/28, A. Mujtaba 0/7, S. Hayes 0/37, R. Sparkes 0/12, J. Williams 1/23, C. Fisher 1/33. 1st innings Inverloch M. Woods c. J. Asbury b. B. Christopher ....................8 H. Smith c. B. Christopher b. P. Cleary .............................2

J. Bowring c. L. Keating b. B. Christopher ....................8 A. Mujtaba b. S. Boyack ............6 L. Anderson c. J. Asbury b. S. Boyack ...........................0 C. Fisher c. P. Cleary b. J. Excell ............................21 N. Bradley c&b. S. Boyack........1 S. Hayes n.o. ............................ 11 D. Cashin n.o............................14 Extras ......................................23 Total ...............................7/94 (cc) Bowling: B. Christopher 2/11, P. Cleary 2/14, K. Robinson 0/22, S. Boyack 2/4, J. Grace 0/4, J. Excell 1/19, C. Wilson 0/4, M. Parsons 0/8.

WON CLUB d NERRENA 1st innings Won Club C. Harvey c. N. Battersby b. C. Dougherty ....................34 R. Geyer c. N. Battersby b. C. Dougherty ....................13 L. Sawyer r.o. ...........................13 A. Geyer c. M. Collins b. C. Dougherty ......................0 C. Harvey c. S. Helms b. J. Kelly .............................31 S. Williams c. S. Helms b. N. Battersby .....................59 M. McCall b. C. Baudinette .....20 M. Davey c. C. Baudinette b. C. Dougherty ......................6 D. Herbert c. J. Kelly b. N. Battersby .......................3 B. Evans c. C. Dougherty b. N. Battersby .....................14 L. McGuirk n.o. .........................4 Extras ........................................7 Total .......................................204 Bowling: C. Dougherty 4/31, M. Collins 0/35, J. Beckwith 0/29, J. Kelly 1/46, C. Baudinette 1/43, N. Battersby 3/18. 1st innings Nerrena A. Harrison c. D. Herbert b. M. McCall ........................18 J. Beckwith c. B. Evans b. A. Geyer .............................0 S. Helms c. M. Davey b. M. McCall ........................10 J. Kelly b. L. McGuirk .............28

C. Baudinette b. R. Geyer ........21 L. Roberts c. C. Harvey b. R. Geyer ...........................16 J. Renden b. R. Geyer ................3 N. Battersby c. R. Geyer b. D. Herbert ..........................6 C. Dougherty n.o. .....................13 M. Croatto c. C. Harvey b. M. McCall ........................18 M. Collins b. M. Call .................0 Extras ........................................8 Total .......................................142 Bowling: M. McCall 4/44, A. Geyer 1/7, L. McGuirk 1/6, B. Evans 0/23, S. Williams 0/17, R. Geyer 3/24, D. Herbert 1/18. OMK def by TOWN 1st innings OMK L. Jones c. A. Fixter b. S. Clark ............................54 A. McKinnon c. S. Clark b. J. Hume ............................27 R. White lbw. b. J. Hume ............................33 W. Dowel r.o. .............................4 A. Busana r.o. .............................1 D. McMeekin b. A. Hickey ........0 J. Greenwood b. J. Hume .........10 J. Lamers c. R. Edwards b. A. Hickey ...........................9 D. Jeffries n.o. ..........................10 P. Harper n.o.............................10 Extras ........................................7 Total .............................8/165 (cc) Bowling: W. Turner 0/14, Z. Trease 0/33, A. Hickey 2/24, A. Fixter 0/28, S. Clark 1/33, J. Hume 3/31. 1st innings Town Z. Trease b. R. White .................4 M. Wilson c. J. Greenwood b. R. White .............................4 A. Hickey c. J. Lamers b. D. McMeekin ...................29 J. Hume b. J. Greenwood .........36 M. Borschman c. R. White b. D. McMeekin ...................19 I. Hanks c. J. Lamers b. D. McMeekin ...................14 W. Turner r.o. .............................5 A. Fixter c. .................................6 S. Clark c. J. Greenwood .........23 R. Edwards n.o. ........................ 11

D. Goss c. D. McMeekin b. R. Dixon .............................5 Extras ......................................15 Total .......................................171 Bowling: R. White 2/47, R. Dixon 1/23, J. Greenwood 1/33, D. McMeekin 3/21, D. Jeffries 0/25, A. Busana 2/13. MDU d KILCUNDA-BASS 1st innings MDU W. Prosser lbw. b. D. Blackney......................14 T. Sinclair b. C. Elliott .............27 S. Arnup lbw. b. D. Blackney........................0 C. Hoober lbw. b. D. Blackney........................2 T. Harris c. b. D. Ferguson .......35 M. Olden r.o. ............................22 S. McRae n.o. ...........................24 C. Olden b. C. Elliott ...............22 T. Corry n.o. ...............................1 Extras ......................................39 Total .............................7/186 (cc) Bowling: S. Leman 0/47, D. Bettles 0/32, D. Blackney 3/21, R. Duff 0/34, C. Elliott 2/22, S. Tapscott 0/17, D. Ferguson 1/9. 1st innings Kilcunda-Bass B. Joseph c. P. Vine b. C. Harris .............................0 D. Ferguson c. S. McRae b. C. Harris ...........................15 R. Gardiner c. T. Sinclair b. C. Harris ...........................12 S. Tapscott c. C. Hoober b. C. Harris .............................0 J. Rosenow c. W. Prosser b. M. Olden ..........................10 S. Leman b. T. Corry ................16 D. Blackney c. C. Olden b. T. Corry ..............................0 R. Duff c. P. Vine b. S. Arnup .............................2 H. Grace n.o. ..............................6 C. Elliott lbw. b. M. Olden ............................3 D. Bettles c. T. Sinclair b. S. Arnup .............................1 Extras ........................................9 Total .........................................74 Bowling: C. Harris 4/18, P. Vine 0/16, T. Corry 2/12, M. Old-

en 2/18, S. Arnup 2/9.

DIVISION 2 FOSTER def by KOONWARRA L/RSL 1st innings Koonwarra L/RSL J. Rockall b. D. Lacasa...............3 J. Stockdale c. b. D. Walker .......0 D. Baker b. D. Thornell..............0 J. Tomada n.o. ..........................68 J. Hastings lbw. b. S. Chaseling .......................6 P. Stow b. S. Chaseling ..............4 D. Clark r.o...............................14 E. Fudd n.o. ................................3 Extras ......................................13 Total ............................. 6/111 (cc) Bowling: D. Walker 2/9, D. Lacasa 1/24, S. Chaseling 2/7, J. Pilkington 0/11, H. Buckland 0/18, A. Starret 0/17, G. Tanner 0/17. 1st innings Foster W. Davy c. J. Tomada b. J. Pickersgill .....................15 H. Buckland c. J. Geary .............8 J. Pilkington c. J. Rockall b. J. Hastings ........................17 S. Chaseling lbw. b. P. Stow..............................27 A. Starret c. J. Geary b. J. Hastings ..........................7 D. Thornell b. P. Stow ................7 D. Lacasa c. J. Hastings b. P. Stow................................8 D. Walker c. D. Baker b. P. Stow................................8 G. Tanner r.o...............................0 B. Cripps b. J. Rockall ...............0 K. Davy n.o. ...............................1 Extras ...................................... 11 Total .......................................108 Bowling: J. Geary 0/8, J. Rockall 1/20, J. Pickersgill 1/15, J. Tomada 1/17, J. Hastings 2/24, P. Stow 4/20. KORUMBURRA d WON MINERS Korumburra won on forfeit POOWONG-LOCH d IMPERIALS Poowong-Loch won on forfeit

• LDCA C Grade

C Grade makes a stumbled start THE opening round of cricket for C Grade saw just one match completed in Divison One while all matches were played in Division Two. In C Division One Nerrena was defeated by Club. Nerrena won the toss and batted but the innings saw only 98 runs on the board before the team was all out. Gavin Giliam top scored with 22 exceeded only by extras with 27 which made the Red Caps score healthier than it really was. Club shared the wickets around with Joel Brann and Nicholas Dobbie taking three apiece. The Town v. Phillip Island match was abandoned (points shared), Inverloch lost on forfeit to Korumburra while the OMK and MDU match was abandoned and called a draw. In Division Two matches Darcy Brosnan and Sean Roche were in good early season form for Wonthaggi Workmens; Brosnan finishing at 75 not out and opener Roche making 66 in a stand of 124 after the side had slumped early to be 2/1 at one stage. Workers finished with 4/166 batting first. Korumburra in reply was never really in the hunt and finished all out 65, two runouts not helping its cause. A strong middle order partnership helped Glen Alvie set a 169 target for Koony/Leongatha RSL. Josh Thomas 39 and Paul

Gardiner 46 put on 76 runs to end the innings on 5/168. In reply Koony slumped early and couldn’t bridge the gap. Best run scorer was Paris Buckley 34 and Mitchell Scrimshaw 22. The dismissal of these two after making solid starts was to the Cougars’ downfall with a runout not helping its cause. Poowong Loch 8/104 batting first was too solid for OMK all out for 72. Opener Neil Hancock started well for Poowong/ Loch with George Lomagno good with the ball for the Diggers, taking 3/9. In reply OMK’s total was disappointing with Sam Matthews being runout after making a solid 28 run start. After he and Lomagno were dismissed it was all downhill from there. In the final match Kilcunda Bass sent Phillip Island in and the move backfired, the Island making 146 with Killy Bass making 9/111 in reply after its 40 overs. Island opener Mark Christopher top scored with 47 followed closely by Peter Francis on 40 with Tyler Pipicelli taking 3/18 for Killy Bass. Killy Bass best batsman was Blake Egeberg with 35 while Stuart Cox took 4/9 for the Island. NERRENA def by WON CLUB 1st innings Nerrena B. Croatto b. J. Brann ...................16 B. Gannon c. K. Dutchman b. K. Dudley ................................4 G. Giliam c. S. Brann b. J. Brann..................................22 B. Martin lbw. b. M. Cadwallender ....................1 M. Waltom lbw. b. M. Cadwallender ....................3

S. Gaddam b. J. Brann....................4 M. Patterson c. K. Dudley b. N. Dobbie ................................0 C. Marinou c. J. Schulz b. N. Dobbie ..............................13 P. Joseph b. N. Dobbie....................0 D. Grigg n.o. ...................................2 R. Baudinette b. K. Dudley ............6 Extras............................................27 Total ..............................................98 Bowling: M. Sharp 0/4, K. Dudley 2/25, M. Cadwallender 2/17, J. Brann 3/7, N. Dobbie 3/9, B. Van Agtmaal 0/13. 1st innings Won Club S. Brann ret. n.o. ..........................52 J. Schulz c. D. Grigg b. P. Joseph ..................................3 B. Mattock c. D. Grigg b. M. Patterson ..........................28 K. Dutchman n.o.............................9 J. Brann n.o. ....................................4 Extras............................................10 Total ........................................ 2/106 Bowling: P. Joseph 1/16, D. Grigg 0/12, B. Croatto 0/18, S. Gaddam 0/30, C. Marinou 0/9, R. Baudinette 0/11, M. Patterson 1/6. TOWN drew PHILLIP ISLAND Match abandoned INVERLOCH def by KORUMBURRA Inverloch lost on forfeit OMK drew MDU

DIVISION 2 WON CLUB d KORUMBURRA 1st innings Won Club S. Roche c. S. Hall b. E. Allaway .............................66 D. McGuirk c. G. Barrett b. S. Hall ......................................0 J. Licis c. B. Kerr b. E. Allaway ...............................1 D. Brosnan n.o. .............................75 M. Schreck b. S. Hall....................14 A. Baumgartner n.o. .......................3 Extras..............................................7 Total .................................4/166 (cc) Bowling: S. Hall 2/18, E. Allaway 2/39, B. Kerr 0/14, A. Brinksma 0/11, G. Barrett 0/34, R. Francis 0/15, D. Kemp 0/18, P. Whelan 0/14. 1st innings Korumburra

G. Barrett c. L. Borne b. M. Schreck ..............................2 A. Brinksma r.o. ..............................0 B. Kerr lbw. b. L. Borne.................................11 D. Kemp c. D. Brosnan b. L. Borne...................................1 R. Francis c. J. Licis b. S. Roche ................................14 E. Allaway c. S. Roche b. S. Liddle ................................13 S. Hall n.o......................................11 P. Whelan c. J. Licis b. E. Dempsey .............................0 T. Sorrell r.o.....................................1 A. Sinclair c. D. McGuirk b. S. Liddle ..................................2 A. Allaway b. E. Dempsey.............0 Extras............................................11 Total ..............................................65 Bowling: L. Borne 2/16, M. Schreck 1/19, S. Roche 1/16, S. Liddle 2/10, E. Dempsey 2/3. PHILLIP ISLAND d KILCUNDA-BASS 1st innings Phillip Island M. Christopher b. R. Duff ............47 R. Young c. b. T. Pipicelli...............4 G. Excell b. B. Egeberg ................21 P. Francis c. b. B. Jones ................40 J. Walton lbw. b. T. Sorace ..................................0 D. Stevenson b. T. Pipicelli ............2 M. Fletcher c. b. T. Pipicelli ...........3 G. Marshall b. K. Duff ...................4 S. Cox n.o. .......................................8 J. Johnston c. b. P. De Rubeis.........1 M. Lee c. b. P. De Rubeis ...............3 Extras............................................14 Total ........................................... 146 Bowling: T. Pipicelli 3/18, S. Burchell 0/31, R. Duff 2/28, B. Egeberg 0/7, B. Jones 0/18, T. Sorace 1/5, B. Noble 0/20, K. Duff 0/10, P. De Rubeis 2/3. 1st innings Kilcunda-Bass S. Burchell c. b. S. Cox ................15 R. Duff c. b. S. Cox ........................0 P. De Rubeis c. b. S. Cox................8 G. Burchell c. b. M. Lee .................5 B. Jones stp. b. P. Francis .............16 B. Noble b. R. Young......................8 B. Egeberg c. b. S. Cox ................35 T. Pipicelli c. b. J. Johnston ............0 K. Duff n.o. .....................................4 S. Quaife c. S. Cox b. G. Marshall .............................9 T. Sorace n.o....................................3

All rounder: Paris Buckley of Koonwarra/Leongatha RSL bowled a tidy 1/22 from eight overs before top scoring for the Cougars with the bat, making 34. Extras..............................................8 Total ................................. 9/111 (cc) Bowling: G. Marshall 1/11, J. Johnston 1/26, M. Lee 1/17, S. Cox 4/9, P. Francis 1/19, R. Young 1/23. GLEN ALVIE d KOONWARRA-L/RSL 1st innings Glen Alvie J. Burke c. b. A. Drury....................2 M. Hull b. A. Drury ......................13 D. Hynes c. I. Smith b. A. Stanley ................................6 J. Newsome b. P. Buckley ............12 J. Thomas c. P. Buckley b. A. Piksons..............................39 P. Gardiner n.o...............................46 M. Grieve n.o. ...............................17 Extras............................................33 Total .................................5/168 (cc) Bowling: A. Drury 2/15, A. Stanley 1/30, B. Manicaro 0/13, P. Buckley 1/22, C. Buckland 0/19, A. Piksons 1/34, G. Sherriff 0/12, I. Smith 0/6. 1st innings Koonwarra-L/RSL A. Piksons b. J. Thomas .................4 A. Stanley c. M. Grieve b. K. Hull .....................................5 P. Buckley b. D. Hynes.................34 M. Scrimshaw r.o..........................22

B. Manicaro n.o. .............................5 D. Van Puyenbroek c. M. Grieve b. D. Hynes..................................0 C. Buckland stp. M. Grieve b. R. Matthews ............................1 Extras............................................23 Total ...................................6/94 (cc) Bowling: J. Newsome 0/9, P. Gardiner 0/12, J. Thomas 1/12, K. Hull 1/23, J. Burke 0/15, M. Hull 0/4, D. Hynes 2/5, A. Newsome 0/5, R. Matthews 1/2. POOWONG-LOCH d OMK 1st innings Poowong-Loch N. Hancock c. D. Elford b. G. Lomagno ..........................41 A. Johnson c. D. Elford b. S. Matthews ............................4 J. Knox lbw. b. S. Matthews ............................0 B. Knight .......................................25 B. Nicholls b. D. Elford..................9 M. Scholz lbw. b. D. Elford..................................1 B. Regan c. D. Elford b. G. Lomagno ............................2 S. Head n.o. .....................................6 B. Ruyter c. J. Whiteside b. D. Elford..................................3 T. Sheedy n.o...................................3

Extras............................................10 Total .................................8/104 (cc) Bowling: D. Wylie 0/17, S. Matthews 2/4, P. Green 1/18, M. Blackburn 0/17, D. Wylie 0/23, G. Lomagno 3/9, D. Elford 2/13. 1st innings OMK P. Green lbw. b. N. Hancock ...........................11 D. Wylie c. B. Nicholls b. S. Head ....................................5 S. Matthews r.o. ............................28 G. Lomagno stp. B. Nicholls b. B. Knight ...............................18 C. Walker r.o....................................1 M. Blackburn c. W. Walker b. T. Sheedy .................................2 D. Elford b. B. Knight ....................0 A. Perry lbw. b. B. Knight .................................0 J. Whiteside c. B. Ruyter b. N. Hancock .............................0 D. Wylie n.o. ...................................0 R. Wyatt c. S. Head b. N. Hancock .............................0 Extras..............................................7 Total ..............................................72 Bowling: S. Head 1/12, N. Hancock 3/12, W. Walker 0/12, B. Knight 3/10, T. Sheedy 1/11.


PAGE 54 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

SPORT | CRICKET

thestar.com.au

• LDCA A Grade Division One

Britt shines with big ton DAVID Britt scored a mammoth not out 165 for Wonthaggi Club in its punishing defeat of Nerrena in A1 cricket on Saturday. Forget about too much running between the wickets; Britt’s magic innings included no less than 11 fours and 12 sixes; that’s 116 runs in boundaries. Club finished with 4/266 from its 40 overs and the more than six runs an over was going to be tough. Dropping wickets at regular intervals didn’t help the Red Caps and despite a 42 from Gerard Murphy, the side was 9/128 at the close. James

Sherrin with 4/20 was the best of the Club bowlers. Leongatha Town went from chocolates last week to boiled lollies this week when it was knocked over by OMK. The Diggers sent Town in and the Scorpion bats did pretty well, Damien Burge making 34 and Matt Smith 55 not out, producing a competitive 6/182. OMK was very solid in reply with a number of bats getting amongst it, no better than Adam Miller with 51 not out. Inverloch managed to tough out a close win over Phillip Island. Winning the toss and batting Inverloch made 133 with

Hitting out: Damien Burge steered Town pretty well with the bat making 34 despite the side going down to OMK.

Kit Rotthier scoring a fine 53 to give his side hope although the bowlers would need to work hard. Simon Kirton was best with the ball taking 4/23 for the Island. In reply the Island fell just 11 runs short thanks to some great bowling by Ryan B Thomas 3/16 and Lewis Rankin 3/21. Jack Keating top scored for the Island with 32. In the final match it was Korumburra 171 batting first defeating Kilcunda Bass 9/142. Shane Dole was the backbone of the Cobra’s innings with 57 with Luke Zanchetta also scoring freely with 44 not out. Killy Bass’s innings saw Andrew Donohue with 34 and Cameron Davidson 30 the best of the innings. INVERLOCH d PHILLIP ISLAND 1st innings Inverloch W. Taberner r.o. ........................16 B. Debono b. S. Kirton...............0 N. Brayley r.o. ..........................18 K. Rotthier c. B. Johnston b. G. Odgers .........................53 L. Rankin b. S. Kirton ................0 W. Rankin b. S. Kirton ...............3 J. Smith r.o. ................................2 W. Williams b. S. Kirton ..........25 B. Thomas stp. J. Keating b. C. Keerthisinghe ................4 E. Cousins b. G. Odgers .............0 R. Thomas n.o. ...........................0 Extras ......................................12 Total .......................................133 Bowling: S. Kirton 4/23, G. Odgers 2/28, B. Johnston 0/27, M. Wright 0/37, C. Keerthisinghe 1/15. 1st innings Phillip Island L. Cleeland lbw. b. R. Thomas ........................19 J. Keating c. E. Cousins b. R. Thomas ........................32 J. Black b. R. Thomas ................0 B. Johnston lbw. b. L. Rankin..........................12 S. Kirton c. W. Rankin b. L. Rankin..........................15 T. Hornsby r.o.............................9 C. Keerthisinghe c. J. Smith b. L. Rankin............................9 B. Insall n.o. ...............................8 G. Odgers r.o. .............................4 M. Wright n.o. ............................3 Extras ...................................... 11

On the ball: Nick Audino sends one down for the Diggers. He took 2/50 for OMK as well as taking a catch. Photos by Mark Drury. Total .............................8/123 (cc) Bowling: R. Thomas 3/16, B. Thomas 0/17, L. Rankin 3/21, K. Rotthier 0/29, E. Cousins 0/17, W. Williams 0/19. NERRENA def by WON CLUB 1st innings Won Club D. Britt n.o. ............................165 S. Huitema b. N. Trotto ..............6 M. Thomas c. D. Trotman b. J. Hoy ...............................13 R. Thomas c. N. Trotto b. T. Wightman .....................25 D. Turton r.o. ............................24 L. McLean n.o. .........................10 Extras ......................................23 Total .............................4/266 (cc) Bowling: A. Trotto 0/45, J. Trease 0/46, N. Trotto 1/49, G. Murphy 0/32, T. Wightman 1/49, J. Hoy 1/21, D. Symmons 0/18. 1st innings Nerrena D. Symmons c. S. Huitema b. J. Thomas .........................14 D. Trotman c. S. Huitema b. J. Thomas ...........................9 T. Wightman c. K. Brann b. J. Thomas ...........................4 S. Lester c. D. Britt b. Z. Macdermid...................13 D. Baldi r.o. ..............................19 G. Murphy c. L. McLean b. J. Sheerin ..........................42 J. Hoy stp. K. Brann

b. J. Sheerin ..........................15 J. Trease c. D. Britt b. J. Sheerin ............................0 A. Trotto c. M. Thomas b. J. Sheerin ............................0 Extras ......................................12 Total .............................9/128 (cc) Bowling: R. Thomas 0/17, J. Thomas 3/30, R. Birkett 0/22, L. McLean 0/18, Z. Macdermid 1/6, J. Sheerin 4/20, M. Thomas 0/10. TOWN def by OMK 1st innings Town S. Fixter stp. A. Rose b. N. Audino .........................17 D.Burge c. N. Audino b. N. Cant .............................34 A. Ratnaike c. A. Rose b. P. Dell .................................2 M. Weerasinghe-Silva c. D. Creed b. N. Audino .........................25 M. Smith n.o. ...........................55 T. Sivatnanam lbw b. N. Cant ...............................0 N. Mahendrakumar c. D. Creed b. D. Lloyd .............................8 S. Browne n.o...........................20 Extras ......................................21 Total .............................6/182 (cc) Bowling: N. Audino 2/50, J. Dewell 0/21, P. Dell 1/27, N. Cant 2/28, D. Lloyd 0/44, T. Wyatt 0/5. 1st innings OMK

D. Creed lbw. b. B. Berry ............................26 N. Creed lbw. b. T. Sivatnanam.....................5 A. Rose b. B. Berry ..................24 J. Dewell c. A. Ratnaike b. M. Weerasinghe-Silva ......28 A. Miller n.o.............................51 T. Wyatt n.o. .............................21 Extras ......................................30 Total ....................................4/185 Bowling: N. Mahendrakumar 0/17, T. Sivatnanam 1/27, S. Browne 0/28, B. Berry 2/19, A. Ratnaike 0/28, M. WeerasingheSilva 1/53. KILCUNDA-BASS def by KORUMBURRA 1st innings Korumburra I. Osman b. T. Smith ................16 M. Giles b. A. Wells ...................8 K. Rigby lbw. b. T. Smith ............................13 S. Dole c. J. Markland b. J. Dakin ............................57 K. Dorman c. C. Davidson b. J. Mahood...........................3 P. Edwards c. A. Wells b. J. Mahood...........................2 L. Zanchetta n.o. ......................44 D. Salmon c. A. Larcombe b. C. Peckett ...........................9 J. Richards b. C. Peckett ............0 D. Wyhoon r.o. ...........................0

B. Browne lbw. b. C. Peckett ...........................1 Extras ......................................18 Total .......................................171 Bowling: A. Wells 1/27, J. Dakin 1/33, C. Peckett 3/24, T. Smith 2/35, J. Mahood 2/24, A. Donohue 0/24. 1st innings Kilcunda-Bass S. Oates stp. K. Dorman b. S. Dole................................0 J. Markland lbw. b. B. Browne ..........................7 A. Donohue c. K. Dorman b. D. Wyhoon .......................34 A. Larcombe lbw. b. D. Wyhoon .........................1 J. Dakin c. P. Edwards b. B. Browne ..........................0 C. Davidson b. L. Zanchetta ....30 J. Tregear c. B. Browne b. S. Dole..............................27 A. Wells n.o. .............................22 T. Smith c. K. Dorman b. L. Zanchetta .......................0 C. Peckett stp. K. Dorman b. I. Osman .............................0 J. Mahood n.o.............................6 Extras ......................................14 Total .............................9/142 (cc) Bowling: L. Zanchetta 2/26, S. Dole 2/15, B. Browne 2/26, D. Wyhoon 2/33, I. Osman 1/35, M. Giles 0/5.

• LDCA A Grade Division Two

Glen Alvie by one run over Cougars GLEN Alvie and Koonwarra/Leongatha RSL fought out a thriller in A2 cricket with Glen Alvie getting over the line by just one run. Batting first Glen Alvie made 8/144 with Jeff Reid top scoring with 48 while Brock Hastings 3/19 and Jayke Hoy 3/20 bowled well for the Cougars. Sam Hughes got the Koony boys off to a solid start despite brother Jack falling for one. Sam ended his innings stumped for 47 and it was Koony 6/104 still looking like winners. With Josh Moore, 27 and Nick Arnup, 16 not out the Cougars were still a chance but they ran out of deliveries; 9/143 at the end of 40 overs. Father and son combination of Gary and Tim Sauvarin featured in Imperials solid win over Foster. Dad Gary, 67 not out and son Tim Sauvarin, 60 made a partnership of 107 before Tim

was dismissed. This went a long way to establishing an innings total of 5/190 for Imps batting first. In reply Foster made a respectable 9/177 with Murray Lynch, 54 not out and Graeme Watkins, 42 giving the Tigers a good chance. A four wicket haul to Jack Ginnane, 4/32, helped get the Imps over the line. In the final game Poowong Loch scored an impressive win 6/218 batting first defeating Wonthaggi Miners 9/158. The openers for Glen Alvie Colin Knox, 46 and Aaron Bardwell, 29 hit 75 for the first wicket. Steady innings from both Wilson Pollock, 35 and Jacob Bardwell, 33 ensured a good total. In reply Miners fell 60 runs short, opener Blake Andrighetto made 33 and Sam Farrington, 24 not out.

D. Hales r.o. ...............................6 R. Slade b. B. Hastings ............19 A. Hamilton b. S. Hughes ..........4 S. Watson n.o..............................7 W. Luke b. B. Hastings ..............3 T. Brown n.o...............................1 Extras ......................................14 Total .............................8/144 (cc) Bowling: N. Arnup 0/11, B. Hastings 3/19, J. Hoy 3/20, B. Perry 0/20, J. Guinan 0/39, K. Thorne 0/15, S. Hughes 1/17. 1st innings Koonwarra L/RSL S. Hughes stp. A. Hamilton b. J. Reid ..............................47 J. Hughes c. J. Reid b. T. Brown.............................1 J. Guinan c. A. Hamilton b. W. Luke ............................ 11 B. Perry c. R. Slade b. W. Luke .............................4 J. Hale lbw. b. W. Luke ..............1 J. Moore c&b. K. Simpson.......27 A. Rockall lbw. b. T. Brown.......0 B. Hastings b. J. Reid .................8 J. Hoy b. D. Hales ......................6 N. Arnup n.o.............................16 K. Thorne n.o. ............................6 Extras ......................................16 Total .............................9/143 (cc) Bowling: D. Hales 1/24, T. Brown 2/23, W. Luke 3/29, K. Simpson 1/24, J. Reid 2/40.

GLEN ALVIE d KOONWARRA L/RSL 1st innings Glen Alvie J. Reid lbw. b. J. Hoy ...............13 S. Smith b. J. Hoy ....................17 P. Palmer b. J. Hoy ...................12 J. Reid b. B. Hastings ...............48

WON MINERS def by POOWONG-LOCH 1st innings Poowong-Loch C. Knox c. J. Honeysett b. A. Hall ..............................46 A. Bardwell c&b. R. Todd .......29 W. Pollock c. B. Andrighetto

b. J. Loos ..............................35 J. Bardwell b. J. Loos ...............33 P. Dyer c. D. Loos b. J. Loos ................................7 R. Greaves c. J. Rumbold b. J. Honeysett ......................10 A. Fisher n.o.............................19 K. Miller n.o...............................0 Extras ......................................39 Total .............................6/218 (cc) Bowling: J. Loos 2/17, J. Rumbold 1/50, J. Piasente 0/33, D. Loos 0/3, A. Hall 1/64, J. Honeysett 1/23, R. Todd 1/15. 1st innings Won Miners G. Kent c. J. Bardwell b. M. Hancock ........................4 B. Andrighetto c. K. Miller b. R. Greaves ........................33 C. Thomas lbw. b. J. Bardwell .......................14 D. Loos b. R. Greaves ..............21 J. Honeysett b. A. Jenkins ..........4 S. Farrington n.o. .....................24 R. Todd c. J. Bardwell b. A. Jenkins ...........................0 J. Piasente b. C. Knox ..............17 J. Loos c. R. Greaves b. C. Knox ..............................6 J. Rumbold b. J. Bardwell ........16 A. Hall n.o. .................................1 Extras ......................................18 Total .............................9/158 (cc) Bowling: A. Jenkins 2/16, M. Hancock 1/15, B. Monson 0/38, C. Knox 2/22, J. Bardwell 2/35, A. Fisher 0/3, R. Greaves 2/26. IMPERIALS d FOSTER 1st innings Imperials R. McLennan c. J. Weston

b. F. Griggs .............................0 G. Sauvarin n.o. .......................67 L. Rogers c. O. Straw b. F. Griggs .............................2 T. Sauvarin b. R. Johnston .......60 J. Ginnane c. G. Watkins b. R. Johnston.........................0 R. Higgins c. M. Jones b. H. Griggs ..........................24 K. Gray n.o...............................20 Extras ......................................17 Total .............................5/190 (cc) Bowling: F. Griggs 2/33, R. Johnston 2/25, O. Straw 0/23, J. Weston 0/32, H. Griggs 1/40, J. Chaseling 0/11, G. Watkins 0/23. 1st innings Foster M. Jones c. R. McLennan b. J. Ginnane ........................14 J. Toner b. J. Ginnane .................0 T. McWilliams b. J. Ginnane .....4 G. Watkins c. R. O’Loughlin b. P. McCaughan ..................42 O. Straw lbw. b. J. Ginnane ..........................6 J. Chaseling c. J. Ginnane b. J. Forrester........................10 M. Lynch n.o. ...........................54 F. Griggs c. D. Ginnane b. J. Forrester..........................0 R. Johnston c. D. Ginnane b. T. Sauvarin .......................25 J. Weston r.o. ..............................2 H. Griggs n.o. .............................0 Extras ......................................20 Total .............................9/177 (cc) Bowling: J. Ginnane 4/32, T. Sauvarin 1/35, L. Rogers 0/28, R. McLennan 0/15, J. Forrester 2/25, P. McCaughan 1/18, D. Ginnane 0/19.

Easy one: Jack Guinan tickles a single down the leg side for Koonwarra/Leongatha RSL.


“THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016 - PAGE 55

CRICKET | SPORT

thestar.com.au • Representative Cricket

Ideal start for all GCL teams LEONGATHA and District Cricket Association recorded its strongest start to Gippsland Cricket League (GCL) competition for many years after securing wins in the seniors, Under 18’s and Under

16’s on the weekend. The first round of the Gippsland Cricket League competition started on Sunday. The senior match against Central Gippsland had to be transferred to a hard wicket, at East Campus, Leongatha. Batting first Central Gippsland was dismissed for 191.

For Leongatha, newly appointed captain James Sherrin picked up three for 38 while Jack Mason and Alan Jenkins both picked up a brace. Leongatha secured the win scoring six for 192 with nine overs to spare. For Leongatha, the stars were Alex Rose who scored 70 and Damian Symmons 44.

James Markland also chimed in with 26. Travis Picking picked up three wickets for Central Gippsland. Sale-Maffra has started the defence of its 2015/16 title with a win against Warragul. The game was also transferred to a hard wicket at Garfield after persistent rain in the west of the region

over the last month rendered all turf venues unplayable. Warragul finished at nine for 166. In response Sale-Maffra got the runs four down with three overs to spare. The final match was between Traralgon and Bairnsdale. Traralgon batted first and scored 238.

Bairnsdale fell 50 short in the response. LEONGATHA & DISTRICT d CENTRAL GIPPSLAND 1st innings Central District Extras ......................................10 Total .......................................191 Bowling: A. Jenkins 2/31, L. Zanchetta 1/20, C. Keerthisinghe 0/28, J. Mason 2/40, T. Wightman 1/33, J. Sherrin 3/38. 1st innings Leongatha & Dist D. Symmons b. R. Blunt ..........44

J. Markland c. M. Higgins b. R. Blunt ............................26 J. Guinan lbw. b. T. Pickering ........................1 A. Rose c. J. Alexander b. T. Pickering ......................70 D. Salmon c. M. Higgins b. T. Pickering ........................7 D. Turton b. R. Webber ............14 L. Zanchetta n.o. ......................13 Extras ......................................17 Total ....................................6/192 Bowling: R. Webber 1/47, J. Alexander 0/27, T. Pickering 3/41, R. Blunt 2/37, R. Hare 0/38.

• GCL Under 18s

Perry scores a ton LEONGATHA Under 18’s played Traralgon at Andrews Park Churchill and with Gary Sauvarin and Liam Keating coaching the team it started off with a great win. Leongatha won the toss and batted and was soon in trouble losing Jack Keating run out for one and Jye Celebrine lbw for one to be 2 for 11. It was left to Ben Perry and Koby Brann to get the innings back on track and they added 75 for the third

wicket when Koby was out bowled for 39 but it was Ben’s day with a magnificent 126 with six 4’s and two 6’s (Ben’s third representative century). The side reached 240 with the help of Connor Epifano 16, Jacob Beckwith 10, Adam Busana 8 and Nathan Trotto 14. The side was dismissed in the 50th over setting a very good score for Traralgon to chase after lunch. The Leongatha bowlers quickly made inroads into Traralgon batting Elijah Cousins 4 for 22 off 9 over’s, Ben Perry 2

for 20 off 4 over’s, Daniel Blackney 1 for 13 off 8 over’s, Damon Guinnane 1 for 3 off 3.3 over’s with good support from Nathan Trotto and Nick Battersby. There were also two run outs in a good all round effort. Traralgon all out for 82 in 32 .3 over’s. It was a very comprehensive win with an outstanding contribution from Ben Perry of Koonwarra RSL- a century, two wickets and a catch. The Under 18’s play Bairnsdale at Korumburra this Sunday in Round 2. In the second match

Warragul 10/67 were outclassed by Sale-Maffra who scored eight for 206. Bairnsdale and Central Gippsland will play their match for this round on November 6. TRARALGON & DIST def by LEONGATHA & DIST 1st innings Leongatha & Dist J. Keating r.o. .............................1 J. Celebrine lbw. b. J. Mason .............................1 B. Perry c. b. D. Williams ......126 K. Brann c. J. Mason................39 C. Epifano r.o. ..........................16 J. Beckwith c. J. Mason b. J. Twite .............................10 D. Ginnane b. J. Smith ...............0 A. Busana lbw. b. J. Mason .............................8 N. Trotto n.o. ............................14

N. Battersby b. D. Williams .......4 E. Cousins c. J. Smith b. J. Mason .............................0 Extras ......................................21 Total .......................................240 1st innings Traralgon & Dist Extras ........................................9 Total .........................................82 Bowling: N. Trotto 0/11, N. Battersby 0/13, B. Perry 2/20, D. Blackney 1/13, E. Cousins 4/22, D. Ginnane 1/3.

Standout: Ben Perry, pictured batting for his club Koonwarra/Leongatha RSL on Saturday, scored a magnificent 126, his third ton in representative cricket.

• GCL Under 16s

Leongatha Under 16’s open with a win LEONGATHA and District Cricket Association’s Under 16 team enjoyed a strong start in the Gippsland Cricket League after defeating Central Gippsland in Wonthaggi on Sunday. Leongatha won the toss and elected to bat first. It started well with Aaron Bardwell and Matt Allen coming together after the early wicket of Drew Herbert for five. Next to go was Aaron with a well made 25 with two fours and the score at two for 65. This brought Alex Geyer to the crease. He and Matt Allen took the score up to 96 before Matt was out for a very well made 43 with four fours and a six. Jack Hume was the next batsmen in and he and Alex Geyer put on a fantasic 101 run partnership before Alex was out with the score in a very strong position of four for 197. Alex topped scored for Leongatha with 59 runs eight fours. With seven overs to go and quick runs needed, Jack Hume was runout just short of his 50 with a very well batted 46 three fours. Jack was out with the score on 5/215. Brad Monson, 16 not out, and Joel Brann, 10 out on the last ball, did a great job getting quick runs to

give Leongatha a very good score of 6 for 239 off our 50 overs. Central got off to a great start with some good hitting by Leo Connelly (48) and after 12 overs were none for 68. Enter Leongatha’s leg spinner Josh Williams who got Connelly in his first over and bowled seven very tidy overs for the figures of 1/21 to help slow down the Central batsmen. Josh was well assisted by Ryan Sparks who bowled eight overs 0/26. It was Blake Christopher who then turned the game in Leongatha’s favour with three wickets in his

third over then finished with great figures of three for 19 off his six overs. With the game still in the balance and Central’s gun opening bat Liam White still at the crease it was up to Leongatha’s two captains to make sure we got the win. Jack Hume 2/45 off nine overs and Alex Geyer 2/36 off eight overs cleaned up the remaining Central batsmen to have them all out for 216. Liam White finished on 91 not out. Leongatha and District 6/239 (cc) (Alex Geyer 59, Jack Hume 46, Matthew Allen 43, Aaron Bardwell 25) defeated Central Gippsland

216 (Liam White 91, Leo Connolly 48, Blair Clymo 22, Blake Christopher 3/19, Alex Geyer 2/36, Jack Hume 2/45). Next week’s team for Leongatha (October 23) to be played at Rosedale is Alex Geyer, Jack Hume, Matt Allen, Aaron Bardwell, Ryan Sparks, Blake Christopher, Josh Williams, Drew Herbert, Joel Brann, Rohan Slade, Josh Schulz and Jakob Lamers. The bus will be meeting at Wonthaggi McDonalds at 7.20am and Leongatha’s football ground at 7.50am. If there are any problems or questions please ring Rob Geyer 0434 676 406.

LEONGATHA & DISTRICT d CENTRAL GIPPSLAND 1st innings Leongatha & Dist A. Bardwell c. R. Baldi b. L. White ...........................25 D. Herbert b. L. Tumino.............5 M. Allen c. A. Meenakshi b. L. White ...........................43 A. Geyer c. R. Baldi b. B. Masien .........................59 J. Hume r.o. ..............................46 B. Monson n.o. .........................16 J. Brann c&b. R. Baldi .............10 Extras ......................................35 Total .............................6/239 (cc) Bowling: L. Tumino 1/33, R. Baldi 1/44, L. White 2/41, L. Connolly 0/55, C. Millsom 0/25, B. Clymo 0/13, B. Masien 1/23. 1st innings Central Gippsland L. White n.o. ............................91 L. Connolly c. B. Monson b. J. Williams........................48 B. Clymo c. K. Robinson b. B. Christopher ..................22 R. Baldi b. B. Christopher..........0 B. Masien b. B. Christopher.......0

Junior team: from left, Ryan Sparkes, Josh Williams, captain Alex Geyer, Joel Brann, Drew Herbert, captain Jack Hume, Josh Schulz, Keith Robinson, Aaron Bardwell, Matt Allen, Blake Christopher and Brad Monson represented Leongatha in the U/16 Gippsland Cricket League on Sunday.

A. Meenakshi r.o. .....................16 N. Faltum c. A. Geyer b. J. Hume ..............................9 L. Tumino b. J. Hume ................0 S. Dawson b. A. Geyer ...............0 C. Dastey b. A. Geyer ................4 A. Connolly r.o...........................0

Extras ......................................26 Total .......................................216 Bowling: J. Hume 2/45, B. Monson 0/45, A. Geyer 2/36, K. Robinson 0/18, J. Williams 1/21, R. Sparkes 0/26, B. Christopher 3/19.

Leongatha District Cricket Association Umpire Appointments EVANS PETROLEUM Round 3 - October 22 Home team Grade A1 OMK Town Korumburra Kilcunda-Bass Grade A2 MDU Glen Alvie Koon-L/RSL Poowong-Loch Grade B1 Inverloch Nerrena Phillip Island Won Club Grade B2 Poowong-Loch Won Miners Foster Imperials Grade C1 Inverloch Phillip Island Town Korumburra Grade C2 Koon-L/RSL OMK Glen Alvie Poowong-Loch

Away Team

Ground

Umpire

v v v v

Phillip Island Inverloch Won Club Nerrena

Outt SP 1 Kor Rec Bass 1

T. Rogers G. Adams G. Goss G. Laird

v v v v

Won Miners Imperials Foster Bye

Meen Rec G. Wightman Butch W J. Curry L Turf L. White

v v v v

Town Kilcunda-Bass OMK MDU

Inv Turf Nerr Cowes McMhn

v v v v

Korumburra Koon-L/RSL Glen Alvie Bye

Loch Rec N. Barnes Won Rec M. Wishart FGC K. Scrimshaw

v v v v

Nerrena MDU OMK Won Club

Inv Rec Newh SP 2 KSC

B. Bek TBA TBA I. Thomas

v v v v

Korumburra Kilcunda-Bass Won Club Phillip Island

Koon L Velo GA Poow

TBA TBA TBA TBA

C. Salmon A. Jordan I. Richards A. Stride

Any person interested in umpiring contact Graham Laird 0408 454 741. Please note all games start at 1pm.


PAGE 56 - “THE STAR” Tuesday, October 18, 2016

Basketball stadium plea By Tayla Kershaw A MULTIMILLION dollar stadium is desperately needed for the ever growing Wonthaggi Basketball Association. Domestically, there are now two or three additional teams in every age group, as well as seven rep teams. The rep teams play for Wonthaggi state wide, but can’t host their own tournaments due to inadequate facilities. The association has the skill, and accredited coaches and referees, and now it needs somewhere to grow. “We have young players who represent other associations because we can’t have a Victorian Junior Basketball League team without a stadium,” association president Cathy Garnham said. “It’s great for us, because the players come back with more experience to share with the rest, but they can’t represent us.” The association plays its matches in the gym at Wonthaggi North Primary School and the Wonthaggi YMCA, and sometimes trains in the gym at Wonthaggi Secondary College’s Dudley Campus. However, none of these courts comply with

standard regulations. “There must be at least two metres from the boundary line to the wall on a standard court, which our courts do not comply with,” Ms Garnham said. “The children who play go hard. They will run to try and block a layup, over commit, and hit the wall, which can cause injury.” The Bass Coast Shire Council elections are underway now, and the association has been lobbying prospective councillors. “Most of the candidates we have spoken to are in favour of our proposal,” Ms Garnham said.

“We need to get them elected and then continue to lobby for State and Federal funding, which needs to be initiated by local government. For council to fund the stadium, it is estimated it would like take 10 years. We won’t be here in 10 years if we don’t have a stadium.” Ideally, the association is looking to have four courts included in the stadium, which would accommodate other sports like netball, volleyball, soccer and tennis. Each court would cost roughly $2 - $3 million. It could also be used as an entertainment complex, and local schools would be encouraged to

use the facilities. “Inverloch Primary School does not have a big enough area for all its students, so its presentations are divided. This is one use the schools could have for the stadium,” Ms Garnham said. The association is open for suggestions about the potential location of the stadium, but believe the education precinct site would be a good option. “We are not looking at this from just a basketball angle. We are looking to encompass everyone and turn this into a regional hub,” Ms Garnham said.

Training: from left, Mohammed Mohammed and Taj Murdoch play in the U/12s division for the Wonthaggi Basketball Association, and trained at the Wonthaggi Secondary Young guns: from left, Wonthaggi’s Angus Murdoch and Inverloch’s Harry Scott play for the U/14s side and need a new stadium to be able to continue to play basketball at a high standard locally. College Dudley Campus recently.

• Leongatha Little Athletics

Eleanor giving back to little aths ELEANOR Patterson has joined the Leongatha Little Athletics team as a volunteer to help run its On Track program, which is a skills development program for children just learning the techniques of athletics. And what a fabulous way to continue the athletics season with beautiful weather and our special guest for the On Track program. Children aged five to seven years are able to participate in the 10 week program and then they join in with the competition program after the Christmas break. Eleanor will also be mentoring her colleague and assistant Courtney Clarke. There were 15 On Track children this week and more than 150 athletes competing on the

day. The focus is on fun, participation and enjoyment and achieving your personal best. We run the competitions days most Saturdays from 9.15am - 12noon, with a couple of twilight nights, in fact Thursday, October 27 will be our first Twilight competition for the season starting at 5.30pm. We welcome new members if you are interested in trying out little athletics, come and see us on competition days for a “come and try session” at 8.45am and we will help you settle in. For more information please email us at leongathalac@gmail.com or contact our Regleongathalac@gmail.co istrar Linda Richards on 0417 821 482. or our President Ben Cruickshank on 0438551976. We look forward to seeing you all on the track.

Welcome back: Eleanor Patterson has joined to help the On Track program and will also be mentoring her colleague and assistant Courtney Clarke. Both Eleanor and Courtney are pictured with just a few of the On Track children.

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The Great Southern Star - October 18, 2016  

The Great Southern Star - October 18, 2016  

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