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JUL/AUG 2012 P R O M O T I N G T H E S T A F F O R D S H I R E B U L L T E R R I E R VOL 3 ISSUE #4 FREE

The Stafford Knot

The Stafford Knot promotes Health Tested Staffords

Cover Story on Page 4

LINE BREEDING PAST AND PRESENT BY NORMAN

BERRY

PAGE 9

BUILDING

FEATURED

CONFIDENCE

RESCUES

BY TINA M. SPRING VAN WHY          

PAGE 16

WHY THE S*#T HITS THE FAN! BY

FLYING BRICKS BY

ERIKA PARDY BELINDA O'SHEA

PAGE 20

PAGE 27

THE STUD DOG BY

CLARE LEE

PAGE 32

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

BRAGS

HEALTH TESTING INFO

‘JUDGE COMPETANCY’

PAGE 40

PAGE 41

PAGE 38

PAGE 43


The Stafford Knot Behind the Scenes If you are interested in securing a future cover on The Stafford Knot please contact us for details. Stud Gallery Page 45 Classifieds Page 48 Breeder Directory page 49 Illustrated Breed Standard page 51 & scattered throughout issue Back Issues page 63

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All historical and/or current photos and articles used in this publication were sent to us by our readers unless otherwise stated. In such instances all permissions were acquired prior to publication. We take no responsibility for use of images widely available on the internet or sent to us by owners or breeders of dogs mentioned in this publication. If you wish to have photo credit given it is the responsibility of the photographer to send to us in writing during the current issue publication your wish and we will do our best to accommodate with no guarantees. The Stafford Knot offers WORLDWIDE Publication 24/7 Accessibility, No Waiting For Delivery! DIRECT DISTRIBUTION to Stafford Judges Worldwide No PAID Subscriptions needed!

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Interactive Advertisements Back Issues Archived online Lynn Caswell Chris Kerrigan - Erika Phillips Linda Strange Worldwide Guest Authors/Historians -

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Special thank you goes to those selfless people who assist with Stafford rescues on a regular basis - if you can help transport, foster, donate or adopt - there is sadly always a need! TSK is here to raise funds to aid in these rescues. Please be a part of the solution! We welcome Fundraiser representatives and article contributions from interested parties. Please contact us if for more information how you can get involved. Thank you also to our Rescue Coordinators Worldwide The Stafford Knot is an independent publication and not affiliated with any specific breed club. TSK is a collaborative effort from like minded Stafford enthusiasts whose common goal is to support the health testing of purebred Staffords. We reserve the right to approve or disapprove any material submitted. All material on this site is copyright protected & cannot be used unless indicated without the written consent of The Stafford Knot Thank you. Contact Us TSK benefits Stafford rescue worldwide Š 2009 - 2012 BrownDog Design


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COVER STORY WAVEMAKER DARDEVLE FD, FDX, FDCH, FDCH-S, FDCH-G “MADOC”

FLYBALL IS A DOG RELAY RACE THAT MATCH TWO TEAMS OF FOUR DOGS EACH, RACING SIDE-BY-SIDE OVER A 51 FOOT LONG COURSE. EACH DOG MUST RUN IN RELAY FASHION DOWN THE JUMPS, TRIGGER A FLYBALL BOX, RELEASING THE BALL, RETRIEVE THE BALL, AND RETURN OVER THE JUMPS. STAFFORDS SEEM TO EXCEL AT THE SPORT WITH THEIR DRIVE, ATHLETICISM AND TRAIN ABILITY.  MADOC IS MY 2ND STAFFORD PARTICIPATING IN FLYBALL AND HE WAS A DREAM TO TRAIN AND EVEN MORE FUN TO RUN. HE HAS MADE A NAME FOR HIMSELF IN A VERY SHORT TIME OF RUNNING HE IS TOTALLY CALM AND QUIET UNTIL HE WALKS ON TO THE RACING LANES AND THEN HE BECOMES A MADMAN HE STARTS SCREAMING AND BARKING AND ABOUT JUMPS OUT OF MY ARMS WANTING TO RACE SO HIS NICKNAME TOTALLY SUITS HIM AND AFTER THE RACE IS DONE HE CALMS RIGHT BACK DOWN AND WALKS CALMLY OFF THE RACING LANE.  MADOC RUNS AS A HEIGHT DOG FOR A TEAM WHICH IS THE SHORTEST DOG THAT SETS THE JUMP HEIGHTS FOR THE TEAM OF DOGS RUNNING AND HE IS CONSIDERED A FAST HEIGHT DOG. HE RUNS IN THE LOW TO MID 4 SEC RANGE AND HE ALSO IS AN ADVANTAGE BECAUSE HE CAN RUN THOSE SPEEDS IN THE PACK WHICH MEANS HE PASSES TWO OTHER DOGS DURING A RACE.  FLYBALL IS A FAST PACED COMPETITIVE TEAM SPORT WITH LOTS OF EXCITEMENT AND STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIERS ARE A HIGHLY DESIRABLE BREED OF DOG FOR TEAMS BECAUSE THEY ARE FAST HEIGHT DOGS AND ALSO GIVE THEM A SEPARATE BREED TO RUN IN A MULTI BREED TEAM WHICH CONSISTS OF 4 TOTALLY DIFFERENT BREEDS OF DOGS RUNNING.  LISA SKORIJA FOR MORE INFORMATION ON FLYBALL GO TO WWW.FLYBALL.ORG

The AKC Board unanimously approved the recommendation that AKC recognize the NAFA titles of Flyball Champion (FDCh), Flyball Master (FM) and ONYX. NAFA flyball dogs can now have their accomplishments recorded on their AKC pedigree.


Volunteer positions available at The Stafford Knot:

Sales - we need people around the world to help us sell advertising. Ads are how we raise money to donate to Stafford rescues. If interested please send email to sales@thestaffordknot.com

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Reporters - We are looking for show reporters from around the world to send us results from major shows. If you would like to volunteer for this new position please email editor@thestaffordknot.com

Writers - we are always looking for writers to send in articles for each issue. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if your are interested and available

www.aht.org.uk/genetics_tests.html

dnatesting@aht.org.uk


www.staffierescuescotland.co.uk


Staffords sure can sleep in/on some odd positions!


lorelei@cierastaffords.com

www.cierastaffords.com


Line Breeding Past and Present by Norman Berry Breeding a litter is not a difficult exercise to carry out. Admittedly there are awkward matings and problems can occur during the time of whelping, but technically speaking little knowledge is required to produce a litter. Many thoughts on how to create and maintain a successful line of winning dogs have been put forward over the years and no doubt much of the writing on the subject has assisted our strains to develop.

happy moments watching dogs from our kennel winning at shows, and I can assure you that financial gain is far from my thoughts, especially on the occasions they receive first prizes and other acclamations. There are many genuine breeders who care about their stock and their ultimate destination and life style. The only breed one or perhaps two litters a year not wishing to add to the ever increasing number of unwanted dogs currently putting strain on rescue organisations. I believe restraint is the price to be paid for the popularity which encourages the interest of people outside the breed to take advantage of the opportunity to make financial gain at the expense of the breed. The objective of the true and dedicated breeder is to bring about an improvement in his stock. Essentially, he hopes to breed better stock than he already has, which may be at the end of its show days. By breeding a further litter they hope to retain virtues and improve deficiencies.

There are many reasons for mating a bitch. One is the desire to breed a fine future prospect for the show ring. The rest of the litter must, of course be sold off and there lies the danger of selling the wrong puppy. Therefore a wealth of knowledge of one’s stock by knowing the ancestors can be a great advantage when choosing your puppy. Money must not be allowed to take priority over your choice. Financial gain is the wrong incentive and should be put to one side. Although it sometimes comes as a relief when veterinarian and feeding bills start to accumulate. If one breeds good dogs there is no reason why one Information is required if one is to should not benefit from surplus establish a strong line. Questions stock. must be asked, photoraphs perused and pedigrees studied. Gathering information takes time; people When a breeder has established a starting late in life need to absorb strong line, great interest can be knowledge faster than a younger aroused when watching the course people, although younger people of development through the animal’s may suffer from the early pressures show career. I have enjoyed many of home keeping etc, and not have

the time to spend on it what they might wish. Genetic understanding, if not a fundamental grasp of the subject, can be an advantage although not a necessity. It can avoid wasting time on trying to achieve impossible goals. Over the past thirty or forty years many good strains come to mind. One or two breeders carried out extensive breeding programmes and experimented quite rigidly with specific lines. I think of Mr Jack Altoft of the well known Godwyns affix, his first mating being a bitch called Goldwyn. During the war traveling was greatly restricted due to official regulations and it was quite difficult to achieve a mating with the chosen stud dog, Brindle Bill a son of the founder of the M line type of breeding, Brindle Mick. This mating produced a dog puppy called wheatley lad. The mating was planned to be repeated but unfortunately Brindle Bill died, cutting off any chance of a repeat mating. The next best choice was a Wheatley Lad’s litter brother Sunny Bill; this union produced a further excellent litter from which a bitch was retained, Brindle Diane. Later she was putto Wheatley Lad, her uncle and half brother. From this mating came CH Goldwyns Leading Lad. Due this success, the mating was repeating and resulted in an other Ch Goldwyns Lucky Lad.


Line Breeding Past and Present by Norman Berry, To summarise, the first inbred mating was a brother sister experiment repeated and then the brother sister and sister from each litter were put together. From two sib matings, a further union was contrived and turned out a further success.

safest mating to advocate in our breed. Sister/ brother matings and parent to offspring are, in my opinion, rather too close for reasons I will dwell on later. Close breeding should only be practiced if the breeder is clear in his own mind that he has come as close as possible to perfectly achieving his ideal animal. The disadvantage of After searching through various such matings is that while finer pedigrees, I cannot find any breeding virtues are being fixed, undesirable as close as Mr Altofts’s program. combinations of character are also Although it proved successful for being implanted and can be one hell him and resulted in three of a job to eliminate. I am sure many champions. I feel the results have people in Staffords would endorse highlighted the point that I am my remarks that in our breed no trying to emphasis, it could have kennel is far enough advanced to disastrous consequences. The carry out such close matings as method employed reduces the gene described, due to the diversity of pool considerably in favour of the pedigrees relating to the breeder. contemporary Staffordshire Bull Terrier. When only mediocre stock is available in breeding should not Planning matings of closely related be considered. dogs is not always the answer to success. Certainly without knowledge of the ancestral Most people consider inbreeding to dominance and traits, such matings be distasteful and undesirable but could lead to repeated failures. really it is one of the most natural No breeder can guarantee success with every sale and should a puppy not turn out a winner, all is not lost! Despair should not be allowed to take a hand but rather the next step is to select a suitable dog of the same line, or as possible to the immediate line. Having had success with closely related dogs, for example, half brother and sister matings, I feel this is the best and

functions of wild animal packs, as one would observe. In nature incest is carried on on a grand scale, all gregarious animals subjected to in breeding as a matter of course. Usually the pack is taken over by one dominant male who then commences to mate all the females over a number of years and when the time comes for him to be ousted from his privileged position in the pack, due to infirmity or old

continued

age, his place is then taken over, quite likely by one of his many sons. He in turn commences to copulate with his own sisters. This is repeated over future generations and so on. To be on safer ground, the method of line breeding (half brother to half sister or cousin to cousin) does allow some latitude and allowance for the breeder to eliminate bad points that can arise when trying to establish a strain of his own. Unfortunately the disadvantage is the greater number of gene combinations that must be expected to occur in the puppies produced. A thoughtless approach to the subject, possibly resulting in a mis match which can be reflected in future generations, can not be condoned. The odd chance flyer may occur but is not often repeated. Should the said animal be a dog, it should not be regarded as the savour of the breed, a view which no doubt would encourage people to rush out and use him. A poorly bred bitch is as unreliable as an ill bred dog and even though they have brought great success for their owners in the show ring, they are most unlikely to have been endowed with genetic power of any great strength and can hardly be expected to continuously produce good specimens.


Line Breeding Past and Present by Norman Berry, Occasionally a potent dog arrives on the scene who seems to have the ability to produce excellent specimens to various types of bitches. This particular dog quickly becomes extremely popular and is used quite extensively. Encouraged breeders having learned of his prepotent hope he will enhance their luck in producing a good litter. Having been successful, the clever ones keep line of the prepotent sire and go on th further success and establish a breeding pattern of their own. I expect there will always be people who cannot see or appreciate a good thing when they have it stuck under their noses and for reasons best known to themselves, go off and use the next popular dog that takes their fancy, disregarding the fact that they have ignored the opportunity offered to them to advance their breeding programme. Over the past ten years, I can think of three or four prolific dogs that have certainly left their mark on the breed, their owners having used a good dog with double genetic strength (homozygous qualities) and carrying all the virtues they obviously desired. One would surmise this was the reason for using the dog in the first place.

programme on inferior breeding stock is handicapping itself so severly as to allow nothing more than limited succes. Most Stafford kennels are limited to no more than two or three breeding bitches. Therefore it is most important that they carry the greatest virtues in double strength and their pedigrees be of the highest possible order in a great depth of homogosity for that strain.

Such a dog as previously described should be used as a point to build from. In doing so it will prove that a more favourable results will occur.

The method of breeding back to back to some well known illustrious sire or dam is considered and recommended by some breeders. It may have its rewards but one should consider the amount of time and trouble involved even if it is successful. I consider this method a rather roundabout way of arriving at a hopeful conclusion when one considers the possible combination of genes to conjure with when breeding back to back over generations; the genetic pool becomes immensely unpredictable, especially if somewhere along the way there have been a couple of out crosses. Considering most Stafford pedigres this is almost inevitable, the thought makes the mind boggle. To follow this line of thought, when one considers the distance and diversity of the individual pedigrees, this method is nothing more than a euphemism for out crossing!

It cannot be emphasised too strongly that a kennel basing its

The method of outcrossing is more or less self explanatory. After

concluded

looking through the results of show catalogues, it can be seen that in some cases this does bring immediate results, either through ignorance or by a calculated chance mating of two good looking specimens from two different lines. The fact stills remains that one must expect the results of the second generation to vary quite enormously. By employing a line breeding exercise, one can again bring back stability. Great care should be exercised in selecting out cross matings. One should ensure that as few recesive traits as possible are introduced. .One way to proceed is to choose a dog which posses the desired quality, is related as nearly as possible and has a similar genetic makeup to the other character. Be prepared for the possible occurrence of an out cross and its attendant problems. The message is quite clear. Keeping pedigrees as tight as possible and considering only the first three generations of the two pedigrees thirty dogs carry all the virtues and faults have been employed. Any further back and the task seems to be getting more difficult and diverse and in my opinion of purely historic interest only.


PH OTO CO L L E CT I O N N OR M A N BE R RY


L 2 - H G A & H C DATA B A S E P RO J E C T THE STAFFORD KNOT ONLY ACCEPTS ADS FROM OWNERS AND BREEDERS OF DOGS WHO HAVE BEEN HEALTH TESTED. THE MINIMUM REQUIREMENTS ARE L2-HGA & HC TESTING. WE PROVIDE INFORMATION ON WHERE TO GO TO HAVE THESE SIMPLE AND INEXPENSIVE TESTS PERFORMED. DOCUMENTATION IS REQUIRED TO BE SCANNED AND SENT IN TO THE EDITORS FOR APPROVAL. FURTHER HEALTH TESTING (CARDIAC, CERF, PHPV, HIPS, ELBOWS, PATELLA, ETC) IS ALSO ENCOURAGED. IT IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED TO BUYERS THAT THEY SEE THESE DOCUMENTS PRIOR TO PURCHASING THEIR NEW STAFFORD. IF ALL BREEDERS AND OWNERS WERE TO TEST, STAFFORDS WOULD ALL BE BETTER OFF SIMPLY BY THE FACT THAT WE WOULD HAVE MORE INFORMATION REGARDING WHERE THIS BREED IS GOING AS FAR AS HEALTH MATTERS ARE CONCERNED. TO FURTHER THIS POINT, IF ONLY CLEAR TESTED (L2-HGA & HC) STAFFORDS ARE BRED FROM THESE TWO GENETIC DISEASES COULD BE ERADICATED IN THREE GENERATIONS OF BREEDING. THAT’S CERTAINLY SOMETHING TO THINK ABOUT. SOME ARGUE THAT THIS WOULD NARROW THE GENE POOL TOO MUCH AND IS NOT A NEEDED STEP TO IMPROVING THE FUTURE OF THIS BREED. TO THOSE I SAY, POSSIBLY, HOWEVER - IS THAT CARRIER STUD DOG SO STRUCTURALLY SUPERIOR TO HIS CLEAR TESTED BROTHER THAT YOU WOULDN’T CONSIDER USING THE BROTHER INSTEAD? JUST SOMETHING ELSE TO THINK ABOUT. TSK IS COMPILING REGISTERED NAMES AND SCANNED DOCUMENTS OF ALL TESTED (CLEAR, CARRIER AND AFFECTED) STAFFORDS FOR A FUTURE DATABASE PROJECT SO THAT DOCUMENTATION WILL BE ON HAND FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS. IN THE U.S. OUR REGISTRIES DO NOT DOCUMENT THESE TEST RESULTS AS THE K.C. DOES IN THE U.K. THEREFORE TOO MANY PEOPLE WHO OWN ‘CLEAR BY PARENTAGE’ STAFFORDS HAVE NO PROOF IN HAND SEVERAL GENERATIONS DOWN THE LINE. IN TIME, WE AT TSK HOPE THE DATABASE WILL HELP THOSE WHO WISH TO KNOW THE STATUS OF A PARTICULAR DOG OR LITTER. IF YOU HAVE A TESTED STAFFORD - PLEASE SEND ONE EMAIL TO HEALTH@THESTAFFORDKNOT.COM CONTAINING THE FULL REGISTERED NAME, REGISTRATION NUMBER, SIRE AND DAM REGISTERED NAMES AND SCANNED COPIES OF ALL HEALTH TESTING DONE ON YOUR DOG. PLEASE ONLY SEND ONE EMAIL PER DOG. IN TIME, WE HOPE TO BUILD A NAME ONLY DATABASE WITH THIS INFORMATION. THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING

We are also working on a database of semen stored from health tested stud dogs. If you have semen stored from a tested dog and wish to have him included, please email HEALTH@THESTAFFORDKNOT.COM with health scans, pedigree information and contact information. Also please indicate whether or not the semen is available for use.


limitededitions1@verizon.net


Building Confidence - Help your cowardly canine build confidence by Tina M. Spring Van Why      

                    

Specific exercises to build confidence We all hear the psychobabble about building confidence. Confidence is often misunderstood, it is not an excuse to be a bully or cocky. Real confidence comes not from ego but from very real “power”. The power is to make correct decisions. Whether you have a seven-week-old puppy or a ten year old Doberman, all dogs need to have real confidence encouraged. This gives the dog the ability to make decisions without reactivity and allows them to “sit on their center” emotionally. There are lots of methods one can use to build confidence in their dog. We will discuss three ways in this handout. Six Interesting Things Assemble six items your dog has never seen before. At least one item should be something organic (like a log). While getting your items together your CONFIDENCE IS OFTEN dog should not be MISUNDERSTOOD, IT IS in the area. Use at NOT AN EXCUSE TO BE A least one item that rolls (as BULLY OR COCKY. movement attracts attention) like a paint roller and at least one object that makes noise (a can with pennies in it works well). Use items that are metal (a metal ladle), wooden (a ping pong paddle), and plastic (a funnel, scrubber or brush); the more variety in the items the better. Don’t go out and buy a bunch of stuff, just use items from around the house that the dog doesn’t see all the time and that are safe for the dog’s interaction. (No glasses, remote control, shoes or other items you definitely don’t want your dog to mess with).

Get out your top notch treats (chicken, cheese, lamb, steak, etc) in raisin sized pieces (approximately sixty) and your clicker. Put out the items, get your clicker and rewards ready and go get your dog, be sure the dog is restrained by a leash and cannot prematurely interact with the items. Count out ten treats out loud making a big deal of it so the dog gets excited and understands that it is time to work. Take advantage of your dog’s immediate curiosity by clicking and

treating (c/t) for ANY interaction with ANY of the items. Sniffing, a look at the items, or pawing them are all normal responses. In the beginning you may have to toss the treats inside the circle of items to encourage the dog to try stuff out. Once you have done so five times or so begin throwing the treats outside the circle so the dog has to choose to interact with the items by changing direction. Pay the dog for interacting with any item. If the dog is only looking at the items slowly increase your criteria to wait for a nose touch or a paw touch. Anything will do but you want it to be measurable and observable. Work through your ten treats then put the dog on lead and remove her from the area until she “turns off” for a couple of minutes. This down time is important, it gives the dog time to think about what you are doing and keeps her from becoming too tired or demanding.

Return to the area, count out your ten treats and take the dog off lead. Again, begin with c/ting for the dog interacting with any of the items. Now raise your criteria gradually, choose only one kind of touch (paw, nose, etc.) or for only one item that you will reward (the funnel). If your dog starts to shut down (yawning, lip licking, whole body shakes like he is wet, etc.), lower your criteria to get him restarted or just toss a treat without clicking to get him moving again. Through all of this you should be sitting down or standing quietly by the side. If your dog needs more encouragement as he is just staring at you, make sure you are looking at the items on the floor, not at the dog, and you may have to quietly walk around the items occasionally bending down to look at an object more closely (your interest may spur your dog’s interest). This will draw your dog’s attention. Slowly and gradually shape (over as many sessions or days as necessary) to one item with only one kind of interaction being rewarded. Work through forty or so treats in a session. The session should be separated by at least twenty minutes and can be done three to eight times a day. Eventually, you can play this game with the dog’s regular kibble as rewards or as an adjunct to the hand feeding challenge.You can even include items that are toys that your dog loved at first and now thinks is boring. Yuck it up with different items each time you play and your dog will be zooming with the new stuff.


Building Confidence - Help your cowardly canine build confidence, continued          

         

Yea Hah! Now your dog should be wagging his tail and getting excited when you start getting “stuff” out for him to interact with during the exercise. If your dog is fearful or apprehensive about a specific item (toenail cutters are usually a good bet), include it in the items next time you play and reward the dog for choosing that item with his foot. If that piñata you brought home from Mexico is a scary dragon to your dog, include it another time to build your dog’s confidence with this scary item.Vacuum cleaners can be added to the group of interesting things. By encouraging your dog that “braver is better” you help to build

Instinctive Behavior Builds Confidence If your dog finds the six interesting things too difficult you can work on another exercise. Rewarding behavior (any behavior that is even slightly appropriate) builds confidence as well. Count out ten treats and reward your dog for ten different movements—an ear flick, a blink, breathing, wagging his tail, taking a step with his front left foot, with his right rear foot, turning his head, whatever he offers freely. Slowly and gradually reward only one behavior, moving a foot for example, or taking a step backward, and slowly shape the behavior by rewarding it. Try to be able to get for of ten treats in twenty seconds. The more your dog is moving the better. If your dog is wonder dog and offers something like a spin, c/t only that behavior until there is no hesitation between eating the treat and offering the behavior again, you are ready to put it on cue. If you don’t know how to put the behavior on cue, give us a call or an email to find out how. Many of the behaviors dog’s offer, like spinning, can be used to your advantage. Some of our clients use the spin behavior to have their dog dry off their feet on a rainy day. Be creative with your dog and enjoy the interaction. Watch specific parts of the body and do not stare at his eyes, as this will shut a dog down in a heartbeat if he is anxious. See how many “back up” steps your dog can do in a row. Reward instinctive behaviors and your dog’s confidence will grow. This is called “body shaping”. 101 Things to do with a Cardboard Box This builds creativity in dogs and is an excellent exercise to do on a rainy day or a day when your dog will be unable to exercise sufficiently for the day. I often say there are two ways to tire out a dog—work their bodies for thirty minutes and

wear out your rotator cuff throwing a ball or work their minds for ten minutes. Get out a cardboard box, yummy treats and a clicker; c/t your dog for any interaction with the box. Do not lure the behavior. If your dog stands there dumbfounded, you should just start behaving interested in the box. Get the dog’s curiosity up and reward that. Looking at the box is a start and is a reward-worthy behavior. Slowly and gradually build your criteria by waiting the dog out for different behaviors with the box. There really isn’t a wrong here (except maybe urinating on the box or chewing on it). Let the dog climb in, around, jump over, and even stand on the box. Let him push it around the room with his nose. See if he can stand with only one rear foot in the box. From time to time move on to new interactions with the box by changing which direction the box is in, bottom up, on it’s side, etc. This exercise is much more difficult for “cross-over” dogs who have been trained with other methods as they are used to being told what to do rather than puzzling it out for themselves, just use your rewards to keep the dog going and using his mind. See how creative your dog can be, I bet he will find something to do with the box you never considered. We even had a dog put himself in the box and close the flaps, and one dog crawled under the box and hid his entire body. Building his creativity sends the message that he is a wonderful dog who makes fantastic decisions. Isn’t that what we all crave. Be forewarned, that the box game will result in a dog that tires to interact with ANY Cardboard box (even months or years later) when you a trying to pack up Christmas gifts to sent to Boise, so you should be mindful and lock up the dog when you need to use a box so you don’t accidentally ship him to your sister. If you see a behavior you just love, shape for only that behavior and put it o cue. During the next session, move on and try to find something else the dog can do with the box, This is great fun for owner and dog and frankly, will make even the most dark day sparkle. Eventually, all of these exercises can be done in many environments (even in the car sitting in the driveway or a parking lot). Work on these exercises in areas where your dog formerly lacked confidence and you will go a long way toward building his “power” in these situations and lowering his anxiety. © September 2004  Tina M. Spring Van Why                             All rights reserved.


www.showdays.info


alan@ramblix.fsnet.co.uk

www.staffordbook.com


Why the S*#T hits the fan!

I think it necessary to remind ourselves what can be passed to other dogs via feces;

by Erika Pardy

Round worm – a parasite that can, if not treated, kill young puppies, causes lung damage, blindness, epilepsy.

I moved to an island a few weeks ago, brought my two dogs with me and aptly set out to find the best place to walk them. What I found was amazing! There were numerous trails and paths that were dog friendly and both the dogs and I were quite pleased to have such a vast trail system to enjoy. I set out for our early morning walk on one path in particular one day and took in the fresh air and the pleasant sound of singing birds. It was such a pretty path with a brook running all the way along the side of it and woods on the opposite side, playgrounds with jungle gyms along the way and beautiful mini bridges that crossed the brook at various points to take you back to civilization. The sad part to this was that almost immediately out of the gate, I narrowly avoided stepping in a pile of dog doodoo, then another and yet another. I was appalled by the amount of dog feces on that single path. It was a city designated path that was beautifully designed, paved and lined EVERY 50 ft with garbage cans AND doggie bags! I was disturbed and began to wonder why, with such conveniences so close at hand, people would intentionally allow their dogs to foul a public path and not stoop and scoop? Surely dog people understand the importance of hygiene, how dog diseases are spread and how easy it could be to prevent them simply by picking up the offending product. Not to mention how incredibly nasty it would be for the children, bike riders, elderly people or anyone else trying to enjoy the same rights, if they were to end up with poop on their shoes, toys, or bicycle wheels.

Hook worm – a nasty blood sucking parasite that is difficult to detect and can cause serious health issues and can eventually kill a dog. Whipworm – Another hard to detect blood sucking parasite that causes severe anemia and eventually death. Parvo – life threatening and critical, causing severe diarrhoea and dehydration and is extremely painful. Distemper – Also life threatening, causes severe neurological disease Giardia – Not necessarily life threatening but causes diarrhea, cramping and other problems and is nearly impossible to detect and treat. Coccidia- Again can kill small puppies and create serious health issues in adults. These diseases are not limited to dogs but also can be transferred to humans, parasites that can be transferred to humans through the feces of animals, particularly dogs can cause IBD, cramping, blindness, anemia and more. Some diseases associated with animal feces include; Campylobacteriosis- a bacterial infection that causes diarrhea in humans Salmonellosis- the most common bacterial infection transmitted to humans from animals. Symptoms include fever, muscle aches, headache, vomiting, and diarrhea. Toxocarisis- roundworms transmitted from animals to humans. Symptoms include vision loss, rash, fever, or cough.


Why the S*#T hits the fan! by Erika Pardy, continued I think it is important to point out that the public path that I have been referring to is not an isolated incident nor is it limited to ignorant pet owners. Unfortunately even the professional dog community is at fault. I have been to numerous canine events where handlers, trainers, dog walkers, groomers and others in the field have been just as blatant about cleaning up after their pets, openly allowing their dogs to defecate on public property and not cleaning it up. This is unacceptable as we , the professionals, are responsible for setting a good example to others. More and more cities and towns are less enthusiastic about hosting dog events in their area because of the mess left behind from irresponsible pet owners. Hotels and motels no longer want to allow dogs on their premises, and parks, beaches and other public places no longer allow dogs. It isn’t that they haven’t tried, they have. They’ve supplied garbage cans, bags and other tools but we let them down. I remember when I was younger that nearly every hotel was happy to host a dog show or other doggie event. Now you are lucky if you have a handful of those same hotels. I remember being outside of one such hotel at the doogie ‘spot’. The Hotel went out of their way to install a designated ‘spot’ to exercise your dogs. They had supplied a garbage can, disposable doggy bags and a scooper so you didn’t even have to bend over. Sadly there was still more feces left on the ground IN FRONT of the garbage can that ever made it inside the can! Dogs may be gaining popularity as important members of our family from a marketing perspective but they are gaining notoriety with the public. Which, under the circumstances, is a little pathetic since almost every household has one! So even though the pet industry is booming and playing us like a deck of cards when it comes to catering to our pets as ‘people’, the bureaucrats in charge of parks and rec or tourism are cringing at the thought of dogs in public places. What do we need to do to maintain and regain our rights to bring dogs to public places?

CLEAN UP AFTER YOU PETS!

EDUCATE others to not only the health issues in doing so but the effects of not doing so Let’s show the world that our dogs have a right to be with us wherever we go! We wouldn’t let our children soil public areas so why on earth would we let our pets.

A student of Animal Behavior/Nutrition and Alternative Medicine since 1990. She has studied at Guelph University in Canada, Glasgow University in Scotland and attended the British institute of Homeopathy. Erika has bred, raised and competed with many breeds of dogs in all aspects of dog sport. She currently consults on Animal Nutrition, Animal Behaviour and Alternative Health , including herbs and homeopathy and owns The Controversial Canine. She currently esides between Ontario and Newfoundland Canada


Typical Stafford Head Shapes


motoxgrl83@yahoo.com www.lbellestaffords.com

www.thecontroversialcanine.ca controversialcanine@gmail.com


nozac.hubery@googlemail.com


www.staffordwelfare.com

rescue@sbtca.com


laureen.williams43@ntlworld.com Merchandise also available at www.cafepress.com/thankdog


Flying Bricks by Belinda O’Shea Flyball is one of the major dog sports in Australia. It is raced in most of our major states and is exciting for both dog and handler! In Australia we run flyball outdoors on

much more reserved, she jumps twice the height she needs to and loves to tell the other dogs “Over, over, over” while she waits for her turn. They both have one thing in common

grass. We are exposed to all weather conditions and tend to hold our comps during the warmer months of the year.

however, they both LOVE to flyball, and afterwards they love to come home and sleep on the couch and cuddle up to us!

We hold comps at both public events and on club grounds, and the staffords are true crowd pleasers! There aren’t a lot of Staffords competing in flyball here. At

At first other breed owners can be vary of the Stafford running in the lane next to them. Lets face it Staffords can be misunderstood, and people often have strong opinions

our last National in Canberra there were only 5 Staffords competing out of hundreds of dogs, but they are perfect for

on them. The Staffords running in flyball in Australia are true ambassadors for our breed. They run well, they are

it. They have huge amounts of enthusiasm and drive and they love to please their owners. A lot of Stafford owners are worried about their dog running relay with other dogs

focused on their job, not on the other dogs, and they are proving to both the general public at events like Royal shows, and to other flyballers that these dogs really are a

of various breeds, however if you build them up to it slowly, work on their focus on you and effectively neutralise them

great all round breed, . This is especially important in my state, who have just passed new horrific Breed Specific

to other dogs they can be superstars. Flyball also keeps dogs stimulated and tires them out making them less prone to destructive behaviours at home.

Legislation which affects so many of our beautiful bull breeds.

I personally compete with both of my Staffords, Eddie – Kimbastaff Heart O Glass CCD FMX, ET and ‘Molly’ –

something both stimulating and exhausting for your dogs, find your local flyball club and give it a go, you will meet

Saracen River of Faith CCD FMCh. ET - ‘Eddie’ is completely mad. He runs like a bull in a china shop and doesn’t let anything stop him. Molly on the other hand is

some fantastic people, form great new friendships and keep your dogs fit, happy and healthy.

If you have a Stafford and would to get out there, and try

Eddie- photo by Paul Loughnan

Molly - photo by Paul Loughnan


http://www.staffordarchive.com


w w w. s t a f f i e s o n l i n e . o r g . u k

http://www.staffie-rescue.org


Jim & Lynn Caswell info@wavemakerstaffords.com www.wavemakerstaffords.com


The Stud Dog by Clare Lee At the club meeting prior to the Belfast Show last year, I noticed that a lot of interest was engendered in what I can only call the ‘management of a Stud Dog’. The question that always comes up is ‘what IS a good Stud Dog’. Seldom do you hear a person ask ‘who is the Dam of your pup?’ - it is always ‘who is the Sire’. A pup is, in fact, the product of both its parents but too often we forget it takes two to tango, which means the stud dog tends to get all the praise but also all the condemnation when things go wrong. Nevertheless stud dogs are important if only because a bitch has a limited opportunity of producing goods. When you are looking for a mate for her it is important to have some evidence to help you make your choice. In this respect a ‘good’ stud dog must be the one from whom you can see a consistancy of type, that is after a few litters you can see the same characteristics appearing in a number of his progeny, even when coming from bitches of different breeding. If these are characteristics you need to improve your line, then you must feel fairly confident that this is the stud dog for you. Even if these characteristics are not what you think you need for your bitch, at least the dog has given you a chance to make a reasoned judgement. The worst kind of stud dog for any breed is one that produces wide variations - the dog does not stamp his type.You might get a flyer but it could be the one star amongst a load of variables, and is unlikely to get you further forward in the next generation. The second consideration for a ‘good stud dog’ is the way he performs. Very often there are stories about a dog being ‘no good’, a waste of time because

he isn’t interested in the bitches. Sometimes, these stories originate from owners of competitive stud dogs and should therefore, like most rumours in the dog game, be treated with a certain amount of suspicion. The chief reason for a failed mating is actually that the owner of the bitches take them on the wrong day - but that is a subject on its own. There is, of course, a case to be made out for careful education of a stud dog in order to make him as keen as possible and so that, given everything else being right, he is able to put in a good performance.

“...THE STUD DOG TENDS TO GET ALL THE PRAISE BUT ALSO ALL THE CONDEMNATION WHEN THINGS GO WRONG.” The trouble in this respect is that damage can be done quite easily to the future stud dog in his infancy, before anyone is sure that he will be needed as a stud dog.Young animals play sex games, there is no other way to describe this. They will do this before they are sexually mature and its part of their learning process. Now, while I can see that it might not go down well with the family if Macho pup is practising his fore-play all over the living room carpet while you are entertaining your Aunty to tea, I think you should distract him; calmly separate him from the other dogs, rather than giving him a cuff around the head. I can’t tell you how often we have had owners who I KNOW have let their young puprun with his Mother in full season at say three to four months, simply pushing him off and cuffing him when he

mounted her, tearing their hair out in bewilderment a few months later when they want to mate him and can’t understand why he gets off the bitch every time they approach. So I say distract them, or close your eyes but never give a perspective stud dog the idea that what he is doing is wrong. The one cocidil I will add is that I will not put up with any performance up the leg on a human being. Fortunately, compared with other breeds we have owned, Staffords are not, in our experience, prone to this behaviour. But if it occurs we stop it straight away. In our household we are not party to this modem ‘we are all part of the same herd’ philosophy. We are a human family who happen to have invited a dog family to share our habitat but the rules they follow in relationship to us are different and separate from those they might follow in relation to each other. The next big stage is at what age should you allow your dog to be used at stud. This is not necessarily the same age at which it is possible for them to mate. Generally, we would hope to find a mate for a prospective Stud Dog at around nine to ten months old. Then perhaps one or two more until the age of say fifteen months or so. Really it seems to me that the most important thing is not how young they have their first bitch but that they do not have too many before they are fully matured. Unfortunately a bright new star in the ring is often much sought after at stud at an early age. If you over-use your young dog they almost invariably run out of steam when they are older and this is especiallysad because we are all much more likely to know what the older dog is likely to produce than the


The Stud Dog by Clare Lee, tyro. The other important thing about the first bitch or bitches that a dog has is that they are preferably matron bitches, who know the score and are likely to be more co-operative. However co-operative she is, it is a good idea at this early stage to hold the bitch for the final mating and get the dog used to being handled. he will surely get a bitch one day who is ‘naughty’ and if he has always been used to the idea that he mates a bitch who is being held, it will hold you in good stead at the more difficult matings. Dogs are creatures of habit and quickly learn a routine. It is therefore an idea to follow a similar pattern for all the dog’s matings. This pattern will depend very much on your circumstances and the character of your dog. It is general policy that the bitch visits the dog, and that the overall control of the service is laid down by the stud dog owner. Following a set routine has advantages I have known a stud dog who always performed on a special mat - the mere sight of this mat being taken out of the cupboard, immediately revved him up and he was ‘raring to go’ even before he had set eyes on the bitch.

continued

it results in the bitch releasing more eggs.Yes, I know we have had many people who baulk at this idea ‘she’ll murder him, she’s a real fire-ball’ etc. The fact is that however fiery a bitch is, her over-riding instinct at this time will be to get herself mated (presuming of course that we have the correct day!) She may want to kill him afterwards, but after a token resistance her instincts will take over, and if they really don’t you should be asking yourself ‘Why not?’ A good male Stafford will ‘ride the punches’ he does put his foot down it will only be to make his dominance clear and should encourage the bitch to be more complient. Once they have had a run around we take them inside and the bitch’s head is held while the actual mating takes place. This is often

“DOGS ARE CREATURES OF HABIT AND QUICKLY LEARN A ROUTINE..”

necessary because a Stafford bitch who decides to take a biteat a dog can do him quite a bit of damage. We are not, in general, in favour of muzzles, We have always followed the routine of sedatives, etc. There are breeds of dogs allowing the dog and bitch to run freely where the bitches have to be held in ‘mating machines’ in order to be served together for a few minutes prior to by the dogs, it strikes us as significant actual mating. We have been fortunate that these same breeds are notorious in having fully fenced gardens or for producing poor mothers who e.g. paddocks which have made this will quite happily eat their young. Such possible. We have been brought up to disatrous results often start from small believe that this was a good idea to beginnings - generations of force mating relax the bitch and facilitate an easier reluctant bitches who nature probably mating. Recently reading an article in a dog magazine I was interested to learn never intended to be mothers. So I don’t think stud dog owners should be that there has been some research which suggests that allowing this kind of too proud to say ‘enough’s enough! I don’t want my dog to mate this bitch.’ fore-play has a very real benefit in that Some handlers of stud dogs feel it

necessary to investigate a bitch internally beore mating. Personally, I would not let anyone stick anything up my bitch at this or any other time, unless it was a vet. No matter how often you wash your hands there is always the chance of introducing infection. Secondly, there is also the possibility of damaging the bitch. Our vet was recently actively encouraging a breeder (not in Staffords I must add) to sue a stud dog owner because of a lesion which appeared inside his bitch following the stud dog owners amateur ‘internal examination’ prior to mating. I don’t know the outcome but it could have been an expensive experience for the stud dog owner. People seem happiest with matings that result in a tie - this is the most satisfactory result but there have been many good-producing dogs that rarely tie bitches. Once a dog has entered a bitch it must be regarded as a mating and the bitches owner is not then free to go to another dog in search of a proper tie. KC rules state that where two dogs have served a bitch on the same season, both dogs must appear on the papers as the sire(s) of any resultant litter, unless scientific evidence can be produced identifying the sire. Some owners of stud dogs like to administer antiseptic after a mating in order to reduce the chance of infection to their dog, which he might pass on to the next bitch he mates. Any stud dog with an obvious infection should not be used at stud until this has cleared up. If your dog has an infection antiseptic cream can and should be acquired from your vet, but I doubt if he would suggest this as a thing to be regularly administered. Dogs have their own


The Stud Dog by Clare Lee, natural resistance to infection and you could very well interfere with this if you are constantly dousing him with antiseptic. Leaving sufficient time - at least 48 hours between matings - will minimise the possibility of disease being spread. Sometimes, in spite of your good planning, two bitches - perhaps one is ready earlier and one later than expected, will present themselves within the 48 hours.You should then be fair to the second owner and explain the position, giving them the chance to change their mind and come next season, or outside the 48 hours, if they wish. Some stud dog owners are, frankly, too greedy to do this and others are too afraid of disappointing the bitch’s owner. In the long run a sensible owner will recognise that you are doing your best by all concerned in being honest with them. Some owners like to have more than one mating. Really this is probably gilding the lily and if you don’t want to have this you are within your rights to refuse. Multiple matings may cause problems at the other end when you have a whelping date covering many days. The stud fee is a charge for the service, not the result. Most people however will enter into a ‘gentleman’s agreement that follows for a free mating if the bitch misses. Stud fees are a bone of contention with some people. Some now believe that the fee should equal the price of a pup. Since I believe that Stafford puppies are grossly over-priced at the moment I cannot agree with this. Frankly it depends on what you expect to get out of your stud dog. If you are going to take all comers, and many of these will be coming because they want to make a little extra money for themselves, then

concluded

charge what you can get. If, on the other hand, you are anxious for your dog to produce some good, well-reared animals then select only the best owners and bitches and in that case there will be some you would gladly give the stud for free (and you probably will) because you will be so excited to see just what will result in the litter. Signing, and passing over the ‘green form’ should only occur after the stud fee has been paid. Other agreements e.g. exchanging a puppy in lieu of a fee, paying by installments etc. should be made clear before the event, since even with the best will in the world, these all too frequently lead to misunderstanding and acrimony.You are probably better off claiming the Stud Fee, looking at the resulting litter and then offering to buy a chosen puppy back. An offer ofpayment of the Stud Fee by installments or when the puppies are sold would make one question the ability of the bitch’s owner to have the resources to cope with an emergency or even to raise the puppies to the highest possible standards. It must be said that nowhere is there more trust involved than in the question of matings. You trust that the person has not already been to another dog (may be even his own unbeknown to him, has got her first) and you trust that he will keep her under guard after mating. Often in this respect it is the nicest, most inexperienced owners who get you into trouble this way. They think that a second mating doesn’t count or that the bitch was out of the garden too short a time for anything to have happened, etc. You can protect your stud dog in some ways. Never give out pedigrees with your dogs Registration Number on it.

Ask to see the bitch’s registration papers if you don’t know the owners personally.Your stud dog should have had his health testing done and you are within your rights to expect the same of the bitch, these details are shown on the registration certificates now. Try to take a look at the KC Breed Records Supplement if you have a well-used dog. The KC keep everything on computer now and you can send for your stud dogs Record, which will give you all the details of his registered litters and even the name of the person they have been sold to. See the litters if you possibly can. Having a stud dog can be a drag - then perhaps the mercenary approach is all you have. But if you choose your owners carefully a mating can turn into a full-scale party, you can talk about for years to come. In this respect I have just been reminded of a friends experience, sending a bitch up to the late lamented Harry Latham. Harry took the bitch from a show at Olympia to mate to his red dog in Manchester, keeping her for some 12 days until friend Tom could get up from London to collect her. Arriving at 6pm Tom said he was met at the station taken home for a gargantuan meal, ate and drank his way through the night and after just a couple of hours sleep, on the way to catch the 5am train back he remembered to ask about the stud fee . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . “would £8.00 do all right?” said Harry! This article originally appeared in print in the 1995 Issue #3 of the Northern Ireland Staffordshire Bull Terrier Club newsletter and has been reproduced with kind permission from its author, Ms. Clare Lee (Constones)


w w w. c a f e p re s s . c o m / t h a n k d o g

jo@scruffydogs.co.uk OR ProSBTHealth@aol.com

easbtc@thedoghouse89.freeserve.co.uk


www.sbtcv.org.au

http://forum.bullbreedsonline.com


Send your letters to editor@thestaffordknot.com or - Send your Q&A question to ASK TSK

Letters To The Editor Letter to the Editor: Is there any subject that can create more controversy than "Judging?" Most of realize that judging is totally SUBjective. One judge's opinion can be totally contrary to another's.  But now we're starting to see a huge chasm among the judges: those whose opinions are somewhat wellfounded on the breed standard; those who are INCOMPETENT (meaning don't have a clue, don't wanna know & aren't gonna change); and those who are down-right INCAPABLE.    I'm thinking we need to start having a breed-involved movement here. I propose that we start with those judges showing a definite INCAPABILITY to judge our dogs. Its time we  alert the AKC, the show superintendents and sponsoring kennel clubs  when our judges are disoriented in the ring. Questions from a judge like, "What do we do next?" after judging Winner's Bitch need to be addressed.  Judges who try to give BOB & BOS to the SAME SEX need to be examined.  Judges who come to the show looking like they've taken a fall and not received first aid, or clothing in huge disrepair, and how about those who can't count? You know,  the ones that hold the Winners class without all the class entries in the ring or CAN'T see across the ring or the other exhibitors IN the ring for a classs?  And don't get me started on the ones that can't properbly examine a dog 'cause they can't walk around without help.   I'm all for writing letters. Lets weed out those obviously INCAPABLE and then we can't go to those incompetent and uncaring.    That's what I think. How 'bout you? Kari Ketchum Qwik n Thik Staffordshire Bull Terriers San Diego


http://www.psbtc.org

staffordtimes@psbtc.org

Issue out now!


The Stafford Knot Brags, Shows, Litters Send us your BRAGS, Litter Announcements, Seminar and Show announcements and we can post them here. Be sure to fill out the BRAGS form found HERE

MANXIC ANS LITTER ANNOUNCEMENT EMAIL Araidh Jacques Au Boite x Zoellies Brave Angel ‘Molly’ our UK import bitch was flown back and bred to the UK dog of our choice and we have 7 beautiful puppies from this mating

Owner: Yas & Liz Parr L2-HGA & HC Clear by parentage, CERF 2012

WAVEMAKER NEW TITLE EMAIL UWP UKC GrCH Wavemaker Hula Popper, CGC CA CAA CAX (Sabahouse Touch of Class at Zoellies x UKC GrCH AKC CH UWP Cazomic Look Busy, URO1, CA CAA CGC)

‘Hula’ is now the FIRST Staffordshire Bull Terrier to earn the COURSING ABILITY EXCELLENT title - running 600 yards for all 25 passes. Thank you to G.A.N.G. for helping to make this possible for the ‘Screaming Staffy Bullet’. Clear by parentage L2-HGA, HC - PHPV unaffected, OFA Cardiac, CERF 2011 Bred & Owned by Lynn & Jim Caswell


Wanted Samples for PHPV/PPSC Research. If you own or have bred a dog diagnosed with either of these eye conditions, could you help by supplying mouth swabs from the affected dog plus its parents and litter-mates.

Any PHPV positives found in litter screenings are not reported in the Breeds Record Supplement, nor are any cases of PPSC - hence this appeal.

If sufficient samples from affected cases can be obtained, it is hoped that research to determine the inheritance of both conditions may be commenced, possibly leading eventually to DNA tests similar to those available for HC and L-2-HGA.

A copy of the eye test certificate and a copy of the dogs pedigree would also be appreciated. All samples and information will of course be confidential just in case anyone has any concern's about that.

If you can help with this and thus help the Stafford , can you please contact one of the following who can supply swabs and any information required.

Diane Taylor - 01670 823635 email - taylor@niatona.fsnet.co.uk Lesley McFadyen - 01205 871762 email - easbtc@thedoghouse89.freeserve.co.uk Archie Bryden - 01772 715807 email - archie.bryden@yahoo.co.uk Many thanks for your co-operation.


The Stafford Knot wishes to provide the following information for your convenience. TSK encourages health testing of all Staffordshire Bull Terriers, especially those used for breeding purposes and/or performance events. The testing is made available to be used as a tool to eliminate certain diseases from a breeding program. Used wisely, this can be accomplished. The following testing information is provided as a service to you, however should not be used as the only health checks your Stafford receives. There are many more health issues to be considered when breeding dogs, caring for dogs and when looking to buy a purebred dog. As always, please seek the advice of your personal veterinary specialists for your day-to-day needs of your dogs. Thank you!

* * * Please note - a CERF or PHPV test done by a canine ophthalmologist is NOT the same test as the DNA test for HC - BOTH tests should be carried out * * * ***PLEASE send in your test results for the databases. Accurate records are valuable to the breed*** Remember, if you choose to breed from a carrier you must test the entire resulting litter to determine clears & carriers. Thus if you choose to keep a carrier from that litter, the same must be done for each subsequent litter resulting from breeding carriers. If you sell carrier pups, please consider spay/neuter so that more carriers are not produced. With the advent and ease of genetic testing many of these diseases could be eliminated by only breeding clear to clear. To use a known carrier requires an extra step of responsibility. There is no excuse to breed an untested dog.

======================================= Testing Facility For L2-Hga & HC

Testing Facility For L2-Hga Onl y

Animal Health Trust

Ca nine Genetic Diseases - University Of Mo.

Lanwades Park, Kentford New Market, Suffolk CB87UU

321 Connaway Hall Columbia, Missouri 65211-5120 USA

Phone: 01638 751000

Phone: 573-884-3712 

F ax: 01638 750410

F ax: 573-884-5414

Ema il

We bsite

Direct Link

Ema il

We bsite

Direct Link

Testing Facility For HC in USA:

Other labs offering L-2-HGA test in Europe:

http://www.animalgenetics.us/Canine/HC.htm

France www.antagene.com Czech Republic www.genomia.cz Germany www.laboklin.de / www.laboklin.co.uk

======================================= Testing Facility For Hip, Elbows, Patella and Cardiac Certifications *

Testing Facility For Eye Certifications* Canine Eye Registration Foundation (CERF)

Orthopedic Foundation For Animals (OFA) 2300 E Nifong Boulevard Columbia, Missouri, 65201-3806 USA Phone: 573-442-0418  Email

1717 Philo Rd P O Box 3007 Urbana, IL 61803-3007 USA Phone: 217-693-4800

Fax: 217-693-4801

Fax: 573-875-5073 Website

*Note: A Board Certified Cardiologist must perform all Cardiac exams.   A qualified licensed Veterinarian can provide X-Ray films for hips, elbows and Patella.

Email

Website

*Note: A Board Certified Canine Ophthalmologist must perform all CERF exams. CERF exams are annual exams for breeding stock.


The Stafford Knot

Featured Rescues

Maggie - Female - CT Maggie is an adorable 3 yr old, tiny little girl in need of a home! Maggie weighs 35 lbs, and is happy to be picked up and carried around! Maggie is a total love and just wants to cuddle!! Maggie loves to be with people, however she really needs to be the only animal in the home. She came from Tennessee area. We know that she lived a terrible existence there chained outside and forcibly breed numerous times. When she arrived at the rescue, she loved people and was horribly dog aggressive. Working with her, she is now much more tolerant of other dogs if they don't invade her space. We have also found out that she likes big quiet male dogs. But, she needs to be kept away from little dogs and cats. She is quite mellow. She loves belly rubs and is very happy to hang out in her crate/run and not cause any problems. This little girl deserves a good home. She is in Norwalk, CT. Watch Maggie's Video Here: http://bullybreedrescueinc.org/Videos.php She is with: http://bullybreedrescueinc.org/Dogs-For-Adoption.php . CONTACT

===================================== Pepper - Female - NY Pepper is about five years old. She’s sweet, smart, good in the house and loves everyone. She’s not particularly dog aggressive, but she’s not exactly dog tolerant either, so she should probably be in a one-dog home. She loves to sit on the couch or on a chair, right next to her people, she gets excited when she meets and greets, but she settles down quickly. In other words, she’s a typical Stafford. She’ll make someone a great pet. We really cannot believe she is still in a foster home! There is a great video of her here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1F3VvK5YFY&feature=email

CONTACT

===================================== Zorro - Male - Arizona Zorro is a white with red male that is microchipped, tattooed and up to date on all shots. His family no longer have the resources to give him the life he needs. They have had him since he was 8 months old, from a known breeder. He is house-trained, crate-trained, he eats the raw meat and bones diet currently. He loves running, playing fetch, tug-a-war, going for walks and cuddling. He loves children, and lives with three (8 months old, 2 years and 4 years old). Zorro needs to be properly introduced to other dogs and then gets along great. 

CONTACT


The Stafford Knot

Featured Rescues

PLEASE consider rescuing a Stafford needing a home before purchasing a puppy. SBTCA always has wonderful dogs who have been screened and are looking for permanent homes. All the applications can be found on the rescue pages of the National club website. We list these dogs as a courtesy. The dogs are NOT here with us. They are in different parts of the country. Thank you for considering rescue. Donations and advertisements in TSK benefit Stafford rescue.

===================================== Bella - Female - AZ Bella is a black brindle with white female that is spayed, microchipped, tattooed and up to date on all shots. Her family no longer have the resources to give her the life she needs. They have had her since she was 4 months old, from a known breeder. She is house-trained, crate-trained, she eats the raw meat and bones diet currently. She loves sleeping, eating, playing fetch, tug-a-war, going for walks and cuddling. Bella loves children, and lives with three (8 months old, 2 years and 4 years old). But she is dog aggressive.

CONTACT

===================================== Denver - Female - N. CA Denver's owenrs have lost their home and cannot keep her. She is an older Stafford, born in 1998, who would do best as the only dog. Denver loves to play fetch with the ball, she also loves all people and especially children. She has been to obedience class, and is very eager to please. She loves getting scratched. She loves to take walks, but since she is older, she does not need long walks. She also loves to eat. She is a very loving dog. She is not food aggressive but a little dog aggressive. She needs a final place to call her own in her last days. Please consider giving Denver a place to call home. CONTACT

===================================== Grady - Male - PA Sadly, Grady was adopted last year by a wonderful man, who loved him so much who has been diagnosed with a terminal illness and has only a couple of months. So awful. He will hold onto Grady as long as he can care for him. For a dog like Grady, his fosters are willing to drive up to 4-5 hours for his placement.  We would ask the potential home to come visit him here, at his foster home, first, but would then happily place him anywhere in Pennsylvania, most of NY state, NJ, MD, DE, and much of VA...   Grady is very dog aggressive and also cat aggressive (typical prey drive), so he needs to be an only pet.  He does fine with little kids, although he's a little bit of a goober and forgets they are so smallHe's great with people, like most staffies, and is mostly a lower energy snuggly lap dog when given the chance!

CONTACT


The Stafford Knot

Stud Gallery

The Stafford Knot lists health tested stud dogs in the gallery, however, it is up to you to verify this testing by asking to see the certificates for each test if they are not made available here for download. We have screened this to the best of our ability, but cannot guarantee dogs listed have been tested. PLEASE ask for copies of certificates before using dogs at stud for the health and the future of our breed. Thank you. Stud Gallery Ads run annually - Form to advertise in Stud Gallery is found

HERE

STILL TIME TO RENEW FOR 2012!

======================================= DayDream Ch. Slam Dance, CGC (Imp UK) “Nigel” DNA - AKC - #P24384 L2-HGA, HC, PHPV Unaffected, OFA/PennHip Hips, Patella, CERF http://www.offa.org/display.html?appnum=678935#animal daydreamsbts@cox.net www.daydreamsbt.com Tel 530-306-0305 Frozen semen available to health tested bitches only. More photos of Nigel available. Health documents available by request.

======================================= Absolute BIS BISS CH Belnore Dream Keeper OFA ‘Beau’ AKC DNA - V426729 Clear of L2-HGA, HC, OFA/PennHip Hips, OFA/PennHip Elbows, Patella, OFA Cardiac - documentation available upon request AbsoluteAST@aol.com www.absoluteamericanstaffordshireterrier.com Tel 337-255-3508

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The Stafford Knot

Stud Gallery

The Stafford Knot lists health tested stud dogs in the gallery, however, it is up to you to verify this testing by asking to see the certificates for each test if they are not made available here for download. We have screened this to the best of our ability, but cannot guarantee dogs listed have been tested. PLEASE ask for copies of certificates before using dogs at stud for the health and the future of our breed. Thank you. Stud Gallery Ads run annually - Form to advertise in Stud Gallery is found

HERE

STILL TIME TO RENEW FOR 2012!

Moonstruck Moonstruck Blue Asher, TT “Asher” L2-HGA, HC, PHPV Unaffected jlhellr@me.com www.moonstruckstaffords.com 301-261-4202 "Available to Heath Tested Bitches with Correct Stafford Temperaments Only" Health documents available by request

======================================= Moonstruck CH Moonstruck The Stamler Express, TT “Stamler” L2-HGA, HC, PHPV Unaffected jjlhellr@me.com www.moonstruckstaffords.com 301-261-4202 "Available to Heath Tested Bitches with Correct Stafford Temperaments Only" Health documents available by request

Concluded on next page


Elvid Ch/U-Ch Heaven's Warrior De El Doradostaff “Bruce” L2-HGA and HC Clear, PHPV Unaffected, CERF, OFA Hips Good, OFA Elbows, Patellas, & Cardiac Normal, AKC DNA - V615701 lizz.kester@gmail.com http://www.elividstaff.com "Health documents available by request. Available at stud to approved, health-tested bitches only."

======================================= The Stafford Knot is an independent publication and not affiliated with any specific breed club. TSK is a collaborative effort from like minded Stafford enthusiasts whose common goal is to support the health testing of purebred Staffords. We reserve the right to approve or disapprove any material submitted. All material on this site is copyright protected & cannot be used unless indicated without the written consent of

The Stafford Knot Thank you. Contact Us

Merchandise now available - proceeds benefit Stafford rescue worldwide!

CLICK to shop and donate to SBT Rescue!


The Stafford Knot

Classified Advertising

The Stafford Knot is offering classified advertising of goods and services which are dog related. Ads are limited to 20 words, no images. For larger ads please consider gallery advertising. The Stafford Knot cannot be held responsible for any items sold through this page. All sales are between seller and purchaser. TSK makes no warranties either written or implied. Information on how to advertise in TSK classifieds can be found HERE TIME TO RENEW!

===================================== Bull Breeds Online Your online forum for all Bull Breed lovers and canine enthusiasts! www.bullbreedsonline.com ‘Like� us on Face Book

Scentsy Wickless Candles - safe for pets and children, environmentally friendly. Contact Lori Divine, 678-516-7567 http://divinelori.scentsy.us, lori_divine@yahoo.com Avail in UK

Limited Editions FitPaws Canine Conditioning Equipment, Natural Treats + Chews, Toys, Tugs, Collars. Unique accessories for your unique pets. www.limitededitions1.com limitededitions1@verizon.net

Thankdog - All Breeds Equal Help fight BSL promote responsible dog ownership. T-shirts, Calendars, Stickers, & more. Proceeds benefit Stafford causes. thankdog@gmail.com www.cafepress.com/Thankdog

Young Living Experience therapeutic benefits of essential oils for your family - pets too! Use Independent Distributor Referral #1166695 CLICK for more info

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The Stafford Knot

Breeder Directory

The Stafford Knot cannot be held responsible for the breeders listed below. Please do your homework and ask to see health certificates, discuss terms and decide whether the Stafford is the correct breed for you prior to purchasing a puppy. Remember, Stafford rescues are also available and make be wonderful pets in the right homes! A Stafford is not the breed for everyone. Please be responsible dog owners and take responsibility for you and your dog in all situations. Contact us with questions.

We reserve the right to approve or disapprove any material submitted Form to advertise in Breeders Directory can be found HERE Alabama Cornerstone The Folmars Alabama http://www.cornerstonestaffords.net 205-966-8114 L2-HGA, HC

Georgia Wavemaker Staffords Jim & Lynn Caswell GA, USA EMAIL www.wavemakerstaffords.com 770-666-6121 L2-HGA, HC, Hips, Elbows, Patella, Cardiac, CERF

"Staffords that are exemplary in type & balance" “Naturally reared - Promoting health, exercise & the Breed Standard - Wavemaker Staffords....naturally” California Chavier Staffords Kim Washington-Smith Southern California EMAIL 213 - 760-9081 L2-HGA, HC, CERF

Illinois 1 of a Kind Staffords Andrew Currier Peoria Il EMAIL 309-691-7134 L2-HGA, HC, Hips, Elbows, Patella, Cardiac

"Breeding Staffords with Charm"

“Unequalled in type, balance, fitness & health”

California Gemini Kennel Beth Lloyd Southern California EMAIL www.angelfire.com/ca2/geminikennel L2-HGA, HC, Hips, Elbows, Patella, Cardiac, CERF

Maryland Hi-Impact Staffords (Reg) Rich Newberger Baltimore http://hiimpactstaffords.com 410-323-4141 L2-HGA, HC, PHPV, Hips, Elbows, Cardiac, CERF “Bred to standard not by design”

“From show dogs to GO dogs.” Georgia Ramstaff Staffords Angie & Kevin Beezley Georgia, USA EMAIL www.ramstaffkennels.com 770-888-5255 L2-HGA, HC, Hips, Elbows, Cardiac, CERF

Maryland Moonstruck Staffords Judy Heller Edgewater, MD 21037 EMAIL www.moonstruckstaffords.com 301-261-4202 L2-HGA, HC

“Ramstaff...focusing on the standard blend of bull & terrier with true stafford temperament...always”

Quality Staffordshire Bull Terriers of Correct Type & Temperament for Show, Performance & Companion "The Ultimate Nanny Dog”

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TIME TO RENEW FOR 2012! Michigan Blessings' Kennel Cathy Micallef Southeastern MI EMAIL www.blessingskennel.org 734-634-9328 L2-HGA, HC, Hips, Elbows, Patella, Cardiac, CERF “Wonderful companions with show & working potential!” Virginia Elvid Staffords Sterling, Virginia http://www.elividstaff.com EMAIL “Staffords that exemplify the Standard both in the home and show & performance rings"

Wisconsin MSLF Kennels Cindy Bundy EMAIL 262-857-9412 L2-HGA, HC, Hips, Elbows, CERF, Other “We strive to promote sound minds and bodies.”

Wellington, New Zealand Battleaxe Grant & Louise Blackwood DGLKBLACK@xtra.co.nz http://www.battleaxekennels.com 0064 478-9313  L2-HGA, HC, PHPV


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested. Thank you to all who have contributed to this Illustrated Breed Standard and to those who have given permission to use images of your dogs. Thank you to the photographers who have given permission to use the photos in this Illustrated Breed Standard. If we have missed anyone it was not intentional. No harm nor foul is meant. This is an educational tool only. ŠTSK 2012

Balance = Lack of Exaggeration


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.

"Non-conformity with these limits is a fault" Any departure from these limits should be considered a fault and the ‘SERIOUSNESS’ with which the fault should be regarded, should be in exact proportion to its DEGREE.


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.

Keeping in mind that the distance from withers to ground and the distance from withers to tail set should be equal - this means that the Stafford is NOT a true square breed - the points from forechest to buttock extends outside of these parameters making him a tad longer than tall

“Heights Being Related to Weights” Size, Proportion, Substance

Height at shoulder: 14 to 16 inches. Weight: Dogs, 28 to 38 pounds; bitches, 24 to 34 pounds, these heights being related to weights. Non-conformity with these limits is a fault. In proportion, the length of back, from withers to tail set, is equal to the distance from withers to ground.

Males 14”...... 28lbs 14 1/2”..30.45lbs 15”........32.85lbs 15 1/2”...35.5lbs 16” ....... 38lbs

Females 14” ........24lbs 14 1/2”...26.25lbs 15”.........28.80lbs 15 1/2”...31.31lbs 16”.........34lbs


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.

The Stafford Topline The topline is level from the withers to the croup The croup is located after the loin and at the point of the hip bone just in front of the sacrum where there is a slight drop to the tail set (2nd orange arrow) There should not be a severe drop at the croup

The withers are located where the vertebrae face the rear of the dog (between the shoulder blades) and end at the point they begin to change direction where there is also a noticable pad of muscle. There should not be a noticable dip behind the withers (1st orange arrow)

Toplines are designed to help the dog perform a particular function, in this case they must be agile enough to perform the job they were originally designed to do. In very fit dogs there will be muscle pads along either side of the spine. This should not be confused with a dip or roach in the topline. There is a very slight arch over a fairly short loin. The arch occurs over the unsupported-by-ribs portion of the topline (the loin). The strong, flexible loin contributes to the Stafford’s endurance. The topline must be correct or balance is not possible. Illustrations below taken from “The Staffordshire Bull Terrier Handbook” by John F. Gordon, 1951


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.

The Stafford Front Elbows tight against the body, showing no looseness, legs perpendicular to ground, dropping straight from the shoulder. The chest drops just to the elbow and no further. Well sprung but not barreled. Moderation is key - Not overdone but showing strength - too much rib spring will hinder efficient movement and too much depth of brisket only adds bulk and heaviness not conducive to agile and free movement. Not enough forechest or brisket weakens movement. The Stafford requires excellent balance to move freely.

Pinched and too narrow with weak pastern

Overloaded shoulder, chest drops below elbow, weak pastern

Bossy shoulder, lacking depth of chest, low on leg

Bossy shoulder, out at elbows, short leg, too thick, not balanced

Illustration at left taken from “The Staffordshire Bull Terrier Handbook” by John F. Gordon, 1951 - showing a correct Stafford front - “Legs reasonably straight in line from shoulders, showing no weakness at pasterns, from where the feet turn out a little.”


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.

The Stafford Foot is well padded & tight Illustration at right taken from “The Staffordshire Bull Terrier Handbook� by John F. Gordon, 1951

The feet should be well padded, strong and of medium size.


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.

The Stafford Gait Free, powerful and agile with economy of effort. Legs moving parallel when viewed from front or rear. Discernible drive from hind legs. If we do not know the mechanical factors involved in movement, our ideas are apt to be unsound. When viewed coming towards you there is no paddling, wading, circling, stilted movement or looseness. The front legs should block your view to the rear legs in parallel motion with effortless ease of movement. When the Stafford is moving away from you you should view its rear pads pushing off effortlessly. There should be decidedly no effort on the Staffords part to get his pads and body support under his center of gravity. Viewed from the side on the move you will see the tip of the front foot reaching the end of the muzzle. The foreleg must reach forward of the line of scapula then on the foot striking the ground, forward momentum would then see the scapula travel over the striking foot which then ends behind the center line of the scapula. Similarly with the rear foot strike and the line of the pelvis.

The Stafford is not expected to move like other terrier breeds. In order to be balanced all the time he is moving he has to place his front feet slightly under his body with each stride . This inward inclination must begin from the shoulder and never from the elbow. The front feet should never touch each other or cross in movement and any looseness in shoulder is highly undesirable. The gait must be light and jaunty with the feet skimming the ground without any wasted movement. The hind legs should drive strongly moving as much as possible parallel with each other. They should never touch or cross each other in movement. The Stafford on the move should show strength, agility and drive. The Stafford will appear extremely light and bouncy on his feet. This is caused by the width of the front assembly with a well developed rib cage , the lighter loin and slightly less width of rear. Also because of the lesser width at the rear, the hind legs although moving parallel will be just slightly inside the line of the front legs. A specimen that is loose in shoulder can be supported by his handler while on the stack however as soon as the dog becomes mobile any structural faults will become apparent. In the show ring, Staffords should be walked at a steady pace and not run. Always ask exhibitors to walk their Stafford on a loose lead. The Stafford is an efficient working machine, not a cloddy bulldog, heavy breather gasping for air in a show ring nor a prancing terrier. Effortless movement with discernable drive from the rear is the goal.


We are seeking volunteers to help update this project. Please email editor@thestaffordknot.com if interested. Knowledge of the breed, structure, genetics and movement is suggested.

The Stafford Coat & Colors Red, fawn, white, black or blue, or any of these colors with white. Any shade of brindle or any shade of brindle with white. Black-and-tan or liver color to be disqualified. The Stafford coat should shine. It is a single coat and thinner and finer than a fox terrier. It is of medium texture neither course nor silky. The coat should be very close fitting, Because of its fine coat the Stafford feels the wind and rain and if you are judging in inclement conditions expect to see even the best topline with a roach. Staffords are to have a black nose - a brown nose denotes liver. Eyerims should be dark (some white or pied dogs will not have dark rims). Since Staffords do come in so many colors, no judging preference should be made as to color with the exception of Black and Tan (correctly described as Tan Point Markings) or Liver. Black & Tan can mean marked like a Manchester Terrier or Rottweiller. Sometimes this color is not as clearly defined and harder to notice the tan markings. The marks over the eyes, on the face, on the chest, inside the front & rear legs and under the vent can also appear as brindle (on a black brindle) or as cream (on a red or fawn). Liver staffords are recognized by the lack of black pigmentation on the nose (brownish in colour) and usually very light eyes “yellow” (not light brown which some dogs will have) and sometimes light nails. Both of these colours are disqualifying traits and should never be shown, bred or encouraged. When judging the Stafford do not penalise “battle scars” . As a fighting dog it is certainly permissible to have scarring and is part of the history of the breed. All feet in solid coloured dogs should carry black toe nails. When the nails have been subjected to a good deal of wear and tear the black pigmentation can look shabby and worn however if you look at the root of the nail a truly black nail will be seen. Check for good pigmentation in diluted coloured dogs – such as blues and fawns as they cannot have the black nose genetically but still should carry good pigment and not appear washed out. Excellent pigmentation can also show as dark gums and lips and inside the ear leather also being dark. EXAMPLES OF TAN POINT MARKINGS

EXAMPLES OF LIVER

Photo - Ross Anderson of Aberdeen, Scotland ‘Neyo’

EXAMPLES OF GOOD PIGMENT

black nails

Dark gums, lips in a red dog

Dark gums, lips a in a BB dog

inside of ear leather black


50 Points of a Stafford


Thank you to all who have contributed to this Illustrated Breed Standard and to those who have given permission to use images of your dogs. Thank you to the photographers who have given permission to use the photos in this Illustrated Breed Standard. If we have missed anyone it was not intentional. No harm nor foul is meant. This is an educational tool only. ©TSK 2012

In Summary The head should appear clean. No wrinkle or bunched up expression. One should strive for 2/3 to 1/3 ratio head to muzzle with a definite stop but not an EXAGGERATED stop or lack of stop. The stop itself should be almost vertical. The easiest way to determine accurate stop is to place your thumb on the stop and look at the angle of your thumb. Do not be fooled by the profile view of the eye socket and mistake this for the stop. The lip should be very clean, thin and tight to the teeth meeting top and bottom with no flews or wrinkled, fleshy or spongey excess thus giving the Stafford a somewhat serious expression at times. The lip should not turn down at the end or be excessive. Exaggerations of under jaw include total lack of under jaw, weak under jaw or too strong an under jaw. None of these are correct. Depending upon the cleanness of the lip - this can be difficult to asses without a hands on going over. The nose itself may turn up slightly at the tip, but keep in mind the plane of the muzzle and the head - they should be parallel to one another. When the muzzle turns up more than the plane of the top skull the dog has a dish face and if the planes dip downward - a down face - neither is clean, balanced and will be exaggerated in expression. When the muzzle is too short or too long they will lack balance. Ears can deceive on a glance so best to get your hands on the dogs head and feel for placement, thickness of leather and size. Does the dog have sufficient length of leg? If not is it due to a short upper arm or just overall shortness of bone? A balanced Stafford should measure the same from the withers to the ground - as it does from the withers to the base of the tail set. Staffords are a square breed. They are not low to the ground or squatty. They are not way up on leg either. Enough leg, enough back - not too much, not too little. Is there massive bone or fine bone? Neither is balanced. Staffords are square - BALANCED with no EXAGGERATION.. Is the animal wider in front than looks natural or is it pinched in front? Neither is correct. The front legs should appear to drop directly down from the shoulder. The front shouldn't appear to be ‘in’ or ‘out’, and MOST CERTAINLY shouldn't look like a bulldog. The legs straight, no weakness at pastern but the tight well padded feet DO turn out a little. Not a lot, and not straight with upright shoulder as in other terrier breeds. The rear should appear strong - not HUGE and not weak and narrow - somewhat even to the front but slightly narrower when viewed from above. There should be a definite waist line with approximately 4 fingers width between the last rib and the hip bone. One should see that last rib as well, showing no fat or wrinkle and sufficient tuck up from the profile. A Stafford is certainly well muscled, yet not bunched muscle - long and lean muscle is much more suited to the breed and its original intended purpose. Not a heavyweight boxer but more like a middleweight. It must be able to move easily, be active and agile. Too much bunched muscle is exaggeration and the dog will lack balance. Not enough and he will appear soft and will not function correctly. Exaggeration of muscle in either direction will affect movement as well.

Its all about a balance. NO EXAGGERATION.


The Stafford Knot

Back Issues

email editor@thestaffordknot.com for copies of articles if not linked here January 2010 Issue #1, Vol #1 Articles include: Joseph Dunn - Hints to the Novice SBT=Bulldog+Terrier

February 2010 Issue #2, Vol #1 Articles include: SBT Breed Seminar, Raymond Crilly - Judges Ed Breeders Code of Silence SBT Exhibition Center (Past Crufts Wnners story NOT included) March 2010 Issue #3, Vol #1 Articles include: Info on Health Testing Illustrated Breed Standard Balance & Movement - Judges Ed PHPV - Tala’s Story - Health Demodectic Mange - Alternative Therapies for Treatments - Health (WKC stories NOT included)

June 2010 Issue #6, Vol #1 Articles include: Info on Health Testing Illustrated Breed Standard GDC Genetics Interview Breeders Ed Balance in the SBT Judges/Breeders Ed One By One - What YOU can do! The Disappearing Sperm - Breeders Ed/ Health SBT Breed Record Holders, Part 1 July 2010 Issue #7, Vol #1 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Dogs Who Fly - Dock Diving Judging My Way - Judges/ Exhibitors Ed The Holy Grail How to Weight Pull with your Staffordshire Bull Terrier Track Training - Starting Out Flyball - “Organized Chaos”

April 2010 Issue #4, Vol #1 Articles include: Info on Health Testing Illustrated Breed Standard RX For Whelping & Caesarians Breeders Ed What You See is What You Get The Tragic Loss of Bloodlines & Mentoring in America - Breeders Ed A Very Special Boy Meets His 1st Stafford May 2010 Issue #5, Vol #1 Articles include: Info on Health Testing Illustrated Breed Standard Tan Point Markings - AKA Black & Tan Judges/Breeders Ed Staffords in Working Trials Fibro Cartila....what? - Health How to Select Against Genetic Disease with Knowledge, Not Hope - Breeders Ed

August 2010 - Veterans! Issue #8, Vol #1 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Grey Muzzles & Puppy Dog Tales Staying in the Game My Sunshine Tammy Alf May be viewed HERE September 2010 Issue #9, Vol #1 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Training Your Stafford Forequarters What Price Glory Early Neurological Stimulation May be viewed HERE

October 2010 Issue #10, Vol #1 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Living With Cushings Don't Steal My Joy What is Natural Rearing Using Genetic Pedigree May be viewed HERE November 2010 Issue #11, Vol #1 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Miracles Do Happen Nostalgia The Versatile Stafford The Genetic Pedigree Arnica Montana May be viewed HERE December 2010 Issue #12, Vol #1 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard The Breed Today Puppies For Christmas Pets As Therapy Understanding Recessive Genes A Tribute To Trilby When Things Don’t Go As Planned May be viewed HERE January-February 2011 Issue #1, Vol #2 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Arthritis How Cassie Became an Australian Obedience Champion What is L2-HGA? Teaching Bite Inhibition The Truth About Vaccines The Eukanuba Experience Q&A - Toplines May be viewed HERE


The Stafford Knot March - April 2011 Issue #2, Vol #2 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Cherish Every Moment Importance of Nutrition in Natural Healing What is CERF? Competitive Obedience Understanding Judging Consistency How Diatomaceous Earth Works Q&A - Underjaw May be viewed HERE May - June 2011 Issue #3, Vol #2 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Tally Ho - Lure Coursing The Topline of the SBT The Rule of Fives Interview - Norman Berry (Rendorn) Renal Disease in Canines Hereditary Cataracts in Staffords Q&A - Bites May be viewed HERE July - August 2011 Issue #4, Vol #2 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Breed Specific Legislation Hip Dysplasia Preferred Breed Type The Problem with Dog Parks What Veterinarians are Saying About the Raw Diet Interview with Tony Brindley (Cabrindle) How It All Began

Back Issues

Sept - Oct 2011 Issue #5, Vol #2 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Got Itch? The Backyard Puppy Sportsmanship, Part 1 Sportsmanship Revisited Dog Showing Q&A - Slipped Hocks May be viewed HERE Nov - Dec 2011 Issue #6, Vol #2 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard The SBT Standard - A Personal Interpretation Breeding - The Big Picture Where Have All The Pure Breeds Gone? The Ostrich Syndrome Foster Mom Finds Rewards The Head of a Staffordshire Bull terrier Q&A - Hocks Let Down May be viewed HERE

Mar - Apr 20112 Issue #2, Vol #3 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Vaccination Reactions Can Mimic Disease Symptoms Phil Drabble Playing COI Kennel Blindness Bull & Terrier Letter To The Editor: Structure May be viewed HERE May - June 2012 Issue #3, Vol #3 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard SCSBTS 75th Anniversary of 1st Show Hints to the Novice: Joe Dunn Our Dogs - Review of 1936 by HN Beilby The Breed According to Fred Phillips Pictorial Early Staffords Letter To The Editor: Weak Structure May be viewed HERE

Jan - Feb 20112 Issue #1, Vol #3 Articles include: Illustrated Breed Standard Faultlessness vs Virtue A Dog Named Tilly The Stafford Knot is an independent publication BSL - Banning Lassie and not affiliated with any specific breed club. TSK Meet the Breed is a collaborative effort from like minded Stafford What is Your Target? enthusiasts whose common goal is to support the Choice of Stud Dog health testing of purebred Staffords. Letter To The Editor: We reserve the right to approve or Imports disapprove any material submitted. May be viewed HERE All material on this site is copyright protected &Â cannot be used unless indicated without the written consent of The Stafford Knot Thank you.

Contact Us


The Stafford Knot

The Back Page

From the Editor TSK WANTS YOU! SEND US YOUR ARTICLES, EXPERIENCES, IDEAS PLUS QUESTIONS FOR OUR Q&A PAGE! TSK BENEFITS STAFFORD RESCUES WORLDWIDE BUT WE CANT HELP WITHOUT YOUR HELP

Ringside Sportsmanship - or lack thereof Too many are lacking in this department Remember that old quote “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”?

TSK ran a story called ‘Don’t You Dare Steal My Joy’ back in our first year of publication. Joy Stealers and THINK ABOUT A people with bad attitudes GALLERY AD, STUD AD, are quite popular ringside OR BRAG, CLASSIFIED AS ORY these days. Recently I ECT DIR BREEDER WAY E ABL ORD AFF witnessed this firsthand AN TO HELP RESCUE PLUS when a breeder with a dog ADVERTISE YOUR DOG, who had won 7 out of 8 KENNEL, COMPANY OR shows in a row and had PRODUCTS. received several group placements with his Stafford actually pitched a fit, raising his voice and taking his loss out on his dog and handler when another dog won Best of Breed one day! I was embarrassed for the man and quite ashamed to watch his uncalled for attitude in public as judges and stewards and handlers of other breeds watched and listened to his loud fuss.

Unfortunately this is very common and seems to be quite accepted by many. Nobody said a word to this angry man. I was about to but I walked away instead. I did, however, make sure I congratulated him when his dog won each time. How can we act like spoiled children and expect to be respected? We cannot. Please learn to take your losses quietly, congratulating the winners and take your wins gracefully. It reflects badly otherwise and is uncalled for and unpleasant for everyone around you. Everyone comes to the show to win. I have yet to meet anyone who arrives ringside expecting to lose. Keep this in mind when you are not the winner and be happy for, or at least congratulate and fake happiness for the winners on the day. And PLEASE never take your losses out on your dog! The dog has no clue that it won or lost. Give them kisses and treats either way and smile as you exit the ring. As long as it was a fair decision you can complain in private or to a representative later. Thank you for helping to promote health testing in the breed and raising money for Stafford rescues - Share TSK with someone! Thank you to all of you for supporting TSK! Go hug your Staffords! Lynn Caswell, Sr. Editor

The Stafford Knot July/Aug 2012, Issue 4, Vol 3  

The Stafford Knot is an independent publication and not affiliated with any specific breed club. TSK is a collaborative effort from like min...

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