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The Stafford

Knot

Inc. 501(c)3

JUNE 2017 P R O M O T I N G T H E S T A F F O R D S H I R E B U L L T E R R I E R

ISSUE 1, VOL 6 FREE

Subscribe online for FREE www.thestaffordknot.com TABLE OF CONTENTS - PAGE 2 !1 THE STAFFORD KNOT PROMOTES HEALTH TESTED STAFFORDS WHILE BENEFITING STAFFORD RESCUES WORLDWIDE


All historical and/or current photos and articles used in this publication were sent to us by our readers unless otherwise stated. In such instances all permissions were acquired prior to publication. We take no responsibility for use of images widely available on the internet or sent to us by owners or breeders of dogs mentioned in this publication. If you wish to have photo credit given it is the responsibility of the photographer to send to us in writing during the current issue publication your wish and we will do our best to accommodate with no guarantees. We welcome Fundraiser representatives and article contributions from interested parties. Please contact us for more information on how you can get involved. Thank you also to our Rescue Coordinators Worldwide

Lynn Caswell Helen Reaney Melanie Sinclair Clare Robinson Cox Kelly Cromwell Debra Roseman Krissy Stanford Brian Owen Worldwide Guest Authors/Historians Advertising Sales -

Sr. Editor , Creative Director, Fundraising, Distribution Managing Editor, Education, Fundraising Writer Writer Health Editor Performance Editor Social Media Director Historian Article Contribution Sales

Special thank yous go to those selfless people who assist with Stafford rescues on a regular basis. If you can help transport, foster, donate or adopt, there is sadly always a need! TSK is here to raise funds to aid in these rescues. Please be a part of the solution! The Stafford Knot, Inc. is an independent publication and not affiliated with any specific breed club. TSK is a collaborative effort from like minded Stafford enthusiasts whose common goal is to support the health testing of purebred Staffords and benefit Stafford rescues worldwide. We reserve the right to approve or disapprove any material submitted. All material on this site is copyright protected & cannot be used unless indicated without the written consent of

The Stafford Knot, Inc.501(c)3 Thank you. Contact Us

TSK benefits Stafford rescue worldwide © 2009 - 2017 BrownDog Design

TABLE OF CONTENTS Advertising Rates………………………………………………………………………….…………….….. 3

Volunteer Positions Available………………………………………………………….….…………….…. 4

Illustrated Breed Standard, Books & Judging Seminar Links…………………………………..……… 5

Joe Mallen Tin (on cover) - By Helen Reaney………….…………………………………….……..…….8

The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) - By Melanie Sinclair ………….……..……13

Rescued by Staffie Smiles - By Melanie Sinclair…………………………………………….……..……32

Just Nosin’ Around - By Deb Roseman………………………………..…………………….……..…….39

2017 Health Survey Results - By Kelly Cromwell………………..………………………….……..….…43

Living With L2HGA — By Andrea Phillips …………………………….…………………….……..…….52

A Guide to Health Screening for the Staffordshire Bull Terrier - By Kelly Cromwell…………………56

Health Testing Information ………………………………………………………………………………...61

Discover Dogs - Crufts 2017 - By Clare Robinson-Cox ………………………………………………..63

Somewhere Over the Rainbow - By Cindy Bundy …………………………………………….………..75

Recipes For Your Staffords - Birthday Cake - By Melanie Sinclair ………………….…………..…… 81 Rescue Organizations Worldwide …………………………………………………………………….…. 82 From the Editors …………………………………………………………………………………………….84 Past Champions - By Brian Owen & Linda McCulloch……………………………….…….……..……89


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VOLUNTEER POSITIONS AVAILABLE MacIntosh savvy people - We are looking for someone familiar with Pages to assist with paste up duties. If you would like to volunteer for this new position please email - editor@thestaffordknot.com Artist - TSK is seeking an artist to create advertisements and assist with creative tasks for the website and publication. A working knowledge of AI, PS, ID and Pages a plus. Web - Seeking a Macintosh savvy web designer and SEO manager with knowledge of iWeb and RapidWeaver, iWeb, or Sandvox. If interested and available please send email to editor@thestaffordknot.com Sales - We need people around the world to help us sell advertising. Ads are how we raise money to donate to Stafford rescues. If interested please send email to - sales@thestaffordknot.com Writers - We are always looking for writers to send in articles for each issue. We look for original articles and stories as well as historical ones. All permissions must be granted prior to publishing. Please email - editor@thestaffordknot.com

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INTERPRETATION & ILLUSTRATION OF THE WRITTEN BREED STANDARD

NOW AVAILABLE IN PRINT DISTRIBUTED WORLDWIDE BY OUR PUBLISHER

HARDCOVER $76.99 WITH DUST JACKET

SOFTCOVER $39.99 EBOOK $12.99

IMMEDIATE DOWNLOAD

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK AND INSTAGRAM PROFIT BENEFITS STAFFORD RESCUES

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INTERPRETATION & ILLUSTRATION OF THE WRITTEN BREED STANDARD CLICK TO READ

Beautifully illustrated for us by Maurizio Molinari

HUGE thank you goes to all who contribute to the Illustrated Breed Standard and Judge Seminar projects. We could not present such a collection of information were it not for all the work done by so many people in this breed and others. We cannot name all of you but many many thanks are indeed passed on to each of you. Thank you also to those who sent in images of dogs to be used. We consider the projects to be invaluable educational tools. Take from them what you will with the understanding that we cannot all agree on all points but should continue to work together in eorts to protect this wonderful breed we all cherish. To use this judging seminar for your own club please email The Staord Knot. !6


THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

The Stafford

Knot

Inc. 501(c)3

The Staord Knot, Inc. is happy to share our educational materials with you for educational purposes and seminars. However, we do ask that we are contacted prior to use, credit is given to TSK, and that you please link or tag TSK so people know where to go for more information. We are made up of a 100% volunteer sta from around the world and we work very hard to bring this information to our followers and subscribers. We appreciate your continued support. Thank you.

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JOE MALLEN BISCUIT TIN by Helen Reaney

This is the story of a biscuit tin that caused a frenzy around the world when it was placed on E-Bay.

The story

He arrived with the tin and inside is a

begins with a

treasure trove of history. Harry Robinson,

man named

Clare’s father, was a boy back in the day so

Martin who

a lot of the documents inside made

goes to house

complete sense to him. He told us many a

clearance sales

tale as many of the names on the pedigrees

and buys

and photos were known to him as boy.

papers, badges and documents. Martin bought this tin from

The tin belonged to Joe Mallen and it

auction for £10.00 around two and half

included his birth certificate which was

years ago and had been sitting in his

dated 7/7/1896 in Rowley Regis. Also in the

storage unit.

tin were pedigrees showing the beginning of lines that have through the generations

A few months ago, he placed the tin on

made what we see today in the Stafford.

E-bay with a sample of the contents on show, the price £99.00, a woman in Australia put the advert on the Social Media page Staffordshire Bull Terrier Debates and Topics. The post went into meltdown with Stafford enthusiasts going onto e-bay to bid for the tin at one point it got to £350 but then Martin did a bit of research because of the frenzy of offers to buy the tin, he found the SBT Heritage Centre site and contacted the Chairman Paul Baker and after much discussion he offered to donate the tin to the Heritage Centre. Clare Robinson Cox and I went to her fathers home to meet up with Paul Baker.

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

CONTINUED

JOE MALLEN BISCUIT TIN by Helen Reaney Included in the tin was the pedigree of Crossguns Johnson who won Best of Breed at Crufts in 1936. He never made champion as two weeks later he was killed. This dog did sire litters contrary to what was believed. Another notable dog of the day was Fearless Joe who started the “J” line. Also included was his litter brother Brindle Mick started the “M” line and sired over 300 litters but probably the most famous dog whose pedigree was inside was CH Gentleman Jim who was bred by Joe Dunn and sold to Joe Mallen. An affix certificate shows, contrary to what many thought, the Crossguns prefix registered with the kennel club in February 1935. In some cases the affix had Old Crossguns on some pedigrees. Something that did surprise me was a Challenge Certificate which was dated 1955 and was signed by judge Austin Hollingsworth which is my maiden name. Looking back through the family tree it seems this man is a distant cousin to my late father. This is something that I never knew as my father was from Nottingham but family members left the area to live and work in the Black Country. So many pedigrees, reserve CC’s, registrations and much more were discovered inside making this tin very valuable. It will be on show at the Heritage Centre. A special event is being held at the Heritage Centre on June 4th to showcase this historic find. The address is Albert Street High Bullen Wednesbury WS10 7EZ, and Stafford folk are invited to attend. The Heritage Centre will be producing a booklet about this find and at some point, the option to buy copies of the booklet and items will be available so WATCH THIS SPACE

Please visit the website www.thestaffordshirebullterrier.co.uk

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

CONTINUED

JOE MALLEN BISCUIT TIN by Helen Reaney

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

CONTINUED

JOE MALLEN BISCUIT TIN by Helen Reaney

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

The Future Belongs to Our “Young Name: Alana Copland Age: 10 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier How long have you been involved in dog showing? 2 years

How did you become interested in showing dogs? My sister was already showing and so was family friend Jessica Bell.

Do you compete in Young Handler competitions? Yes I do, I enjoy meeting new people and bonding with my dog.

What has been your greatest achievement? To go to Crufts.

What do you enjoy about showing Staffords? I enjoy spending time with my dog in and out of the ring.

Do you also do other ‘jobs’ to do with showing? Are you on a committee, or help set up at shows or anything like that? I have helped out at local shows.

Do you have ideas for the Kennel Club and Breed Clubs to increase the number of people who want to show their dogs? More Ringcraft Classes.

Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started? To attend a show and talk to other Junior Handlers.

Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers? Only at shows.

Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows? Yes but I’m not sure there are enough young handlers.

Anything else you would like to add? More young people need proper education on dog ownership and seeing the breed

for the loving pets they are.

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Amy Levett Age: 11 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terriers

How long have you been involved in dog showing? 1 year

How did you become interested in showing dogs?

Because my Aunt shows and I started helping her.

What has been your greatest achievement?

Got a first in minor puppy class at the SSBT open show in 2016. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

Because I have grown up with Staffords Do you also do other ‘jobs’ to do with showing? Are you on a committee, or help set up at shows or anything like that?

Yes, I help at the shows and go to ringcraft class

Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started?

Lots of practicing have fun; make it fun for the dog

Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows? yes

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Menna Harris Age: 11 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier How long have you been involved in dog showing?

7 MONTHS (me and my puppy started when he was 12 weeks old) but I have been going weekly to ringcraft with mam for 2 and a half years watching. How did you become interested in showing dogs?

Watching my mam and Bella (our Stafford) at ringcraft then in shows. Also meeting people who have Staffords and love the breed just like I do. Do you compete in Young Handler competitions?

I entered once but decided not to go as I preferred to do shows like my mam was doing. I have practiced the junior handling in ringcraft but because I was told the judge might ask me questions I changed my mind about doing it. What has been your greatest achievement?

I entered my first ever show with my puppy Benny (he was 6 months old). It was in stafford NOVEMBER 2016 – both championship shows Saturday and Sunday. He was placed 4th in his category. I had lovely gifts and felt very proud. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

Being in the ring with my puppy and practicing together is fun. He is so good and listens to me while wagging his tail. And I enjoy learning and watching other people with their dogs. Do you have ideas for the Kennel Club and Breed Clubs to increase the number of

people who want to show their dogs? Maybe to send a special personal invitation with the dates of annual dog shows open & championships to pedigree dogs (including dates/venues/judges names/which website to enter / dog friendly hotels nearby/ maybe having shows in certain parts of the country in the same month to reduce cost of travelling) Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure

about getting started?

Go to watch a ringcraft session without their dog first. Maybe go early to a class for 1:1 advice before people arrive and to help settle their dog. Speak to the trainer and talk about any worries you have and they should help you. Reading a book about dog showing or looking on YouTube. Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers?

There are some in ringcraft that I watch. Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows?

I guess that would be a good idea.

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Tiana Keetch Age: 13 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier How long have you been involved in dog showing?

Since I was 6 How did you become interested in showing dogs?

When my family got one of our first Staffords, named Axle, someone who showed in UKC told us that Axle was really nice and we should try to show him. The UKC judge happened to also be a AKC judge as well and said we should show in AKC. So, we did and have been showing ever since. Did you compete in YH Competitions? If you do, what do you enjoy most about it?

Yes I have a current junior license. I like the scholarship they offer. I like how the judges can talk to you and educate while you’re in the ring. What was your greatest achievement?

My greatest achievement was making my first Stafford a champion from the owner handled classes then later breeding her and getting a puppy that I will start showing soon. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

I enjoy showing staffords because all of them are different. Their fun, and crazy personalities is what makes them fun to show. Do you also do other ‘jobs’ to do with showing? Are you on a committee, or help set up at shows or anything like that?

I was on the Sunshine committee for two years, I’ve helped with the last two nationals and three regionals by organizing trophy tables, and handing out ringside hospitality gifts. Do you have ideas for the Kennel Club and Breed Clubs to increase the number of people who want to show their dogs?

I’d say more awards should be given to runners up. If exhibitors think there is a chance to come home with at least something then they will be more eager to go. It’s hard to spend a lot of money entering and traveling then know if it’s a big entry you may go home with nothing. It happens to all of us, but I am happy win or lose if there is a cool entry gift. Also, everyone needs to remember Be nice, have open arms, and help newcomers with the dog show world. Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started?

Go for it! It is so much fun. You won’t regret it. Dogs are pills sometimes always remember that it takes time to learn and really you never stop learning and getting better as a team. Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers? Not really. I am usually the only entry out my way, except my sister. Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows?

Sure, why not Anything else you would like to add?

Keep doing what you love and never stop believing you can make a difference. We need more breeder judges and so the juniors need to be encouraged to aim for a goal.

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: : Isla Copland Age: 13 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terriers How long have you been involved in dog showing?

3 and a half years. How did you become interested in showing dogs?

We are friends with Jessica Bell and when we got a new puppy I decided that I would like to show him. Do you compete in Young Handler competitions?

Not anymore. What has been your greatest achievement?

Building a bond with my dogs. Winning a few first places. Getting to go to Crufts. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

Their personality and that they are quite a challenge to show. Do you also do other ‘jobs’ to do with showing?

I help out at local shows. Do you have ideas for the Kennel Club and Breed Clubs to increase the number of people who want to show their dogs?

Ringcraft classes aren’t talked about as much as puppy classes. I think once you have successfully finished Puppy Training there should be an option or a mention on a Ringcraft Club. Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started?

Talk to people. See what’s involved. Go to a Ringcraft Class. Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers?

Only at shows really. Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows?

It wouldn’t really affect me because I don’t do Junior Handling anymore but yes it is a good idea. Anything else you would like to add?

I think there should be more Ringcraft Classes. What about children’s Ringcraft Class?

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Kate Holmen Age: 14 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier How long have you been involved in showing dogs?

I have been involved in showing my Staffords for seven years. I started showing in the breed ring at 7 years old. How did you become interested in showing dogs?

I got interested in showing when we got our first Stafford, Kitty. Her breeder encouraged my parents to show her, so they gave it a try. Watching both my my mom and Kitty have fun, I asked my mom let me bring our second Stafford, Logan, for a test run in showing. Do you compete in Juniors competitions?

Yes. I love to show in the Juniors ring. It gives me a chance to ask the judge how I can improve because they’re looking at how I handled and not how the dog looks while I show them. What was your greatest achievement?

My greatest achievement was in 2015 when I was twelve and I won first place bred by bitch with my heart dog Quinn at the SBTCA Nationals competing against experienced breeder under a highly recognized judge. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

I enjoy showing my Staffords because I know that both my dog and I have fun not only winning but losing too. I like connecting with her in the ring that’s where we have our best moments as a team. Do you have ideas for the AKC and breed clubs to increase the number of people who have interests in showing dogs?

My idea is getting our club out there and telling young people about showing and how to get into it and have fun with their dogs. This is why my mom and I started the SBTCA Juniors Committee. I want to create a fun environment for kids to share their stories. Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started?

I advise just stepping into the ring with your dog and give it a try, you might be surprised at how fun it is. Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers?

I don’t think I have enough time to meet young handlers. I am active in a lot of sports and school is a great priority of mine. Also, meeting young handlers is tough because all-breed clubs don’t typically host social events for Juniors.

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Kai Merrick Age: 15 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier & Border Terriers How long have you been involved in dog showing?

Fifteen years, all of my life really. My parents took me to Crufts as a 3 month old baby! How did you become interested in showing dogs?

As I grew up my family always showed dogs so I wanted to. I helped my parents whelp a litter when I was 6 or 7 years old, I got the bug for dogs. Do you compete in Young Handler competitions?

Yes our Ringcraft runs a Young Handler competition which I do quite well in on occasion. What has been your greatest achievement?

Being able to judge dogs on the B List and handling my bitch to her Stud Book Number. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

Everything from the feeding regime, the exercise of the dogs to the pre-show grooming. Then the big day, the adrenalin rush, the look on the others’ faces. My bitch loves showing. Do you also do other ‘jobs’ to do with showing? Are you on a committee, or help set up at shows or anything like that?

I often help set up at West Midlands and at the Ringcraft Club. Do you have ideas for the Kennel Club and Breed Clubs to increase the number of people who want to show their dogs?

Yes, the costs are massive, maybe reduce costs. Generals could give rosettes out. Move weekday shows to weekends as lots of people can’t do weekday shows. Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started?

Just go for it! Join a Ringcraft Club. Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers?

Yes Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows?

Yes

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Mason Coleman Age: 15 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier How long have you been involved in dog showing? 3 years

How did you become interested in showing dogs?

Family! My Grandparents David and Linda Lee affix “Socksdown” which now I share. I attended my first show a few years ago and after speaking to people at the show and discovering what showing consisted of I thoroughly enjoyed it and have been to many shows since then. Do you compete in Young Handler competitions? I don’t compete in young handler competitions as it’s very rare that it occurs in the breed. What has been your greatest achievement?

Firstly, it was to own my own dog, a Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Mum and Dad and Nan and Grandad said not until I could walk and feed, and clean up after my dog, as it’s a total responsibility as the quote that comes to mind? A Dog is for Life not just for Christmas. There are too many to list but I would like to thank all Judges who have so thought highly of Archie. An achievement I am immensely proud of and will never forget is being asked to be a reserve on the UK Team in which we were again successful in winning the European Staffordshire Bull Terrier Match. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

The People. Everyone has been so welcoming, helpful, and encouraging. Do you also do other ‘jobs’ to do with showing?

I help at East Midlands SBT Club at the Clubs shows. Whatever the task, I will give 110% effort if I’m not sure I’ll ask. I have attended Two Breeds seminars. 1. Conformation and Movement. 2. Breed Specific Seminar, I hope to do future further breed seminars one I would like to do is First Aid for Dogs. I also Steward at East Midlands SBTC Limited and Open shows which I thoroughly enjoy. I need more experience before I take on Championship show level appointments. In addition, I think it’s important that experienced first aiders are on hand at shows, I am a trained First Aider.

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Mason Coleman

Continued

Age: 15 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier Do you have ideas for the Kennel Club and Breed Clubs to increase the number of people who want to show their dogs?

Breed Clubs to consider having junior membership in Clubs. I’m a member at several Breed Clubs. Also, I think if closing dates for entries at general champion shows were shortened that would be effective. Also, the clubs could possibly consider taking entries on the day at a premium entry cost benefiting both the clubs, as it would generate more revenue for the club and exhibitors unsure to whether they can attend due to other commitments after the closing date for entering.

Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started?

If you’re not sure ask, the people in the Breed are super helpful, approachable, knowledgeable and don’t mind if you ask more than once. Attend the handling Club, always take your puppy to these events to get your dog socialised with other dogs and used to be handled/ having other people’s hands on them i.e. judge’s. Listen to the advice given, don’t be disheartened if you make mistakes everyone makes them, and everybody has to start somewhere and its important with the breed to be sensible and confident handler of the Breed.

Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers? Unfortunately, there are few young handlers in the breed, the media sadly doesn’t help the breed at all they depict the Breed as an entirely different dog as we know.

Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows? No and Yes if that makes sense. I like the idea of these YH competition as it may encourage youngsters into the Breed. But with reservations. Personally, I would like to see the youngster handle their puppy from inception to show age, as the puppy grows you also grow with experience.

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Alexa Keetch Age: 17 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terriers How long have you been involved in dog showing? Since I was 10

How did you become interested in showing dogs?

I got my Stafford as a therapy dog. Then when my family started showing, I decided I wanted to show mine dog as well. Showing dogs has proven to keep me grounded and happy! Do you compete in Young Handler competitions? Yes, I have a current junior license. If you do, what do you enjoy most about it? Meeting other kids and talking “dogs” with people of my own age. What has been your greatest achievement?

Showing my first Stafford to her Bronze Level Grand Championship. I also take pride in her first breeding that produced other Champions. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

Staffords, “are like a box of chocolates, you never know what you are going to get!” Do you also do other ‘jobs’ to do with showing? Are you on a committee, or help set up at shows or anything like that?

I enjoyed participating on the Sunshine committee. I supported Area 5 with the most recent National Show and the last three Regionals by organizing trophy tables, and handing out ringside hospitality gifts. Do you have ideas for the Kennel Club and Breed Clubs to increase the number of people who want to show their dogs?

I suggest the National and Regional clubs start looking to grow youth membership to groom new handlers and judges. I also would like to see breed clubs work on unity amongst members and increased club marketing. Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started?

Showing dogs is an excellent learning opportunity for a variety of life skills. Confidence, adaptability in addition to building a bond with your dog is just the tip of the iceberg. Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers?

Area 5 does not have a lot of Junior Handlers. It is rather disappointing to not have the opportunities to show with other kids my age. Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows?

Yes, and I would look forward to that opportunity. Anything else you would like to add? I would like to see the breed clubs work to bring in new judges and provide better training opportunities for all-rounder judges to better educate about our breed.

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Brooke Boyle Age: 17 Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier How long have you been involved in dog showing?

3 years in August/September.

How did you become interested in showing dogs?

An old family friend of my mum used to show dogs so my mum had an interest in it. Our first 2 weren't show quality Staffords so we never showed them. After we lost them and got Alfie, we decided to show him and were encouraged to show him through our breeder. What has been your greatest achievement?

Best Puppy dog at Border Union probably. Also getting good photos at crufts 2016. What do you enjoy about showing Staffords?

Got to be the puppies and meeting all the dogs and getting to know them. Do you also do other ‘jobs’ to do with showing? Are you on a committee, or help set up at shows or anything like that?

Take photographs at shows and for clubs. Involved and was previously on the committee for Scottish Staffordshire club. Do you have ideas for the Kennel Club and Breed Clubs to increase the number of people who want to show their dogs? Increase and regulate judging. Encourage more younger individuals to get involved. Is there any advice that you would give to other youngsters who might be unsure about getting started?

Just go for it. Accept from the start you'll never always win, and if you don't take it in your stride. Enjoy it, it's not always about winning- remember you'll always take the best dog home, award or no award.

Do you have enough opportunities to meet with other young handlers?

For Staffords it's definitely older individuals who are showing them but this could be due to it being a ‘strong breed’. There are only a few people under 18 showing Staffords, never mind under 12/13 like other breeds. Would you like YH competition classes at Breed Shows?

No, I don't they wouldn't last and would eventually be voted out by committees- which is a shame. Young handler shows would maybe be best. Anything else you would like to add?

Unfortunately negativity can ruin shows and showing your dog. It would be great if this wasn't a thing at shows !23 but it's really just part of dog showing ‘culture’ which is a real shame. If there was a way to prevent this I think shows would be much better.


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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Jessica Bell Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier & others

Age you started showing dogs:

I started showing from the age of 7 with our family pet (Chase and SBT) but only at Fun Shows where we did obedience tests too. How did you get started?

I was 8 years old when I had my first “proper show ring” experience with a Flatcoated Retriever who belonged to a friend. I then moved onto another breed belonging to another friend (Italian Spinone). My mum and Dad bought me Dixie (Cannichbull Sweet Mystery) my own show dog as I was enjoying showing so much. That was when I was 13 years old. Dixie has been good for me as I suffer from ill health and she gave me a reason to get up and give me something to focus on. Did you compete in YH Competitions, showing your breed/s, or both?

I have competed in Junior Handling competitions with Dixie and we qualified to enter the JH Final at Crufts. Unfortunately I couldn’t attend due to my health. We still compete in the 18-24 years category classes when we go to local shows. What was your greatest achievement?

Me and Dixie have achieved her Show Certificate of Merit and her Stud Book number. My greatest achievement and proudest moment with her was when she got a 1st at Crufts. When I was 15 I fell in love with Dixie’s niece and Dad drove me down to pick her up. Beau (Cannichbull Sweet Surrender) has been a pleasure to own and she has also done me proud in the ring. By the age of 15 months she had gained her ShCM and won two RCC. My proudest moment was when I welcomed my first ever litter of Drumburn puppies. I kept a bitch and a dog our of the litter. Drumburn Betty Boop who I show is turning out to be a dream in the ring and I really enjoy taking my 3 girls out to show. What advice would you give to this generation of Young Handlers?

The advice I would give to Young Handlers is to enjoy your dogs because win or lose you always bring the best dog home. You will learn so much from so many nice and genuine people and possibly make friends for life with some of them.

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The Future Belongs to Our “Young Handlers” (Juniors) Name: Tracy Hamilton Former Young Handler – now an adult and a judge Breeds handled: Staffordshire Bull Terrier & Skye Terrier Age you started showing dogs: 5 years old  

How did you get started? I was born into the world of dog showing , and had 2 old timers who taught me all I know my papa Andy Hamilton and the late and very knowledgeable man Abe Harkness who was a second dad to me   

Did you compete in YH Competitions, showing your breed/s, or both?

Yes showing both Staffords and my other breed Skye Terriers.

What was your greatest achievement? Being on Blue Peter they filmed me at Crufts and I got interviewed with Anthea Turner and I was only 12.

What advice would you give to this generation of Young Handlers? Enjoy your hobby it gives you lots of fun and good memories plus you meet lots of good friends    Anything else you would like to add? Just hope all the younger ones stick at as long as me and many others it's people like them we need to keep the breed going.

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

JOIN US ON OUR FUND RAISER AUCTION PAGE ON FB

https://www.facebook.com/groups/TheStaffordKnotRescueFundraisers/ !30


Knot

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,INC.

TSK merchandise available at http://www.cafepress.com/

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Rescued byKNOT, Staffie Smiles - Fact File - CHIP By Melanie Sinclair THE STAFFORD INC. 501(C)3

Chip's history is not known but he was rescued by SSR from a pound in Yorkshire a few days before he came to me. He had been picked up as a stray. Chip was in a terrible state - very underweight (under 10 kilos), huge bald patches due to skin condition (and I believe stress) and covered in scabs. His teeth are little brown stumps and we think they may have been filed down in the past. Sadly we suspect he was a bait dog, which would account for his scars and the aggression towards other dogs and his teeth being filed down.

The photos SSR put on Facebook of poor little Chip captured my heart. It was his expression of sheer anxiety and him being in such terribly poor condition and I just could not stop thinking about him. Chip was initially thought to be a very young dog, described as 10 months old when I first saw his photo on SSR page. He looked so tiny. However, when we collected him, we took him to the vet for his vaccinations and the vet said he was a middle aged dog although difficult to be very accurate due to his lack of teeth. After some serious thought about how we could provide a suitable home for another dog, I contacted one of my oldest and dearest friends, Fiona Shepherd, who is a founder member of SSR. After a lot of discussion with Fiona and her checking my home and lifestyle were suitable, we collected little Chip a couple of days later. Poor, poor wee soul that he was but despite everything, he was friendly and affectionate with my children and me. Chip had a very busy few weeks as we live in the country and he had to meet, horses, chickens, sheep and other livestock as well as learn that rabbits, squirrels, hedgehogs, birds etc are not just there for him to chase (a couple were lucky his teeth are practically non existent but no real harm done to anything!). Chip was also aggressive towards other dogs and it took some time to build his confidence and train him to relax and behave when meeting new dogs. He can now play safely with up to 12 other dogs when at the stables visiting our young pony. !32


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Rescued by Staffie Smiles - Fact File CHIP By Melanie Sinclair

Chip's physical condition was relatively easy to improve; good quality food, worming, exercise and security were all he needed. He was so afraid of being left when out walking, that he couldn't run around and stuck within feet of me for a long time. Even now, he is always catching my eye when we're out and about.

Where is he now? Chip lives with Jane Lothian and her family she says, “I was very lucky to adopt Chip in February 2015.” Chip is a very special dog to me. He is remarkable to have survived goodness knows what kind of cruelty and neglect in his past and his amazing love for people and strength of character has allowed him to forgive and trust enough for him to enjoy his life. This morning, I was very proud of Chip when some semi-tame ducks wandered into the garden, his prey instinct is strong and he just couldn't resist going to chase them, however, he stopped and came back as soon as I called him. We also live next to a field of sheep at the moment and he has become desensitised and not once even attempted to go near them. Favorite things: Chip loves our pony, they seem to share similar playful personalities and I have to keep a close eye on them as they will run around the field together - only playing and both can initiate it but I don't want to risk any accidents so they are banned from this activity! I am hoping that Chip’s story might encourage people to see the potential for a dog who's in a terrible physical condition. I have always chosen to have animals in very poor condition in need of rescue - the young pony is the latest and maybe that's why she and chip seem to have such an unusual friendship. He is quite cocky though and does silly things like just running under the horses if it's the shortest route - he hasn’t been kicked yet as our horses are used to dogs and very tolerant with him being a town boy! There really is nothing more rewarding than nursing and nurturing an animal back to good health and watching them enjoying life as they should be. What I have now is a handsome prince who has gone from under 10kilos to 17 kilos and although he's middle aged, most people we meet think he's a puppy. He is very playful and does have a cute puppy look about him. Chip is also a very brave dog and he makes us all laugh doing things like jumping in the air barking at fireworks and trying to chase horrendously loud, low flying jets that everyone else gets a fright with. He certainly is a small dog with a big personality. He has brought us so much love, fun and adventures and although there have been some issues, we would never be without our gorgeously, adorable little Chipster.

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Rescued by Staffie Smiles - Fact File LEXI, INDY & TUBS

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By Theresa Trotter

We adopted Lexi in 2014 and I wasn't keen on ‘Staffies’ at all, I was one of those people who would cross the street when I saw one! My partner had had ‘Staffies’ in the past and said they were fantastic dogs. So I agreed and Lexi arrived, she settled in straight away and loved going out for walks and playing in the garden with her toys. We let her off the lead after two weeks and she came back no problem, she cosied in and was a sook. Unfortunately she took unwell after about 7 weeks and after various trips to the vet and the animal hospital she was diagnosed with an aggressive cancer that surrounded her heart, we decided it best to let her go, we were absolutely devastated. That wee Staffie had changed my mind about the breed in the short space of 8 weeks and then she was gone.

After a few weeks of having an empty house we got in touch with Staffie Smiles and adopted Indy. She was an insecure wee thing and had terrible separation anxiety, we stood outside in the freezing cold in the winter coming in and out every five minutes. Two weeks later she stopped howling while we were out, she knew we were coming home for her. She also had a little chewing issue, but quickly resolved. Then Tubs arrived with us in December as his forever home had fallen through, we were fostering until he found a home. He was so scared and quiet and wouldn't come near anyone, he was petrified of men. I decided straight away he was staying. I had to keep him and let him know he would be loved and could trust people again. Two years we have had him now, he and Indy are the best of friends and love their walks. We have a son who is 17 months old and both my staffies adore him and are very patient with him and love hoovering up his biscuit crumbs. It's not been an easy road for any of these rescue dogs but I honestly believe if you give them the love and respect they deserve you will get it back in abundance. Would never get another dog apart from a Staffie. !34


Rescued by Staffie Smiles - Fact File DEAKIN

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By Melanie Sinclair

Janine Burns is a volunteer with Staffie Smiles Rescue and has a rescue dog through SSR. Andrea is her next door neighbour and friend. She got to know both Janine’s dogs and asked her about fostering and helping with Rescue due to her having more time on her hands. Andrea has been very unwell over the last couple of years and who better to help her recuperate than a dog. 
 Deakin was in Rosewell kennels and Janine took her up to meet him and walk him, she brought him home for a couple of days to see how he would get on, but as soon as he walked through her door he moved in! After a week or so Andrea approached Janine and said that she couldn't bear to part with Deakin as it felt like he had always been part of the family. He looked it too. So another failed foster! 
 Where is he now? Deakin is enjoying life with Andrea and regular fun with Janine and her dogs. He recently became a Hero! One afternoon Andrea was taking him for his walk through our woods which are opposite our houses. They were on his normal path and he started to pull Andrea in another direction, which was off the track. Andrea is not strong and he was pulling really hard, she had to let him go. He ran down a track and stood barking into what is a ditch that runs drainage water down it. He was very excited and barking and Andrea thought it was kids messing about but when she got to him she found a lady in the ditch in her electric wheelchair/scooter. She was stuck but thankfully not hurt physically. Andrea couldn't manage to free her on her own and called Janine who came across and they decided to call emergency services. The lady had 2 poodles with her and Deakin was very calm with them even though both dogs were very anxious and upset about their owner. She is very grateful to Deakin and fed him lots of treats when she got out the ditch. Andrea says “Deakin was totally fab!”
 Deakin loves socialising and meeting people! He is representing Staffie Smiles Rescue at the Scottish SBT Club Champ Show in May. !35


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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

Thanks to you, our supporters from all over the world, TSK was able to raise over $2000 in our online rescue fund raisers and from donations in 2016 and already over $1000 in 2017! This money, and all profits we raise each year, gets donated to Stafford rescues worldwide. If your rescue has not yet been recognized, or if you have a special case you need help with, please contact TSK and let us know. Our goal is to help the Staffords in need, no matter where in the world they are located. We can’t help them all, but with your continued support we can help many. The last 8 years have been a tremendous success! !38


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Just Nosin’ Around by Deb Roseman It goes without saying that the canine nose is so much more powerful than the human nose, that scientists can’t even quantify the comparison. Human beings depend on sight to interpret the world. But dogs? They rely on their sense of smell. It is this sheer olfactory ability of dogs that has made them an indispensable tool for various jobs that rely on the sense of smell. There are way too many applications to list here, but here are a few examples. Search & Rescue dogs are trained to use their sense of smell to locate a lost individual or human remains through several methods including air-scenting, tracking, trailing, and combinations of the three. Disease Detecting and Medical Alert dogs are trained to use their sense of smell to detect cancer, predict an oncoming seizure, and alert diabetics of low blood sugar levels just to name a few. Substance Detection dogs are trained to use their sense of smell for the detection of illegal substances.

It is no surprise that these true working activities have been molded into competitive sports for just about any dog and owner to enjoy together. One of the newest canine sports to hit the scene is Nosework which is modeled after real world substance detection.

I have to admit, when I first started to hear about Nosework, I thought it was silly. I resisted participating for a long time. Even when it did start to intrigue me a little bit I still refrained for fear of being ridiculed. But one day curiosity got the best of me and I decided to sneak off and sign up my Staffordshire Bull Terrier, Bonnie, for a beginners class. Bonnie and I had already been participating in several canine sports like Obedience, Agility, and Tracking, and we were successful at lower levels, but her over-exuberance was getting in the way. We both were getting frustrated. I needed something else. I needed something that was mentally challenging yet still engaging for the dog and fun for me too.

NOSEWORK !39


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Just Nosin’ Around

CONTINUED

by Deb Roseman

Bonnie and I attended our first class where the dogs were encouraged to find food in a box. I struggled to keep an open mind. It wasn’t until I got home that night and sat down to watch some TV that I realized change was already happening. My energizer bunny of a dog who rarely knew how to “turn off” was collapsed at my side on the couch fast asleep.

As the weeks went by, I got more and more excited about going to class and so did Bonnie. I just had to mention the word “smell” to her and her whole face would light up. She’d eagerly prance as I took out her harness and loaded her in the car.

As our classes progressed, we transferred the hunt for food in a box to the hunt for essential oil scents. Specifically birch, anise and clove. Then we transferred the hunt from boxes to various environments. Interiors of buildings, exterior locations like pavilions at parks, vehicles, and various kinds of containers. Bonnie learned how to source the odor in all of these locations, and I learned how to read what she was telling me when she found it. We were both engaged, we were both having fun, and at the end of the day I had a dog snuggling and snoring next to me on the couch. What more could I ask for?

That was a silly question. Of course there was more! Being of a competitive nature and loving the challenge of testing skills, I did not forget for a second that Nosework is a titling sport! And so began our new journey into the world of competitive nosework.

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Just Nosin’ Around

CONTINUED

by Deb Roseman

While we have several nosework titles under our belts, and are working towards more advanced titles now, competing in nosework isn’t about the titles for us. It’s about the experience. It’s about the joy of working with my dog in an activity that I can see she truly enjoys, that we love to do together and can be successful at.

Through competing, I’ve of course met many new people and made new friends. But more importantly, I have learned how accommodating the sport of nosework is for the dogs. I’ve seen big dogs, little dogs, young dogs, old dogs, and disabled dogs. I’ve even seen dogs with behavioral issues. The sport of nosework is accommodating for ALL of these dogs, some of which would never be welcome elsewhere. The sport of nosework is giving all of these dogs a chance to use their brains and their bodies and to thrive in an activity that they love with their owners.

Now, what’s so silly about that?!

NOSEWORK !41


THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

Just Nosin’ Around

CONTINUED

by Deb Roseman

Thank you to the following photographers for allowing us to share their photos: Lorelei Craig, Kelly Cromwell, Alyssia Greiner, Michelle Ostrander, Terri Spaeth-Merrick, Scott Peterson, and Marcella Winslow !42


THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

Thank you TSK Health Editor Kelly Cromwell for conducting this detailed survey and gathering all results for this report

2017 Stafford Health Survey Results 254 total submissions 127 owners reporting *Country of residence* USA – 82% Australia – 9% UK – 5% Other – 4% *How Many Staffords currently live with you?* 1-3 (79%) 4-7 (18.5%) 8-11 (1.5%)

Microchipped (75%) CERF/PHPV tested (35%) Other (BAER tested, cardio screened, spay/neuter) – (3%)

*Do You Health Test Your Adults?* Yes (47%) No (14%)

*How Many Years Have You Owned Staffords?* Less than 5 years (30%) 6 – 10 years (27%) 11 - 15 years (16%) 16 – 20 years (9%) More than 20 years (18%) *What Are Your Primary Interests/Activities?* Companion (89.7%) Therapy/Assistance (18%) Conformation (65%) Tracking (13.4%) Obedience/Rally (41.7%) Nosework (12.6%) Barn Hunt (26.7%) Weight Pull/Dock Diving (11%) Agility (24%) Lure Coursing (5%) *Have You Bred Your SBT?* No (58%) Yes (42%) *If Yes, How Many Litters?* 1 litter (45%) 2 – 4 litters (26%) 5 – 7 litters (15%) 8 – 10 litters (7.5%) More than 10 litters (4%) *Before Puppies Go To Their New Homes, They Have Been:* Examined by a veterinarian & given 1st vaccines

Only if using for breeding (24%) Only if I suspect an issue (5%) Other (3%) *Of The Dogs You Have Health Tested, How Do You Choose To Report The Results?* Submit All - Clear, affected, carrier, etc for public benefit and disclosure (76%) Submit None – Keep for personal records (21%) Submit Clear only (3%) *Sex Of Reported Dogs* Male (60%) Female (40%) *Country of Birth* USA (75%) UK/Scotland/Ireland (12%) Australia (8%) Canada (3%) Other (2%) *Of Those Dogs Reported Deceased – Age At Passing* 11 – 13 years (41%) 14 - 16 years (38%)

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CONTINUED

2017 Stafford Health Survey Results 254 total submissions 127 owners reporting *Living Dogs – Age At Time Of Survey*

*Was/Is This Dog Spayed or Neutered?*

1 – 3 years (39%)

No (56%)

4 – 7 years (30%)

Yes (44%)

8 – 10 years (15%) 11 – 13 years (10%)

*If Yes, At What Age?*

14 – 16 years (5%)

5 – 7 years (26%)

And ONE 17 year old!!

2 – 4 years (24%) 7 – 12 months (16%)

*What Is/Was Overall Health Of This Dog?* Excellent (63%) Good (28%) Fair (7%) Poor (2%)

*What Is/Was This Dog’s Overall Temperament?* Confident (55%) Boisterous/High-Energy (25%) Quiet/Calm (14%) Reserved (4%) Timid/Shy (2%)

13 – 18 months (13%) 8+ years (8.5%) 19 to 24 months (6.5%) 0 – 6 months (6.5%)

*This Dog Was Routinely Given:* All vaccines recommended by my veterinarian (39%) Puppy vaccines, then Rabies only (25%) 3 year DHPP (Distemper) & Rabies only (24%) No vaccines (6.5%) 3y DHPP, Bordatella & Rabies (2%) Rabies only (1%)

*Was/Is This Dog Used For Breeding?* No (64%) Yes (34%) Unknown (2%)

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CONTINUED

2017 Stafford Health Survey Results 254 total submissions 127 owners reporting *Did This Dog Ever Have A Reaction To Any Vaccine?* No/None (94%) Yes, Life-Threatening (4%) Yes, Minor – no medical attention needed (2.7%) Yes, Major – medical treatment needed (1.5%) Reaction to Rabies vaccine/Other (2%) *Does/did This Dog Receive Flea/ Tick Prevention?* Oral/Topical as directed by veterinarian (70%) None (28%) Homeopathic/Herbal (6%) Oral/Topical as needed/seasonal (3.5%) Tick Collar/Seresto collars only (2%) Over-the-counter brand (1%)

*Has This Dog Ever Been Treated For A Tick-borne Disease?* No (99%) Yes – Lyme Disease (1%) *Does/Did This Dog Receive Heartworm Prevention?* Year-Round as directed by veterinarian (38.5%) Seasonal as directed by veterinarian (31%) None (24%) Homeopathic/Herbal (4%) Injectable (1%) *Has This Dog Ever Had A Reaction To Heartworm Prevention?* No (100%) *Treated for Heartworm Disease?* No (98%) Yes (2%)

*Has This Dog Ever Had A Reaction To Flea/Tick Prevention? * No/None (94%) Yes, localized/skin reaction (2%) Yes, Major – needed medical treatment (2%) Yes, Minor – GI/lethargy (1%)

*This Dog Was/Is Fed Primarily:* Super-Premium Formula (Fromm, Natural Balance) – (32%) Premium Formula (ProPlan, Eukanuba, Royal Canin) – (30%) Raw/ Home-cooked diet - (26%) Economical Formula (Purina, Iams, Diamond) – (6%) Prescription/Veterinary Diet - (4%) Cheapest - (1%)

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CONTINUED

2017 Stafford Health Survey Results 254 total submissions 127 owners reporting *Has This Dog Ever Been Anesthetized/ Sedated?* Yes (62%) No (38%) *Anesthetic Events Reported?* None (93%) Issues with/Slow recovery (3%) Respiratory Events while sedated (1%) Seizures (1%) Death Under Anesthesia (1%) *Has This Dog Had Hips X-Rayed for Hip Scoring?* (252 reporting) No (68%)

*Screened for Luxating Patellas (252 reporting)?* Not Done (66%) Of Those Screened: Normal (99%) Grade 2-4 (1%)

*Screened for Heart Disease?* Not done (98%) (250 reporting) Of Those Screened: OFA Auscultation prior to breeding (40%) Will be done prior to breeding (26%) OFA Auscultation Yearly (20%) OFA Ausc w/Echocardiogram (14%) Echocardiogram to check murmur (2%)

Yes – OFA (29%) Yes – PennHip (3%)

*Hip Grading (81 reporting)* Good (56%) Excellent (21%) Fair (16%) Dysplastic (5%)

*Diagnosed With Cardiac Issue? (197 reporting)* Normal (98%) Congestive Heart Failure (1%) Murmur – (1%)

*Has This Dog Been CERF (eye) tested?* (253 reporting) No (38%)

*Elbow Grading?* (251 reporting) Not Done (72%) Of Those Screened: Normal (99%) Grade I (1%)

Yes, Yearly (15%) Yes, as a puppy (12%) Yes, Once as an adult (10%) Yes, Prior to 1st breeding (10%) Will be done prior to breeding (7.5%) Yes, undefined (3.5%)

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CONTINUED

2017 Stafford Health Survey Results 254 total submissions 127 owners reporting (CERF) *Results (149 reported)* Normal/Clear (82%) Normal w/ Breeder Option (12%) Fail – undefined (5%)

*Issues Diagnosed By Veterinarian or Specialist? (209 reporting)* Normal (80%) Senior Cataracts (4%) Distichiasis – extra/abnormal eyelashes (4%)

*Type? (30 reporting)* Mast cell (30%) Testicular/Mammary(12%) Lipoma (10%) Hemangiosarcoma (10%) Brain Tumor (6%) Anal Adenocarcinoma (6%) Splenic Mass (6%) Other (<3%)

Punctate Cataracts – Suspect not inherited (2%)

*Does This Dog Have Any Chronic GI Issues? (247 reporting)*

PHPV (1%)

None (91%)

Multifocal Retinal Dysplasia (1%)

Food Allergies (4.5%)

Other Diagnoses (<1%)

IBD (1.6%)

~1 reported case of HC SBT type

Chronic HGE/colitis (1%) Pancreatitis (1%)

*Has This Dog Been DNA tested?*

Reflux (<1%)

No/Not Done (43%) Yes, HC/L2HGA Clear (37%)

*Chronic Ear (Aural) Issues? (248 reporting)*

Will be done in future/prior to breeding (10%)

None (93%)

Clear by parentage – (3.5%) Yes, L2HGA Clear (2.3%) Clear by parentage – verified (1%)

Chronic Ear Infections (3%) Occasional Ear Infections (2%) Deaf (acquired/senior) – (1%) Deaf (congenital) – (1%)

Yes, HC/L2HGA/DM clear (1%) *Respiratory Issues? (248 reporting)* *Has/Was This Dog Ever Diagnosed With Cancer/Tumor? (250 reporting)* No (88%) Yes (12%)

None (98%) Brachycephalic Syndrome (1%) Elongated Soft Palate (1%)

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CONTINUED

2017 Stafford Health Survey Results 254 total submissions 127 owners reporting *Neuromuscular Issues? (250 reporting)* None (94%) Head/Leg Tremors/”Stafford Shake” (3%)

CCL tear/rupture (1%) Intravertebral Disc Disease (<1%) Other (<1%)

Epilepsy (1%) Other (1%) 1 reported case of L2HGA

*Dentition: This Dog Has – (243 reporting)* Normal dentition/occlusion (81%) Underbite (6.5%)

*Dermatological Issues? (246 reporting)* None (76%) Seasonal Allergies (15%) Demodectic Mange (5%) Atopy (2%) Alopecia (1%) Chronic Staph/Seborrhea (1%)

Retained Puppy Teeth (4%) Inverted/Converging Canines (3%) Overbite (3%) Missing Teeth (2.5%) Base Narrow Canines (1%) Level Bite (1%) Cleft Palate/Wry Mouth (<1%)

*Metabolic Disorders? (248 reporting)* None (98%) Cushings Disease (1% - 3 cases)

*Female – Reported Reproductive Issues (129 reporting)*

Hypothyroid Disease (1% - 2 cases)

None (73%) C-section (16%)

*Miscellaneous (249 reporting)*

Pyometra (6%)

Bladder Stones – undefined type (2% - 4 cases)

Litter Resorption (5%)

Chronic UTIs (2% - 4 cases)

*Orthopedic Issues/Diseases? (249 reporting)* None (90%) ACL tear/rupture (3%) Osteoarthritis (2%) Spondylosis (2%) Canine Hip Dysplasia (1% - 3 cases)

Dystocia (2%) Malformed Uterus/Eclampsia (1%)

*Female – First Heat Cycle (137 reporting)* 6 – 8 months (52%) 9 – 12 months (36%) 13 – 15 months (3%) 9% reported were spayed before first heat

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CONTINUED

2017 Stafford Health Survey Results 254 total submissions 127 owners reporting *Female – Frequency of Heat Cycles (108 reporting) Every 6 – 8 months (76%) Every 9 – 12 months (10%) Every 4 – 5 months (8%) Sporadic/Unpredictable (4%) Every 12 – 14 months (2%)

*Average Litter Sizes (79 reporting)* 3 -5 puppies (56%) 6 – 9 puppies (40%) 1 – 2 puppies (4%) *Reported Congenital Defects (36 reporting)* Cleft palate (25%)

*Female – Number of Litters Whelped (85 reporting)* 1 litter (58%) 2 litters (18%) 3 litters (14%) 4 litters (6%) Never/None (4%)

Cleft lip (22%) Stillborn (22%) Fading Puppy/Failure to Thrive (8%) Short/Bob Tail (8%) Neurologic – unknown (6%) Deafness (3%) Hemi-vertebrae (3%)

*Female – Age at Last Whelping (80 reporting)* 2 – 4 years old (60%) 5 – 6 years old (24%) 7 – 8 years old (14%) 9 – 11 years old (2%) *Male – Reported Reproductive Issues (90 reporting)* None (97%) Cryptorchid (2% ) Low Sperm Motility (1%)

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Advertisement sponsored by members of Bull Breeds Online

Merchandise also available at www.cafepress.com/thankdog Proceeds go to the AHT for

DO NOT use this image without written permission from Laurene Williams or Diane Taylor. Thank you.

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Living with L2-HGA by Andrea Phillips

Our L2-HGA journey began in 2011. I took Willow to the vets on a couple of occasions as I’d noticed her walking on tiptoes and kicking her hind legs out and a curved spine.  Our first vet diagnosed this as a pulled muscle but unhappy with his diagnosis, I felt there was more to the way she was walking, I changed my vet.  There they asked me to send them videos that they could send to contacts studying canine neurology.  It was about then that I learnt about L2HGA and the test to detect for presence of the condition.  Within weeks the swab was taken, sent off and returned a positive diagnosis.  Willow was only 11 months old.

Willow's 'dolly' walk https://www.youtube.com/watch? v=VSA1vwRTRmo

There was lots of information available online about the symptoms and testing for breeding purposes but little about actually living with the condition. There are two variants; one with seizures and the other without.  Willow didn’t suffer from the seizures so we didn’t discuss medication options with my vet but we did need to learn what her triggers were; weather, exercise, excitement and stress all seemed to affect Willow.  Once you have a diagnosis, you can attribute a lot of quirks to the condition, such as staring into space, wobbly head, funny gait, slow learning.  She only had the capacity and patience for basic commands  and her

lack of balance made ‘paw’ or anything more than this difficult so I was happy for her just to have basic manners. The lack of information for the L2-HGA owner led to my starting a blog and then a Facebook page, Willow the Wobbly Staffie, as a way of raising awareness and also to document her journey.  This, in turn, led to connections to people within the SBT network in the UK to provide information on how they have been able to breed out the condition.

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Living with L2-HGA by Andrea Phillips

Living on a day to day basis with L2 for us consisted of making sure Willow had jumpers and blankets in winter to keep her warm, to changing the flooring throughout the house. One of the effects of the condition meant that she had no control of her toilet habits.  She was completely house trained but her body and brain weren’t in sync.  She had no traction control so we swapped our laminate flooring for carpet – that also helped with the temperature.  Willow was the most snuggly, cuddly, loving dog and we had a special bond but I couldn’t take her out for walks for longer than 20 minutes as her legs would spasm and she’d struggle for hours.  After the worst episode, she was rendered completely immobile and her muscles were rock solid. In 2014, we started to notice a change in Willow.  She became more withdrawn and began taking herself off on her own, spending less time with us.  She was more aggressive to other dogs and when I got her diagnosis we were advised this was the step before seizures would begin.  My husband and I had already agreed that we would not medicate her and if her quality of life was to be negatively affected, we would make that most difficult of decisions.  16th January turned out to be that day – she was only 3 years and 4 months old.

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Living with L2-HGA by Andrea Phillips

Willow’s Facebook page has over only has 500 likes but we have been asked a lot of questions from people all over the world and even had dogs diagnosed as a result of their owners finding her page. One of those dogs was owned by our friend, Dee Bates.  His name was Logan and in June 2016, we asked Dee if she would be happy for him to be our ambassador for Willows page. Logan was a rescue dog and went to live with Millie and William with his mum, Dee.  Dee was unaware of L2-HGA and just thought the mild symptoms she noticed were down to his bad start in life but in April of the same year, Logan was out for a walk with his friends when his legs began to shake.  Dee took him home to rest but when she went back to him 20 minutes later, he was having a full seizure.  After an emergency visit to the vet, it was decided that L2 could be the cause and Dee sent a test to the Animal Health Trust…sadly it came back positive.

Logan was restricted to short on-lead walks, kept warm and quiet when need be and a close eye was kept on him, constantly looking for the signs of another attack or that he was tiring. William is a ‘trick dog’ and Logan often joined in and loved to learn a few tricks of his own.  Dee also kept an eye on Logan’s diet as she noticed there was a marked difference in his health when he was given beef protein so this was removed from his diet

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Living with L2-HGA by Andrea Phillips

Logan attended local dog shows promoting awareness of L2 but only for short periods of time or where he could rest comfortably, but Dee was always painfully aware of her boy’s condition and the constant worry of having an L2 dog. Some days he would be physically fine but his brain wasn’t quite working right; this earned him the nickname ‘Little Bobble Head’ with his ping pong brain.   Although Logan was on meds for his condition, Dee was painfully aware that quality of life was important for him and sadly in March this year, just shy of his 5th birthday, Logan took his last trip after a particularly bad couple of weeks.  His temperament changed and Dee realised this wasn’t the boy she knew and loved and made the heart-breaking decision to let him go.


This was the reality and consequence of Willow’s parents not being tested for L2HGA. Willow’s and Logan’s stories are bitter-sweet – completely preventable but without them we wouldn’t have the memories or these stories to tell to help raise awareness of how to eradicate this condition. Thank you from The Stafford Knot to Andrea Phillips, Gemma Proctor and Dee Bates for sharing this story and for creating the FB page - Willow the Wobbly Staffie Living with L2-HGA. This devastating disease is completely preventable and can be totally eradicated if all breeders tested their Staffords prior to mating them and never bred carriers together.

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THE STAFFORD A Guide KNOT, to Health INC. 501(C)3 Screening

for the Staffordshire Bull Terrier

By Kelly Cromwell

Have you heard your friends talking about getting their dog CERF’d? See your pup’s breeder post on Facebook about getting OFAs done for their breeding dogs? Have no idea what they are talking about? Thinking about breeding your dog and want to make sure you are doing the best you can to produce healthy, happy puppies? This article aims to help simplify the current recommended health tests and registries for the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. All health testing is aimed at screening your dog for the more commonly found health issues that are genetically passed from parents to offspring or that are present in the breed and could affect the health and well-being of your pet. For 2017, it is recommended that Staffords be screened for hip dysplasia, DNA tested for L2HGA & Hereditary Cataracts and have a board-certified ophthalmologist perform an eye exam to clear from inherited or sight-limiting eye disorders (like corneal dysplasia or PHPV). For those seeking a higher and more thorough screening, testing is readily available for elbow dysplasia, luxating patellas, cardiac clearance, degenerative myelopathy and coat color inheritance. Testing methods vary but are typically performed by an experienced veterinarian or veterinary specialist, with the exception of DNA testing which can be completed and submitted by the owner.

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By Kelly Cromwell RECOMMENDED SCREENING FOR STAFFORDSHIRE BULL TERRIERS: **O.F.A. (Orthopedic Foundation for Animals) is a research and data collection organization founded in 1966 that maintains a searchable, public database of health testing results. **PennHIP: a radiographic screening method for hip evaluation that measures and quantifies canine hip joint laxity. Results are reported in percentiles as compared to the database of other individuals within the breed. **CHIC (Canine Health Information Center) is a centralized health database sponsored by OFA that works with parent breed clubs to determine a recommended protocol for screening breeding dogs. Currently, to become CHIC registered Staffordshire Bull Terriers. Screening for Hip dysplasia

Hip dysplasia is a condition involving an abnormal formation of the hip socket and is degenerative in nature. Affected dogs may develop weakness, lameness and arthritis involving the hip joint. Milder cases may be maintained with diet, exercise and physical therapy, while more severe cases may require surgery to alleviate painful symptoms. Hip dysplasia is considered to be an inheritable disease with multiple genetic influencers. OFA ranks the Staffordshire Bull Terrier at #60 out of 183 listed breeds with a reported incidence of hip dysplasia at 10%.

Screening for hip dysplasia requires radiographs (X-rays) to be performed by an experienced veterinarian that will be submitted to either OFA or PennHIP for interpretation. PennHIP may be done at any age after 16 weeks. Dogs must be 24 mths of age or older to submit for a final OFA rating.

Both OFA and PennHIP require precise radiographic technique and positioning that starts with placing the dog to on their back upon the X-ray table. The hind legs are fully extended and knees rotated to ensure proper alignment of femurs for best viewing of hip joint conformation. This positioning can be difficult for veterinary technicians physically and quite uncomfortable for a heavily muscled breed like the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. Light sedation is often recommended (or required) for patient comfort and compliance.

OFA submissions are reviewed by three randomly chosen board-certified radiologists using 9 different evaluation criteria. PennHIP looks at 3 different radiographic views to compare laxity, compression and extension of the hip joint against breed ‘normals’.

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By Kelly Cromwell

Eye screening (OFA Eye Certification Registry/CAER - formerly CERF) Screening for congenital/inherited eye issues differs greatly from a general eye exam done by your primary veterinarian. This focused exam should be performed by board-certified ophtamologist (DACVO) and uses indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp biomicroscopy. The pupils are dilated to allow for proper evaluation of lens and retina of the eye. This exam screens for glaucoma, eyelid/eyelash abnormalities, cataracts, diseases of the cornea and iris, PHPV (persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous) PHA and retinal dysplasia, as well as multiple other possible inheritable eye disorders. It is currently recommended to screen puppies between 8-12 weeks for congenital issues and PHPV, then again after 12mths of age/before breeding and (ideally) once yearly thereafter.

General anonymous data is submitted to OFA for data collection, owners may submit results for public record and registry with OFA/CHIC.

DNA screening for L2HGA and Hereditary Cataracts (SBT type) L2HGA is a devastating inherited neuromuscular disease affecting the Staffordshire Bull Terrier which causes a failure in breakdown of L-2-hydroxyglutaric acid. This causes symptoms such as weakness, ataxia, seizures, behavior issues, tremors, muscle cramps and dementia. Hereditary Cataracts have been identified as an inheritable condition in the Staffordshire Bull Terrier since the 1970s. Cataracts form on the posterior or back side of the lens, becoming progressive and sight-limiting with advancing age. Thankfully, we have DNA tests available to screen for both disease processes. Using a small cotton swab provided by the testing company, a saliva sample is submitted that will screen for the chosen condition and will pronounce your dog clear (100% free of the disease and unable to pass the gene to offspring), carrier (unaffected by the disease but potentially able to pass the gene to offspring) or affected (has the disease and can pass the gene to offspring). Breeding dogs are often classified as ‘clear by parentage’ based on their sire and dams results or family history, but it is preferable to DNA test for definitive results before breeding. DNA screening is simple and rather inexpensive. Breeders can use these results to make more informed breeding decisions as identified carriers could still be included in the breeding pool, as long as they are bred judiciously to DNA clear partners. Results can be posted to OFA/CHIC for recording to database.

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By Kelly Cromwell

Other valuable screening: There are many potentially inherited issues currently affecting purebred and mixed breed dogs. There are quite a few that are ‘not a problem in SBT’...well, until it IS a problem. Testing routinely for common canine (vs strictly SBT issues) shows puppy buyers that you are using all available resources to ensure their puppy is as healthy as possible. Many Stafford breeder have chosen to ‘go the extra mile’ and screen breeding and performance dogs for the following:

Cardiac screening - Cardiac exam done by board-certified cardiologist (DACVIM) that screens for early-onset degenerative valve disease, cardiomyopathy or inherited arrhythmias. Heart disease was cause of death for 11% of Staffordshire Bull Terriers reported in the 2017 Stafford Health Survey.

Patellar Luxation - Devation/displacement of kneecap. Typical more common in smaller/medium breed dogs, but reported occasionally in the Staffordshire Bull Terriers.

Degenerative Myelopathy (DM) - degenerative spinal cord disease causing progressive loss of coordination and eventual paralysis. DNA testing available to the Staffordshire Bull Terrier for one the most common variant of this disease.

Thyroid screening - Hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) is a common metabolic disorder in all canines. Screening is done via blood test performed by your veterinarian and submitted to OFA through a participating laboratory. Resources:

Email kelly.cromwell72@gmail.com - SBTCA Health Committee Chair and TSK Health Editor OFA: www.ofa.org CHIC: www.caninehealthinfo.org PennHIP: www.pennhip.org Eye Care for Animals: www.eyecareforanimals.com CVCA - Cardiac Care for Pets: www.cvcavets.com VetGen (DNA testing): www.vetgen.com Paw Print Genetics (DNA testing): www.pawprintgenetics.com

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By Kelly Cromwell

Current SBTCA Breeder Code of Ethics: BREEDING should only be considered:
 A. With the intention of producing Staffords who are physically and mentally sound, of the proper temperament, and within the desired type and characteristics inherent to the breed as described in the official Staffordshire Bull Terrier breed standard. 
 B. When the breeding stock has been selected based upon the breed standard, merit of the individuals, genetics, pedigrees, and when every reasonable attempt has been made to determine that the dogs selected are in the best health, temperamentally sound and free of any serious inheritable genetic disease or defect including but not limited to: L-2-Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria (“L-2-HGA”), Hereditary Juvenile Cataracts (“HC”), Persistent Hyperplastic Primary Vitreous (“PHPV”), and Posterior Polar Subcapsular Cataracts (“PPSC”)
 The SBTCA encourages breeders to screen litters for PHPV before placement as it can be detected as early as 6 weeks of age. 
 C. When the breeder is in the position to offer proper care to the dam and the litter. Suitable homes are not always readily available, therefore the breeder must be committed to long term care and be able to provide the additional facilities needed for the physical and emotional development of the puppies. 
 D. Breeder must be prepared to ensure to the best of their ability that no stud dog or brood bitch owned by them is bred to any dog or bitch whose owner is directly or indirectly involved with any dog broker, puppy mill, pet shop that retails dogs, auctions, litter lot sales, or any other commercial enterprise whose business is involved in these activities.
 The SBTCA Strongly Recommends
 E. That all puppies are micro-chipped before they leave the breeder's house, with the breeder on the paperwork as an alternate contact.
 F. That all breeding stock is DNA tested for L-2-Hydroxyglutaric Aciduria (L2-HGA) and Hereditary Juvenile Cataracts (HC) as well as having a current CERF clearance (within a year) before being bred.
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HEALTH TESTING INFORMATION Remember, if you choose to breed from a carrier you must test the entire resulting litter to determine clears & carriers. Thus if you choose to keep a carrier from that litter, the same must be done for each subsequent litter resulting from breeding carriers. If you sell carrier pups, please consider spay/neuter so that more carriers are not produced. With the advent and ease of genetic testing, many of these diseases could be eliminated by only breeding clear to clear. To use a known carrier requires an extra step of responsibility. There is no excuse to breed an untested dog.

Animal Health Trust (L2HGA, HC, Genetics research, Diagnostics) http://www.ahtdnatesting.co.uk/ Lanwades Park Kentford Newmarket Suffolk, CB8 7UU p 01638 555621 email: dnatesting@aht.org.uk Paw Print Genetics (L2HGA, HC & Degenerative Myelopathy) www.pawprintgenetics.com 220 E. Rowan   Suite 220 Spokane, WA 99207 p 509-483-5950 VetGen  (L2HGA, HC, Degenerative Myelopathy, Coat Color Testing) www.vetgen.com 3728 Plaza Drive - Suite 1 Ann Arbor, MI 48108 p 734-669-8440 email: vetgen@vetgen.com Animal Genetics US (HC) www.animalgenetics.us Animal Genetics Europe (HC) www.animalgenetics.eu Orthopedic Foundation for Animals *Searchable database for test results: cardiac, CAER/eye, patellas, hips, elbows, DNA *Links to test information and submission applications *Breed statistics *Calendar of testing clinics www.ofa.org CHIC (Canine Health Information Center) www.caninehealthinfo.org

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HEALTH TESTING INFORMATION Remember, if you choose to breed from a carrier you must test the entire resulting litter to determine clears & carriers. Thus if you choose to keep a carrier from that litter, the same must be done for each subsequent litter resulting from breeding carriers. If you sell carrier pups, please consider spay/neuter so that more carriers are not produced. With the advent and ease of genetic testing, many of these diseases could be eliminated by only breeding clear to clear. To use a known carrier requires an extra step of responsibility. There is no excuse to breed an untested dog.

OTHER TESTING FACILITIES FOR L2-Hga and/or HC: FRANCE:

www.antagene.com

CZECH REPUBLIC: www.genomia.cz

GERMANY:

www.laboklin.de / www.laboklin.co.uk

SOUTH AFRICAN VETERINARY ASSOCIATION (SAVA): www.sava.co.za Tel: 012 345 1150

AUSTRALIAN VETERINARY ASSOCIATION: www.ava.com.au

NEW ZEALAND VETERINARY ASSOCIATION: www.nzva.org.nz

SWEDISH VETERINARY ASSOCIATION: www.svf.se Email: kansli@svf.se Tel: +46-8-545-559-20

*NOTE: A Board Certified Cardiologist must perform all Cardiac exams.

A qualified licensed Veterinarian can provide X-Ray films for hips, elbows and Patella.

Coat color testing for those wishing not to produce blues, dilutes or black and tan (tan pointed markings in any color or pattern) can be found at many labs worldwide now including VetGen, PawPrint Genetics & DDC Veterinary Labs in USA.

* NOTE: a CAER or PHPV test done by a canine ophthalmologist is NOT the same test as the DNA test for HC - BOTH tests should be carried out

* For DNA parentage testing please contact American Kennel Club in USA

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Discover Dogs – Crufts 2017

By Clare Robinson-Cox

So, for any of you regular readers, you may remember the article in last year’s TSK about Discover Dogs. If you have not seen it, please take a look as it provides an overview of what the whole Discover Dogs booths are about – JUNE 2016 Issue #2, Vol #5. This year, I will be bringing you a few of the stories behind the people who so kindly give up their time to come along and support the breed and promote our wonderful dogs.

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Discover Dogs – Crufts 2017 And so it begins…………………………………. The first couple we will hear from is Lynne and Trevor Bowler of the Trelynbow affix. Lynne and Trevor have done so much for the breed over the years, having been committee members of the SBTC for many years and are now committee members of the Heritage Museum. Lynne has shared a few memories of their time supporting Discover Dogs.

“We have been fortunate to be involved with Discover Dogs for 15 years or more and we really love to do it - talking about our breed and showing them off. We have met some lovely people and beautiful dogs.

Many years ago we took our dog, Butch, who was exceptionally fussy and wouldn't let anyone pass the stand without stroking him. Fred Gadd wrote an article in a magazine and mentioned Butch and his antics and called him the fastest licker in the west.

By Clare Robinson-Cox

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We also took our girl, Annie, as a puppy and had an elderly lady in a wheelchair come to look. This lady fell in love with Annie - she said she has had Staffords all her life but didn't have any now. I asked her if she would like to hold her so I put her on her lap and she actually cried.

We had our other boy, Spike, there one year and a man asked me if he liked kids I said yes he has had two for his breakfast, he asked if his son could come in the pen which he did and stayed for ages.

You hear all sorts of comments - long legged Staffords, Irish Staffords and we have been asked if ours are miniature Staffordshire Bull Terriers.

Roll on next Crufts hope we will be asked to do it again.”

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Discover Dogs – Crufts 2017

This is Lynne (kneeling)

with Peggy

By Clare Robinson-Cox

Trevor with Sam (on his lap) and Peggy

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This lady is meeting

Buddy The Rescue Stafford.

& Trevor with Sam. It’s amazing to hear Lynne’s memories of the lady in the wheelchair and how she cried when she held Annie. We had some wheelchair visitors this year to the booth too.

This lady is having a cuddle with Roxy.

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Discover Dogs – Crufts 2017

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The next regular supporter of Discover Dogs that will share some thoughts is Diane Rogers.

Diane has the Ynysstaff affix and has had dogs since she was first married in 1978. Here’s a picture of Diane at Discover Dogs this year. She goes on to say:

I then decided to join the SBT Club and then started showing - the bug had bitten me well and truly.   At that time I still had a horse but couldn't spend enough time with her with working full time as a conveyancing lawyer and showing my dog.   I very soon realised that just buying a puppy of a certain breed isn't enough to be successful in the showring so I bought a puppy who did very well and qualified for Crufts as a puppy.

Unfortunately, Bentley had to be PTS at the age of just 20 months as he had severely bitten me and the vet was of the opinion that he had a brain tumour as he suffered mini fits as well.    I still have the second puppy I bought who is Button and now 11 and a half years old !

“In 2005 I had just had to rehome my 3 dogs a German Shepherd X Rottweiller, a collie cross and an Irish Wolfhound due to my second marriage breakup and having to sell the house and move to rented accommodation.   My landlords were 'animal' people and agreed that I could have a dog.   I decided to choose between a Staffordshire Bull Terrier and a Whippet !   Not a great deal of difference.    Anyway there was an advert for Stafford puppies not far from me and I ended up with Bentley a pied chunky puppy.  

I have had quite a few dogs over the years and have met some wonderful people and some not so wonderful.   I really enjoy the dog world and especially meeting all the members of the public who attend Crufts and come to the Discover Dogs stand.  It is very tiring but oh so worth it.

I always remember that nobody knows everything and also no matter how much you read about dogs - the dogs haven't read the books !”

Well, they may not have read the books but they do think they are more human than dog at times, judging by some of these pictures:

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Discover Dogs â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Crufts 2017

By Clare Robinson-Cox

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This year, we were also very fortunate to have been visited by one of the Chelsea Pensioners

This gentleman is with Ronnie who belongs to Natalie and Richard. As you can see, Ronnie is a blue and Richard and Natalie have had some serious skin issues to deal with on Ronnie. But they have persevered and he is now a lovely boy. He has taken a few turns in the show ring and is a regular supporter of any events promoting the health and well-being of the breed.

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Discover Dogs – Crufts 2017

By Clare Robinson-Cox

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Another regular at Discover Dogs is Buddy The Rescue Stafford. Buddy had a tough start in life and was found by his present owners, Nicola and Jon, as he had been abandoned – locked in a cage in his own excrement. He also had severe skin problems and had to have part of his tail removed as a result of the severity of the infection. But, despite this awful start in life, Buddy still loves people and really enjoys spending time at Discover Dogs.

Nicola sharing Buddy’s story with a visitor to the booth.

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Another Discover Dogs longstanding supporter (I would say veteran, but she’ll kill me!!) is Gill McDermott. Gill has organised and helped with Discover Dogs for many years and this year she brought along her ever-faithful boy – Yan

Emma and Yan

As you have probably noticed, we didn’t manage to get a snap of Gill with Yan as she is quite camera-shy, but Aid (Porter) and Emma (Makin) regularly handle Yan at the SBTC Ringcraft Club and, as they don’t currently have a dog of their own, Yan adopts them whenever he can!! Hopefully next year Aid and Emma will have another Stafford of their own. But until then, they will try and “steal” anyone’s!!

Aid and Yan

And here is Aid again, this time with Ellie. This time he is joined by Keith and Beau and John with Roxy

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Keith and Sue Price are another couple who always come along and support the breed whenever they can. They have previously had other breeds of dog but Beau, who is now 7, is their first Stafford. Keith and Sue have had some success with Beau in the showring, having been placed at Crufts a few years ago!! Ellie has also taken her turn in the ring and done some winning too. Keith and Sue are both members of the East Midlands SBTC but also support the SBTC Handling Club whenever possible.

Beau and Ellie

The other member of “The Three Amigo’s” in the picture above is John Hillman who, with his wife, Maria, are proud owners of Roxy. John and Maria have had Staffords for almost 30 years but

Roxy & Maria meeting a young lady in a

have recently ventured into the showring with Roxy. They are also committee members of the Heritage Museum and regulars at the SBTC Handling Club where Roxy is put through her paces. Roxy was in an earlier photograph Aid andwhere Yan she was meeting the lady in the wheelchair. In the below photographs, she is showing just how good Staffords are with children.

wheelchair.

This is another lovely picture of Staffords meeting kids – this time its Oscar and Rosie kissing a little girl.

Rosie also loves the attention and here she is with Kaine

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Discover Dogs – Crufts 2017

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Finally, to end with a real success story from Discover Dogs. Last year in 2016, a couple came to chat with me about the breed while I was at Discover Dogs. This couple were thinking of getting a dog but had not decided which breed they wanted, though they had narrowed it to 3 breeds, Staffords being one of them. I chatted for a while with this couple, who introduced themselves as Steve and Baz Tomlinson. After asking me quite a few questions, as I would encourage

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This is Chester, relaxing at Steve’s feet

anyone buying any dog to do, they thanked me for my time and went off to see the other breeds on their shortlist. However, less than a week later, I had a telephone call from Steve, saying they had decided that a Stafford was the breed for them and the rest, they say, is history!! During late summer 2016, Steve and Baz welcomed Chester to their home and, I think I’m right in saying, they are fairly smitten with him!! They regularly attend the SBTC Handling Club, Chester has progressed to Silver Good Citizen Dog Scheme and is now training for his gold and they kindly came along to Discover Dogs to show what a valuable role our time on the booth can be for those people searching for the right dog. And just a few more general photo’s from across the weekend, showing just how busy we were.

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Somewhere Over the Rainbow By Cindy Bundy Spring is here and with it comes the pure warmth of the sun as it gently awakens the delicate, fragrant flowers and all the wild babies of feather and fur. Spring is a time of birth, life, awakenings. Just as spring brings life, winter brings darker days, cold nights and death. The winter usually brings about a higher incident of canine deaths, and this winter was no exception. Many of us lost one of our beloved Stafford friends over the past few months. Death is inevitable. We can’t cheat it, we can’t hide from it, we can’t change the fact that it will and does happen. When it happens to one of our beloved dogs, it brings with it a roller coaster of emotions. Unlike the death of a human loved one, many people don’t know how to grieve the loss of their four-legged friend. We all deal with grief in many ways. Some people hide their sadness. They feel no one will understand that they are devastated at the passing of their canine companion. They may feel that it is not right to compare the death of their dog to that of Aunt Betty or Grandfather Paul, even though they hurt so bad they can barely breathe. There are those who grieve so intensely for their pet that they can barely get out of bed in the morning. They withdraw into profound depression and feel they will never be the same person they were before their loss. They too feel no one would understand how a dog could affect one so deeply. Many fall in between. Still unsure how they should feel. We have all heard people say they will never get another dog again. The hurt is just too much. Others go out right away and get a new dog. Not to replace the one that died, but just because the thought of not having a dog, or two or three is just unfathomable.

There is no right or wrong way to grieve. Grief is like a jigsaw puzzle of a heart with a huge piece missing. Yes, grief comes in stages, but it is not set in stone which stage you experience first or if you will even experience all of them. The five stages of grief are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. When your dog dies, of course you are sad. Sadness is experienced by practically everyone who suffers a loss to death. You need to know that it is okay to be sad. It is okay to cry, yes, even for a dog. It is okay to feel as sad at the death of your dog as you were at losing any human you know. The loss of a pet can be just as hard to process as that of a human and there is absolutely nothing wrong with feeling that way. Recent studies show that some people grieve harder and longer for a pet than they do for a human counterpart. Why, because a dog gives you it’s all. It gives you love, it gives you companionship, it gives you a sense of responsibility without conditions. All it asks is that you feed it and nurture it and love it. During the many years I was a child grief facilitator, I found that the children would talk about the loss of a pet before they would talk about their parent or sibling who died. You also need to know that it is okay to be happy. It is okay to laugh, to socialize with friends and it is okay to get another dog right away. It is also okay not to get another dog. It is okay to wait until you feel comfortable getting another pet if and when you are ready. !75


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Somewhere Over the Rainbow By Cindy Bundy Denial is a strange feeling. We don’t want to believe our dear dog is dying or has died. It just doesn’t seem real. You want to wake up from that bad dream and everything be what it was before that fateful day. Your sweet Stafford at your side, smiling up at you with that big goofy grin. Then reality sets in and you can’t deny that your wonderful companion is gone, forever. How many times have you heard your dog walking down the hall or give a woof to come in the house even though they have been dead for weeks. How many times have you caught a glimpse of your dog out of the corner of your eye. You swear he was there. I believe they are there. I believe they come back just to let you know they are still with you. In your heart and in your memories, today, tomorrow and forever. I take great comfort in those phantom sightings.

You are angry at the Vet for not doing more. You are angry at your family and friends because they don’t understand how you can be so upset about a dog. You are angry because no one wants to talk to you about Rover, when all you want to do is talk about the dog that shared so much of your life. A dog who made you who you are. A dog that you were proud of and loved to your very core. Anger at others, anger at yourself. You can even be angry at your loving

Stafford that just died, just because he died. If family and friends don’t understand, fine. They are probably very uncomfortable talking about death, any death. Death is not an easy subject to talk about. It brings feeling to the surface that they may have suppressed for some time. Talking to you about your dog dying may bring up painful memories for them. Try not to be too hard on those people. They may think that talking about your dog will make you sad, and they don’t want you to be sad. Then there are those just plain, cold people, who never had any love for any animal. I pity those people who never knew the love of a dog. I may not want to be friends with them, but pity them, I do.

We all bargain whether we like to or not. Why did my dog have to die? Why him or her? I loved her so much. I tried everything I could do to save him. Why did the repairman leave the gate open? Why did I not have my dog in a crate in the car? Why didn’t I realize my dog was that sick? Why did I not get to the Vet sooner? Why did it have to happen to me? Why didn’t the veterinarian find a cure? Why didn’t I spend more money on treatment? Why did I spend so much money? Why didn’t I do more? Why didn’t he pass in his sleep. Did I euthanize too soon? Why? Why? Why? !76


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CONTINUED

Somewhere Over the Rainbow By Cindy Bundy The anger, the guilt. It all comes rushing

and break the crust as you walk, you will

at you. You can’t stop the feelings, they

get through the drift. You never get over,

come in waves. The shoulda, woulda,

but you do get through it.

coulda’s of life. We have all been there. What you need to know is you did all you could. If treatment was so expensive that you would put yourself into an unsurmountable debt, then you have to sit back and tell yourself that you did what you could with what you had. Stop beating yourself up over that. Accidents happen too. You can’t change what happened, even though in your mind, that is exactly what you do, over and over and over again.

When I went through grief training we talked about any difference in losing a pet as opposed to losing a person. We came to the conclusion that the only real difference was that with a pet you don’t say “If only Fluffy was here to see the first grandchild” or “Too bad Spot never got to see the new house”. You don’t say “Rocky missed the wedding of Cousin Jim”. We all felt that losing a pet can be just as devastating as losing a person, especially to someone who has

Finally there is acceptance. We all must

no human family near. For our dogs are

accept what happens, whether we want

family and we do love them immensely.

to or not. The acceptance may come right away, or it may take years. For some it will never come. They say time heals all wounds. Time lessens the pain but you never really get over it. We always tell the children that you get through grief, not over it. Think about grief as a giant snowdrift. Looking at it is overwhelming. This giant wall of sadness and pain. You think that you will never get over it. And that is true. If you try to climb on top of the drift, you keep falling through the crust of the snow. It wears you out and you feel like quitting, you feel like you are drowning in sorrow. But if you slowly take one step at a time

So what can you do to get through that massive drift of grief? First, forgive yourself. You did all you could, period. Yes, maybe you could have spent thousands on treatment. Yes, maybe you could have double checked the gate. Yes, maybe you could have gotten to the Vet sooner, but that doesn’t change the past. That also doesn’t make you a bad person. So forgive yourself, you did nothing wrong. Find family and friends who feel the same way you do about animals. They can be a huge support network for you. Whether it is in person or on social media, seek people who you

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CONTINUED

Somewhere Over the Rainbow By Cindy Bundy know are open to talking to you about your dog. Make a memorial for your pet. I have a memorial wall where I hang pictures and collars. I have a beautiful tabletop chest that I put special keepsakes of my dogs that have died. I open it and reflex on why those items were so special to me. You can use a wall, a table top, a shelf, or a chest or box. Light on candle, donate to a shelter or medical research in your dogs name. I wear memorial necklaces that I have engraved with my dogs names. Inside I have a bit of their hair. You can use cremains. I, for some reason, want something with their DNA, so I go with hair. The weight of the pendant is comforting to me. I catch myself just holding the pendant in my hand and it makes me smile as I think of my dogs. I recently had a friend comment on my pendants. She wanted to know if it was odd to make one while her dog was still alive. Of course it is okay. Wearing a pendant with your dogs hair means they are always with you. When that fateful day arrives and you have to say goodbye, your dog is already with you, around your neck, close to your heart.

Remember you are not alone. There is always someone out there who has

experienced what you have. It is not the same, for it is different for everyone, but knowing you are not alone in your thoughts and feelings can be a great help on your road to healing. Know that what you are feeling is normal. As the children at group would say, a new normal. One without your beloved pet. You also need to recognize that if your sadness is so intense that you think you can’t possibly go on, you may need to consider outside help. Whether it be in the form of bereavement groups, counseling or therapy. It is not a sign of weakness or shame to seek professional help.

If you get a call from a friend who lost a pet and is having a hard time, never tell them to get over it, because you don’t. Never tell them it is only a dog. It is not, it was an integral part of the family dynamics. Never tell them enough time has passed, for grief has no time limit. Never push another dog on that person. When the time is right, they will know it. Do, however, be there for them. Don’t judge what that person did or did not do for their dog during their illness or accident. Don’t judge if they didn’t mortgage their home to pay for expensive medical treatments. !78


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CONTINUED

Somewhere Over the Rainbow Don’t judge if the dog died as the result of an accident, whether at home or in a vehicle, for they are feeling enough guilt. Offer condolences, send a loving note, make a phone call, give a hug. We all know our wonderful Staffords don’t live anywhere near as long as we wish they would, so cherish them for the time you have with them. Love them for who they are. Treasure their memory when they are gone and be there for each other when that beautiful life is no longer on this earth. We all know the poem “The Rainbow Bridge”. I want to believe that somewhere over the rainbow I will see all my fabulous dogs again, for how can it be heaven if they are not there!

This memorial jewelry came from Perfect Memorials. They offer a huge selection, have great prices & fast service.

Most colleges and universities that have veterinary schools, offer pet bereavement services. You don't have to live in the state !79 of the college to utilize their services.


THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

CONTINUED

Somewhere Over the Rainbow By Cindy Bundy

Just this side of heaven is a place called Rainbow Bridge. When an animal dies that has been especially close to someone here, that pet goes to Rainbow Bridge. There are meadows and hills for all of our special friends so they can run and play together. There is plenty of food, water and sunshine, and our friends are warm and comfortable. All the animals who had been ill and old are restored to health and vigor. Those who were hurt or maimed are made whole and strong again, just as we remember them in our dreams of days and times gone by. The animals are happy and content, except for one small thing; they each miss someone very special to them, who had to be left behind. They all run and play together, but the day comes when one suddenly stops and looks into the distance. His bright eyes are intent. His eager body quivers. Suddenly he begins to run from the group, flying over the green grass, his legs carrying him faster and faster. You have been spotted, and when you and your special friend finally meet, you cling together in joyous reunion, never to be parted again. The happy kisses rain upon your face; your hands again caress the beloved head, and you look once more into the trusting eyes of your pet, so long gone from your life but never absent from your heart. Then you cross Rainbow Bridge together.... !80


RECIPES FOR YOUR STAFFORD THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

BIRTHDAY CAKE Makes: 1 doggy birthday cake •

1 egg

65g peanut butter

60ml vegetable oil

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

80g honey

135g grated carrots

120g wholemeal flour

1 teaspoon bicarbonate of soda

METHOD: Prep: 20min ›  Cook: 40min  ›  Ready in: 1hr  1. Preheat oven to 180 C / Gas 4. Grease a ring cake tin or medium square tin. 2.

Combine the egg, peanut butter, oil, vanilla, and honey, if desired, in a large bowl;

blend well. Stir in the carrots and mix thoroughly. Sift together the flour and bicarb and fold into the carrot mixture. Spoon cake mixture into prepared tin. 3.

Bake in preheated oven for 40 minutes. Let cake cool in pan for 10 minutes; then

turn out onto a cooling rack to cool completely. !81


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RESCUE ORGANIZATIONS WORLDWIDE

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

w w w. s t a f f i e s o n l i n e . o r g . u k

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC.

FROM THE MANAGING EDITOR If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and man. Hello Everyone Davies and well all had a different spin on the Welcome to this edition of the Stafford Knot I hope all you all enjoy the read. A special welcome to three  new team members Kelly Cromwell who has volunteered to be our Health Editor. Krissy Stanford who will be in charge of Social Media and last but not least to Debra Roseman as our Performance Editor.  This edition has many interesting articles and we thank everyone who has contributed.  We would really like more people to advertise their dogs, as proceeds go to support many Rescue's around the world. Sadly social media today has affected many on line magazine and also paper magazines as we

Stafford. The feedback regarding the Illustrated Standard was excellent and now its available in book form can only be a good thing as so many new to the breed want to know what the Stafford should look like. So get your copy go to the link NOW...  Once again thank you to everyone who has contributed, to the team for all their hard work and a special thank you to Lynn Caswell who has the task of putting the magazine together and who I know tears her hair out sometimes.  I am off to South Africa end of June to judge and I hope to do an article for the December edition on the Stafford in South Africa. 

can all advertise our dogs etc on Facebook, Instagram etc.

Finally we do need someone who is prepared to help with design work for adverts as they come in,

The world of Staffords is changing none more so than in the UK with registrations down, to under

so anyone out there who is interested please let one of the team know.

5000 in 2016. Compared to 12 years ago when they were at record highs of over 14,000. 

Helen Reaney Managing Editor

Thankfully with on line magazines like this we can show the positive side of the breed in all its activities from showing, agility, obedience, therapy dogs and working dogs. I judged in Stockholm in February and saw some wonderful dogs, I also did a breed seminar again to around 80 people, I used the Illustrated Breed Standard and the feedback and the contribution those in the room made was amazing, my co judges that weekend were Dr Archie Bryden and Mark

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC.

FROM THE EDITOR It’s no coincidence that man’s best friend cannot talk. Hello fellow Stafford lovers! for us - its a quality product and I feel you will be Firstly let me thank you all for the support given to The Stafford Knot, Inc. over these last 8-9 years. We began as a small monthly newsletter whose goals were to promote health testing in the breed, share informational articles and raise much needed funding for Staffordshire Bull Terrier rescues

happy with them. Don’t forget to download the affordable eBook version to your phones and tablets so that you will always have it handy to share should the need arise. We made the eBook a low cost option hoping to attract judges and provisionals to the breed.

worldwide. We have done all of this and more! Thanks to you we have been able to grow into a hugely successful company with a worldwide presence and are followed by 1000’s of people from all over the world on FB, IG, Twitter, website and email. We have raised

I would also like to thank Jason Nicolai for his dedication to editing and writing - taking dozens of seemingly disjointed parts and helping them make sense. Jason has worked on the last few versions of the book and seminar and has done so with the

many thousands of dollars for rescues, we have now sold

tenacity of a Stafford. Kudos Jason!

hundreds of books in three formats and our little monthly newsletter has grown into a 50-70

I would like to welcome our new

page online magazine which

team members - Health Editor

publishes twice annually.

Kelly Cromwell, Performance Editor Debra Roseman and Social Media Director Krissy Stanford. You

Speaking of our new books, many thanks to all who worked so hard over the years perfecting the text and submitting

ladies will make a fantastic addition to our already thriving staff here at TSK and I

information and images. We are forever grateful to talented artist Maurizio Molinari whose patience and

look forward to watching you all shine!

perfection really make these books the collectibles

We hope you will enjoy another packed edition of

they are. Without all of the many people involved this could not have been as big of a success as it is.

the magazine and think about submitting your articles and advertisements for our next issue!

As you all know, 100% of the profit we bring in from

Lynn Caswell

book sales will be donated to the TSK rescue fund just like items sold on our fundraising page and all

Sr. Editor, Creative Director

advertisements sold. Our publisher does take a rather large cut of book sales but they also take orders, print the books and do all of our distribution

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC.

FROM THE HEALTH EDITOR People love dogs. You can never go wrong adding a dog to the story. Hi everyone! Kelly Cromwell here. I am honored and excited to join The Stafford Knot team! I live in Maryland where I work as Team Leader and Employee Training Facilitator for CVCACardiac Care for Pets, the largest veterinary cardiology service in the world. I've been with CVCA for the past 8 years, but prior to that have worked as a veterinary technician and manager in emergency and critical care, general practice and at a large equine veterinary facility. 
 I’ve always had a strong passion for promoting health-conscious breeding, but having worked in cardiology for the last eight years, my interest has only grown stronger as my own knowledge base expands in regards to heritable and congenital

another breed as much as I do the Staffordshire Bull Terrier. I currently share my life with three Staffords (Ballyhoo The Black Rainbow - Midge, CH Dynastaff Always & Never RATS - Jemma and Mat-Staff Howling Commando RA - Dugan) and one Australian Cattle Dog (Jasper). We play and compete in agility, conformation, rally obedience, nosework and barn hunt. Over the last 20 years, I’ve bred four litters (three ACD, one SBT) under the Ballyhoo affix. I look forward to sharing thoughts, information and articles to help spread awareness of health issues affecting the Staffordshire Bull Terrier with you all!

issues. I am inspired to help encourage others to learn more about genetic health issues and to help bridge the gap between veterinary medicine and breeder/owners. My first dog, an Australian Cattle Dog named Duffy (CH Jaroo's Sing Bleu Silver NA HIC) came into my life when I was 20 years old. He was my first AKC champion, first agility title and first herding title partner. Together with him and his daughter, Jess, I was owned by ACDs for almost 20 years. My first Stafford came along while I was looking for a new companion that would be better suited to apartment living than my ACDs. I had the opportunity to meet a Stafford at the vet clinic I was working in at the time and was instantly smitten. They are (as we all know)

Kelly Cromwell

PERFECT...active, friendly, funny, snuggly little weirdos and I couldn’t imagine myself loving

Health Editor


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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC.

FROM THE PERFORMANCE EDITOR Dogs are the magicians of the universe.

While Deb has owned and trained dogs her entire life, she is a relative newcomer to the world of Staffordshire Bull Terriers. She met her first Staffords in the early 2000s while attending agility trials with her rescued Elkhound and PitBull. She was smitten immediately by these spunky, muscular yet athletic dogs, but

Stafford clubs at both the National and local level and uses these commitments to promote Staffords in sports. Deb strongly believes that an active lifestyle is important for any breed of dog and encourages everyone to explore activities that they can do with their Staffords! She is also passionate about rescue and does what she can to help.

spent several more years rescuing and rehabbing shelter dogs before

Deb Roseman Performance Editor

obtaining a Stafford of her own. Deb obtained her first Stafford “Bonnie” in August of 2010 (CH Elivid’s Shaken Not Stirred CD BN RN CAA CGC CD-C NW2 L1E L1V). She added “Harley” to the pack in 2015 (CH Ciera Homebrewed Dirty Side Down OA OAJ OF RATO NW1). Deb participates in all kinds of activities with her Staffords including conformation, agility, obedience, rally, barn hunt, nosework, lure coursing, tracking... amongst other things! Deb holds positions in

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC.

FROM THE SOCIAL MEDIA DIRECTOR In times of joy, all of us wished we possessed a tail we could wag.

It is my goal to take TSK and expand the HI! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Krissy Stanford, here to assist The

viewer base through social media outlets,

Stafford Knot in the realm of social media

such as Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

exposure. I currently own two shiba inus

There are numerous fanciers of the breed

and am an avid fan of the Staffordshire Bull

and rescue work that may not own a SBT

Terrier, having gone to shows to support

but may some day or who may just want to

and watch them over the last ten+ years.

help a good cause. Instagram and

My background is in the American Pit Bull

Facebook are growing networks in which

Terrier where I have shown and competed in

TSK can and will benefit from. Fundraising

performance events since I was 17 years of

activities, SBTs in need, and an awareness

age. I am a weight pull and conformation

of what TSK is and does will be showcased

judge for an APBT specific registry and will

for both existing and new followers. I am

always have an appreciation for the terrier breeds, more specifically the bull breeds.

planning on hold some fun interactive posts and giveaways to expand our viewer base and keep followers engaged.

Krissy Stanford Social Media Director

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

STAFFORDS OF THE PAST

Ch Fordson Major

Ch Tillcarr Ring of Fire

Ch Wallace The Wizard

Photos © Brian Owen & Linda McCulloch - used by permission for TSK, Inc.

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THE STAFFORD KNOT, INC. 501(C)3

STAFFORDS OF THE PAST

en

Ch Wardrum Dixie Que

gain

CH Waystaff Strikes A

k JW Ch Waystaff Strikes Bac

Photos © Brian Owen & Linda McCulloch - used by permission for TSK, Inc.

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The Stafford Knot - June 2017 - Issue 1, Vol 6  

The Stafford Knot, Inc. is an independent publication and not affiliated with any specific breed club. TSK,Inc. is a collaborative effort fr...

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