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Chabot College TRUTH, LIBERTY & INTEGRITY

The Spectator www.thechabotspectator.com

Hayward, California

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Your vote, your electors, your president By Jessica Caballero

In some states, such defectors are called could be against the Electoral College system. “faithless electors” and can sometimes be fined Federal law dictates that the Electoral ColOn Nov. 6, 2012, the public will cast their votes or punished for going against their state or dis- lege meets on the first Monday after the second for the next president of the United States, or will trict’s popular vote. Wednesday in December. This year, that will be they? Congressional nominees, federal govern- on Dec. 17, 2012. Student Youssef Riahi feels that voting “sym- ment employees, as well as members of Congress The results of the election aren’t actually conbolizes our willingness to take actions on our are all prohibited by the California Elections firmed until January 6, 2013. That’s when the own behalf. Sure, you can be represented electors’ votes are opened and read by someone else who gets paid to do so, but by the president of the Senate in when you unapologetically represent yourfront of both houses of Congress. self, your inner self gets paid.” Presently, most states follow the In truth, when you receive your “I voted!” winner-take-all or proportional repsticker, it means you have chosen to trust resentation systems. your vote to an elector in the Electoral ColWinner-take-all is exactly as it lege - whose 538 citizens have the real decisounds: the public votes and the sion in their hands. majority wins the state, giving the The magic number Mitt Romney and candidate who won all of the Barack Obama will be chasing on election electoral votes; this is the process night is 270 electoral votes - the majority plus in California. one, out of 538 possible votes. ) With proportional representaNK I According to the article “The History of H tion, states are divided into districts (I T the Electoral College” by Kevin Bonsor, each -- each with their own electors -state has a number of electors equal to its U.S. and those electors place their votes senators plus the number of representatives, following the popular vote. determined by population of the state. The electoral votes in that state The public is able to project the winners are then split according to the peron election night by the number of votes each centage of districts each candidate state is supposed to be worth. won. As of the 2010 census, California is worth The Electoral College was cre55 electoral votes - more than any other state. ated by the founding fathers, when Electors are average citizens who have they wrote the Constitution, who Graphic by Allen S. Lin pledged to vote along their chosen party line Code (Division 7, Section 7100) from being an were looking for a way to compromise between when their candidate wins the popular vote. elector, keeping the balance between executive allowing Congress to elect the President and In most cases, these people have been nomi- and legislative branches of our government. how to honor the popular vote. nated or voted on by their state party committee, Also barred are citizens who have “engaged “I like the idea, [of the Electoral College] and have many years of service with their party, and in insurrection or rebellion” against the U.S., as it’s not a popular idea among young people when usually have close personal or political ties with stated by the U.S. National Archives and Records they find out they’re not really voting for their the candidate. Administration. president,” said ICC member Skye Ontiveros, When a vote is cast in a polling place or via This idea is troubling to students like Camille “It’s not a democracy, it is a representative deabsentee ballot on Election Day, that vote is re- Cristobal, “We are ‘the people’ and if we don’t mocracy, and we have representatives for a good ally one in a pool of influence for an elector, but vote we are letting other people decide the rules reason. “Among industrial nations, we have one an elector is not always required by law to follow we are governed by and the way we live our lives.” of the lowest educational systems, people don’t the popular vote in their area. It i s u n d e r s t a n d a b l e w hy some people even know the political system.”

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Polling stations near Chabot College

Election day is just around the corner. If you do not know where your polling place is, please visit the Alameda Election Info page at https://www.acgov.org. Once you are on the page, you will need your address and date of birth to gather your election day information.

Graphic by Allen S. Lin

• A - Precinct 420500 Ochoa Middle School - Room 27 2121 Depot Road, Hayward, Calif. • B - Precinct 420600 Fire Station 6 Classroom Rear 1401 West Winton Avenue, Hayward, Calif. • C - Precinct 420700 Southland Mall Community Room A (Side A) 1 Southland Mall, Hayward, Calif. • D - Precinct 421000 Southland Mall Community room A (Side B) 1 Southland Mall, Hayward, Calif. • E - Precinct 420900 Alameda County Office of Education building hall B-C 313 West Winton Avenue, Hayward, Calif. • F - Precinct 421100 Park Elementary School Hallway 411 Larchmont Street, Hayward, Calif.


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Hayward, California

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Why the major spike? Expensive summer gas, cheap winter gas By Ray Magallon

rmagallon@thechabotspectator.com

In the wake of the Richmond refinery fire and the power failure of another refinery in Torrence, Californians saw a major spike in gas prices. In the Bay Area gas prices soared well over $4.50 seemingly overnight, leaving Californians to pay record breaking highs for the state. The American Automobile Association (AAA) is an auto club that serves 49 of the 50 states and reports that the national average of regular gas is currently $3.73. While gas prices continue to back down after the spike, Californians are still paying well above the national average. This affects hundreds of students at Chabot, “I paid $47 last time at the pump, I usually pay about $30,” says Ashlynn Swenson, a biology major here at Chabot, “I’m a delivery driver, I get paid for delivery, I don’t get [more] if gas prices go up.”

According to “Popular Mechanics” magazine, there are around 20 different blends of gasoline in the United States. Each blend is different to control the amount of volatile organic compounds mixed in. These compounds are likely to evaporate in higher heat and are the main cause of smog. Each of these types of gas is measured on the Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) scale that measures how easy the gas is to vaporize, and how bad it is for the environment. The higher the RVP is, the more expensive the cost of the gas will be. The RVP in summer grade fuel is much different than in winter grade fuel. Summer grade fuel is better for the environment because of a lower RVP and winter grade is cheaper but with more emissions. In the cooler months, the higher amounts of smog don’t affect the environment as greatly and costs a lot less.

With gas prices soaring out of control in California, Gov. Jerry Brown ordered state smog regulators to allow refineries to release our winter blend gas earlier than most years when we release them on October 31. State senators Barbara Boxer and Dianne Feinstein have both released statements about the cost of gas in recent times. Boxer called on the Department of Oil and Gas Price Fraud Group to look into the recent rise of gas affecting Californians. “It is critical that we ensure that these shutdowns are not part of any broader effort to deliberately keep gasoline supplies tight, and prices high, at the expense of the consumer.” Over the last week after the winter gasoline was released, we have seen gas prices drop pretty dramatically with gas prices down to $4.31 at some gas stations near Chabot College. Hopefully as time goes on we will see it drop more.

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EDITORS Editor-in-Chief ......................................................... Allen S. Lin

editor@thechabotspectator.com

Business/Managing ......................................... Jessica Caballero

jcaballero@thechabotspectator.com

Chief Copy Editor .............................................. Sarah Suennen

ssuennen@thechabotspectator.com

News ................................................................. A. Marcus Frates news@thechabotspectator.com

Campus ................................................................... Galia Abushi

campus@thechabotspectator.com

Local ................................................................ Cristoffer Zuniga

local@thechabotspectator.com

Scene ............................................................... Sergio Almodovar scene@thechabotspectator.com

Sports .........................................................................Tammy Lee sports@thechabotspectator.com

Photo ....................................................................... Sam Stringer photo@thechabotspectator.com

Multimedia ........................................................... DaSean Smith

dsmith@thechabotspectator.com

Online ........................................................................ Brian Chua

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Hayward, California

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Yamada’s mission to restore Fukushima By Sergio Almodovar

A month after the disaster, Yamada came up with an idea to make a change. He wanted to Founder of the Skilled Veterans Corps for Fukushima (SVCF) Yasuteru Yamada is on a tour bring in a group of elderly skilled men to help that stopped at Chabot College on Thursday, with the infrastructure of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station because the chance of raOct. 18, 2012. Yamada is visiting community colleges and diation damage is very low for elderly people. “I am 73 and, on average, I probably have 13 universities in order to gain support from stuto 15 years left to live; Even if I were exposed dents in bringing jobs to elderly, skilled veterans to radiation, cancer could take 20 or 30 years or longer to develop. Therefore, us older ones have less chance of getting cancer.” said Yamada. Yamada felt the responsibility of fixing what was destroyed from the tsunami is the responsibility of the elderly. salmodovar@thechabotspectator.com

“We need to clean up the mess for the next generation.” The main problem is that SVCF has not gained any support from the owner of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) in their proposition of having elderly men working (to reduce young men working) on the power plant. TEPCO admired their proposition, but did not comply. SVCF feels that plant Fukushima Daiichi should be independent from TEPCO, “We ask to act out together with us,” expressed Yamada. For more information about SVCF, visit http://fukushimaresponse.org.

Left: Yasuteru Yamada,73, receives translation assistance from Shige Kajiwara (right), 61, math instructor at Chabot College during a question and answer session after the presentation.

ALLEN S. LIN/STAFF PHOTOS

to help restore the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Power Station in March 2011. Yamada made a special appearance hosted by philosophy instructor Jeff Zittrain. One of Yamada’s biggest concerns was that Fukushima brought about a worldwide change. Over 45 percent of the world was affected by Yasuteru Yamada,73, founder of the Skilled Veterans Corps for Fukushima (SVCF) gives a presentation on SVCF’s misFukushima. sion to stabilize the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station in Japan to Chabot College students in Hayward, Calif.


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Hayward, California

Thursday, October 25, 2012

Business education seminar AS Transfer degrees

on transferring to a four-year school. It is designed for students who are new to the working field. It also may be a good decision for students looking to expand their professional growth or need to change their career. It requires 30-38 units of the student’s major with an additional 19 units of general education courses. Overall, there should be a minimum of 60 units completed. The AS

math sequence. It could entail a number of courses and therefore they [students] need to start early. By Galia Abushi “Another important part of why we’re doing gabushi@thechabotspectator.com this is because if students declare their major, The business administration and faculty held a then it gives them a better chance of having the seminar in the events center last Monday, Oct. 15 classes available that they need,” she added. that was open to all students to explore business “They’re [students] doing the right thing…getting and transfer opportunities. the education. It will make a difference in their The topics that were discussed were quality of life and their ability to achieve transfer opportunities, business certificate their goals. So I applaud them.” programs, business education plans and Chabot also offers certificate programs. programs to help students achieve degrees These programs are intended to help in business. with employee skills and career and Chabot offers AS-Transfer degrees, development growth in students’ fields. which are business administration degrees There is no general education courses intended for students who plan on required for a certificate, just 18-30 units transferring to four-year schools, AS of your major. Classes are available in the degrees, for students who don’t plan on morning, day time, evening and online. A transferring, certificate programs and more. certificate can be finished in 2-3 semesters Dmitriy Kalyagin,who is a business for students who are part-time. instructor here at Chabot said, “The message Of the 10 majors that are offered, five is mostly start planning your educational can be completed fully online. They are plan early, get help as soon as possible, management, marketing, bookkeeping, [and] see counseling.” accounting technician and health care During the presentation, professor management. The other five are human Kalyagin explained that the AS-T degree is resource assistant, business transfer, the only guaranteed path to California State retailing & retail management, small University or CSU. It requires 27-30 units business management and real estate. of the student’s major, with an additional Gabrielle Medina, a Chabot student 29 units of general education courses. who attended the seminar said, “I did Total, there must be a minimum of 60 units five semesters here, and out of the five, completed to achieve this degree. two I dropped [classes]. So I was worried The AS-T degree requires students The above listing is a suggested sequence and some courses may have that would look bad for me to transfer so to take only one math course. The prerequisites. Students may take courses in any sequence except where knowing that it [the AS-T degree] secures a prerequisite applies. recommended math course is Math 43. you to transfer…makes me interested * Business 7, Accounting for Small Business, is strongly recommended He also explained the transfer now.” opportunities offered at Chabot. The website before you take Business 1A. “I got a lot of information about what I GRAPHIC BY ALLEN S. LIN http://www.assist.org helps students find need to transfer, what degrees I should really schools that they are able to transfer to, and the degree is available for accounting, business, and aim for,” says Franciska Karbobich, also a Chabot majors that are offered at those schools. Counselors retail management. student. “It seems like I’m on the right track.” and the Transfer & Employment Center can help “The important message is just plan early,” For more information on degrees and students with questions or advice that may be says Lynn Klein, a full-time faculty member of the transferring, visit http://www.chabotcollege.edu/ needed on transferring schools. business department. “One of the big obstacles to BUS. Students can also contact Lynn Klein, or The AS degree is for students who don’t plan students achieving their goals here at Chabot is the Dmitriy Kalyagin for more information.

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Life Goes On for “AR”

Good Kid, M.A.A.D City

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The Spectator Oct. 25, 2012  

Print Issue for 10/25/2012

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