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Page 2 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan


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SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

The Southern There is no place quite like here D welcomes you outhern Illinois is a beautiful region and home of SIU Carbondale. One of the best parts of my job is being an ambassador to this region, and it is a pleasure to welcome you to this great area as you continue your education. To help in your transition, this section offers a compilation of information FROM THE designed to help you acclimate to SIU PUBLISHER and the region. We know you’ll find it BOB useful, and recommend keeping it WILLIAMS accessible in the weeks ahead. More of you are going online for news, and we’re online, too. We generate a multitude of content available through both print and electronic formats. By using print- and Internet-based delivery methods, you receive the best and most comprehensive local news coverage in the region. This is information you can use, not only about SIU and the Salukis, but also about the wide variety of regional activities, festivals, sporting and cultural events and others exciting opportunities. We encourage you to check us out at thesouthern.com, download our smartphone apps or become a fan of The Southern Illinoisan on Facebook. We also encourage you to explore Southern Illinois and discover the vast natural beauty of this region. Many vineyards and orchards are located throughout the region, and our communities offer a wide variety of festivals that you won’t want to miss. The many beautiful lakes, forests, bluffs and rivers make for great outdoor adventures. Don’t be surprised by the warm welcome you’ll encounter from local residents you meet along the way; hospitality is just part of our nature here. Again, welcome. SIU is a great university and we know you are in for an exciting year. We’re glad you’re here and we wish you the best of luck in all that you do.

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BOB WILLIAMS is publisher of The Southern Illinoisan.

Page 4 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan

ear new and returning SIU students: I’m looking forward to your arrival in Carbondale. Although there are a number of concerts and cultural events that take place here during SIU’s summer break, there is also plenty of time to relax after FROM THE a busy spring semester. MAYOR However, the energy and the JOEL countless activities that come to FRITZLER Carbondale when classes resume in August are very much welcomed. Congratulations on your decision to come to Carbondale and attend SIU. You have made the right choice. I’ve also lived in Indiana, Oregon, Botswana, Malawi and Albania, so I can safely say there is no place quite like this place. I’m slightly biased as, besides being mayor, I work at SIU, so I can also say there are some exciting things taking place in every department on campus. Whether you are from a small town or a big city, Southern Illinois has something to offer to make you feel welcomed. You’ll find southern hospitality, great food, excellent music, entertainment and peaceful solitude in the Shawnee National Forest, but if you find yourself longing for a big city, we’re only a few hours from St. Louis, Memphis or Nashville.

And, with an Amtrak station in town, you are a train ride away from either Chicago or New Orleans. It doesn’t matter if you are coming as a new student or a returning student — I can promise the next few years of your life will be challenging, rewarding, exciting and probably a bit scary, but probably not ever boring. Your experiences at SIU will prepare you to go further than you can possibly imagine; however, if you ever start to feel bored, come to a City Council meeting, as they can be a comedy, a mystery, a drama, a thriller or all of the above. While you’re in Carbondale, I want to invite you to make yourself at home. Whether you live on campus or in one of our neighborhoods, I want you to feel you are part of the community. There are many ways to get involved, whether by volunteering at the Boys & Girls Club, the Red Cross or the I Can Read! program, or by serving as a Big Brother or Big Sister. In any case, the best way to feel you are part of a community is to become part of the community. So, as we look forward to your arrival in Carbondale, let me throw out a big, “Welcome to Carbondale!” If you or any of your family members ever have any questions, feel free to call or email me at 618-457-3229 or jfritzler@ci.carbondale.il.us. Sincerely, JOEL FRITZLER MAYOR OF CARBONDALE, CITY OF TREES AND PHDS

City government Carbondale City Hall, 618-5495302, 618-457-3283 (fax) Mayor Joel Fritzler, 618-457-3229 (home), 618-549-3928

Council members Corene McDaniel, 618-529-1466 Chris Wissman, 618-549-2653 Don Monty, 618-549-0372 Jane Adams, 618-457-8228 Lee Fronabarger, 618-457-7770 Lance D. Jack, 618-457-3229

Other city offices City Clerk, 618-549-5302, ext. 280 Citizen’s Assistant, 618-549-5302, ext. 226 Civic Center Coordinator, 618-549-5302, ext. 209

City services Emergency, 618-549-5021 Fire Department Business Office, 618-457-3234

Police Department General Calls, 618-457-3200 Street Maintenance/ Environmental Services, 618-457-3275 Water/Sewer Treatment Billing and Services, 618-457-3265 Parking Division, 618-457-3278 Building and Neighborhood Services, 618-549-5302 Carbondale Chamber of Commerce, 618-549-2146


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Proud to be Salukis SIU heritage abounds in Southern Illinois BY MARILYN HALSTEAD

science, agricultural biotechnology, biomedical research and cognitive science projects. Other elcome to Saluki areas of strength include country. Wherever you go in the arts and humanities, Southern Illinois, you will with research in American find Salukis. From alumni philosophy, creative writing, documentary living and working in the filmmaking, finance and area to SIU sports fans to rehabilitation. The employees , we show our university also has grantSaluki pride. funded outreach projects I am proud to be a in education, rural health Saluki, and graduated and social work that nearly 30 years ago. benefit Illinois residents. But even the roads in SIU offers more than Carbondale show our 200 undergraduate Saluki pride, thanks to majors, minors and painted paw prints specifications, along with directing people to the a variety of doctoral university. SIU has a proud history. degrees, master’s degrees, master of fine arts degrees The university began as and certificate programs. the second teachers’ Students in the School of college in Illinois in 1869 Law and first-year medical and has grown to a students attend classes on comprehensive public the Carbondale campus. university offering a SIU offers world-class variety of degrees, entertainment through including law and several venues. The School medicine. We are proud of SIU and of Music offers student concerts, recitals and its heritage. Our Saluki performances, plus faculty pride extends from and guest concerts, educational programs to research to entertainment workshops, master classes and seminars. and athletics. McLeod Theater offers SIU ranks among the performances as well as an top 5 percent of all opportunity for students U.S. higher education to learn the technical institutions for research aspects of theater. by the Carnegie Shryock Auditorium Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. offers a venue for theater groups and musicians, as Research opportunities well as student shows. exist for graduates and But most of all, undergraduates. Southern Illinois loves Research strengths Saluki athletics. in science and social We celebrate when science are supported by environmental and energy teams win, and bleed maroon when they lose. research, materials THE SOUTHERN

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THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

SIU graduates celebrate May 12 at SIU Arena. The university offers more than 200 undergraduate majors and minors.

We tailgate through football season, and continue to follow volleyball, basketball, baseball, softball, swimming and track. SIU has had some world-class athletes and won a national basketball title. Our football and softball teams have made post-season appearances. The women’s track team finished 14th in the nation this year. Welcome to Saluki pride!

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Page 6 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan

SIU BACK TO SCHOOL Emergency phone numbers Carbondale Police: 9-1-1 Carbondale Police (non-emergency): 618-457-3200 Carbondale Police Crimestoppers Tip Line: 618-549-2677 Memorial Hospital emergency room: 618-549-0721 SIUC Student Health Service: 453-3311 or Dial-A-Nurse 618-536-5585 Jackson County Ambulance Services: 9-1-1 or Carbondale facility (non-emergency) 618-529-5158 Jackson County Health Department: 618-684-3143 Emergency Services: 618-549-5021 Fire: 911 or Business office, 618-457-3234 SIU Police: 618-453-3771 Sheriff: 618-684-2177 Child Abuse and Neglect Hotline: 800-252-2873 Rape Crisis Services of the Women’s Center: 618-529-2324 24-Hour Sexual Assault Crisis Hotline: 800-334-2094

Book stores Barnes and Noble: 1300 E. Main St., Carbondale, 618-351-0404 The Bookworm: 618 E. Walnut St., Carbondale, 618-457-2665 Coram Deo Books: 3249 N. Reed Station Road, Carbondale, 618-457-5282 Lifeway Christian Outlet: 110 E. Plaza Dr., Carterville, 618-985-3702


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Welcome aboard! Chancellor says many programs available to help students adjust to university life THE SOUTHERN

he main thing SIU Carbondale Chancellor Rita Cheng would like to say to incoming students is “welcome.” The chancellor said she understands many students will be facing an unknown but assures them college will be an exciting time for them. “We know this is a huge step for them,” Cheng said. “For many, this will be their first experience living away from home. So it is an incredibly exciting time, but it also can be a bit unnerving, for students and for parents as well. I certainly remember how I felt when I first went off to college.” She said she can also empathize with the parents who must say goodbye to their children as they take a major new step in life. “As a parent, I also remember what it was like driving away after taking my son and daughter to college,” Cheng said. “We want our students to feel welcome as the newest members of our Saluki family, and to feel comfortable asking for any kind of help they may need, in and out of the classroom. We have caring faculty and staff who are very responsive to our students.” Cheng said students should inquire about Saluki Cares, a program that helps students face any challenges that come with going to college. She said there is also Saluki First Year, helping to ease the transition into college through programs and student success courses. “We believe a successful first year is essential to a rewarding college career, and we go out of our way to make sure nothing gets in the way of our students realizing their dreams,” Cheng said. “Our new students will quickly learn that they have picked a nationally ranked research university that has the heart of a small college.” She said college will also be a great opportunity for students to introduce themselves to different cultures, as there are students from all 50 states and more than 100 countries.

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‘As I told my son and daughter when they started college, set your alarm and go to class. Make time to talk individually with your instructors. Definitely stay on top of your homework. And call your mother.’ RITA CHENG, SIU CARBONDALE CHANCELLOR

“One of the best parts of the college experience is how much it opens our eyes and broadens our horizons,” Cheng said. “Growing up in a small, rural community in Wisconsin, that definitely was true for me.” She said students can also take advantage of more than 400 registered student organizations and in the classroom, they will benefit from top-quality faculty members who care about their students. While she believes students will enjoy their time at the university, she encourages them not to forget about Carbondale and the surrounding area, where she said she has met many friendly people. There is also an excellent assortment of shops, restaurants and natural beauty in the region. “With all the lakes, the state parks and the Shawnee National Forest, if you love the outdoors, you are in the right place,” Cheng said. “I hope our students will get out and explore. I do that all the time, and I am always finding something new and different.” She said students should enjoy their time at college and take advantage of all the benefits it offers. Finally, she offers students some of the same advice she offered her own children when they went to college. “As I told my son and daughter when they started college, set your alarm and go to class,” Cheng said. “Make time to talk individually with your instructors. Definitely stay on top of your homework. And call your mother.”

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

Chancellor Rita Cheng delivers her State of the University address Sept. 29 at Student Center.

The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 7


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Bigger & Better BOOKS & BEYOND Morris Library is the main library for SIU Carbondale. It holds more than 2.6 million volumes, 36,000 current periodicals and serials and more than 3.6 million microform units. It provides access to I-Share (the statewide automated library system) and to a wide array of databases and other electronic data files. Services include reference assistance, instructional and technical support, distance learning and geographic information systems. More information is available at www.lib.siu.edu or by calling the information desk at 618-453-2818.

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SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Morris Library offers everything you need for study and research The library itself is named after Morris to recognize his vision in n expansion and getting national renovation of Morris recognition for SIU. Library at SIU Since the renovation, Carbondale has created a which began in 2005 and friendlier atmosphere, both was completed in 2009, the for staff and patrons. library has more group The redesign offers a study rooms available. place for serious research, Some are first-come, group study and casual first-served; others can be browsing. reserved for specific times There now are more through use of hotel-type study and work areas access keys. Some of the offering a view of the rooms can accommodate campus outside, one two to six students; others worker observed. as many as 16. The library now boasts Morris Library’s Special amenities like a patio area Collections Research and Delyte’s, a coffee and Center boasts the papers of snack shop named after prominent scholars, Delyte Morris, SIU authors and political president from 1948 to figures. It also houses a 1970. variety of materials,

BY LINDA RUSH THE SOUTHERN

A

ranging from household items and artifacts to letters from Civil War soldiers to their families. An oral history project, a partnership between Special Collections and the Carbondale Preservation Commission, has amassed both recordings and transcripts of interviews with many longtime residents of the region. Just as the library’s redesign extends a welcome to users, so does its website, www.lib.siu.edu. A click of the mouse can tell a user library hours for that day, list special events that are scheduled, and, of course, allow searches for books, journals and other materials.

For novice researchers, the site has tips on how to find items both in the library collections and through other sources. The website also has an “Ask a Librarian” link to answer questions. Help is available online via email, instant messaging, texting or, of course, in person. “Library liaisons” are staff members who have expertise in specific areas of study and are available to students and faculty to offer help with research. Though not the only resource, books are the heart of a library. During the remodeling, most books were moved from the library into an annex building on McLafferty Road. They could be

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

A man studies Jan. 29 on the second floor of Morris Library. SIU students (far left) work in the computer lab in 2009.

ordered and picked up at the library later. The process of moving the collection back into the library is now under way

after delays caused by state funding cuts. linda.rush@thesouthern.com 618-351-5079

The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 9


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL 2012 SIU FOOTBALL SCHEDULE Date Thur., Aug. 30 Sat., Sep. 8 Sat., Sep. 15 Sat., Sep. 22 Sat., Sep. 29 Sat., Oct. 6 Sat., Oct. 13 Sat., Oct. 20 Sat., Oct. 27 Sat., Nov. 3 Sat., Nov. 17

Opponent at Eastern Illinois at Miami (Ohio) vs. SEMO at Missouri St.* vs. Indiana St. (Family Weekend)* at Illinois St.* vs. Northern Iowa (Homecoming)* at Youngstown St.* at N. Dakota St.* vs. S. Dakota St.* vs. Western Illinois*

Location Charleston Oxford, Ohio Carbondale Springfield, Mo.

Time 6:30 p.m. Noon 6 p.m. 1 p.m.

Carbondale Normal

6 p.m. 1 p.m.

Carbondale Youngstown, Ohio Fargo, N.D. Carbondale Carbondale

2p.m. 3 p.m. 2:30 p.m. 2 p.m. 2 p.m.

*Missouri Valley Football Conference game

‘I’m pretty pleased with the front seven. We’re pretty solid there, and we have some good depth, and we have some playmakers.’ DALE LENNON, SIU FOOTBALL COACH THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

SIU’s Steve Strother returns a kick during a game with Youngstown State on Oct. 15 at Saluki Stadium in Carbondale.

SIU Football Lennon hopes front seven can lead defense BY TODD HEFFERMAN

the secondary are gone, but two of the four starting linebackers, seniors Jayson DiManche and Joe Okon, are back. “I’m pretty pleased with the front hree senior defensive linemen may be the best part of SIU’s defense this seven,” SIU coach Dale Lennon said. “We’re pretty solid there, and we have fall. some good depth, and we have some Nose tackle Kayon Swanson, a second playmakers.” team All-Missouri Valley Football SIU allowed 27 points per game last Conference pick last year, led the Salukis season, the most in Lennon’s four years. with 52 tackles. Defensive end Ken Boatright, a converted safety who started Most of them came through the air, as the Salukis allowed 21 passing all 11 games, led the team with 13.5 tackles for loss and 6.5 sacks. Eze Obiora, touchdowns, the third most in the MVFC. a junior college transfer originally from Luke Thuston, who backed up Mike Manchester, England, played in all 11 McElroy last year at strong safety, and games after coming over from the redshirt freshman D.J. Cameron will College of DuPage. start fall camp in the back of this year’s The trio combined for nearly half of defense. McElroy scored the only SIU’s 25 sacks last season, and in a 3-4 defensive touchdown of the season in the system designed mostly for linebackers, could be exactly what the Salukis need to last game of the year, at Indiana State, and finished his five-year career with 15 challenge for a playoff spot this year. career interceptions. Two of the team’s top three tacklers in THE SOUTHERN

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Page 10 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL That was the third-highest total in SIU history. Sophomore Courtney Richmond and junior Terrell Wilson will start fall camp at the cornerback spots. Richmond had 16 tackles in nine games. Wilson, a two-year starter, was the Salukis’ leading tackler not on the defensive line with 50 stops. Offensively, SIU returns seven starters, including three on the offensive line. Sophomore Tanner Crum was one of two true freshmen on the team to play last year, and moves over to center from left guard to replace Rimington Award winner Bryan Boemer. Boemer was honored as the top center in the Football Championship Subdivision. SIU opens the season at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 30, at Eastern Illinois. The Salukis will play six road games and five home games, beginning with the opener Sept. 15 against Southeast Missouri State. For the first time, the MVFC will be a 10-team league this year with the addition of South Dakota. The Coyotes came from the Great West Conference but don’t play the Salukis during the regular season. South Dakota is eligible for the MVFC regular-season title and its automatic bid to the playoffs. todd.hefferman@thesouthern.com 618-351-5087 / On Twitter: @Todd_Hefferman

Performance is free but tickets are required. THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

SIU runs onto the field before the Salukis’ 38-30 loss to Illinois State on Oct. 29 at Saluki Stadium.

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The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 11


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

SIU Volleyball

NEW BLOOD

New coach inherits five starters BY TODD HEFFERMAN THE SOUTHERN

ustin Ingram begins his first season in the Missouri Valley Conference this fall as SIU’s new volleyball coach. Ingram was introduced in mid-January. Coaching at Arkansas State the last three years, Ingram led the Red Wolves to three West Division titles and two 20-win seasons. He was named Sun Belt coach of the year in 2011, when Arkansas State went 21-10 and 12-4 in the league.

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He inherited five starters from last year’s 9-18 squad at SIU, which missed the MVC tournament for the fifth time in seven years. If the summer was any indication, Ingram could have a big effect right away. Against two of last year’s NCAA tournament teams, Purdue and Kentucky, the Salukis split a pair of games with the Boilermakers and dropped two tight games to the Wildcats, 26-24, 25-23. “What that did, I think, was really set the foundation,” Ingram said. “Set the tone for where the

Page 12 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan

program could go for the course of the spring, and the best part, for the athletes, I really think, for the most part, started believing that something good was going to happen throughout the course of the spring.” SIU setter Rachael Brown, who played all 106 sets last year, returns after giving out 1,048 assists. The Salukis return three top hitters in outside hitters Laura Thole and Jessica Whitehead and middle blocker Alysia Mayes. Thole was fourth in the

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

SIU Athletic Director Mario Moccia hands a Saluki jersey to new volleyball coach Justin Ingram on Jan. 18 at SIU.

Valley with 346 kills and was second on the team in digs, with 316. Whitehead, a Murphysboro native, had 338 kills as a sophomore. Mayes, one of four seniors on the squad, had 277 kills. Ingram succeeded Brenda Winkeler, who was

reassigned within SIU’s athletic department after seven seasons. Winkeler went 94-107 and 41-85 in the Valley. todd.hefferman@thesouthern.com 618-351-5087 On Twitter: @Todd_Hefferman

Justin Ingram starts his first year with the Saluki volleyball program this fall. Ingram went 60-33 in three years as the head coach at Arkansas State, leading the Red Wolves to two 20-win seasons. He previously was an assistant at Kansas State and Houston, and has helped seven teams reach the NCAA tournament. Hometown: Milwaukee Alma mater: Iowa State (1995) Record at Arkansas State: 60-33 overall and 35-15 in Sun Belt Conference


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Groundbreaking Ideas SIU is recognized as one of the few research universities in nation THE SOUTHERN

pportunities for students to participate in top-notch research and work alongside renowned scholars are boundless at SIU, as groundbreaking research projects are under way in nearly every college on the university’s campus. Nationwide, there are more than 4,000 colleges and universities, but only 199 of those are considered to be research institutions. SIU is among the research institutions, as university scholars conduct their research in the lab, classroom and out in the field. SIU research not only enriches the academic community, but contributes to the local economy, as external grants and contracts totaled more than $68 million in 2011. Research being conducted at SIU has the potential to change the way we live our lives, raise our children, fight diseases, construct our homes, protect our environment and utilize our natural resources. In the Dental Hygiene Program, Professor Joan Davies has implemented programs to better discuss tobacco use with patients.

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She began an online curriculum called Tobacco Free for worldwide educators to use. Davis is a Fulbright Scholar and has researched the level of tobacco dependence education in dental hygiene programs. At the Center for Autism Spectrum Disorders at the SIU Rehabilitation Institute, university staff and students work with children, including infants and toddlers, to help them develop skills and abilities they might not otherwise develop. Students and staff work throughout the community in school programs and clinical settings. The SIU School of Medicine Division of Plastic Surgery is conducting tissue engineering research in the hope of finding a solution to complications that can arise as a result of organ transplant rejection. The research is looking at the possibilities of growing skin, ears and eventually organs around a scaffolding using a patients’ own cells. Simmons Cancer Institute researchers are working on developing medicines that target specific forms of cancer more effectively in the hope of being able to target and neutralize them.

In the College of Engineering, students are researching better ways to use coal ash, or fly ash, by cutting down on coal’s carbon footprint and using the ash in building materials, such as concrete. Research is also aimed at extracting valuable substances from the ash, such as metal oxides and minerals that can compose 10 to 20 percent of the ash. The College of Engineering is also researching coal gasification and how engineers might more easily convert coal into synthetic gas or liquid fuels. A company started on the campus of SIU has the potential to revolutionize the way plastics are made, while increasing the value and demand for Illinois coal. SIU Professor and CEO of Thermaquatica Inc. Ken Anderson said the company grew from years of research and development, testing and refining. Thermaquatica has developed technology that allows chemists to use coal instead of petroleum to make polymer molecules that can be used to make plastics. The innovation is no small feat; the chemical used to make polymer chains, which in turn are used to make products like

‘That one chemical is a $30 billion-a-year market. This is more than an interesting trick in a lab. This is an enormous market.’ KEN ANDERSON, SIU PROFESSOR AND CEO OF THERMAQUATICA INC.

plastic water bottles, is part of a multi-trillion dollar petro-chemical industry. “That one chemical is a $30 billion-a-year market,” Anderson said. “This is more than an interesting trick in a lab. This is an enormous market.”

Thermaquatica’s innovation has several advantages. It uses green technology, in that it uses coal for products other than energy; it could increase the value of coal while expanding the uses for it; and the benign process doesn’t suffer

from any of the emission or waste problems resulting from other uses of coal. Anderson said one of the significant advantages is that plastics can be made from coal at about 10 percent of the cost of making them from petroleum.

W W W.T H E S O U T H E R N . C O M The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 13


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL CLICK & CONNECT: To get weekly updates on Southern Illinois art shows and museum exhibits, find us online at www.flipsideonline.com.

Galleries Art Alley: Second floor of the SIU Student Center, 618-536-3393. Carbondale Civic Center Arts Corridor Gallery: 200 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale. 618-457-5100. Hickory Lodge Gallery: 1115 W. Sycamore, Carbondale, 618-457-5100. Little Egypt Arts Association: 601 Tower Square, Marion. www.littleegyptarts.com, 618-998-8530. Southern Illinois Art Gallery: 14967 Gun Creek Trail, Whittington. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily. 618-629-2220. Varsity Center for the Arts: 418 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, varsitycenterforthearts.org. Headquarters for Carbondale Community Arts and The Stage Co., 618-967-5257. Vergette Gallery: Allyn Building, Room 107. 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday. 453-4315. Other privately owned galleries offer a variety of art exhibits in the area.

Coffeehouses Cousin Andy’s Coffeehouse: Fellowship Hall of the Church of the Good Shepherd, United Church of Christ, 515 Orchard Drive, Carbondale; www.cousinandy.org. Yellow Moon Café: 110 N. Front St., Cobden, 618-893-2233; www.yellowmooncafe.com. Longbranch Coffee House: 100 E. Jackson St., Carbondale, 618-529-4488; www.lbchouse.com.

Page 14 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL Museums African-American Museum of Southern Illinois: University Mall, Carbondale, 618-457-2217. The museum seeks to identify, preserve and portray outstanding achievement of African-American citizens. Exhibits vary according to the season but include quilts, masks, children’s books and an exhibit on the Tuskegee Airmen. Gen. John A. Logan Museum: 1613 Edith St., Murphysboro, 618-684-3455, www.loganmuseum.org. The museum details the history and life of Gen. John A. Logan, who was born in 1826 in what is now Murphysboro. Logan’s lasting legacy is that he established Memorial Day as a national holiday. Over the next four years, the museum will present the exhibit “Caught in the Sweep of History: Egypt in the Civil War.” This exhibit follows 19 Southern Illinois counties throughout the war and changes on an annual basis. Museum of the Jackson County Historical Society: 1616 Edith St., Murphysboro, across the street from Gen. John A. Logan Museum, 618-684-6989, jchsil@yahoo.com. The museum contains clothing and artifacts from before statehood in 1818 to the present time. The files in the library contain personal and court documents from the 1840s to 2012. Old photographs of people and places are available, as well as obituaries covering the past 100 years.

Historical and/or genealogical research may be conducted. The museum also has a special section devoted to the 1925 tri-state tornado. The Science Center of Southern Illinois: University Mall, 1237 E. Main St., Carbondale, 618-529-5431, yoursciencecenter.org. The Science Center features a variety of scientific marvels and hands-on activities for the whole family. The museum welcomes more than 18,000 visitors a year and more than 100 field trip groups. University Museum: North wing of Faner Hall, SIU, 618-453-5388; www.museum.siu.edu. The Museum exhibits cover a range of subjects in the arts, sciences and humanities. There is also a museum gift shop. Railroad Museum: 111 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, in the Old Railroad Passenger Depot; 618-867-2203. The depot was built in 1903 by the Illinois Central Railroad. Station Carbondale, a non-profit volunteer group, restored the depot in the 1990s. The building houses a collection of railroad memorabilia as well as Carbondale Chamber of Commerce and Carbondale Main Street. A bronze statue of a railroad conductor, a tribute to all railroad employees, stands watch over the depot and historic train caboose. The statue was modeled after the late Roy Clark, a 44-year Illinois Central employee.

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

Children run their hands over the clay skin of a sculpted Allosaurus named Cooper after it was unveiled May 20 at The Science Center in Carbondale. Artist Bill Adams created the 18-foot-long replica that was purchased by The Science Center. ‘I was really attached to it for the couple of years I owned it,’ said Adams, who built the dinosaur about two years ago. ‘This is a good home for it.’

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

A bust of its namesake sits behind a glass case at Gen. John A. Logan Museum in Murphysboro.

The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 15


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SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Something for everyone Entertainment options are varied in region THE SOUTHERN

he college experience is about more than gaining an education. There’s no denying the importance in putting a personal emphasis on studies and homework, but when the days’ tasks are done and one is looking for relaxation or an escape, there are countless entertainment and nightlife options available, both on campus and around town. And the glory of Carbondale’s scene is that there is truly something for everyone. Whether theater or music, comedy or art, you’re bound to find it. Theatergoers can find stage productions of varying levels, from newer community theater groups like Three Graces Theatre to long-established troupes like The Stage Co. And that’s not including the productions of SIU’s own theater department. National touring productions also come to town a few times a year to perform at Shryock Auditorium or other venues throughout the region. Recent years have seen such national shows as “Avenue Q,” “Cats” and “A Christmas Carol” come to life on local stages. When it comes to music, the options are endless. Local bands perform

T

... There’s no excuse for any student to suffer from a case of boredom. Just look around and you’ll find something calling your name. almost every night of the week at bars, coffeehouses, wineries and other venues across Carbondale and Southern Illinois. The region offers bands and groups of all varieties, from the Southern Illinois West African Drum Ensemble to the Kevin Lucas Orchestra. Seeing bands play in Southern Illinois is also a way to get in on the ground floor of some acts before they take off to the national level. One of the best examples is Revis, a popular rock band that recently reunited after a short split. After forming at SIU, the band headed to Los Angeles, where the members secured a record deal and started building a national reputation. Much like with the theater performances, national acts also make stops in Carbondale. SIU and private business ventures such as Walker’s Bluff bring in big-name musicians to play in Southern Illinois.

Page 18 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

Seth Avett (right) and his brother, Scott, entertain the crowd during their performance Oct. 25 at SIU's Shryock Auditorium.

Recent concerts have included Sheryl Crow, the Avett Brothers, Breathe Carolina and the Ready Set, Kenny Rogers and more, representing a wide diversity of styles and genres. Comedy fans can find weekly entertainment at Hangar 9 and The Station courtesy of The Carbondale Comedians, who also invite anyone interested in trying his or her hand at stand-up to climb on stage and give it a shot. They also have a chance to see some of the biggest names in the industry, as touring comedians have been brought to town as part of the previously mentioned entertainment series. Ron White has performed at Shryock

Auditorium in the past, and Lewis Black will be headed to campus this fall. For those willing to travel outside of Carbondale, the options are increased exponentially. Venues such as the Show Me Center in Cape Girardeau and The Carson Center in Paducah also bring in big-name national acts representing all aspects of the entertainment industry. The nightlife and entertainment opportunities are endless in Carbondale and the surrounding area, so there’s no excuse for any student to suffer from a case of boredom. Just look around and you’ll find something calling your name.

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

Country artist Travis Tritt performs Feb. 12 at Shryock Auditorium in Carbondale.


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL Theaters Browne Auditorium: Parkinson Hall, SIU campus, 618-453-7792. Home to most artists brought in by the Visiting Artists Program. Christian H. Moe Lab Theatre: Communications Building, SIU, 618-453-3001. Student playwrights and directors present their original works. Kleinau Theatre: Communications Building, Room 2014, 618-453-2291. Projects written and performed by students in speech communication. McLeod Theatre: SIU campus, 618-453-3001. The Theater Department puts on several shows each year in this 488-seat theater. Weekend and evening shows begin at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. SIU Arena: SIU campus, 618-453-2000. This facility features nationally touring concerts, family shows, theatrical events and circuses. It is also home to Saluki basketball. Shryock Auditorium: SIU campus, 618-453-2787. This 1,200-seat theater hosts several performance genres. Varsity Center for the Arts: 418 S. Illinois Ave., 618-457-6100. The Stage Co. is housed in this building, which used to be the Varsity theater and features a historic marquee.

The Best Health Care Team ... The Best Care Welcome Students! SHAWNEE HEALTH SERVICE A Non-Profit Organization Serving Southern Illinois Since 1972

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The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 19


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SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Scholarships & More SIU Alumni Association involved in many aspects of university BY SCOTT FITZGERALD THE SOUTHERN

o some college students, “alumni” is a concept considered once they have graduated and left campus. That’s not so, however, with the SIU Alumni Association, which is part of the initial experience for new and incoming SIU students each fall. The association aids with student activities, including scholarship programs and other endeavors that are part of the university experience. “What we want students, family members and alumni to know is that we are here to service them with a commitment to the university and other alumni,” said Laura Taylor, director of member services for the association. There are more than 17,000 members in the SIU Alumni Association who live throughout the United States and abroad. They can keep in touch through 30 alumni/ chapter clubs, with participation in 70 alumni events each school year. Alumni officials are working now on a strategic plan initiative to establish a set of guidelines for international SIU alumni chapters, Taylor said. The association also has a presence at new student orientations throughout the school year. “We sell memberships and educate students about the association,” Taylor said.

T

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

The Marching Salukis make their way into the SIU Alumni Association tent Sept. 2 near Saluki Stadium. Financial support from the association helps the band.

More that $72,000 in scholarship money was pledged from alumni members for the 2011-12 academic year. Among the scholarships offered through the SIU Alumni Association is the Legacy Scholarship, set up to assist students with a relative who is an alumnus of SIU and who

has been an active member of the Alumni Association for three of the past five years. Financial support from SIU alumni has also gone to the Marching Salukis, Morris Library, Paul Simon Public Policy Institute and Saluki Athletics. There have also been unique alumni association

campaigns to light Pulliam Tower and install the many flags on campus. It’s not all fundraising endeavors for alumni members. There remains some of the fun from the college days, such as “Tell Us Your Story” on the association’s website, where alumni can post

personal stories about attending SIU and what they have done since moving on with their lives. “There is a great compilation of SIU stories and a great repository of where our alumni are today. The stories are amazing and uplifting,” Taylor said. Alumni Association staff

member are also working on a more thorough and updated alumni directory that will be available in December or January. It’s a big job, Taylor said, with about 220,000 to 245,000 names and addresses to consider. scott.fitzgerald@thesouthern.com 618-351-5076

The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 21


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Get me home! Amtrak: www.amtrak.com Greyhound: www.greyhound.com Williamson County Airport: www.wilcoairport.com BART: www.bartshuttle.com

Planes

Buses Greyhound tickets can be purchased by stopping in the ticket office at 905 E. Main St. in Carbondale. Three buses depart the station daily. Two buses, one leaving at 10:10 a.m. and the other at 10:55 p.m., are non-stop to St. Louis — taking just less than two hours to arrive. The third bus goes south at 8:05 p.m., making stops in Paducah and Nashville along the way. Tickets can also be purchased by calling the ticket office at 618-5493495 or 800-231-2222.

Williamson County Regional Airport offers daily flights to St. Louis from Marion. Ticket price can vary depending on when a ticket is booked. Tickets may be purchased at www.capeair.net; by calling 800554-5111 or at Williamson County Regional Airport’s ticket counter. The airport is on Illinois 13 between Herrin and Marion.

Trains Amtrak service offers three train routes for people headed to Chicago or New Orleans. The trains make stops in various cities, such as Champaign-Urbana and Memphis, along the way. The trains leave at different times

throughout the day, with a night train option leaving once per day. Tickets can be booked by calling 800-872-7245 or visiting www.amtrak.com.

BART BART is the answer for people who need to make a connection to St. Louis. The company’s mission is to provide safe, dependable, comfortable and pleasant transportation to and from Lambert International Airport in St. Louis at a reasonable cost. Pickups are available seven days a week, 24 hours a day. Pickup can be arranged on campus. Service is by reservation only. Reservations may be made by calling 800-284-2278 or online at www.bartshuttle.com.

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

Passengers disembark from Amtrak’s southbound Saluki line in Carbondale. The Carbondale station offers service to Chicago, New Orleans and points in between.

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SIU BACK TO SCHOOL Churches and Places of Worship American Baptist Campus Ministry: 516 S. Hays St., 351-1940 Apostolic Life UPCI: 7076 Old Highway 13, 618-351-1300 Baptist Collegiate Ministries: 825 W. Mill St., 618-457-2898 Beth Jacob Congregation: 904 N. Norwest Drive, 618-529-1409 Bethel AME Church: 316 E. Jackson St., 618-529-5278 Bible Baptist Church: 7373 Old Highway 13, 618-549-2624 Boskydell Baptist Church: 3518 Boskydell Road, 618-457-8818 Calvary Campus Church: 501 W. Main St., 618-529-4395 Canterbury Fellowship, Episcopal (Anglican): 402 W. Mill, 618-529-4316 Carbondale Muslim Center: 530 N. Wall St., 618-457-6522 Christian Campus Ministry: 302 Robinson Circle, 618-4577501 Church of Christ: 1805 W. Sycamore St., 618-457-5105 Church of Christ: 900 N. Wall St., 618-457-7093 Church of God: 1461 County Line Road, 618-457-6634 Church of God in Christ: 604 N. Marion St., 618-457-5523 Church of the Good Shepherd: 515 S. Orchard Drive, 618-4572232 Community of Christ (Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints): 1755 S. Wall St., 618-457-7535 Cornerstone Reformed Church: 801 N. Almond St., 618-5493333 The Door Christian Fellowship: 112 S. Illinois Ave., 618-529-2653 Dutch Ridge Church: 204 Dutch Ridge Road, 618-549-2960 Drury Christian Church: 781 Drury Road, 618-529-3680 Epiphany Lutheran Church of All Saints: 1501 Chautauqua Road, 618-457-2065 Evangelical Presbyterian Church: 624 N. Oakland Ave., 618-529-1616 Faith Temple Church of God In Christ: 604 N. Marion St., 618-529-3546

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

Carbondale Unitarian Fellowship at 105 N. Parrish is one of many places of worship available in the city.

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) : 306 W. Monroe St., 618-457-6817 First Church of Christ Scientist: 304 W. Walnut St., 618-5491583 First Church of God: 1140 Giant City Road, 618-529-1456 First United Methodist Church: 214 W Main St., 618-457-2416 First Presbyterian Church: 310 S. University Ave., 618-5492148 Grace United Methodist Church: 220 N. Tower Road, 618-4578785 Grand Avenue Christian Church, 1305 E. Grand Ave., 618-4574222 Greater Gillespie Temple: 810 N. Wall St., 618-549-2515 Heartland Christian Center: 519 S. Giant City Road, 618-529-2681

Hope Church, 7373 Old Route 13: 618-529-2744 Hopewell Baptist Church: 400 E. Main St., 618-529-3975 House of Prayer (Apostolic): 401 N. Marion St., 618-5490033 Islamic Center: 511 S. Poplar, 618-457-2770 Jehovah’s Witnesses: 2150 N. Illinois Ave., 618-549-5783 Lakeland Baptist Church: 719 S. Giant City Road, 618-529-4906 March of Faith Church: 400 S. Wall St., 618-529-3223 Murdale Baptist Church: 2701 W. Main St., 618-529-5800 Neighborhood Bible Fellowship: 1218 W. Freeman, 618-549-7649 New Beginnings Community Church: 2605 W. Striegel Rd., 618-549-7110 New Life Covenant Church (Apostolic): 313 W. Chestnut St., 618-457-8825

New Zion Missionary Baptist Church: 803 N. Robert Stalls Ave., 618-457-7075 Newbirth Kingdom Church: 302 N. Robinson Circle, 618-549-4963 Newman Catholic Student Center: 715 S. Washington St., 618-529-3311 Olivet Freewill Baptist Church: 409 N. Marion St., 618-5493374 Our Savior Lutheran: 700 S. University Ave., 618-549-1694 Praise Central Church of Deliverance: 400 E. Jackson St., 618-457-4108 Praise Outreach Ministries: 215 E. Sycamore St., 618-3511749 Rock Hill Baptist Church: 219 E. Monroe St., 618-457-5926 St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church: 402 W. Mill St., 618-529-4316

St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church: 303 Poplar St., 618-457-4556 The View Church: 1201 S. Giant City Road, 618-457-8216 Union Hill Christian Church: 701 Union Hill Road, 618-5494007 Unitarian Fellowship, 105 N. Parrish, 618-529-2439 University Baptist Church: 700 S. Oakland Ave., 618-457-0323 University Christian Ministries: 913 S. Illinois Ave., 618-5497387 Victory Dream Center of Carbondale: 607 E. College St., 618-351-8018 Vine Community Church: 1445 S. Wall St., 618-351-8463 Walnut Street Baptist Church: 218 W. Walnut St., 618-457-0479 Wesley Foundation United Methodist: 816 S. Illinois Ave., 618-457-8165

The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 23


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Get around town Saluki Express

Route 1 runs seven days a week and goes to Students can ride the bus University Mall and free upon showing an SIU downtown Carbondale. I.D. Regular one-way It runs until 11:18 p.m. admission is $1 per ride. every day except Friday and Spouses and children of Saturday, when it runs students can purchase a until 12:18 a.m. semester pass for a On Friday and Saturday, discounted price of $40 per Saluki Express has a Late semester, $47 for CESL Night Route, which runs students. Community until 2:30 a.m. members can purchase a Shuttles buses run from semester pass for $50. SIU Arena parking lot to all There have been changes areas on campus and near to the routes. The Logan campus residential areas. Route, which went to John Bus schedules can be A. Logan College in Carter- found at the I.D. office on ville, will be discontinued. the second floor of the There will be a new Student Center, on buses Crosstown route, that will or at University Mall include 48 stops from and other businesses campus to various places. throughout Carbondale.

For more information about Saluki Express operations, call 618-4535749.

Jackson County Mass Transit Jackson County Mass Transit provides transportation throughout Jackson County, including all of Carbondale and Murphysboro. Students ages 16 through college ride for a discounted rate of $2.50 one way. Regular fare is $3 for adults, $1 for children ages 6 to 15 and free for children younger than 6. Personal attendants of disabled patrons may ride free.

Rides must be requested at least 24 hours in advance. Same-day service prices are $5 for students and $6 for adults. People can only book same-day rides if there is room available. High gas prices have increased ridership and space fills up fast, so try to plan ahead. People with medical conditions may be eligible for a subscription service. The Jackson County Mass Transit Service works these people into the daily schedule, meaning there is no need to request a ride every day. For more information or to request a ride with Jackson County Mass Transit, call 618-549-0304 in Carbondale or Murphysboro or 866-884-7433 from outside the area.

Campus Transit/ Accessible Van Campus Transit offers rides to students who have become injured or sustained some form of disability that prevents them from getting to class. To qualify for the free ride, students should get a green ticket from health services. Rides are available from 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Students with disabilities who have approval through disability student services can use the Accessible Van Transport service. The service runs from 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Both services provide transportation from offcampus locations to campus and from campus to off-campus locations, but not between classes. Riders can call 5 to

10 minutes before pick-up. All rides are free of charge. For more information or for services, call Campus Transit at 618-453-2212.

Night Safety Transit Service Night Safety Transit Service provides free transportation to get students on and off campus. The rides are available Sunday through Friday from 6 p.m. to midnight (7 p.m. to midnight during daylight saving time). Calls will not be taken after 11:45 p.m. The service takes students from on-campus locations to off-campus residences and vice versa for study and campusrelated activities. For more information, call 618-453-2212.

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Division of Continuing Education | (618) 536-7751 or www.dce.siu.edu Page 24 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Safety first

MORE INFO SIU Department of Public Safety houses the university’s police and parking divisions. The department’s website offers several crime prevention tips, a campus map and disaster preparedness information. Location: 705A S. Washington St., Carbondale Hours: Police are available 24 hours a day; administrators are available from 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday Contact: 911 for emergencies, 618-453-3771 for non-emergencies Website: dps.siu.edu

SIU Department of Public Safety offers tips to help prevent crime Carbondale’s nightlife offers plenty of chances for fun. he beginning of the One of the best ways to school year is an stay safe is through the exciting time for students, whether they are buddy system. “We like the buddy returning to campus or living away from home for system because it minimizes the opportunity the first time. of somebody taking While generally safe, advantage of them,” said campus life does have Russell Thomas, crime its share of possible prevention coordinator for pitfalls. SIU police. Most crimes on and off “If you’re by yourself, campus are crimes of you’re sticking yourself opportunity, and those out there for the possibilioccurring on campus are ty that something is going usually student-on-stuto happen.” dent. Thomas said students The SIU Department should remember their of Public Safety recomprimary reason for being mends students stay in Carbondale — to get a vigilant and stay out college education. of potentially dangerous “Use good judgment and situations no matter be responsible,” Thomas where they are. said. The department has an Violent crimes draw expansive list of safety tips attention, but many more accessible by clicking on the “crime prevention” tab crimes involve theft of personal property. on its homepage, Thomas said locking dps.siu.edu. From parties to concerts doors and never leaving property unattended are to a night on the town, THE SOUTHERN

T

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

SIU Police Officer Darrell Webb drives the department’s new T3 police vehicle on campus. The vehicle was purchased through a grant from the University’s Sustainability Council.

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two important ways to prevent theft. Textbooks are popular targets for thieves, and Thomas said marking books with unique symbols makes them easier to return to owners if they are recovered. Thomas recommended students install or activate GPS tracking devices on laptops and cellphones. He also said bicyclists should use metal U-locks instead of cable or chain security systems. When it comes to traveling around campus, avoid cutting through darkened areas such as Thompson Woods after sunset. Thomas recommended students use only Brightway Paths after nightfall. There are also dozens of emergency call boxes along sidewalks and at residence halls. Thomas also said drivers need to pay special attention to crosswalks, and

pedestrians and bicyclists should always be aware of motor vehicles. Crosswalks on Lincoln Drive near the communications and technology buildings are especially busy, Thomas said. Thomas also said students should not hesitate to call police if they notice suspicious activity or are the victims of crimes. “Report it. Call 911. That’s what we’re here for,” he said.

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SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Don’t just sit there SIU Student Recreation Center has plenty to offer BY BRENT STEWART THE SOUTHERN

ith the number of programs and activities available at the SIU Student Recreation Center, it would be hard for students to complain about having nothing to do. Full use of the center and all its programs is included in student fees, and Gary Tisdale, Student Recreation Center assistant director of marketing and publicity, said they should take full advantage of its benefits. The Student Recreation Center building has an Olympic-sized pool, featuring a 10-lane, 50-meter long course, and two eight-lane, 25-yard short courses. The 770,000-gallon natatorium is surrounded by a closed gutter filtration system, which

W

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

SIU senior David Hug (left) holds the rope tight while Rotary Youth Exchange student Margo van der Veldt of the Netherlands ascends to the top of the climbing wall Jan. 7 at the SIU Student Recreation Center.

DETAILS For up-to-date lists of classes, programs, hours of operations and more, go to www. reccenter.siu.edu. drastically reduces water turbulence and helps to increase swimmers’ speed. Outlining the pool area is a water-resistant deck spanning 20 feet. The multipurpose center also houses basketball, volleyball, racquetball/handball

Page 26 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan

aquatics, adaptive and inclusive recreation, group fitness classes, sport clubs, youth programs, women’s programs and more. GARY TISDALE Tisdale said the STUDENT RECREATION CENTER ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF MARKETING AND PUBLICITY Student Recreation Center is an important together on your residence resource for student campus that (students) hall floor, with your can use.” socialization, fitness and fraternity or sorority or For example, students stress relief. just your friends,” Tisdale are able to check out “Get out and be said. canoes and paddleboats involved, don’t just sit in Instructional programs for free at the boat dock on your dorm room and do include boxing, Thai Campus Lake. nothing,” Tisdale said. The Student Recreation boxing, dance, martial Center also has intramural arts, T’ai Chi, base camp brent.stewart@thesouthern.com sports for no extra charge. for trips, clinics and 618-351-5805 outdoor equipment rental, On Twitter: @BrentStewartSI “You can get your team

‘You can get your (intramural) team together on your residence hall floor, with your fraternity or sorority or just your friends. ... Get out and be involved, don’t just sit in your dorm room and do nothing.’

and badminton courts, a climbing wall, dance studio, weight room, indoor track and several exercise rooms with more than 1,000 pieces of equipment. “And it’s not just the rec center,” Tisdale said. “There are several outdoor facilities across


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL Banks The Bank of Carbondale: 216 E. Main St.; www.tboc.com; 618-549-2181 Other ATM locations: Tres Hombres, 119 N. Washington St. Attitude Designs, 718 S. Illinois Ave. SIU Student Center Pick’s Liquors, Lewis Park mall Key West, 1108 W. Main St. Gatsby’s Bar, 610 S. Illinois Ave. Carbondale East Branch, 1399 E. Main St.

First Bank: 1500 W. Main St.; www.firstbanks.com; 618-549-2116

www.oldnational.com; 618-457-3700 Other ATM locations: Memorial Hospital, 405 W. Jackson St. Grand Laundromat, First Southern Bank: 867 E. Grand Ave. 301 East Main St.; www.firstsouthernbank. Schnuck’s Banking Center, 915 W. Main St. net; 618-549-3621 SIU Student Center, Other ATM locations: 1255 Lincoln Drive First Southern Bank, 2500 W. Murphysboro Road Regions Bank: 601 E. Main Arnold’s Market, St.; www.regions.com; 2141 S. Illinois Ave. 618-529-2700 Carbondale Public Other ATM locations: Safety Building, Regions Bank, 500 W. 501 S. Washington St. Main St. MidCountry Bank: Banterra Bank: SIU Credit Union: 1217 W. 925 W. Main St.; 1917 W. Main St.; Main St.; www.siucu. www.midcountrybank. www.banterrabank.com; org; 618-457-3595 com; 618-549-9904 618-549-4445 Other ATM locations: Other ATM location: Other ATM locations: Hucks, 1900 S. Illinois Ave. SIU Credit Union, Westowne Centre, 395 N. Giant City Road 2003 W. Main St. SIU Student Center, Old National Bank: Kroger Parking Lot, 1255 Lincoln Drive 509 S. University Ave.; 501 N. Giant City Road

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SIU BACK TO SCHOOL Heritage Sites Woodlawn Cemetery: The cemetery, at 405 E. Main Street in Carbondale, was the location of the first organized Memorial Day service in Illinois, and perhaps the first in the nation. On April 29, 1866, Woodlawn was the site of a service honoring those who had died in the Civil War. There are more than 60 Civil War soldiers buried there. Woodlawn Cemetery has been owned and maintained by Carbondale since 1890. The iron gate at the cemetery entrance actually came from the Carbondale College, which was built in 1860. Carbondale Historic Town Square: Twenty-five historic buildings edge Carbondale’s nostalgic Town Square. When Daniel Harmon Brush, Carbondale’s founding father, filed the original 56-acre plot of Carbondale in 1852, almost 10 acres were left open in the center of town and were deeded to the Illinois Central Railroad to be used for “railroad purposes only.” Throughout the 1800s and 1900s, this area became known as the “public square” and it was both the central focus of the town and its business center. The Old Illinois Central Railroad Passenger Depot: The depot was built in 1903 and was designed by Francis Bacon, an Illinois Central Railroad architect. The hipped roof station, modeled after the one in Champaign, Iwas built of brick and stone, with a tall central block and two long, lower end wings. The outside edges of the brick were shaped to make them look like cut stone. The building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002 and is used as the office space

home of the Murphysboro Chamber of Commerce. 618-684-6421. Makanda Boardwalk: This block of storefronts, dating from the 1890s, has been restored, providing shop space for local artists and craftspeople. The original village of Makanda, first named North Pass, began prospering in 1854 when Illinois Central Railroad built a station, two water tanks and a boarding house along Drury Creek, which still runs through the community. Makanda is the gateway to Giant City State Park, a 3,700-acre forest. Fountain Bluff Indian Carvings: Prehistoric dwellers left their mark on the rock walls of Fountain Bluff at the north end of Big Hill about a mile southwest of Gorham. The mysterious carvings depict wolves, birds, deer, human THE SOUTHERN forms, crosses, circles and Dorothy Rudoni lays a wreath May 28 at the grave of Col. Daniel H. Brush at Woodlawn Cemetery during Memorial Day events. other geometric figures. To reach the rock carving site, Murphysboro, just across Wheeler Hall: This of Carbondale Chamber of The pointed arches and turn east off Illinois 3 onto the street from Gen. John Romanesque-style red trefoil patterns are typical Commerce, Carbondale Gorham Road. Drive A. Logan Museum. It of the style. The octagonal brick and rock sandstone Main Street and the 1.2 miles to Gorham and building was the university houses hundreds of files four-story tower, turrets Carbondale Business Second Street, and turn available for genealogy library. The architecture, Development Corporation. and parapet were popular research, including Jackson left. Continue two blocks West Walnut Street for educational buildings of with its round, arched to Lake Street, turn east windows, is reminiscent of County court records Historic District: the period. The building and proceed about 1 mile dating to the 1800s. The the Richardson Carbondale’s West Walnut was constructed in 1898 museum also has an exhibit on the gravel road to the Romanesque style. Street Historic District was and resembles an English petroglyphs, where Gen. John A. Logan statue: of women’s vintage granted designation as a castle. Altgeld Hall has roadside parking is clothing ranging from 1865 registered National The marble and bronze been updated and enlarged, available. (This gravel road Historic District in May with renovations designed statue depicts the Civil War to the 1970s. It is open is not perfect. Drive with 1975. Fifty-four historic hero and national figure of from noon to 3 p.m. to match the architecture residences are in the Wednesday through Friday caution.) the 19th Century on of the building. It is home Giant City Lodge: Just district. While some of the to SIU School of Music and horseback. It was erected and 6:30 to 9 p.m. across the county line, near homes date back to a time Thursday evenings. 618by the state of Illinois in is connected to Shryock Makanda, the lodge was when Carbondale was 684-6989. 1928 at 2125 Spruce St. in Auditorium. built by the Civilian founded (early 1850s), most Mobile and Ohio Railroad Shryock Auditorium: This Murphysboro. Conservation Corps in the date back to the early 20th historic and acoustically Depot: The structure was Grange Hall: This 960mid-1930s. It was the most century. The homes in the square-foot brick meeting built in the 1880s and was superb facility boasts structurally ambitious district are not open to the performing arts, popular used as a train depot for hall, 4 miles north of project undertaken by public. One of these is almost 90 years. It is at Murphysboro on Illinois entertainment and President Franklin D. Hundley House, at 601 W. lectures. Former President 127-13, was the successor of 1701 Walnut St. in Roosevelt’s CCC in Illinois. Main St. the first Grange Hall, which Murphysboro. William Howard Taft gave Altgeld Hall: Originally Robert W. Hamilton House: The structure now operates burned in 1909. The the first public address the Science Building, One of the oldest houses in as a popular restaurant, existing building was when the building was famous for its all-you-canAltgeld Hall is the oldest Jackson County, the erected in 1912. dedicated April 18, 1918. eat fried chicken, and is building on campus. It was The building is dedicated to Jackson County Historical Hamilton House was built surrounded by comfortable in 1867. This example of designed in the Gothic Society: The Jackson Henry William Shryock, Gothic architectural style is cabins and Giant City State Revival style, with yellow County Historical Society president of SIUC from Park. 618-457-4921. at 203 S. 13th St., and is brick and gray limestone. is at 1616 Edith St. in 1913 to 1935.

Page 28 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL Another unusual rock formation is Devil’s Bake Oven in the same area. Jackson County has many interesting Pitted with caves, the Oven once attractions. Here are some of our harbored river pirates until a U.S. cavalry recommendations: troop drove them off in 1803. Ava Craft Center: This center in Ava is Ghost stories and legends about the open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday Grand Tower area abound. Devil’s through Friday and 9 a.m. to noon Backbone Park also has an old steam Saturday. locomotive on display. The center has 10 antique looms where Makanda: This former farming and anyone can learn to weave for free. railroad town is now home to a Weavers are charged only for the material community of artisans and craftspeople they use as they weave rugs. who display their wares along the Handwoven and braided rugs and Boardwalk. placemats are sold at the center, along Makanda sits at the west entrance to with crocheted rugs and quilts on Giant City State Park. Along the railroad consignment. tracks in the heart of town is a five-foot The center is at 211 N. Main St., across stone monument to legendary hound dog from First National Bank of Ava. For Boomer. more information, call Frances Killion As the story goes, Boomer died while at 618-426-3054. running on three legs, trying to call Cleiman Mound and Village Site: Indian attention to a flaming hot box on the mounds are located at Illinois 151 and 3. speeding train on which his railroad Devil’s Backbone, Devil’s Bake Oven: crewman master was riding. Devil’s Backbone is an unusual rock ridge Boomer was so intent on his task that that runs along the Mississippi River at he failed to notice a bridge abutment Grand Tower. ahead until it was too late and ran headlong into the obstacle. Southern Illinois promoter, the late Wayman Presley of Makanda, kept Boomer’s story alive. SIU campus: The Carbondale campus has many examples of classic architecture, such as Altgeld Hall, the oldest building on campus, constructed in 1898 and resembling an English castle; Shryock Auditorium, dedicated in 1918 and home of one of the largest pipe organs in the Midwest; and Wheeler Hall, a Romanesque building that once was the university library. Tower Rock: The city of Grand Tower took its name from Tower Rock — a small, rocky island on the Missouri side of the Mississippi River. In 1698, a group of French priests came from Canada and planted a wooden cross atop the rock, where it remained for half a century before it rotted and fell. Native Americans had legends about THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO the rock, as well as early settlers, who told tales of lovers leaping from the rock Altgeld Hall is the oldest building on the SIU into the raging waters below. campus, constructed in 1898.

Attractions to visit

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

Waters from the Mississippi River flow around Tower Rock at Grand Tower.

The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 29


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL

Take in some culture SIU Department of Theater has lots planned for upcoming semesters THE SOUTHERN

Subscription Series

he SIU Department of Theater offers a subscription series, as well as special performances throughout the school year. Plans include the following productions during the SIU Department of Theater’s 2012-13 season. Performances begin at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday and at 2 p.m. Sunday in McLeod Theater in the Communications Building at SIUC.

Oct. 18-21: “Rent,” music and lyrics by Jonathan Larson, is based on Giacomo Puccini’s opera, “La Bohème.” A group of young artists struggle to survive in the bohemian Lower East Side of Manhattan in the Tony award-winning rock musical. Nov. 29-Dec.2: “The Three Musketeers,” by Ken Ludwig is loosely based on the novel by Alexandre Dumas. Swashbuckling musketeers, and a kid

T

Page 30 Friday, August 17, 2012 The Southern Illinoisan

sister, face villains, international intrigue and exotic ladies in this action-packed update of the beloved classic. Feb. 21-24: “For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf,” by Ntozake Shange. African-American women examine the struggles and obstacles of their lives in this visceral and compelling “choreopoem.” Apr. 25-28: “Reasons to be Pretty,” by Neil LaBute. A chance remark about the “average looks” of a lover sets off

a series of spark-filled confrontations in this contemporary and hip comedy. This production contains adult language and situations. Subscription series tickets, which include all four shows, are $65 for adults, $24 for students. Indiviudal subscription show tickets are $16 for adults, $6 for students.

Special productions Nov. 1-4: “The Three Seasons of Cora,” by Erin Zimmerman-Moss. A late-19th century

West Virginian young woman is claimed, tamed and changed by her domineering mother and imposing husband. Performances will be in the C.H. Moe Theater. Tickets are $12 for adults, $6 for students. Feb. 7 and 9: “Cosi fan tutte,” music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, libretto by Lorenzo Da Ponte. Men set out to prove their fiancées are faithful by wooing them in disguise. Performances will be two days only,

Thursday and Saturday, in Shryock Auditorium. Tickets are $16 for adults, $6 for students. March 28 -31: “Journeys,” featuring new works from SIU playwrights. Performances will be at 7:30 p.m. Thursday through Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday, in the C.H. Moe Theater. Tickets are $12 for adults, $6 for students. Sept. 24: “New Faces,” (check time). Family weekend reception will follow. Tickets are $12 for adults, $6 for students.


SIU BACK TO SCHOOL Hiking near Carbondale Southern Illinois offers many beautiful outdoor trails for hikers and nature enthusiasts, including several in the Carbondale area. Try these trails in or near Carbondale: Crab Orchard National Wildlife Refuge: 8588 Illinois 148, Marion, five miles west of Marion and five miles south of Herrin, 618-997-3344. The refuge is noted for spring wildflower hikes along Rocky Bluff Trail and eagle tours in winter. Four other self-guided trails are available to view diverse habitats and their fauna and flora. Devil’s Backbone: Off Highway 1, Grand Tower, 618-687-1731. This challenging trail is the end or beginning of the River to River Trail. Giant City State Park: On Giant City Road, south of Carbondale, 618-457-4836. The 16-mile Red Cedar Trail is for novice hikers; the Stone Fort Trail is short but steep; Post Oak Trail is designed for disabled persons. Other trails through this picturesque natural wonder are Devil’s Standtable, Giant City, Indian Creek, Trillium and Arrowwood. Trail difficulty varies on each. Kincaid Lake Trail: Off Illinois 3, west of Murphysboro, 618-6874914. 16 miles including Hidden Cove and Buttermilk Hill trailheads. Lake Murphysboro: Off Illinois 149, west of Murphysboro, 618684-2867. Easy 3-mile loop, starts at the Big Oak campground and is close to the lake. LaRue/Pine Hills Ecological Area: Off Illinois 3, in the Wolf Lake area which is 6 miles south of Grand Tower, 618-833-8576. Majestic bluffs overlook the Big Muddy River. Some roads are closed in spring and fall to protect migrating snakes. Little Grand Canyon: South of Murphysboro, off Illinois 127, 618-687-1731. Trails are moderate to difficult, with

Observation Trail for outstanding views and to see Camel Rock, Anvil Rock and Devil’s Smokestack. Hamilton County Fish and Wildlife Area: Illinois 14, southeast of McLeansboro, 618773-4340. Two nature trails circle 75-acre Dolan Lake. High Knob Lookout: Off Illinois 34, east of Karbers Ridge, 618287-2201. One of the trailheads for the River to River Trail, this is a great walk to Garden of the Gods. Iron Furnace Recreation Area: Illinois 146 and 34, north of Elizabethtown, 618-287-2201. THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO Big Creek Trail loops through Levi Samuel, 6, of Johnston City throws a piece of trash out of a stream creek bottoms and large trees for that he and his father Jason were walking through July 23, 2010, while an easy to moderate hike. The hiking through Giant City State Park. area has several picnic sites and the historic Iron Furnace. 80 percent slopes, four miles. ecological regions and massive Lake Glendale: North of Illinois Trails are slippery and bald cypress trees more than 145 and 146 junction, on 145, dangerous when wet. 1,000 years old, along with the Glendale, 618-658-2111. Oakwood Bottoms/ Turkey Henry Barkhausen Cache River Lusk Creek Canyon: Illinois 145, Bayou: Illinois 3, south of Wetlands Center and canoe east of Eddyville, 618-658-2111. Gorham, 618-687-1731. trails. A two-mile trail leads to a Recreation area offers hiking, Cave-In-Rock State Park: nature preserve and canyon. picnic areas, fishing and Off Illinois 1, Cave-In-Rock, Mermet Lake Conservation handicap accessibility to hiking, 618-289-4545. Hickory Area: Illinois 45, north of fishing pier and wildlife Ridge and Pirates Bluff Nature Metropolis, 618-524-5577. Two viewing. trail winds along the Ohio easy, flat trails are a .5-mile Pomona Natural Bridge: Illinois riverbank. interpretive nature trail with 127, south of Murphysboro to Dixon Springs State Park: tree identification and Pomona turn-off, then right at Illinois 146, west of Golconda, boardwalk into cypress swamp Pomona General Store, 618618-949-3394. Enjoy a selfand a 1-mile trail. 687-1731. A .3-mile moderate guided 1.7 mile nature trail, 1Pounds Hollow/Rim Rock trail showcases the 90-foot mile trail through Ghost Dance Recreation Area: Karbers Ridge natural sandstone arch carved Canyon with 60-foot walls and Road, off Illinois 1, 618-253by water over many hundreds of long, narrow passageways. 1020 or 618-658-2111. A .8-mile years. Ferne Clyffe State Park: Illinois long Rim Rock trail meanders 37, south of Goreville, 618-995- past old Indian Wall, Pounds Hollow Lake, Ox-Lot Cave (a Eighteen trails (from easy Hiking outside Carbondale 2411. .25-mile to moderately difficult huge rock shelter bluff) and Fat Other popular areas for hiking 2-mile) can be found at Ferne Man’s Misery (a narrow in Southern Illinois, including passageway through massive Clyffe. some in the Shawnee National cliffs and huge boulders). Beaver Fort Massac State Park: Off Forest and on the River To River Illinois 45, Metropolis, 618-524- Trail connects Rim Rock with Trail, include: 4712. Two easy trails, Long Knife Pounds Hollow and is one-half mile long. Bell Smith Springs Recreation Trail and Hickory Nut Ridge Pyramid State Park: Illinois 127, Area: Off Illinois 145, Eddyville, Trail (.5-mile and 2.5-mile) loop 618-658-2111. Four creeks come through grassy woods and along south of Pinckneyville, 618-3572574. More than 16 miles of together in the canyon at Bell the scenic Ohio River. Smith Springs. Garden of the Gods Recreational trails are located within the 350 acres of forested hills and stripCache River State Natural Area: Area: Illinois 34, turn east at mine lakes. Off Illinois 37, Belknap, 618Herod, 618-287-2201. This River to River Trail: From 634-9678 or 618-657-2064. 3,300-acre wilderness ranks Grand Tower on the Mississippi More than 21 miles of designated 10th in the United States for River to Battery Rock on the foot trails are within this unique photographing sandstone rock wetland, totaling 14,274 acres. formations and high vistas. The Ohio River, 618-252-6789. This 160-mile trail extends east The area contains four distinct easiest trail is the .25-mile

to west across Southern Illinois. The trail is marked, but the River to River Trail Guide sold in bookshops, state park offices or through the number above is a hiker’s best bet. Terrain varies from moderate to difficult, and at least 14 days are needed to hike the entire trail. Saline County Fish & Wildlife Area: South of Equality, Illinois 13 to 142, 618-276-4405. Four trails, the Lake, Cave Hill, River and Wildlife Nature, total 7 miles of scenic hiking. Shawnee National Forest: 800-699-6637, stretches from the Ohio to the Mississippi River. With 270,000 acres, the unglaciated areas of Southern Illinois boast five natural ecological divisions and are more than 320 million years old. Spring and fall offer the most comfortable temperatures for hiking more than 1,250 miles of paved, gravel, dirt and grass roads in Shawnee National Forest. Stoneface Trail: Illinois 145, near Rudement, 618-253-1060. Just 5 miles north of Garden of Gods, this scenic trail is moderate, but up and down rocky bluffs with famous Stone Face landmark. Tower Rock: Illinois 146, Elizabethtown, 618-287-2201. This scenic hike is to the highest bluff (160 feet) on the Ohio River. Washington County Conservation Area: Near Nashville, 618-327-3700 and 618-327-3137. Seven miles of marked trail wander through forest, wildlife and around a 248-acre lake. Wayne Fitzgerald State Park: Exit 77 off I-57, Whittington, 618-629-2320. Four miles of hiking and biking trails and a 9mile bridle trail are in the Rend Lake area. War Bluff Wildlife Sanctuary: Illinois 146, Golconda, 618-683-6702. This wildlife sanctuary, with 10 walking tails, supports young and old forest and more than 530 types of plants and is popular with bird watchers.

The Southern Illinoisan Friday, August 17, 2012 Page 31


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