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SEPTEMBER 2012


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Inside S E PT E M B E R

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SPECIAL REPORT

INDICATORS

Making a statement: The new athletic fields completed this summer for Du Quoin and Pinckneyville high schools are comparable to the big-city fields of prestigious private high schools. But the new fields in Southern Illinois are part of a trend in smalltown America of making a statement about their quality of life. Artificial turf fields and state-of-the-art tracks in small-town schools are being used to attract families and build communities. Page 6

From bad to worse: Unemployment increased in all 18 counties of Southern Illinois during the month of May, the last month for which complete statistics are available. The tough news followed a rugged April, in which unemployment increased in 12 of 18 counties. The biggest jumps for May were reported in Jackson County, 2.3 percent, and Pope County, 2.2 percent. In other indicators, gasoline prices jumped nearly 30 cents per gallon from July to August, while the number of air passengers at Williamson County Regional Airport dropped 2 percent in June from the same month in 2011. Pages 12-13

EMPLOYMENT LAW What will you do? When a trusted and valuable employee suddenly turns bad, it is shocking and terrible at the same time. It can even send an employer into a state of panic. The first step is to slow down. The key here is to not panic. Keep a calm head and don’t put off dealing with the situation, though you may be tempted to ignore it. It is best to deal with the problem as soon as possible, or the situation will worsen. Page 11

Southern Illinoisan. Contact us via mail at 710 N. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, IL 62901, or at P. O. Box 2108, Carbondale, IL 62903. Also reach us on the Web at www.sbj.biz and via email at SBJ@thesouthern.com. The Journal is published 12 times per year monthly, and mailed to businesses, community development leaders, chambers of commerce members and other professionals in Southern Illinois. Copyright 2011 by

Who is in the news? Find out who has been hired, who has been promoted or who has received an award for efforts in business. Make sure you check out our newest ‘Faces in the News’ collection of business portraits and learn more of achievements and honors in regional businesses. If you know of a business or person who deserves special recognition for advanced training, a unique honor or a business expansion, please let us know at sbj@thesouthern.com. Pages 16-19

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Cover Story Four myths of Southern Illinois agribusiness BY LES O’DELL

SBJ CORRESPONDENT

If you buy into the Hollywood perception of agriculture, it’s easy to consider the industry as one comprised of men in bib overalls, driving tractors in fields of corn. Yet, in Southern Illinois, agriculture is big business, ripe with misconceptions and myths. Myth No. 1: ‘Agriculture is farming —just sows and cows and plows.’ Sure, agriculture in Southern Illinois includes the raising of livestock including cattle and hogs as well as traditional field crops, such as corn, soybeans and wheat, but our region is much more diverse. “It’s much more than what people usually think of,” explains Silvia Secchi, SEE COVER / PAGE 4

JOEL HAWKSLEY / SBJ

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Cover Story Find more business news at www.sbj.biz. assistant professor of agribusiness economics at SIU Carbondale. “I think Southern Illinois is an excellent place where you can see a lot of the interactions and diversity of agriculture. We are much more diverse here than even other parts of Illinois. We have orchards, the wine trail, forestry and specialty crops.” The area is known for fruit and vegetable production, often on small farms. Peaches, apples, peppers, pickles and more are grown in Southern Illinois. There are even catfish and shrimp farms in the region. “Many of these specialty crop producers are selling their products at farmers markets or shipping them all over the world,” says John Pike, educator with the University of Illinois Extension Service. Secchi says all of those products are a part of agriculture. “When you think about it all, there is a lot of value added, all of which starts with production agriculture and much of which ends up on your table or car. Actual farming is a small part, but it is the foundation upon which everything is built.” She explains that food processors such as Gilster-Mary Lee Corp., which has its headquarters in Chester, is one example of a company within agriculture. Many other companies of all sizes are part of the transportation, input, processing and retailing aspects of agriculture. “When you look at the industry, it’s everything from field to fork and everything in between,” says Carol Bennett, manager of the Johnson County Farm Bureau. Myth No. 2: ‘Agriculture is not big in Southern Illinois.’ Not so, Secchi says. “Sure, the impact of agriculture in Southern Illinois is much smaller than it is in other parts of the state, but when you consider all of the tourism with people coming here for the wine trails, the horses, the wildlife and the outdoors, the specialty markets, the support industries and production agriculture, it is an increasing niche for this region,” she explains. Pike says it all adds up to be a significant part of the area’s economy.

AARON EISENHAUER / SBJ

David Petty drives a tractor and trailer through the peach trees at Rendleman Orchards in Alto Pass. The hot, dry weather has helped intensify the flavor in this year's crop of peaches.

‘Actual farming is a small part, but it is the foundation upon which everything is built.’ SILVIA SECCHI ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF AGRIBUSINESS ECONOMICS AT SIU CARBONDALE

“A lot of development continues to be made across agriculture. We see more vineyards and specialty crop production here than you would in other places in the Midwest. Add it all in with the agritourism and it’s a significant impact, maybe in the tens of millions of dollars in addition to what’s captured in commodities.” Case in point: A 2007 study on the Illinois wine and wine grapes industry found a $319 million impact, including providing for more than 2,000 full-time equivalent jobs. Many of those wineries are located in Southern Illinois. The impact of wineries and other forms of agriculture has a multiplier effect, Secchi says. “If a farmer has a couple of good years and he builds a new house, he’s going to pay more property tax on that house, and that is going to affect the local school district,” she says. “The same goes for land values. If a farmer has a good year and buys a new tractor or truck, that affects the local dealer who then spends the money again.”

Myth No. 3: ‘Agriculture is huge corporate farms.’ “I don’t think there are two corporately owned farms in the whole state,” Pike says, speaking of the perception that large companies own and operate farms. He says he thinks it’s a misconception stemming from the way some agricultural input providers advertise. “I think some of the non-farming public drives through the country and sees a Dekalb or Monsanto or Asgow sign near a field and they think that it’s the company farming that ground. In reality it’s just a matter of a company signing a field where their seed was used, just like a plumber putting a sign in the front yard of a house he’s working on,” he says. Pike says it is not uncommon for farms to be incorporated by a family as a means of estate and tax planning. He says although there are a few farms in the region of more than 10,000 acres, usually owned and operated by several related families, the average Southern Illinois farm is about 300 acres and many of the farmers are part time.

Myth No. 4: ‘Farming is not a business.’ Secchi says farmers are business people and their operations are not much different than local retailers. “The skills farmers have to have to be successful are very similar to the local businessman,” she says. “Farmers are entrepreneurs, and they have to know how to deal with risk. They use very sophisticated financial instruments and management techniques, plus they have to deal with risks like the weather that many businesses don’t have to deal with.” Farmers have to understand economics and marketing, as well as the laws of supply and demand, she says. They also must carefully balance assets and cash flow, Pike adds. “Agriculture is very capital intensive,” he says. “A lot of assets are in equipment and land. That money isn’t easily available, and those assets don’t guarantee a profit.” LES O’DELL of Carbondale is a regular contributor to Southern Business Journal and The Southern Illinoisan.


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Drought price tag could be worse The widespread and sustained drought of 2012 will affect both farmers and consumers’ pocketbooks in the coming months, local experts say. While shoppers may find higher prices on everything from cereals to fuel, farmers are facing a reduction in their annual income. But it could be worse. “Probably about 80 percent of the acres in Southern Illinois are covered by some sort of crop insurance,” Cheri Lange of Farm Credit Services in Red Bud said. “For those farmers with insurance, they should be able to break even or come out slightly above break even for the year.” She said the most popular form of crop insurance is called a revenue protection plan in which the farmer’s own historical production data is used to calculate an average yield. When production does not meet that benchmark, insurance coverage kicks in, guaranteeing the producer 50 to 85 percent of average revenue from his crop, using an average of current market commodity prices as a base. Lange said since commodity prices are high, farmers with coverage should not see drastic losses, although they may have to wait longer than normal for money, as the claims process could take several months. “We can’t begin processing claims until after harvest, then we start,” she said. “Typically, the payouts will come by the end of the year, or maybe even in January.” “The drought is a major, major issue this year because a lot of our farmers have lost their crop, and even though they have insurance, it will still be hurtful,” Silvia Secchi, assistant professor of agribusiness economics at SIU Carbondale, said. Consumers have no insurance plans to protect them from high prices. “You’re going to see higher food prices, no doubt about it,” Lange added, explaining that much of the nation’s corn crop is used for livestock feed. With less available corn, the price of feed is higher. “That means meat prices are going to go up and so is everything else in the store.” The increase may not even be apparent until sometime in 2013. Lange added that the drought’s impact will be felt all across the economy, especially in rural areas. “While the nation went through an economic downturn, agriculture has been a bright spot,” Lange said. “Fewer bushels means that farmers may not be spending as much money, and farmers are always good for the economy because they’re always reinvesting in their operation.” — LES O’DELL


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Special Report Illinois schools create community asset in athletic field upgrades BY JAMESON SHELEY SBJ CONTRIBUTOR

If you were blindfolded and dropped off at the new athletic fields completed this summer for Du Quoin and Pinckneyville high schools, your first instinct upon Sheley removing the blindfold would be that you are at a prestigious private high school in a major urban area. Instead, it’s small town America making a statement about its quality of life. Colleges and private high schools have long used athletic facilities to recruit students. Now, rural communities are turning to artificial turf fields and state-of-the-art tracks in their schools to attract families. But, it’s more than just expressing quality of life. For all schools, athletic facilities are being upgraded to optimize real estate assets, which is especially important for landlocked schools. A typical natural grass field may be used only 12 to 15 times a year to avoid wear and tear on the field; however, an artificial turf field has unlimited use for practice, JV games, cheerleading, band and other school functions. It reduces the need to allocate so much land for multiple practice fields. Schools also can generate revenue by renting them for multiple functions. With artificial turf fields costing up to $1 million and premier polyurethane tracks running as much as $600,000, schools need to make smart decisions in not only choosing the type of turf and track surfaces, but also the installation process and maintenance. Here’s a primer.

Turf and track types Selecting artificial turf is like purchasing carpet. There are many

different levels of quality. A less expensive product will not last as long as a more expensive product. Turf design duplicates the bounce of the ball on natural turf, so field hockey, lacrosse, baseball, soccer and football fields will be different. Additionally, highly specialized sports, like field hockey, require a shock pad underneath the surface to cushion it — a more expensive proposition than sand and rubber infill used for multi-purpose fields. A turf’s life span can range from five to 12 years, depending on the type of turf installed, level of usage, quality of the base and diligence of maintenance. So, schools should consider the cost of replacing the turf — typically about 50 to 60 percent of the original cost of the entire project. A $750,000 artificial turf can cost about $450,000 to replace if it has a properly constructed base that can be reused. As for tracks, the size will be determined by the events the school anticipates hosting. Du Quoin and Pinckneyville selected eight-lane tracks suitable for regional or sectional events. Some schools opt for six-lane tracks sufficient for dual league track meets. More than 90 percent of schools opt for polyurethane surfaces generally composed of a black mat with a structural spray coating. It should have a life span of 20 years with a re-spray coating every five years. There are more expensive systems, but no matter what installation is chosen, reputable installers should follow proper manufacturers’ guidelines for the amount of materials required for the track system. This can be confirmed in the bill of lading.

Construction process Most schools want upgrades performed when school is out during the summer, sometimes putting off construction until mid-June to accommodate the use of facilities for graduation ceremonies. When planning

PROVIDED

Colleges and private high schools have long used athletic facilities to recruit students. Now, rural communities such as Pinckneyville, (top), and Du Quoin are turning to artificial turf fields and state-of-the-art tracks to attract families.


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Special Report an upgrade, schools should first consider that it can take up to five months from the time a school commits to the project to putting the first shovel into the ground. This is largely because of the design schedule and permit review process. Engineers and designers need three to four months just to create a final plan to price for contractors. Projects then need to be bid in late winter to early spring for schools planning a summer installation. Permitting can include approval from multiple agencies, including the state department of natural resources, the local sewer district, other state, county and municipal offices, and, in some cases, levee districts. Permitting invariably encounters storm water management, water quality, erosion control and other environmental issues.

Find more business news at www.sbj.biz. Meanwhile, design and engineering requires a thorough evaluation of site selection and site geometry (so the surface fits the site), mapping of existing utilities, storm water retention and water quality concerns before finalizing construction bid documents. Once projects start (typically in June), the timeline for completion can shrink even further if a school wants the field ready for August practice. A lot of things have to go right, especially weather, if a new field or track is going to be installed in 45 days. Construction firms vary in handling a compressed schedule, but the best outcomes start with working closely with schools to manage the

schedule and expectations, while planning each step of the project long before construction is started. A lot of overtime and weekend work will add to the cost of the project.

Maintenance Maintaining artificial turf is easier and less expensive than natural turf, which requires irrigation, seeding, aerating, fertilizing and replacement of damaged turf. Artificial turf needs to be groomed to fluff the blades, have debris removed and swept twice a month under heavy use and once a quarter with lighter use. Seam repairs are also occasionally required. Many schools pay for these costs by renting their fields. Meanwhile, a new rubberized track stays in good condition for five to seven years before requiring a resurfacing coat. The track

should have a total life span of 15 to 25 years, depending on the type installed. Community school budgets are tight, but administrators can find long-term value in upgrading athletic surfaces. They just need to make smart decisions on turf and track surfaces and understand construction timelines and maintenance costs. Be nimble, like an athlete, in your decision making and you’ll have the community asset you seek. JAMESON SHELEY, CFB-S, CTB is a certified field builder and certified track builder and project manager for St. Louisbased Byrne & Jones Sports, which for more than three decades has installed more than 1,000 athletic surfaces. More information can be found at www.byrneandjones sports.com.

Entrepreneur’s Mailbag Strategic planning helps keep an eye on the big picture BY CAVANAUGH L. GRAY SBJ CONTRIBUTOR

Business development work can, at times, be a bit complicated. With so many moving small business parts, owners must know which tools are right for which job. Over time, it Gray became easier to understand the differences between business planning and strategic planning and when it was appropriate to use each one. Strategic plans are more conceptual in nature and produce the overall goals and objectives to be achieved. Business plans, on the other hand, are very specific and responsible for carrying out those goals and objectives. The following is a further examination of strategic planning and how it can benefit your company.

Strategic planning A strategic plan describes how your company executes a chosen strategy. It spells out where an organization is going over the next year, or more, and how it’s going to get there. Typically, a strategic plan is organization-wide or focused on a major function, such as a division or department. A strategic plan focuses the energy, resources and time of everyone in the organization in the same direction. If you are going to implement a strategic plan, be sure to take into account the following:  Make sure your strategic plan focuses on helping your organization build a competitive advantage.  Use your strategic plan to focus on the right opportunities.  Use your strategic plan to help prioritize the company’s financial needs.

Assessing the current situation In developing a strategic plan, a company must answer the questions:

Where are we right now, and what are we up against, both internally and externally? In drafting your strategic plan, remember that the plan is not complete without examining the following:  Are there any pressing problems? If so, what is the scope of those problems?  Has the company recently missed goals, been unprofitable or experienced little to no growth?  What are the contributors to the organization’s current successes or failures?  What assumptions are you operating under that could affect the outcome of your business?  Finally, what potential risk could you be facing over the coming years? Because I am hard wired as a strategic thinker, it drives me crazy when business strategy is poorly done — as in the case of companies like Kodak or, more recently, Netflix. In 2009, the Lego Group was facing a 5 percent global toy decline. Its strategic plan focused on cutting cost,

creating better partnerships and licensing deals (Star Wars, Indiana Jones and Toy Story), creating a more exciting line of toys, courting more young women and promoting Legos as a fun, systematic and creative way to play. Lego’s strategic plan paid off, allowing the company to identify problems and establish goals and objectives for turning things around. In doing so, Lego was able to realize a 23 percent sales increase during a global toy decline. What’s your strategy? CAVANAUGH L. GRAY (cgray@ecafellc.com) is director of business development for The Entrepreneur Café, LLC and can be reached at 877-511-4820. For more information on developing strategic plans or to read a chapter from his new book, “The Entrepreneurial Spirit Lives: 25 Tales to Help Entrepreneurs Start, Grow, and Succeed in Small Business,” log on to www.ecafellc.com. Follow The Entrepreneur Café, LLC on Twitter @TheECafe and on Facebook for more startup information.


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Tax Planning Looking at the new estate tax laws

What has happened since 2010 and what could happen in 2013 BY SCOTT MCCLATCHEY SBJ CONTRIBUTOR

With 2013 approaching, many families and their financial, tax and legal consultants are weighing major estate planning decisions. A shortterm window of opportunity may be McClatchey closing. The relatively low estate tax rates we have now may soon disappear, along with one of the largest federal tax breaks available in decades. Estate taxes are at 80-year lows. At the end of 2010, Congress reset the estate, gift and generation-skipping tax rates at 35 percent and raised the lifetime federal gift, estate and GST tax exemptions to $5.12 million until Jan. 1, 2013. Some Capitol Hill legislators want to see these rates retained, even made

permanent. Two other scenarios may be more likely. In the first scenario, the Bush-era tax cuts expire at the end of 2012, and it becomes 2001 all over again. The lifetime estate and gift tax exemptions fall to $1 million, and estate taxes are reset to 55 percent (60 percent for some households). In the second scenario, Congress makes good on President Barak Obama’s request to turn the clock back to 2009: estate taxes reset to a top rate of 45 percent with a $3.5 million personal exemption. (The lifetime gift tax exemption would still fall to $1 million.) The current $5.12 million personal exemption is portable between spouses. This represents a major tax break for wealthy families — an opportunity to transfer significantly greater amounts of wealth without triggering transfer taxes. Currently, executors have an option to transfer an unused portion of a deceased spouse’s $5.12 million lifetime unified gift/estate/GST exemption to a

surviving spouse. So, with this new portability, a married couple can potentially transfer up to $10.24 million of assets without incurring any federal estate tax. In 2013, this portability is scheduled to disappear. Portability is not automatic. When the first spouse passes away, the executor of his or her estate must file a federal estate tax return even if no estate tax is owed. That move formally notifies the IRS that you are transferring the unused or partially used personal exemption to the surviving spouse. This estate tax return is due nine months after the death of the first spouse, with a six-month extension permissible. If some planning needs to be done to bring the value of your taxable estate under $5.12 million (or $10.24 million), your executor could make donations to qualified charities or non-profits on your behalf to lower the taxable value of your estate, although your heirs would consequently be left with less. You can shrink your taxable estate

Find more business news at www.sbj.biz. without reducing the lifetime exemption. In 2012, the annual federal gift tax exclusion is set at $13,000. So, you (and your spouse) may gift up to $13,000 each to an unlimited number of individuals in 2012 without reducing your lifetime $5.12 million gift/estate tax exemption. Those gifts can even be made as payments for school expenses (except housing costs) or medical bills. Keep the $13,000 annual exclusion limit in mind. In 2012, gifts in excess of $13,000 per individual do cut into the $5.12 million lifetime exemption dollarfor-dollar. Even so, you still might want to make large gifts of appreciating assets this year. Why? Here’s an illustration. If your gift shares value at $52,000 to a relative, you will draw down your $5.12 million SEE TAX LAWS / PAGE 23

Money Matters Shock analysis can help bond investors anticipate effects of higher interest rates BY MICHAEL P. TISON SBJ CONTRIBUTOR

Tison

Although no one can predict exactly where we are on the path to higher interest rates, that doesn’t stop investors — especially those with substantial bond holdings — from wondering

how their portfolios might be affected if and when rates rise. In that regard, an exercise with the somewhat scary name of a “shock analysis” may be helpful. While the Federal Reserve has pledged to keep interest rates low through 2014, many observers believe the next major move for rates is upward, if only because they are so low now. Like everything else concerning investing, even the experts are often surprised, and it may be the consensus is wrong. It’s also true that bond prices are influenced not only by rates but by a number of factors,

including the financial health and credit rating of the issuers, as well as the everpresent effects of supply and demand. However, when and if interest rates do rise, the principal values of bond portfolios as a whole are likely to decline. A shock analysis — sometimes referred to as a horizon analysis — provides a good starting point for discussions between investors and their advisers about the potential price volatility of fixed income portfolios if interest rates increase. Investors who want to minimize risk, or simply have a better

idea of what to expect, can use the results of a shock analysis to determine if they want to make adjustments to their portfolios or simply sit tight. Either way, running a “what if” scenario will provide useful information that can help guide portfolio decisions. A shock analysis illustrates and quantifies the potential impact of a change in interest rates on a fixed income portion of a diversified portfolio. The report contains specific results for SEE SHOCK ANALYSIS / PAGE 10


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SHOCK ANALYSIS FROM PAGE 9

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each individual bond holding, identifying estimated price changes under the chosen scenario — for example, a 1 percent increase in interest rates within the next year. Because the potential effects on each individual bond holding is analyzed, the results can be helpful in determining what specific securities an investor might want to address if portfolio adjustments are deemed necessary. Because the coupon rate, the payout initially pledged by the issuer of a bond, is fixed, bond holders should continue to receive the same amount regardless of what interest rates do. But since principal values and interest rates move inversely, a rise in interest rates typically means a decline in principal values. A shock analysis estimates how potential changes in the principal return (which is assumed to decline by a certain amount if interest rates rise) might combine with the coupon return (which should not be affected by a change in rates). The analysis shows how the total return of the portfolio over a given time period might be affected. It’s important to understand that a shock analysis is not a prediction about the direction of interest rates, nor a guarantee, as to the potential price changes of specific bond holdings under different scenarios. The results of a shock analysis are estimates derived from a mathematical model — the actual impact on the portfolio in question may be different. Other factors can also affect changes in the portfolio holdings. For example, although a shock analysis estimates when a bond will be called prior to maturity, the issuer may or may not actually call (redeem) the bond during the time period in question. Of course, rising interest rates affect many types of investments. While higher rates can be a negative for stock prices, quantifying the impact of interest rates changes on stocks is complex. A discussions with your advisor regarding the possible effects of rising rates on your overall portfolio is a good idea. MICHAEL P. TISON is an investment adviser and registered principal with Raymond James Financial Services Inc., with offices in Harrisburg and Marion. He can be reached at 618-253-4444 or michael.tison@ raymondjames.com.


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Employment Law The good employee gone bad: What you should do BY ANGELA HOLMES-YOUNG SBJ CONTRIBUTOR

It has happened to all of us. You are at work and feeling like things are good. Your work life is good. Things are moving along well. You look around and realize that you have a great staff Holmes-Young and people are working hard. Then, it happens. Usually, without the slightest warning, something suddenly does not seem right. Can it be true? A good employee, maybe even your best employee, has gone bad. It is shocking and terrible all at the same time. It can even send you into a state of all-out panic. What exactly happened? How does a one-time star performer turn into a slacker? What will you do now? He or she was the one you could count on to do everything right. This employee was the one person who would actually do what needed to be done before you even needed to say something. Now, it is all over, and your once star employee is truly your worst nightmare. Let me start by explaining exactly what I mean when I say that the employee turned bad. An example of an employee going bad might be when your star employee begins gossiping to others, breaking rules or policies, missing work and/or showing up late. Other tell-tale signs could be an employee, with a once stellar attitude, who suddenly turns into a sassy employee ready to complain and whine about everything. Work performance suffers greatly when an employee turns bad. When star performers go bad, they take the rest of the staff with them and bring down morale and productivity. They had previously been both a formal or informal leader, and others are used to following where they lead. So, when the star performer is leading them into a downward spiral of poor morale and slow productivity, everyone follows. It is a dangerous and slippery slope that, left unattended, can be a disaster.

Find more business news at www.sbj.biz.

‘Weakness of attitude becomes weakness of character.’ ALBERT EINSTEIN

After you recover from the shock of it all, you start to think deeper. What will you do now? How will you and your organization get through it? Maybe, for just a second, you hoped no one would notice; but, it really is too late. The office know-it-all already noticed and has told everyone. You have to deal with it now, but what do you do? The situation can be ignored no longer. Is there any way to rehabilitate this once great employee? Is it worth the effort? Should you sit back and hope this person quits? Here are the true questions. Is it better to act or to do nothing and let the situation solve itself? Slow down. Yes, the situation can be salvaged. The key here is not to panic. Keep a calm head and don’t put off dealing with the situation. Your first instinct will be to completely ignore the situation. Do not do this. Do not put this off or the mess will get bigger. Take action and set a time to talk to this person right away. Maybe there is something that you can do to help this employee that will ultimately correct his or her behavior. Resist the urge to put off talking to the employee because you decide that you can handle this person’s work for awhile yourself. Trust me. You are too busy for that. You do not have time. You should be delegating, not taking on more work from subordinates. This is not a good use of your time. Now that you are thinking clearly, take action. Meet with the employee. Start by explaining to the employee what you are seeing. This includes specifics on exactly what the problem is. You should also include details on what aspect of the job that isn’t being done. I call this step the “What” step. Be as explanatory as you can here. Make sure that the employee understands exactly what is wrong. Next is the “Why” step. Explain to the employee why any of this matters. Explain who else this is affecting, why it is important. Explain why you need this person to do it a certain way, etc. Again, explain as much as you can. Just saying,

“Do it this way because I said so,” or “That is the way we have always done it,” really isn’t the best explanation here. Now is your chance to explain the business condition and process. Take advantage of this time for education. Now, move onto the “How” step. This step is all about explaining how he or she can turn this problem around. I am not suggesting here that you provide all of the answers. Maybe you do, maybe you don’t. It depends on the problem or situation. Maybe the employee needs to solve this alone, with you mentoring or providing guidance. The last step in this coaching model is the “When” step. When will the employee need to make this change? When will you be looking to confirm positive action? When will the results be due? When will the employee be evaluated? Maybe you need to set up a series of timelines or mini-deadlines so everyone is on the same page and you can work to the end goal in steps.

Coaching made simple Step 1: Discuss what the problem or issue is Step 2: Discuss why this is a problem or issue Step 3: Discuss how the employee can/should fix the issue Step 4: Discuss when the employee needs to have the problem or issue fixed Don’t let your star employee fall down in front of you while doing nothing to help. If you talk with the employee and find the root of the problem to be something of a personal nature and/or something happening at home, should you help? Yes, offer support, but only to a degree. There is a fine line between boss and friend. Recommend some services from professionals who can help the employee. Do not encourage the employee to drown his or her sorrows in a bottle of wine at your kitchen table. Don’t be afraid to refer the employee to

ART SERVICES

Work performance suffers greatly when an employee turns bad.

get the help that he or she needs; but, remember your place in the equation. In the end, as humans, we all have stress that will at times manifest itself in the workplace. Use patience to deal with the stress of others. Act quickly to control situations before they get out of hand and cause major workplace issues. Don’t be afraid to refer someone to a trained professional for help with personal issues. Remember to keep the personal matters of your employees confidential. ANGELA HOLMES-YOUNG is vice president of Consulting & Human Resource Services for Your Professional Partners, Inc. in Marion. She consults with clients of all sizes in a variety of human resource areas, while also offering executive coaching and public speaking. Angela can be reached by emailing angela@yourprofessional partners.com, calling 618-969-8800 or on Twitter @A_Holmes_Young.


S

O

U

T

H

E

Retail sales for Southern Illinois cities City Anna Benton Carbondale Carterville Chester Du Quoin Harrisburg Herrin Jonesboro Marion Metropolis Mount Vernon Murphysboro Nashville Pinckneyville Red Bud Sparta Vienna West City West Frankfort REGION ILLINOIS

YTD June 2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

54.7 38.7 264.1 17.5 24.6 29.1 98.1 76.5 5.7 320.3 36.8 237.3 60.3 53.2 17.9 33.2 55.7 17.5 41.4 10.2 $1,492.8 $71,652.3

119.1 86.4 593.5 42.0 55.7 113.5 214.0 154.0 11.4 686.9 84.4 533.6 135.2 110.3 42.3 74.7 128.2 40.1 88.3 122.5 $3,436.1 $154,650.6

120.9 69.5 598.0 42.2 55.3 77.1 195.0 153.4 11.8 683.1 82.0 507.0 130.6 96.6 38.5 75.2 128.5 39.9 87.8 112.4 $3,304.8 $147,232.0

114.5 69.4 565.5 39.9 52.9 100.8 191.9 147.2 12.5 676.0 77.1 476.7 129.1 107.9 37.2 70.1 126.4 37.1 91.9 111.4 $3,235.5 $139,593.2

113.3 71.4 587.7 40.1 51.5 91.9 179.3 135.9 12.4 673.4 75.9 482.8 117.1 101.8 39.0 77.7 130.5 40.5 89.6 111.2 $3,223.0 $237,438.0

112.3 72.4 607.4 40.3 51.7 94.4 173.6 134.4 11.3 662.4 79.8 461.5 94.9 105.2 35.8 73.7 129.5 39.8 82.8 111.4 $3,174.7 $180,162.7

R

N I L L I Chicago Fed Midwest % change 07-11 Manufacturing Index                      

6.1% 19.3% 2.3% 4.2% 7.7% 20.2% 23.3% 15.6% 0.9% 3.7% 5.8% 15.6% 42.5% 4.8% 18.2% 1.4% 1.0% 0.8% 6.6% 10.0% 8.2% 14.2%

Alexander Franklin Gallatin Hamilton Hardin Jackson Jefferson Johnson Massac Perry Pope Pulaski Randolph Saline Union Washington White Williamson .,REGION ILLINOIS U.S.

2,960 17,700 2,615 4,243 1,831 29,788 20,060 5,067 7,816 9,410 1,942 2,685 15,222 12,751 7,657 8,604 7,770 34,348 192,469 6,669,081 156,385,000

342 1,968 240 363 201 2,608 1,789 544 786 1,093 208 313 1,400 1,218 876 685 642 3,022 18,298 620,332 13,184,000

June 2012 11.6% 11.1% 9.2% 8.6% 11.0% 8.8% 8.9% 10.7% 10.1% 11.6% 10.7% 11.7% 9.2% 9.6% 11.4% 8.0% 8.3% 8.8% 9.6% 9.3% 8.4%

May 2012 11.1% 9.5% 7.7% 7.0% 9.0% 6.5% 7.7% 8.9% 8.2% 10.2% 8.5% 9.9% 7.9% 7.8% 10.0% 6.7% 6.7% 7.4% 8.4% 8.4% 7.9%

104 103 102

IPMFG June 12 95.8

100 98 94 90 88 86 84

81 80

Unemployment rates for Southern Illinois counties, state and nation Jobless

105

82

SOURCE: LATEST STATISTICS AVAILABLE FROM THE ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE. FIGURES ARE IN MILLIONS.

Labor force

The CFMMI is a monthly estimate by major industry of manufacturing output in the Seventh Federal Reserve District states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan and Wisconsin. It is a composite index of 15 manufacturing industries, including auto and steel, that uses electrical power and hours worked data to measure monthly changes in regional activity. It is compared here to the national Industrial Production index for Manufacturing (IPMFG). Base year is 2007. Starting in November 2005, the index excluded the electricity component.

June 2011 14.4% 12.3% 9.1% 7.8% 11.7% 8.6% 8.8% 10.8% 9.5% 10.9% 11.0% 11.4% 8.4% 9.5% 11.6% 7.5% 7.7% 9.1% 10.0% 10.3% 9.3%

SOURCE: ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR. FIGURES ARE NOT SEASONALLY ADJUSTED.

Change month                     

0.5 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.0 2.3 1.2 1.8 1.9 1.4 2.2 1.8 1.3 1.8 1.4 1.3 1.6 1.4 1.2 0.8 0.5

78

Change year                     

76 74 72

CFMMI June 12 94.1

2.8 1.2 70 0.1 68 0.8 66 0.7 64 N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J ’10 ’11 ’12 0.2 0.1 SOURCE: FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF CHICAGO 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.3 0.3 June 12 June 11 Change 0.8 0.1 MONTHLY TOTALS 0.2 886 904  2.0% 0.5 YTD TOTALS 0.6 0.3 2,591 2,433  6.5% 0.4 2011 2010 Change 1.0 ANNUAL TOTALS 0.9 9,682 7,478  29.5%

Williamson County Regional Airport passengers

N

O

I S I N Consumer credit score

D

I

10 85 20 10 8 131 53 30 11 58 2 9 75 80 35 25 48 190 880

14 130 27 22 9 148 76 34 18 52 10 18 86 72 37 47 57 179 1,036

693

Region

694

688

State

O R S U of I Flash Index

U. S.

Total cars, trucks sold based on title applications filed. Excludes motorcycles, trailers.

New vehicle sales Alexander Franklin Gallatin Hamilton Hardin Jackson Jefferson Johnson Massac Perry Pope Pulaski Randolph Saline Union Washington White Williamson REGION

T

Carterville

SOURCE: EXPERIAN

June 11

A

686

Credit scores are numeric reflections of financial behavior and credit worthiness and they are based on information included in a credit report. Ranging from 330 to 830, a higher score means a lower credit risk. Scores are from August 2012.

June 12

C

                  

Change

2011

28.6% 34.6% 29.5% 54.5% 11.1% 11.5% 30.3% 11.8% 38.9% 11.5% 80.0% 50.0% 12.8% 11.1% 5.4% 46.8% 15.8% 6.1% 15.1%

142 1,174 265 279 96 1,482 1,025 392 297 606 96 159 975 1,022 502 583 625 2,060 11,780

2010 126 965 222 236 97 1,320 848 327 269 558 73 129 844 793 486 446 571 1,796 10,097

Change                   

12.7% 21.7% 19.4% 20.8% 1.0% 12.3% 20.9% 19.9% 10.4% 8.6% 31.5% 23.2% 15.5% 28.9% 3.3% 30.7% 9.5% 14.7% 16.7%

Total units sold, including condominiums

Q2 12 Alexander Franklin Gallatin Hamilton Hardin Jackson Jefferson Johnson Massac Perry Pope Pulaski Randolph Saline Union Williamson ILLINOIS

0 78 5 2 3 98 78 16 38 25 4 3 36 53 24 191 35,116

Q2 11 2 87 5 2 6 96 77 13 24 29 2 5 41 41 14 155 29,529

SOURCE: ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS

Change

 100.0%  10.3% 0.0% 0.0%  50.0%  2.1%  1.3%  23.1%  58.3%  13.8%  100.0%  40.0%  12.2%  29.3%  71.4%  23.2%  18.9%

July 12 102.9

F

M

A

M

2011 16 283 12 6 14 325 258 66 82 86 10 11 117 148 89 539 103,294

2010 19 259 8 8 8 358 264 78 91 116 8 6 131 122 84 590 103,455

Change                 

15.8% 9.3% 50.0% 25.0% 75.0% 10.2% 2.3% 15.4% 9.9% 25.9% 20.0% 83.3% 10.7% 21.3 % 6.0% 8.6% 0.2%

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

’12

’11

’10

SOURCE: INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Hotel/motel stats

Consumer Price Index

Total amount of revenue generated in Carbondale by hotels and motels for room rentals only.

The CPI measures average price changes of goods and services over time, with a reference base of 100 in 1982-84.To put into context, a current CPI of 194.5 means a market basket of goods and services that cost $100 in 1982-84 now costs $194.50.

June 12 June 11 MONTHLY TOTALS

Change

$756,575 

$785,550

3.8%

YTD TOTALS $3,124,633

$3,074,580 

2010

1.6%

Change

$28,250 $42,000 $45,000 $51,570 $24,000 $92,500 $95,000 $61,000 $79,500 $48,500 $96,500 $55,000 $69,900 $62,000 $77,500 $100,500 $142,000

226

224

U.S. city average July 12 229.1

222

$7,710,436  <0.01%

MEDIAN SALES PRICE Q2 12 Q2 11 $0 $65,250 $48,000 $189,000 $43,000 $96,500 $84,500 $66,500 $62,000 $61,900 $127,500 $43,000 $81,500 $52,000 $80,250 $116,000 $145,000

230

228

2011 ANNUAL TOTALS $7,706,931

SOURCE: ILLINOIS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE. LATEST DATA AVAILABLE.

Home sales

108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 J

The Flash Index is an early indicator of the Illinois economy’s expected performance. It is a weighted average of growth rates in corporate earnings, consumer spending and personal income. An index above 100 indicates expected growth; an index below 100 indicates the economy is contracting.

220

218

216

Change

214

 100.0% Midwest urban  55.4% July 12 219.0  6.7%  265.2%  79.2%  4.3% SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR  11.1%  9.0%  22.0%  27.6% Average price per gallon of regular, unleaded  32.1% gas as of August 16 and July 27, 2012.  21.8% Aug 12 July 12 Aug 11  16.6% $3.84 $3.58 $3.57  16.1% Metro East  3.5% Springfield $3.81 $3.47 $3.53  15.4% Illinois $4.06 $3.61 $3.77 $3.71 $3.49 $3.59  2.1% U.S. 212

210

208

J

A

S ’11

O

N

D

J

F

M

A ‘12

Prices at the pump

SOURCE: AAA

M

J

J


S

O

U

T

H

E

Retail sales for Southern Illinois cities City Anna Benton Carbondale Carterville Chester Du Quoin Harrisburg Herrin Jonesboro Marion Metropolis Mount Vernon Murphysboro Nashville Pinckneyville Red Bud Sparta Vienna West City West Frankfort REGION ILLINOIS

YTD June 2012

2011

2010

2009

2008

2007

54.7 38.7 264.1 17.5 24.6 29.1 98.1 76.5 5.7 320.3 36.8 237.3 60.3 53.2 17.9 33.2 55.7 17.5 41.4 10.2 $1,492.8 $71,652.3

119.1 86.4 593.5 42.0 55.7 113.5 214.0 154.0 11.4 686.9 84.4 533.6 135.2 110.3 42.3 74.7 128.2 40.1 88.3 122.5 $3,436.1 $154,650.6

120.9 69.5 598.0 42.2 55.3 77.1 195.0 153.4 11.8 683.1 82.0 507.0 130.6 96.6 38.5 75.2 128.5 39.9 87.8 112.4 $3,304.8 $147,232.0

114.5 69.4 565.5 39.9 52.9 100.8 191.9 147.2 12.5 676.0 77.1 476.7 129.1 107.9 37.2 70.1 126.4 37.1 91.9 111.4 $3,235.5 $139,593.2

113.3 71.4 587.7 40.1 51.5 91.9 179.3 135.9 12.4 673.4 75.9 482.8 117.1 101.8 39.0 77.7 130.5 40.5 89.6 111.2 $3,223.0 $237,438.0

112.3 72.4 607.4 40.3 51.7 94.4 173.6 134.4 11.3 662.4 79.8 461.5 94.9 105.2 35.8 73.7 129.5 39.8 82.8 111.4 $3,174.7 $180,162.7

R

N I L L I Chicago Fed Midwest % change 07-11 Manufacturing Index                      

6.1% 19.3% 2.3% 4.2% 7.7% 20.2% 23.3% 15.6% 0.9% 3.7% 5.8% 15.6% 42.5% 4.8% 18.2% 1.4% 1.0% 0.8% 6.6% 10.0% 8.2% 14.2%

Alexander Franklin Gallatin Hamilton Hardin Jackson Jefferson Johnson Massac Perry Pope Pulaski Randolph Saline Union Washington White Williamson .,REGION ILLINOIS U.S.

2,960 17,700 2,615 4,243 1,831 29,788 20,060 5,067 7,816 9,410 1,942 2,685 15,222 12,751 7,657 8,604 7,770 34,348 192,469 6,669,081 156,385,000

342 1,968 240 363 201 2,608 1,789 544 786 1,093 208 313 1,400 1,218 876 685 642 3,022 18,298 620,332 13,184,000

June 2012 11.6% 11.1% 9.2% 8.6% 11.0% 8.8% 8.9% 10.7% 10.1% 11.6% 10.7% 11.7% 9.2% 9.6% 11.4% 8.0% 8.3% 8.8% 9.6% 9.3% 8.4%

May 2012 11.1% 9.5% 7.7% 7.0% 9.0% 6.5% 7.7% 8.9% 8.2% 10.2% 8.5% 9.9% 7.9% 7.8% 10.0% 6.7% 6.7% 7.4% 8.4% 8.4% 7.9%

104 103 102

IPMFG June 12 95.8

100 98 94 90 88 86 84

81 80

Unemployment rates for Southern Illinois counties, state and nation Jobless

105

82

SOURCE: LATEST STATISTICS AVAILABLE FROM THE ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF REVENUE. FIGURES ARE IN MILLIONS.

Labor force

The CFMMI is a monthly estimate by major industry of manufacturing output in the Seventh Federal Reserve District states of Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Michigan and Wisconsin. It is a composite index of 15 manufacturing industries, including auto and steel, that uses electrical power and hours worked data to measure monthly changes in regional activity. It is compared here to the national Industrial Production index for Manufacturing (IPMFG). Base year is 2007. Starting in November 2005, the index excluded the electricity component.

June 2011 14.4% 12.3% 9.1% 7.8% 11.7% 8.6% 8.8% 10.8% 9.5% 10.9% 11.0% 11.4% 8.4% 9.5% 11.6% 7.5% 7.7% 9.1% 10.0% 10.3% 9.3%

SOURCE: ILLINOIS DEPARTMENT OF EMPLOYMENT SECURITY, U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR. FIGURES ARE NOT SEASONALLY ADJUSTED.

Change month                     

0.5 1.6 1.5 1.6 1.0 2.3 1.2 1.8 1.9 1.4 2.2 1.8 1.3 1.8 1.4 1.3 1.6 1.4 1.2 0.8 0.5

78

Change year                     

76 74 72

CFMMI June 12 94.1

2.8 1.2 70 0.1 68 0.8 66 0.7 64 N D J F M A M J J A S O N D J F M A M J ’10 ’11 ’12 0.2 0.1 SOURCE: FEDERAL RESERVE BANK OF CHICAGO 0.1 0.6 0.7 0.3 0.3 June 12 June 11 Change 0.8 0.1 MONTHLY TOTALS 0.2 886 904  2.0% 0.5 YTD TOTALS 0.6 0.3 2,591 2,433  6.5% 0.4 2011 2010 Change 1.0 ANNUAL TOTALS 0.9 9,682 7,478  29.5%

Williamson County Regional Airport passengers

N

O

I S I N Consumer credit score

D

I

10 85 20 10 8 131 53 30 11 58 2 9 75 80 35 25 48 190 880

14 130 27 22 9 148 76 34 18 52 10 18 86 72 37 47 57 179 1,036

693

Region

694

688

State

O R S U of I Flash Index

U. S.

Total cars, trucks sold based on title applications filed. Excludes motorcycles, trailers.

New vehicle sales Alexander Franklin Gallatin Hamilton Hardin Jackson Jefferson Johnson Massac Perry Pope Pulaski Randolph Saline Union Washington White Williamson REGION

T

Carterville

SOURCE: EXPERIAN

June 11

A

686

Credit scores are numeric reflections of financial behavior and credit worthiness and they are based on information included in a credit report. Ranging from 330 to 830, a higher score means a lower credit risk. Scores are from August 2012.

June 12

C

                  

Change

2011

28.6% 34.6% 29.5% 54.5% 11.1% 11.5% 30.3% 11.8% 38.9% 11.5% 80.0% 50.0% 12.8% 11.1% 5.4% 46.8% 15.8% 6.1% 15.1%

142 1,174 265 279 96 1,482 1,025 392 297 606 96 159 975 1,022 502 583 625 2,060 11,780

2010 126 965 222 236 97 1,320 848 327 269 558 73 129 844 793 486 446 571 1,796 10,097

Change                   

12.7% 21.7% 19.4% 20.8% 1.0% 12.3% 20.9% 19.9% 10.4% 8.6% 31.5% 23.2% 15.5% 28.9% 3.3% 30.7% 9.5% 14.7% 16.7%

Total units sold, including condominiums

Q2 12 Alexander Franklin Gallatin Hamilton Hardin Jackson Jefferson Johnson Massac Perry Pope Pulaski Randolph Saline Union Williamson ILLINOIS

0 78 5 2 3 98 78 16 38 25 4 3 36 53 24 191 35,116

Q2 11 2 87 5 2 6 96 77 13 24 29 2 5 41 41 14 155 29,529

SOURCE: ILLINOIS ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS

Change

 100.0%  10.3% 0.0% 0.0%  50.0%  2.1%  1.3%  23.1%  58.3%  13.8%  100.0%  40.0%  12.2%  29.3%  71.4%  23.2%  18.9%

July 12 102.9

F

M

A

M

2011 16 283 12 6 14 325 258 66 82 86 10 11 117 148 89 539 103,294

2010 19 259 8 8 8 358 264 78 91 116 8 6 131 122 84 590 103,455

Change                 

15.8% 9.3% 50.0% 25.0% 75.0% 10.2% 2.3% 15.4% 9.9% 25.9% 20.0% 83.3% 10.7% 21.3 % 6.0% 8.6% 0.2%

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

J

’12

’11

’10

SOURCE: INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENT AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS

Hotel/motel stats

Consumer Price Index

Total amount of revenue generated in Carbondale by hotels and motels for room rentals only.

The CPI measures average price changes of goods and services over time, with a reference base of 100 in 1982-84.To put into context, a current CPI of 194.5 means a market basket of goods and services that cost $100 in 1982-84 now costs $194.50.

June 12 June 11 MONTHLY TOTALS

Change

$756,575 

$785,550

3.8%

YTD TOTALS $3,124,633

$3,074,580 

2010

1.6%

Change

$28,250 $42,000 $45,000 $51,570 $24,000 $92,500 $95,000 $61,000 $79,500 $48,500 $96,500 $55,000 $69,900 $62,000 $77,500 $100,500 $142,000

226

224

U.S. city average July 12 229.1

222

$7,710,436  <0.01%

MEDIAN SALES PRICE Q2 12 Q2 11 $0 $65,250 $48,000 $189,000 $43,000 $96,500 $84,500 $66,500 $62,000 $61,900 $127,500 $43,000 $81,500 $52,000 $80,250 $116,000 $145,000

230

228

2011 ANNUAL TOTALS $7,706,931

SOURCE: ILLINOIS SECRETARY OF STATE’S OFFICE. LATEST DATA AVAILABLE.

Home sales

108 107 106 105 104 103 102 101 100 99 98 97 96 95 94 93 92 91 90 89 J

The Flash Index is an early indicator of the Illinois economy’s expected performance. It is a weighted average of growth rates in corporate earnings, consumer spending and personal income. An index above 100 indicates expected growth; an index below 100 indicates the economy is contracting.

220

218

216

Change

214

 100.0% Midwest urban  55.4% July 12 219.0  6.7%  265.2%  79.2%  4.3% SOURCE: U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR  11.1%  9.0%  22.0%  27.6% Average price per gallon of regular, unleaded  32.1% gas as of August 16 and July 27, 2012.  21.8% Aug 12 July 12 Aug 11  16.6% $3.84 $3.58 $3.57  16.1% Metro East  3.5% Springfield $3.81 $3.47 $3.53  15.4% Illinois $4.06 $3.61 $3.77 $3.71 $3.49 $3.59  2.1% U.S. 212

210

208

J

A

S ’11

O

N

D

J

F

M

A ‘12

Prices at the pump

SOURCE: AAA

M

J

J


14

SOUTHERN BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2012

Elder Law Revocable versus irrevocable trusts BY RICHARD HABIGER SBJ CONTRIBUTOR

When planning for the future, revocable versus irrevocable is not the most important question your attorney should ponder. Instead, your attorney ought to listen carefully to Habiger your hopes, your dreams — in short, your goals for yourself and your loved ones — and then, and only then, think carefully about what instructions ought to be written into the trust in order to accomplish your specific hopes, dreams and goals. In recent months, I have been asked to review a spat of so-called irrevocable trusts drafted by three other attorneys. Each of those attorneys is licensed to practice law in the state of Illinois, but do not practice elder law. After reviewing each of those trusts, I had to tell the persons who asked for my review of their trusts that their nonelder law attorneys had inserted language into each of the trusts that blew the trusts wide open and prevented the trusts from accomplishing the clients’ goals of protecting their homes, their farms and their savings from a nursing home. Unfortunately, a license to practice law does not, by itself, make an attorney competent to handle all legal matters, particularly when it comes to the highly specialized area of long-term care planning. In two other cases, both involving revocable trusts, the clients had been persuaded to sign their revocable trusts as a means of protecting homes and savings from the need to spend down the clients’ savings on long-term nursing home care. In the first case, the revocable trust was purchased from an out-of-state company that also sold the client financial products. In the second case, the revocable trust was drafted by an Illinois-licensed attorney. Unfortunately, both revocable trusts were not worth the paper they were

Find more business news at www.sbj.biz. written on to accomplish the clients’ goals of protecting their savings from nursing home costs. Moreover, the investment advisor who sold one of the trusts violated the Illinois Consumer Protection Act. That law provides that no one, other than an Illinois-licensed attorney (or a financial institution that has been granted trust powers by the state of Illinois), may lawfully assemble, draft, execute or fund a trust in the state of Illinois. In the second revocable trust case, the attorney either did not listen to the client about the client’s goal to avoid going broke in a nursing home, or the attorney only knew enough about Medicaid and trusts to be dangerous to his clients. While revocable trusts are an excellent tool for managing assets during one’s life and for transferring title to assets upon death without the need to go through a court-supervised probate, revocable trusts are always worthless if the goal is to protect savings and other assets from the need for spend-down paying for the cost of a nursing home or other longterm care. In short, contrary to the claims of unscrupulous advisors, a revocable living trust will not protect assets in the event of a long-term illness. Nor will it protect assets from being subjected to state and federal estate taxes upon death. Individuals who wish to protect assets for the future, and commence the running of the 5-year look-back period, should consult with a knowledgeable elder law attorney. A complete list of Illinois elder law attorneys can be found at www.naela.org. Most, but not all of the attorneys listed, have substantial knowledgeable and experience dealing with Medicaid planning and other longterm care issues. Finally, a word about the use of irrevocable trusts for asset-protection purposes and qualification for VA and Medicaid-paid, long-term care benefits. While the term irrevocable may be a turn-off, if the trust is properly drafted, you need not surrender all control. For

ART SERVICES

Individuals who wish to protect assets for the future, and commence the running of the 5-year look-back period, should consult with a knowledgeable elder law attorney.

example, the term irrevocable does not mean you cannot continue to live in your house or you won’t be able to sell it. It simply means the trustee of the trust (i.e., the manager of the trust) would sign the deed rather than yourself. Conversely, the trustee won’t be able to sell your home, if you do not want it sold, provided this protection is incorporated into the trust agreement. Moreover, if the trust is properly drafted, you will retain the ability to replace the trustee with another individual and alter the percentages of the trust assets that the trust beneficiaries are to receive after your death and even add additional beneficiaries. At this point, you might well say, “I thought irrevocable meant the trust could not be changed. So, what exactly does the term irrevocable mean?” At the risk of over-simplification, it means the parent acting alone cannot take back what he or she has transferred into the trust. For many seniors with loving family members, this should not be a serious issue — provided the trust is drafted by an attorney, who has made a career decision to focus his or her

practice on elder law and has sufficient knowledge and experience to carefully listen and to custom-tailor the trust to accomplish your specific hopes, dreams and goals concerning yourself and your loved ones. In short, it means to craft the trust in such a manner as to build parent protections into your irrevocable trust and not insert language that conflicts with your hopes, dreams and goals. As a final point, the most important thing to keep in mind, when assessing your planning options, is to retain as much control as possible over your home, farm, savings and other assets. With the guidance of a qualified elder law attorney, one with whom you feel comfortable, you can retain indirect control, preserve your options and not go broke paying for nursing home or other long-term care. RICHARD HABIGER is the author of the Illinois edition of “How to Protect Your Family’s Assets from Devastating Nursing Home Costs: Medicaid Secrets” and is an elder law attorney, who focuses on asset protection, Medicaid and VA benefits. He may be contacted at 618-549-4529 or info@habigerelderlaw.com.


16

SOUTHERN BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2012

Achievements Rowe wins international design award

Faces in the news

Rowe

Criste

Mileur

Oglesby

Decorator and business owner Angela Rowe of Harrisburg has received a top design award in an international design contest for outstanding design work. The award was presented recently in Atlanta at Decorating Den Interiors’ 43rd annual conference. Rowe was awarded second place in the commercial category for her work at Legence Bank, 502 N. Commercial St., in Harrisburg. Her other entries received honorable mentions.

Criste to serve specialty clinic Dr. Gerson Criste has joined the specialty clinic at Marshall Browning Hospital in Du Quoin and is seeing patients once a month at the hospital. Board certified in pain management, Criste is affiliated with Southern Illinois Medical Services in Carbondale.

Deffley

Lustenberger

Donovan

Burnett

Hunt

Forby

Walker

Bicking

Mileur wins Alpha Award Barbara Mileur, training director for McDonald’s restaurants owned by John and Mary Moreland, recently won the Alpha Award. This award is given to individuals who impact QSC, sales, people development and profits through the effective use of training. This award is given to one individual in the recipient’s region. Mileur has 32 years of experience and has earned many other awards and honors throughout her career.

Regions Bank honors Maze Regions Bank hosted an open house recently at its 100 S. Broadway branch location in Goreville to honor the retirement of associate Vennetta Maze. Maze, a senior teller, is a 30-year veteran with the bank.

Collins

Sperry

Hendon

Romine

Faces in the news Have you been promoted? Send a photo. Has a colleague at work completed an intensive continuing education program? Send a photo. Others in the business community will want to know it, so please consider passing on your employment news and photos to the Southern Business Journal. Feel free to email the information to sbj@thesouthern.com.

Gualdoni hired as Artstarts’ financial officer Alisa Gualdoni has been hired as the new chief operating and financial officer of Artstarts Company, a local non-profit organization that provides programming in the arts for children throughout the southern 14 counties in Illinois. Gualdoni will oversee the company’s

financial operations and property management and be actively involved in all of Artstarts’ programming. She will maintain regular hours at Artstarts, 104 S. Van Buren St., in Marion.

Oglesby certified in ASTYM therapy Angela Oglesby, occupational therapist at Joyner Therapy Services, has become certified in ASTYM therapy. Oglesby attended certification classes at Performance Dynamics in Indianapolis. The ASTYM process decreases pain, enhances mobility and keeps patients active. Joyner Therapy Services has clinics in Marion, Harrisburg and Golconda.

Deffley earns 20th Mary Kay program car Mary Kay independent sales director Kay Deffley of Savannah, Ga., formerly of Carbondale, recently earned the use of her 20th car as a result of her outstanding achievements in operating her independent Mary Kay business. Deffley began her Mary Kay business as an independent beauty consultant in 1973. She became an independent sales director in 1975. In this role, Deffley provides education, leadership and motivation to other Mary Kay independent beauty consultants.

White named activity director at Westside Leonda White has been named activity director at Westside Care Center in West Frankfort. The position was vacated by Brenna Choisser, who resigned to enroll in the nursing program at Rend Lake College. White has been an activity professional for more than 20 years. She has won numerous awards throughout the years. In 2009 and 2010, she was chosen Best Activity Director in Franklin County.

Mitchell promoted Clara Mitchell of First Southern Bank has been promoted to branch manager of the Murphysboro facility. Mitchell has more than 20 years of banking experience in her hometown of Murphysboro.


18

SOUTHERN BUSINESS JOURNAL

SEPTEMBER 2012

Achievements Country Boy Guns & Ammo opens

Jamie Hargett, of a five-generation Thompsonville family, has opened a weapons shop, Country Boy Guns & Ammo, 21099 Division St., in Thompsonville. Country Boy Guns & Ammo carries shotguns, rifles, handguns, bows and knives in popular brands, such as Remington, Ruger, Hi-Point, Charter Arms, H&R and Taurus, as well as a variety of ammunition and accessories, such as holsters and cases, cleaning kits, targets, flash lights and scopes. The shop opens at 11 a.m. Monday through Saturday or by appointment by calling Hargett at 618-513-1275.

Marshall Browning enhances women’s services Marshall Browning Hospital in Du Quoin recently installed state-ofthe-art, full field true digital mammography equipment, which will provide added convenience for patients, who can now have this service provided in their hometown hospital. The arrangement will also enhance collaborative efforts with SIH’s Breast Center in Carbondale for follow-up care.

RSP Heating and Cooling named Master Dealer RSP Heating and Cooling of Carterville has been named a WaterFurnace GeoPro Master Dealer. Only the best from the WaterFurnace network of independent dealers are invited to become a GeoPro Master Dealer. The GeoPro designation is based on RSP’s experience with the installation of geothermal heating and cooling systems. GeoPros are also rated on installation quality, technical training and overall commitment to providing the highest levels of customer service.

There will be extensive renovations and additions to the existing structure. The anticipated completion date is Nov. 15.

for Humanity board consists of representatives from local churches, businesses, trades and professions.

be the company’s first facility in the Marion area and will employ about 130 local residents.

Cripps named paint manager at Wright Do-it Center

Hunt named product support representative

Marshall Browning Hospital welcomes two

Tina Cripps is the new paint department manager at Wright Do-it Center in Murphysboro. Cripps is new to Wright Do-it Center, but not to the home improvement industry. She has been in the business for more than 23 years.

Shannon Hunt is the new product support representative for Fabick CAT at its Marion facility. Hunt, a Harrisburg resident, will cover seven counties in the Marion area: Saline, Pope, Hardin, Gallatin, Williamson, Jackson and Perry. He has been with Fabick CAT for six years, starting out in the parts warehouse and then as a parts counterman.

Frank M. Walker, M.D., and his nurse practitioner, Kellie Lustenberger, have joined the specialty clinic service of Marshall Browning Hospital in Du Quoin. Walker is a board certified obstetrician/gynecologist, and Lustenberger is also board certified. They are from New Horizons Obstetrics and Gynecology in Carbondale and specialize in women’s health, obstetrics and gynecology. OB patients will deliver in Carbondale, where there is a Level II NICU.

20’s Hideout Steakhouse recognized for wine list 20’s Hideout Steakhouse in Marion has been recognized for its outstanding wine list by Wine Spectator, a nationally recognized authority on wine and wine culture. The wine list is put together by the general manager and wine director, Agustin Duran. According to Wine Spectator, 20’s Hideout Steakhouse offers 205 wine selections and has more than 2,125 bottles in inventory.

SIU Credit Union a top pick for financial literacy NerdWallet finance blog recently released its top picks for university credit union financial literacy programs, and SIU Credit Union was named the Best for Car Buyers. SIU Credit Union’s website offers a variety of free resources, including financial calculators, Illinois Motor Vehicle forms and links to popular auto buying websites, such as Kelley Blue Book — all designed to help improve financial knowledge and the car buying experience.

Donovan appointed to Habitat for Humanity board

Shawnna Donovan of Marion has been appointed to the board of directors of Habitat for Humanity of Williamson Tyler’s Jefferson County. A Marion native, Donovan is a Motors expanding licensed managing real estate broker Tyler’s Jefferson Motors in Mount associate and an independent media and Vernon started a comprehensive marketing consultant. addition/renovation project July 30 on She works for United Country Exodus its facilities. This is the dealership’s third Realty of Southern Illinois and has and largest renovation since 1951. worked in the real estate industry for The construction will result in more than nine years. The local Habitat 24,000 square feet of building facilities.

Presley Tours welcomes Sollers, American Classic Tours Larry Rednour, president of Presley Tours, recently welcomed Christopher Sollers and American Classic Tours of Marion. Rednour said ACT has developed an established track record in Southern Illinois and Indiana over the last 30 years, and this partnership will allow for more travel opportunity for its customers. Rednour appointed Sollers, former president of ACT, as vice president of sales and marketing.

Verizon Wireless 4G LTE network expands Verizon Wireless announced that customers have greater access to its 4G Long Term Evolution network in the Carbondale area since recently expanding into neighboring Thompsonville. The expansion of its 4G LTE network enables customers in more parts of Carbondale to use their 4G LTE wireless devices to surf the Web, stream music and video, access thousands of applications, and stay in touch with family and friends, all with speeds up to 10 times faster than before.

Logan’s Roadhouse to open Construction is under way on the new Logan’s Roadhouse restaurant at 1305 Halfway Road in Marion. The 5,600-square-foot restaurant will seat 196 guests and is reminiscent of American roadhouses of the past, complete with neon signs and an interactive jukebox. The restaurant will

Burnett invited to Founder’s Circle retreat Stampin’ Up!, a Utah-based manufacturer of decorative rubber stamps and accessories for paper crafting, scrapbooking and digital designing, recently recognized Metropolis businesswoman and Stampin’ Up! demonstrator Jan Burnett with an invitation to attend the company’s annual Founder’s Circle weekend retreat. This event honors the company’s most successful demonstrators.

Forby receives public service award State Sen. Gary Forby of Benton has received the 2012 Illinois Electric Cooperatives’ Public Service Award. He was presented with the award Aug. 2 in Springfield at the annual meeting of the Association of Illinois Electric Cooperatives. The award was made in recognition of Forby’s public service and contributions to the rural electrification program.

Bicking joins Western Baptist staff Vascular surgeon Griffin K. Bicking, D.O., recently joined the medical staff at Western Baptist Hospital in Paducah. He joins a medical staff of approximately 240 physicians, representing 40 medical specialties.


SEPTEMBER 2012

SOUTHERN BUSINESS JOURNAL

Achievements Lourdes welcomes physicians Kimberly Collins, M.D., Christopher Sperry, M.D., Shane Hendon, D.O. and Spencer E. Romine, M.D. recently joined the medical staff at Lourdes in Paducah. Collins and Sperry join Mercy Primary Care practice and Hendon joins Mercy Gastroenterology practice. Romine joins the Orthopaedic Institute of Western Kentucky practice.

VanDerMeer presents workshops to teens Cass VanDerMeer, director of the Du Quoin-based consulting firm Possibilities, presented three workshops July 24 and 25 for the Illinois Teen Institute at Illinois Wesleyan University at Bloomington. She trained a group of 40 teens in workshops entitled, “Social Competence,” “Effective Training for Genuine Leadership” and “Asserting Personal Values Regarding Drugs and Alcohol.”

Ramsey selected employee of the month Correctional Lt. Anita Ramsey has been selected as August 2012 employee of the month at Tamms Correctional Center. Ramsey began her career with the state of Illinois in 1992 at Menard Correctional Center as a correctional officer, and she transferred to Tamms in 1998. She was promoted to correctional lieutenant in 2001.

Cusumano & Sons earns superior score Cusumano & Sons, Inc., a wholesale produce business established in 1904, recently completed a nationally accredited voluntary third party food safety audit and received a score of superior, which is the highest score category available. Cusumano & Sons services customers within a 100-mile radius of its location in Mount Vernon.

Elite Studio adds BeyondBarre Elite Studio in Marion has added a new exercise modality, BeyondBarre, to its expanding portfolio of offerings. A cardio-infused ballet-barre

workout, BeyondBarre was designed and developed by Colleen Ketchum, owner of Pilates in Motion, a studio in Hudson Valley, N.Y. Elite Studio is located at 3000 W. DeYoung St., Ste. 416. For more information, call 618-944-9767.

Co-op recycling No. 5 plastic containers Neighborhood Co-op Grocery in Carbondale is now accepting clean No. 5 plastic containers to be recycled throughout Gimme 5, a recycling program. The co-op is located at 1815 W. Main St. For more information, call 618-967-4196.

Cook Portable Warehouses opens in Marion Cook Portable Warehouses, which is headquartered in Anna, recently opened a new sales location on the property of AutoPlex of Marion at the intersection of Illinois 13 and 37. The company employs more than 200 and has been manufacturing storage buildings since 1984.

WPSD Local 6 recognizes employees WPSD Local 6 has promoted Chad Darnall to assistant chief photographer and welcomes new employees Briana Conner and Ashley Appel. Conner assumes reporter duties and anchors evening newscasts on the weekend with Todd Faulkner. She also splits anchoring duties during the week with Faulkner on The Nine newscast, which airs on RetroTV and Antenna TV. Appel joins WPSD as a promotion writer/producer.

Ava woman wins Crappiest Car Contest Rebecca Jones-Brasel of Ava won the Crappiest Car Contest, sponsored recently by CIL-FM, and accepted the keys for a Pontiac Sunfire from Chuck Weaver of Auto Credit of Southern Illinois. Her 1980 Toyota Camry Station Wagon, sporting a faded paint job, some rust, scratches, a few dings and original wood door panels, racked up the most crappiest-car points

19

Calendar among the vehicles entered in the contest.

Walker presents program for pharmacists Scot Walker of St. Louis, formerly of Herrin, presented a two-hour continuing education program for pharmacists Aug. 12 at Walker’s Bluff in Carterville. Walker is senior director of content development at Drug Facts & Comparisons, which is part of the clinical solutions division of Wolters Kluwer. Walker is a 1976 graduate of Herrin High School and son of Marilyn Walker and the late Carl Walker of Herrin. He received his Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. His book, “Effective Pharmacotherapy,” was published in 2004.

B and A Travel to host travel show series B and A Travel Service has announced its fall travel show series. Each show will include a presentation, planning tips, travel offers and refreshments. This season’s shows are OnStage Alaska, Sept. 19; What’s On Your Bucket List?, Oct. 2; and Escape Completely with Princess Cruises, Oct. 18. All shows are at 6:30 p.m. The first two are in John A. Logan College Conference Center in Carterville and the final one is in Carterville Community Center. Admission is free. For reservations or more information, call B and A Travel Service in Carbondale at 618-549-7347 or Marion at 618-997-1321.

Sept. 20

Starting a Business in Illinois: 9 to 11 a.m., room 150, DunnRichmond Economic Development Center, 150 E. Pleasant Hill Road, Carbondale. Free. An optional business start-up kit is available for $15. Call 618-536-2424 or email sbdc@siu.edu.

Oct. 10

Using Social Media in Business: 1 to 3 p.m., room 150, DunnRichmond Economic Development Center, 150 E. Pleasant Hill Road, Carbondale. Free. Call 618-536-2424 or email sbdc@siu.edu.

Oct. 16

Starting a Business in Illinois: 5 to 7 p.m., room 150, DunnRichmond Economic Development Center, 150 E. Pleasant Hill Road, Carbondale. Free. An optional business start-up kit is available for $15. Call 618-536-2424 or email sbdc@siu.edu.

Faces in the news Have you been promoted? Send a photo. Has a colleague at work completed an intensive continuing education program? Send a photo. Others in the business community will want to know it, so please consider passing on your employment news and photos to the Southern Business Journal. Feel free to email the information to sbj@thesouthern.com.

Find more business news at www.sbj.biz.


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SEPTEMBER 2012

SOUTHERN BUSINESS JOURNAL

21

Business Fine Print Building permits Herrin

Joe Restivo, 1615 Dolan Lane, $94,000 Irl Eaton, 120 W. Stotlar, $125,000 Jeff Gusta, 1700 Dynasty, $2,200 Charles Longwell, 1413 W. Cherr y St., $14,430 Steve Claunch, 2405 W. Cherry St., $30,000 Bob Newman, 13025/13027 Hafer Road, $100,000 John Crespi, 3206 Corsair Drive, $5,500 Roland McBride, 403 Insignia, $10,000 Brian Golden, 1801 Crown Road, $47,250 Dan Jennings, 815 S. 11th St., $45,000 Jack Anderson, 1612 S. 13th St., $72,000

Marion

Panera LLC, West DeYoung, $801,000 Heath Welch, 1008 W. Boulevard, $12,000 Beverly Hazelwood, Warder and Madison, $170,000

Metropolis

Kirk Dutton, 504 E. 7th St., $4,200 Raven Cohoon, 903 19th St., $7,200

Mount Vernon

Danny Ramsey, 12188 Harlan Road, $20,961 One Stop Flooring, 318 10th St., $45,000 Joe Bandy, 14475 N. Illinois 37, $30,000 Ebay Brokers, 800 Park Plaza, $800 Schmidt Chevrolet, 3423 Broadway, $2,000 Schmidt Chevrolet, 3423 Broadway, $1,100 England, Charles and Crystal, 321 4th St., $0 England, Charles and Crystal, 321 4th St., $39,900 Michelle Ferreira, 1522 Harlan Road, $1,000 Carol and Sam Shillingburg, 2700 Richview Road, $26,596 David Kirk, 1309 Jones, $400 Victory Christian Center, 1719 Broadway, $2,500 Caitlan Grither, 22 Homestead, $9,500 Hondo Miller, 1 Dogwood Point, $108,000 Steven Zelman, 4102 Water Tower, $850,000 Christian Social Services, 1400 Broadway, $0 HPT TA Properties, 4510 Broadway, $95,000 Steven Beal, 225 10th St., $350,000 A.P. Petties, 1017 Bell, $0 Jack Oliver, 219 6th St., $500

Murphysboro

Janice and Joseph Wuest, 1907 Walnut St., $10,000 Byron York, 2140 Pine, $26,000 Raymond Homan, 1210 N. 7th St., $4,200 Dave Tuttle, 412 S. 5th, $9,100 Brandon Ward, 29 Candy Lane, $4,400

Bankruptcies Chapter 7

Patrick M. Green, 308 Alexander St., Paris James H. and Connie J. Hicks, 4204 Rose Lane, No. 15, Mount Vernon Crystal M. Wade, 309 S. 18th, Herrin Randall and Brenda L. Mitchell, 505 W. Fifth St., Benton Richard L. Rhine, 565 Baird Road, Eldorado Vicky J. Waterbury, 1608 W. Dewey, Apt. A, Marion Charles L. and Lisa D. Taylor, 501 S. West St., West Salem Carolena K. Rednour, 205 W. Herrin St., Herrin Jimmie D. Jr. and Pamela A. Firestone, 12116 Tyler Trail, Coulterville Toby Eugene and Tiffany Kay Jones, 364 Old Golconda Road, Golconda William E. Smith, 301 Hickory, Apt. 110, Carterville Christopher Charles, 609 S. Main, Apt. 3, Anna Stephanie Kay Roberts, 118 Kohler Ave., Anna National Learning Systems Inc., 12327 Bahama Drive, Marion Ellen K. Zinn, P.O. Box 178, Hurst George Frank III and Jacenta Elaine Thompson, 19741 Miller Lake Lane, Mount Vernon Charles W. and Laurie A. Howard, 417 S. Royal, Goreville Whitehead Concrete and Masonry Inc., 11582 Angleville Road, Pittsburg Karen L. Shepherd, P.O. Box 303, Creal Springs Kevin Lee and Connie Jean McDonald, 508 Stacy Drive, Brookport Cheryl Kay Fulk, 317 N. Winters St., Du Quoin Brenda S. Savage, R.R. 1 Box 498, Belle Rive Kim L. Howard, 213 E. Charles, Marion Evelyn E. Simmons, 720 North St., Mount Vernon Marty J. Gentile, 1200 N. Mayor Caliper, Colp Michael S. and Dawn M. McCormick, 3708 Poplar St., Thompsonville Christopher and Joan E. Solan, 403 S. Aikman St., Marion Antonio and Jeanette Mendoza, 702 S. Aikman St., Marion Ian Conrad Young, 6500 S. Giant Road, Apt. 6, Carbondale Bruce A. Menn, 16645 Fowler School Road, Marion Jessica Rene Leuellen, R.R. 1 Box 53, McLeansboro Martha Pearl Mezel, 1026 School St., Apt. 2, Percy Brian M. Happach, 18703 N. Steel Lane, Woodlawn Chad A. and Chrystal F. Mills, 126 Baggott St.,

Find more business news at www.sbj.biz.

Zeigler Kenneth E. and Ellen N. Wright, 9381 Walker Road, Johnston City Michael A. Gwaltney, 1207 Alexander St., Eldorado Alan Ray and Denise Ellen Baker, 205 S. Pecan St., Royalton Randall E. Hunerkock, 1694 Pell Road, Brookport Rebecca G. Ledbetter, 406 S. Dorris St., West Frankfort Vera Hall, 1304 W. St. Louis, West Frankfort Stephanie Rebecca Henry, 681 W. Lebannon, Nashville Robert Michael Johnston, 211 S. Oak St., Mounds Dennis A. and Loshia J. Teitloff, 409 Lincoln, Karnak David A. Quinn, 404 Woodvale Lane, Herrin Essie M. Milligan, 801 Sahara St., Apt. A1, Harrisburg Charles Q. and Paula Lynn Davis, P.O. Box 86, Willisville Jesteen Marie Weiler, R.R. 1, Box 142, Rinard Mary D. Berry, 805 Sherman Drive, Apt. A., Marion Judy L. Marotzke, 721 Westfield, Red Bud Leslie Todd Crooks, R.R. 5 Box 131, Fairfield Timothy Harris, 151 Hoffman Road, Lot No. 24, Murphysboro Terra B. Webb, 305 E. Taylor St., Herrin Vickie S. Haseker, P.O. Box 1833, Marion Stephen E. and Sharon K. Mahrley, 4444 Rosebud Road, Metropolis Lucretia E. Stoelzle, 400 N. Oakland 12-B, Carbondale Hugh J. and Serita A. Robinson, 403 Cedar Ave., West Frankfort Tammica C. Dunihoo, 807 Taffee St., Pinckneyville John L. and Amber M. Hopkins, 1301 N. Main St., Benton Patricia A. Smith, 302 W. Eighth St., Apt. H, Metropolis Jacqueline Myers, 204 W. North, Sesser Lisa Lynn Deming, 810 E. Main St., Marion Kerry Lynn Kimpel, 17324 Illinois 37 N., Mount Vernon Steven Joe Green, P.O. Box 463, Tamms Patricia F. Ollie, 1425 Old W. Main St., Apt. 408, Carbondale John M. Zimmerman, 1216 Commercial, Murphysboro Michelle F. Zimmerman, 638 W. Main St., Du Quoin

Heather Mireille Koester, 3912 Barton Creek Drive, Eagle Mountain, Utah Eric W. Smith, 403 W. Broadway, Johnston City Shelley Lynn Garrelts, 10871 E. Straw Road, Mount Vernon Tracy Lee and Pamela Sue Brumfield, 500 N. Eighth St., Mount Vernon Timothy B. and Rhonda L. Wiseman, 15374 Pittsburg Road, Marion Jennifer L. Best, 1411 Benton St., Eldorado Ronald O. Coe, 2690 Old Cape Road, Jonesboro Rober t M. and Loretta L. Dickson, 5 Murphysboro Road, Chester

Chapter 13

Kathleen A. Graham, P.O. Box 723, Carrier Mills Tommy L. and Linda S. Ellis, 611 22nd St., Cairo John S. Morris, 604 N. McLeansboro St., Benton Denise R. Dunkin, 200 Schuetz Lane, Makanda Rodney R. and Gloria J. Brooks, 523 N. Bill Drive, Murphysboro John C. and Lori A. Gelgut, 500 W. College, Energy Angela M. Woods, 2116 Alexander St., Murphysboro Jimmy D. and Patricia D. Avery, P.O. Box 72, Christopher Donna L. Berendt, 301 S. Goldhimer, Benton Jerry R. Casper, 4049 U.S. 51, Mounds Ronnie S. and Zaina L. Mack, P.O. Box 312, Mounds Robert M. and Linda J. Gibson, 739 Old Dam 53 Road, Grand Chain Darlene A. Roper, 19166 Crab Orchard Road, Marion Carlo L. and Carrie T. Dial Jr., 501A Greenacre Drive, Christopher Jimmie M. and Tina S. Matthews, Route 2, Box 171, Wayne City Sandra J. Stone, 116 Washington St., Apt. 714, Anna William L. and Janet D. Daugher ty, 201 Cypress Ave., Elkville Kelly J. and Tracy L. Melton Sr., 156 S. Franklin, Centralia John A. and Leslie S. Hentschel, 2803 W. Kent Drive, Carbondale Jackie Dale and Tracy Lynn Bethel Jr., 1190 Sergeant Drive, Carrier Mills Joshua L. and Amber E. Cranfort, 219 N. Pear, Du Quoin Patricia A. Bangs, 308 W. Fifth, Johnston City Angela G. Hite, 212 W. Park, Harrisburg Shawn Alan Stanley, 701 E. Park, Du Quoin SEE FINE PRINT / PAGE 23


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SEPTEMBER 2012

SOUTHERN BUSINESS JOURNAL

FINE PRINT FROM PAGE 21 Kenneth and Paula J. Cox, 712 S. Thomas, Christopher Stephen L. and Donna J. Crawford, 1101 W. Oak St., West Frankfort Danny Joe Avery and Debra Sue Farris, 140 Farris Lane, Goreville Anthony F. and Sharon R. Theobald, P.O. Box 282, Willisville Scott L. and Tonya K. Walker, 930 N. 24th St., Murphysboro Malcolm T. and Judith K. Holderfield, 210 Elm Ave., De Soto Paul Michael Patterson, 413 S. Dean, Royalton Debra A. Endsley, 111 N. Plum St., De Soto Heather Renae Bailey, 1130 N. Mulberry St., Mount Carmel James F. and Jennifer E. Canfield, 1303 S. 27th St., Mount Vernon Vernon Benjamin and Jennifer Ann Hunter, 102 George St., Anna Kevin B. Hill, 47 Archery Road, Stonefort Donald W. Messamore, 210 Elm Ave., De Soto Steven Eugene Lampley, 520 Lawrence St., Benton Lora Lee Downs, 1181 E. Walnut St., B9-3, Carbondale

23

TAX LAWS: What has happened since 2010 Russ and Paula Saatkamp, 22047 Walker St., Nashville Harley Eugene and Leslie Dawn Hammock, 513 E. Harrison St., Mount Vernon Jon E. Reynolds, 559 Foster Lane, Marion James D. Heath, 410 Camelot, De Soto Stephen M. Scaggs, 8389 Illinois 14, Du Quoin Marion M. Simpson, 1105 Iver y Lane, Carterville Angela Dawn Hacker, P.O. Box 301, Hurst Tommy C. and Sherr y A. Powell, 429 N. Broadway St., Nashville Gary S. and Lee Ann Ward, 501 Bogie Drive, Herrin Wanda L. Bennett, P.O. Box 94, Vergennes Keith O. Ginn, 710 N. Webster St., Harrisburg Rober t A. Pleasant, 1904 Division St., Murphysboro Jesse T. Morris and Karen S. Spangler, 412 W. Webster St., Benton Rodney D. Pickering, P.O. Box 989, Harrisburg Dorothy D. Pickering, P.O. Box 951, Carrier Mills Kimberly A. Higgins, 1025 S. Roosevelt, Harrisburg Dean B. Davis, 2355 Sweets Drive, Carbondale Maurice L. Peek Jr., 2506 Locust St., Eldorado

FROM PAGE 9 lifetime gift/estate tax exemption by $39,000 ($52,000-$13,000). Yet, the future appreciation of these shares will not be included within your taxable estate. This year, you and your spouse can each give away up to $5.12 million worth of appreciating assets without incurring federal gift taxes. An irrevocable life insurance trust may be worth a look. Death benefits from life insurance policies are rarely subject to federal tax. However, if you have any “incidents of ownership” (i.e., have or have had the ability to make beneficiary, payment, loan or cancellation decisions), the policy proceeds may end up in your taxable estate. This problem tends to affect unmarried taxpayers most, though married couples may also face it. One response is to create an ILIT — a trust that owns an individual or couple’s life insurance policy/policies. Upon the death of the insured, the policy proceeds go into the trust rather than the

insured’s taxable estate. The proceeds can subsequently be directed to the named beneficiaries of the ILIT. Two asterisks here: You have to stay alive for at least three years after moving any existing life insurance policies into the ILIT to keep the insurance proceeds out of your estate, and you don’t want to name the estate as the policy beneficiary as that negates the whole purpose of the ILIT. It is time to carefully review your estate planning strategy in light of the potential changes ahead and the window of opportunity that may soon close. SCOTT MCCLATCHEY is a certified financial planner with Alliance Investment Planning Group, a Carbondale investment firm at 115 S. Washington St. He can be reached at 618-519-9344 or scott@alliance investmentplanning.com. He also provides investment, retirement planning, and insurance services to SIU Credit Union members through the SIU Credit Union Investment Services partnership. Securities offered through LPL Financial, member FINRA/SIPC.

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SBJ 09-2012