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S U N D AY, M AY 2 7 , 2 0 1 2

WHATI C A A M E RATS E

e t a r b Ce 12 d n i h s be assics e i r Sto ican Cl e h T r Ame l l A

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ES? DISH E T I VOR UR FA ! O Y E W T AR KNO WHA ANT TO WE W

Š PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


PARADE

SUMMER MOVIE PREVIEW: SNOW WHITE & THE HUNTSMAN (JUNE 1)

P Mariah, Nick, and the twins

Q: Are Nick Cannon and Mariah Carey’s twins showing any musical talent yet? —Jen Baldon, Orange County, Calif.

says Stewart, 70. “I can’t remember the last time I ordered in a pizza. I will either eat out in a very good restaurant or I will cook.” Stewart pays tribute to some of the nation’s favorite dishes in her new book, Martha’s American Food.. Get her recipes for mac and cheese and Mile-High Apple Pie at Parade.com/martha.

THE FIRST RECORD I EVER MADE WAS ‘ST. JAMES INFIRMARY BLUES’ WITH A GREAT ARMY ORCHESTRA IN GERMANY RIGHT AFTER WWII. IT’S ONE OF MY FAVORITES.” —Tony Bennett, pictured circa 1945

A: “They definitely

Learn the know how to keep a secret behind Snow White’s melody,” Cannon, sword at 31, says about Parade.com Moroccan and /stewart Monroe, who recently turned 1. “We call it singing, but others might say it’s baby noises! And Kristen Stewart, 22, talks about turning Snow White they both love to dance, from a fairy-tale princess into a willing warrior. which is pretty funny.” As soon as the armor goes on, you feel The America’s Got Talent untouchable—but it’s a different thing host, who once starred for a 5-foot-5, 110-pound girl to go into on Nickelodeon, is still battle. When we first meet Snow White, she’s been in prison for over 10 years, and the land she part of that network’s knew has been destroyed. She has to find a way family: He produced its to survive, so she becomes an action hero out of movie Rags (May 28, instinct. I did fight training with a cardboard 8 p.m. ET), which he sword and foam shield, and I definitely gave the calls “a hip-hop fairy tale.” guys a good whacking occasionally. But when I

Listen to Bennett’s song and see other stars who’ve served in the armed forces at Parade.com/military

Blade Runner

P Martha Stewart

got to the set, it was like, ‘No, you look like a ninja. Forget the choreography and try not to die.’ The real sword was heavy—my arms got so ripped, I would look down and not recognize myself. Snow White is such a cool character. I respect her compassion; she struggles with the idea of taking up arms. But I am slightly more aggressive. That’s not a struggle in real life for me.”

Q: Does Martha Stewart ever order takeout? —Alina F., Philadelphia

A: “Oh, I never do!”

Ask Walter Scott your questions at personality@parade .com. Letters can be sent to P.O. Box 5001, Grand Central Station, New York, N.Y. 10163-5001.

P A Memorial Day tribute

Q: When was Memorial Day first celebrated? —L. W. Spencer, Kellyton, Ala.

A: The holiday, which

commemorates the fallen members of our armed forces, was originally called Decoration Day and officially became known

as Memorial Day in the 1960s. Its substantive roots date to 1865, when it focused only on Union soldiers; as the nation healed, however, slain fighters on both sides of the Civil War were honored.

BIG TIME RUSH Catch up with the band and your other favorite young stars at Parade .com/kids

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: DONNA SVENNEVIK/ABC VIA GETTY IMAGES; ALEX BAILEY/UNIVERSAL PICTURES; JOHN BRANSCOMBE/GETTY IMAGES; TAYLOR HILL/FILMMAGIC; ILYA S. SAVENOK/WIREIMAGE

Walter Scott,s

2 • May 27, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Event Dates: Sunday, May 27 – Saturday, June 2, 2012.

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Event Dates: Sunday, May 27 – Saturday, June 2, 2012. 1SJDFTBOEJUFNT BWBJMBCMFPOMZJOUIF64" NBZWBSZJO"MBTLB )BXBJJ 0LMBIPNB 8JTDPOTJO 1VFSUP 3JDP PSPOMJOFBU8BMNBSUDPN 'PSUIFTUPSFMPDBUJPOOFBSFTUZPV QMFBTFDBMM PSDIFDLPOMJOFBU8BMNBSUDPN5IFiTQBSLwEFTJHO 8BMNBSU BOE4BWF NPOFZ-JWFCFUUFSBSFNBSLTBOEPSSFHJTUFSFENBSLTPG8BM.BSU4UPSFT *OD SM

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


POWER UP FOR THE INDY 500 00

What to read, see, se and do do this th his week

For more, go to Parade.com/picks Parade.com

E Editors’ Playlist P

Even with some 32 other drivers d to on the track, we’ll be glued y’s Indy Will Power at this Sunday’s 500 (ABC, noon ET). The Aussie heads to the Hoosier State with three IndyCar wins this season; chances are good he’ll take the 500’s checkered flag.

New songs we’re loving Ne

Glee Glee “Somebody That “Som Used to Know” I Use Darren Criss The show’s s and Matt M Bomer team up rendition for a haunting h of the Gotye hit. John M Mayer John “Queen of California” Bluesy but upbeat, with a hint of o southern rock.

Meet M eet 2 2012’s 012’s All-America A ll-America Team eam

Sara Wa Watkins Sara Memory” “I’m a M countryA bittersweet bitters pop tune with a folksyy hook and airy harmonies.

Off O Of fff the the court, th cour co u t, ur t Breanna Bre B rean re anna an n na Stewart S St tew war artt and a d Shabazz an S ab Sh abaz azzz az DE Muhammad Muh M uh uham ham a ma mad d are arre RA PA typical ty ypi p ca cal text-crazy, te ext xt-c -cra -c azy zy,, moviem vviie-mo AM loving lo ovi v ng tteens. eens ee n . (She (She h likes llik ik kes es TE rom-coms; prefers ro omm co c mss; he he p r fe re fers rs action a act ac ttion o flicks.) iick ckss.) But ck But put put a basketball their hands bask ba ssket ske sk etba e ball ba lll iin n th thei eirr ha ei hand n s nd and they’re superstars. ey’r ey ’re e su supe pers rsta ta ars rs. The The high school seniors our 56th hoo ooll se seni nior orss to top ou ur 56 6th annual PARADE PARADE A All All-America lll-A -Ame mericca me meri Team. Re Read ad their ad the heir ir stories ir stori and see the full list of players at Parade.com/all-america.

ERI ALL-AM

CA

Lee Brice Brice Lee Your Truck” “I Drive Yo power An emotional emotio about losing a ballad abo loved one in war.

LOVE, WAR, AND ENORMOUS EGOS Clive Owen and Nicole Kidman are riveting as Ernest Hemingway and his third wife in the HBO movie Hemingway and Gellhorn (May 28, 9 p.m. ET). Get ready to learn a bit more about Papa and the Spanish Civil War and a lot more about Martha Gellhorn, one of the great war correspondents and the inspiration behind For Whom the Bell Tolls.

Greg Laswell featuring Ingrid Michaelson “Landline” A gorgeous, ethereal ballad from Laswell and his wife.

LIFE WITH FATHER Sargent Shriver, who launched the Peace Corps in 1961, may be best known as JFK’s brother-in-law (and Maria’s dad). But in A Good Man, his son Mark offers a moving appreciation of Shriver as a father. His philosophy: Serve God and your fellow man with humility. Sargent Shriver died in 2011, but his example shines on in these pages. Read Mark Shriver’s eulogy to his father by scanning this tag with your smartphone.

Pop Culture With summer movie season kicking off this weekend, Americans will be heading to concession stands in droves. So put this in your popper:

1,047

CALORIES IN LARGE PLAIN MOVIE POPCORN

52 quarts Amount of popcorn the average American eats every year

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: HANS PENNINK/AP IMAGES; LOUIS LOPEZ/CAL SPORTS MEDIA VIA AP IMAGES; ANDREW DERNIE/ GETTY IMAGES; INDY 500; HBO; BRAND X PICTURES/GETTY IMAGES; MARK LUND/GETTY IMAGES; LUIS ERNESTO SANTANA

Us Usher “Scream” “S dance hit A radio-ready r that’s a cross between tha Maroon 5’s “Moves Like Mar Jagger” and Rihanna. Jagg

4 • May 27, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


LET THE GAMES BEGIN

PHOTOS, FROM TOP: ISTOCKPHOTO (2). OPPOSITE, STATISTIC SOURCES, FROM TOP: ADAPTED FROM THE CENTER FOR SCIENCE IN THE PUBLIC INTEREST; THE POPCORN BOARD

Remember when playing meant running around outdoors instead of sitting on the couch with video games? In Tag, Toss & Run: 40 Classic Lawn Games, authors Paul Tukey and Victoria Rowell offer rules, strategies, and little-known facts for everything from badminton to bocce. The charming drawings are enough to get even the most rabid Angry Birds fans out of the house.

PA I N

DIABETES DAMAGES NERVES DI which may cause shooting, burning, pins-and-needles pain. bu Lyrica is believed to work on these damaged nerves. Lyr

CRUNCH TIME Not since Peanut Butter met Jelly has there been a combination as perfect as Nestlé Crunch Girl Scout bars. The new limited-edition candy, which hit grocery stores June 1, took more than three years to develop. Flavors include Caramel & Coconut and Peanut Butter Crème. Our personal fave: Thin Mints in Fun Size. We dare you to eat just one.

Get specific treatment to lower the degree of this pain. Artist depiction

Relief is possible. Ask your doctor about Lyrica today.

A Day to Remember This Memorial Day, honor the fallen by visiting the Virtual Wall of Remembrance at pbs.org/memorialdayconcert. Post a note, photo, video, or eulogy for a loved one and read tributes to those who died in conflicts from World War I to Iraq and Afghanistan.

LYRICA is FDA approved to treat Diabetic Nerve Pain (or pain from Diabetic Peripheral Neuropathy). This pain can worsen over time. LYRICA provides effective pain relief so patients feel better.* In some patients, Lyrica can provide significant pain relief in as early as the first week of treatment. And, you should know, Lyrica is not a narcotic.† *

Individual results may vary. †Those who have had a drug or alcohol problem are more likely to misuse Lyrica.

Prescription Lyrica is not for everyone. Tell your doctor right away about any serious allergic reaction that causes swelling of the face, mouth, lips, gums, tongue, throat or neck or any trouble breathing or that affects your skin. Lyrica may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people. Call your doctor right away if you have new or worsening depression, suicidal thoughts or actions, or unusual changes in mood or behavior. Lyrica may cause swelling of your hands, legs and feet. Some of the most common side effects of Lyrica are dizziness and sleepiness. Do not drive or work with machines until you know how Lyrica affects you. Other common side effects are blurry vision, weight gain, trouble concentrating, dry mouth, and feeling “high.” Also, tell your doctor right away about muscle pain along with feeling sick and feverish, or any changes in your eyesight including blurry vision or any skin sores if you have diabetes. You may have a higher chance of swelling, hives or gaining weight if you are also taking certain diabetes or high blood pressure medicines. Do not drink alcohol while taking Lyrica. You may have more dizziness and sleepiness if you take Lyrica with alcohol, narcotic pain medicines, or medicines for anxiety. If you have had a drug or alcohol problem, you may be more likely to misuse Lyrica. Tell your doctor if you are planning to father a child. Talk with your doctor before you stop taking Lyrica or any other prescription medication.

Please see Important Risk Information for Lyrica on the following page. To learn more visit www.lyrica.com or call toll-free 1-888-9-LYRICA (1-888-959-7422). You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.FDA.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088. PBP460417-01 ©2012 Pfizer Inc. All rights reserved. April 2012 © PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


IMPORTANT FACTS IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION ABOUT LYRICA LYRICA may cause serious, even life threatening, allergic reactions. Stop taking LYRICA and call your doctor right away if you have any signs of a serious allergic reaction: • Swelling of your face, mouth, lips, gums, tongue, throat or neck • Have any trouble breathing • Rash, hives (raised bumps) or blisters

Like other antiepileptic drugs, LYRICA may cause suicidal thoughts or actions in a very small number of people, about 1 in 500. Call your doctor right away if you have any symptoms, especially if they are new, worse or worry you, including: • New or worsening depression • Suicidal thoughts or actions • Unusual changes in mood or behavior Do not stop LYRICA without first talking with your doctor.

LYRICA may cause swelling of your hands, legs and feet. This swelling can be a serious problem with people with heart problems.

LYRICA may cause dizziness or sleepiness. Do not drive a car, work with machines, or do other dangerous things until you know how LYRICA affects you. Ask your doctor when it is okay to do these things.

ABOUT LYRICA

LYRICA is a prescription medicine used in adults 18 years and older to treat: • Pain from damaged nerves that happens with diabetes or that follows healing of shingles • Partial seizures when taken together with other seizure medicines • Fibromyalgia (pain all over your body)

Who should NOT take LYRICA: • Anyone who is allergic to anything in LYRICA

BEFORE STARTING LYRICA

Tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you: • Have had depression, mood problems or suicidal thoughts or behavior • Have or had kidney problems or dialysis • Have heart problems, including heart failure • Have a bleeding problem or a low blood platelet count • Have abused prescription medicines, street drugs or alcohol in the past • Have ever had swelling of your face, mouth, tongue, lips, gums, neck, or throat (angioedema) • Plan to father a child. It is not known if problems seen in animal studies can happen in humans. • Are pregnant, plan to become pregnant or are breastfeeding. It is not known if LYRICA will harm your unborn baby. You and your doctor should decide whether you should take LYRICA or breast-feed, but not both. Tell your doctor about all your medicines. Include over-thecounter medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. LYRICA and other medicines may affect each other causing side effects. Especially tell your doctor if you take: • Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors. You may have a higher chance for swelling and hives.

(LEER-i-kah)

BEFORE® STARTING LYRICA, continued ®

• Avandia (rosiglitazone)*, Avandamet (rosiglitazone and metformin)* or Actos® (pioglitazone)** for diabetes. You may have a higher chance of weight gain or swelling of your hands or feet. • Narcotic pain medicines (such as oxycodone), tranquilizers or medicines for anxiety (such as lorazepam). You may have a higher chance for dizziness and sleepiness. • Any medicines that make you sleepy

7-MINUTE SOLUTION

SAVE BIG BUCKS ON HOTEL ROOMS We checked in with Anthony Melchiorri, host of the Travel Channel’s Hotel Impossible, for tips on landing the best deals

POSSIBLE SIDE EFFECTS OF LYRICA LYRICA may cause serious side effects, including: • See “Important Safety Information About LYRICA.” • Muscle problems, pain, soreness or weakness along with feeling sick and fever • Eyesight problems including blurry vision • Weight gain. Weight gain may affect control of diabetes and can be serious for people with heart problems. • Feeling “high” If you have any of these symptoms, tell your doctor right away.

The most common side effects of LYRICA are: • Dizziness • Trouble concentrating • Blurry vision • Swelling of hands and feet • Weight gain • Dry mouth • Sleepiness If you have diabetes, you should pay extra attention to your skin while taking LYRICA and tell your doctor of any sores or skin problems.

HOW TO TAKE LYRICA Do:

• Take LYRICA exactly as your doctor tells you. Your doctor will tell you how much to take and when to take it. Take LYRICA at the same times each day. • Take LYRICA with or without food.

Don’t: • Drive a car or use machines if you feel dizzy or sleepy while taking LYRICA. • Drink alcohol or use other medicines that make you sleepy while taking LYRICA. • Change the dose or stop LYRICA suddenly. You may have headaches, nausea, diarrhea, or trouble sleeping if you stop taking LYRICA suddenly. • Start any new medicines without first talking to your doctor.

NEED MORE INFORMATION?

• Ask your doctor or pharmacist. This is only a brief summary of important information. • Go to www.lyrica.com or call 1-866-459-7422 (1-866-4LYRICA). Uninsured? Need help paying for Pfizer medicines? Pfizer has programs that can help. Call 1-866-706-2400 or visit www.PfizerHelpfulAnswers.com.

PARKE–DAVIS, Division of Pfizer Inc., New York, NY 10017 *Avandia and Avandamet are registered trademarks of GlaxoSmithKline. Rx only is a registered trademark of Takeda Chemicals Industries, Ltd., and ©2010 Pfizer Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in the USA. ** Actos is used under license by Takeda Pharmaceuticals of America, Inc., and Version January 2010 Eli Lilly and Co.

1

Follow the 14/3 rule. Reserve your room more than two weeks ahead (when hotels have plenty of vacancies) or within three days of your trip (when they need to fill unbooked rooms).

2

Don’t just look online— call. The lowest prices are typically found on the Web, but ring the hotel anyway—you might still get in on a rewards program (if it has one), plus you can ask whether it offers special rates (for Triple AAA members, for instance) or has deals on certain dates.

3

Be flexible. Shifting your trip by one or two days can sometimes cut a room’s rate substantially. The trip calendars on Expedia or Travelocity can give you the lowdown; while you’re there, check out package deals on flights and hotel rooms or flights and car rentals—you may be able to save 20 to 30 percent.

4

Save on last-minute travel. An impromptu getaway doesn’t have to drain your bank account, even when you can’t observe the 14/3 rule. Hotel managers often dump empty rooms on sites like Hotwire and Priceline. Deals of 60 to even 75 percent off can be had, but reservations might be nonrefundable.

6 • May 27, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


GO SLEEVELESS THIS SUMMER! START NOW! Ask Marilyn By Marilyn vos Savant

Prevent & Conquer Dry, Wrinkled, Crepe-Paper Skin*

I’ve heard that watermelon growers have been trying to develop square melons for ease of transportation and storage, but I haven’t seen any in stores. Have they succeeded? —George Liang, La Jolla, Calif.

They have, in a way. Farmers have grown watermelons in square-sided containers that force the fruit to grow into a cubical shape. But the extra effort adds expense, so the box-shaped melons may cost significantly more than watermelons with a natural shape. (You can view a cubical melon online at Parade.com/melon.) I think I’m as modern as the next guy, but I’m not looking forward to cubical bananas!

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SHOP ONLINE: www.htygold.com • ORDERS: 1-800-908-4366 (8am-6pm M-F PST) © PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


BORN ( WHAT AMERICA EATS )

IN

USA by

JANE & MICHAEL STERN

COVER PHOTOGRAPH by LEVI BROWN

THE FRENCH HAVE THEIR FOIe GRAS, THE BRITISH THEIR FISH AND CHIPS. BUT they have nothing on us. we AMERICANS HAVE dreamed up SOME OF THE best FOODS ON EARTH.

8 • May 27, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


CRISPY Americans are great at inventing foods that are satisfyingly crispy but not off-puttingly brittle. Snacks, salads, cereals— some of our most memorable dishes fall into this crunchy category.

CORN DOGS

Perfect for eating on a stroll, the corn dog is a humble wiener on a stick wrapped in corn batter and dunked in the deep fryer until the corn coat turns crisp and golden. It’s an all-American dish, for sure, but its parentage is up for grabs. The Pacific International Livestock Exposition in Portland, Ore., was selling Pronto Pups as early as 1941, and you could get a Corny Dog at the State Fair of Texas in 1942. After World War II, Cozy Dog in Springfield, Ill., started tart arrted ted serving serv se rvin ing g its its own corn dogs, based corn d dog ogs, s, b bas ased e on a rrecipe ecip ec ipe e that that owner own o wner er Ed Waldmire rstt aldm al d ire Jr. Jr. fi firs encountered Muskogee, unt ntered d iin n Mu M skogee e, Okla. In 1949, Cozy Dog Drive In o opened on Route e 66 66 in in Springfi Sp pringfield, and countless cou co untlesss travelers t avelers tr driving ng by by learned le ear arned to love ccorn orn or n dogs. do CHECK K OUT: OUT The State Fair off Texas, bigtex .com;; Cozy Dog, cozydog in.com drivein.com

FRIED ED CLAMS

The way they tell the story along g the North Shore of Massachusetts, sachusetts, the modern deep-fried -fried clam was

invented around Independence Day in 1916 at a roadside stand in Essex run by a fellow named Chubby Woodman. The moment of inspiration came when a customer suggested that Chubby dredge a few clams with cornmeal and toss them into the hot oil he was using to cook the relatively new Saratoga chips—today known as potato chips. Whatever their origin, fried clams are now common on seafood menus everywhere, but Woodman’s of Essex and the nearby Clam Box (founded in 1938) make the best ones hands down. Connoisseurs insist on whole-bellied clams (not clam strips) because they’re more succulent and consider side orders of onion rings or french fries essential. The picnic-table picnic-tabl le seating seat se atin ing g at establishments both bo th e stabli t lish shme ment ntss ad adds ds homey a ho home meyy to touch. CHECK OUT: W Woo Woodman’s oodm dman’s of Essex, wood dmans woodmans .com; the Clam Box, ipswichma.com/clambox

then baked them again, creating hard little nuggets he called granula. Cereal man John Harvey Kellogg added cornmeal and oats to the formula and began marketing his own granula. When faced with legal action, Kellogg changed his product’s name to granola. Though soon eclipsed by the likes of Corn Flakes and Rice Krispies, it came back as hippie health food in the 1960s. Today granola is a breakfast staple. The two best versions, East and West, are made byy the West We s , ar e ma de b th Red Truck Bakery R Re d Tr T uck uc k Ba Bake kery r in Warrenton, W Wa r en rr nto ton, Va., and the Cottage Cott Co ttag a e in La Jolla, Calif. CHECK OUT: Red Truck Bakery, redtruckbakery .com; the Cottage, cottage lajolla.com

COBB SALAD

In that I Love Lucy episode where the Ricardos and Mertzes go to Hollywood, Lucy, Fred, and Ethel dine at a restaurant on Vine Street called the Brown Derby, chosen because it’s the best place to spot celebrities. Sure enough, in the next booth over sits movie star William Holden. What’s he eating?? A Cobb salad, a dish the Brown Derby is often credited with inventing. A classic tale of its creation has it that late one ev evening circa 1937, 19 after dinner was through and the chefs had h gone home, the restaurant’s proprietor, Bob propr Cobb, and a his pal Sid Grauman (of Chinese

Theater fame), were famished but didn’t feel like cooking. So Cobb opened the refrigerator and they grabbed what they could find: lettuce, an avocado, tomatoes, a piece of chicken, a hard-boiled egg, chives, cheese, and French dressing. Cobb chopped all this up while Grauman found some leftover bacon. Then they mixed everything together and had a feast. The next day, when Grauman came back for lunch, he asked the waiter for a Cobb salad. Within weeks,

movie colony tastemakers were crazy for the new concoction. Today, there are a million variations, but you won’t find a better, fresher traditional version than the one served at the fine old 24/7/365 restaurant 13 Coins in Seattle. CHECK OUT: 13 Coins, 13coins.com

GRANOLA

Granola was created during the Civil War by nutrition crusader James Caleb Jackson, who baked sheets of moistened whole wheat flour, crumbled them into bits,

CREAMY These dishes dishe are smooth and ultrarich ultraric in flavor (often in calories, cal too!).

ICE CREAM CRE CONES

On the fair fairgrounds of the 1904 St. Louis Lo World’s

Fair, vendors sold ice cream in recyclable glass containers or paper cups. One legend has the cone coming about when an ice cream man ran out of cups and teamed up May 27, 2012 • 9

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


( WHAT AMERICA EATS )

WHOOPIE PIES

with a guy nearby who had zalabia, Middle Eastern pastries that resemble waffles. The two figured out that you could roll a zalabia into a cone to form a perfect perch for a scoop of ice cream. It’s unclear whether the ice cream man was Arnold Fornachou or possibly even Charles Menches (who,

Where do the nation’s biggest cheese lovers reside? Take our “Who Eats What, Where” quiz, and get recipes for the featured foods, at Parade.com /usafood

along with his brother, Frank, may also have invented the hamburger) or whether the Syrian vendor was Ernest Hamwi or Abe Doumar. But whoever were the geniuses behind it, the ice cream cone was launched. After the fair, Doumar returned to his home back east and started selling cones in Coney Island, N.Y., and at fairs up and down the coast. In 1934 he opened a drive-in restaurant in Norfolk, Va., now run by

his descendants, who continue to use vintage waffle irons and a conical mold to make cones one by one, four per minute. CHECK OUT: Doumar’s, doumars.com

CALIFORNIA DIP

As the story goes, in 1954, two years after Lipton introduced its dry onion soup mix, a now-unknown housewife in Southern California stirred a dry soup packet into a pint of sour cream and made a savory potato chip dip. Her recipe was reprinted in newspapers countless times, and by the end of the 1950s, it had become a house-party classic, perfectly suited for mid20th-century America’s new style of informal entertaining on the patio or in the family room. With no utensils, plates, or napkins involved, guests could hold a highball in one hand and scoop up dip with the other—a task made especially easy with the sturdier ridged

This treat—two reat—two circles of dark rk chocolate cake with a ribbon of vanilla cream m in between—may have originated in 1927 in Roxbury, oxbury, Mass., Mass., at the Berwick Cake Company, mpany, possibly as competition ompetition for for Drake’s ke’s Devil Dogs. gs. Or it could have e been created (and d christened) in Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Dutch tch country, country, where, ere, according to lore, children were so excited to find what hat was known as a “hucklebuck” ucklebuck” in their lunch nch boxes that they shouted, outed, “Whoopie!” The state Maine, where ate of Maine,

whoopie pies are served as dessert after shore dinners, also lays claim to their invention: When a frugal cook in Bangor found herself with leftover batter after making a cake, she put small blobs of it onto a cookie sheet and baked them, using two of the cooked

CHECK OUT: CHECK OUT:

Labadie’s Bakery, labadies bakery.com

CHEWY Both sweet and savory guilty pleasures are found in this fab food group (including a candy invented by accident).

HAMBURGERS

People have eaten ground beef for centu-

discs to sandwich leftover cake frosting. The original whoopie pie was black and white, but modern whoopies expand the possibilities. Labadie’s Bakery (which itself claims to have started the whoopie craze) in Lewiston, Lewiston, Maine, offers a peanut Maine, butter filling option, a well as vanilla cake as instead of chocolate.

ries, but a little more than 100 years ago, someone in America came up with the idea of forming it into a patty and putting it between slices of bread, turning it into a hands-on meal (no utensils required). Who did it first? It might have been the Menches brothers, who supposedly ran out of pork patties at their sandwich stand at the 1885 Erie County Fair

in western New York and substituted beef. In Wisconsin, they say it was Charlie Nagreen, who decided to flatten a meatball and put it on bread at the Outagamie County Fair that same year. Fletcher Davis of Athens, Tex., is said to have made a splash at the St. Louis World’s Fair of 1904 by serving ground beef on bread. But the explanation we like best—because you can still go to the place and taste it— revolves around what is now a brick shack in New Haven, Conn., called Louis’ Lunch. Back in 1900, food vendor Louis Lassen, being a thrifty gentleman, made use of

COVER: FOOD STYLING, STEPHANIE BOTTOM; PROP STYLING, MICHELLE WONG. PHOTOS, OPENING SPREAD, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: WOJCIK/TRUNK ARCHIVE; CORBIS; GETTY IMAGES (2). THIS SPREAD, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MARK PETERSON/REDUX; GETTY IMAGES; ISTOCKPHOTO; CORBIS

potato chip. By the mid1990s, Americans were using a quarter-million packets of onion soup mix every day.

10 • May 27, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


WHAT AMERICA EATS

How’s the Food by You? PARADE and Epicurious are teaming up to discover what Americans eat—at home, at work, or on the town. How would you answer the following?

• Who’s the best cook in your family? • Which supermarket aisle do you spend the most time in? • Which famous chef would you like to whip up dinner for you? • How would you rate your family’s table manners? • When you’re dieting, are you most likely to cheat with chips, candy, or alcohol? Take our survey at Parade .com/eats and look for the results in a future issue of PARADE.

leftover steak trimmings by forming them into beef patties, which he then cooked and put between slices of toast. Louis’ Lunch still uses toast to sandwich its big, pillowy burgers. Sliced tomatoes, sliced onion, and cheese spread are available as garnishes—but don’t ask for ketchup. Louis Lassen didn’t offer it, and his greatgrandchildren don’t either! CHECK OUT: Louis’ Lunch, louislunch.com

CHILI DOGS

Historians have a hard enough time pinpointing the birthplace of the hot dog (Coney Island figures among the possibilities), and determining the chili dog’s origin is just as tricky. But a prominent theory traces it to

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


( WHAT AMERICA EATS ) Fralinger, who started selling molasses taffy on the boardwalk in 1885, was the first to package saltwater taffy as the Atlantic City souvenir every visitor takes home. Out west, the candy was reputedly introduced around 1915 by Victor Marini, great-grandfather

(chili below the frank) in Mobile, Ala. CHECK OUT: Hot Grill, thehotgrill.org (Texas hot dog); El Guero Canelo, Tucson (Sonoran dog); American Coney Island, americanconeyisland .com (Coney Island dog); Ritzy Lunch, ritzylunch wv.com (slaw dog); Dew Drop Inn, Mobile (upsidedown dog)

SALTWATER TAFFY

According to legend, in the early 1880s, on the boardwalk in Atlantic City, N.J., a taffy taff ffy stand ff sttand d proprietor prop op pri r eto etto e

Chat with the Sterns! Ask them about your favorite eats at Facebook.com/dashrecipes on Tuesday, May 29, at 2 p.m. ET.

CHEESY Cheese takes any dish from good to addictive— fr so much so that it rates its very ve own food group.

MUFFULETTAS MUF

country has its own version, including baconwrapped Sonoran hot dogs in Tucson, Coney Islands in Detroit (especially excellent there; typically unavailable in Coney Island), slaw-topped chili dogs in West Virginia, and upside-down dogs

Bradley was named David Bradle grumpy when strong winds and a high tide sprayed ocean foam all over his supply of justmade taffy. Bradley sarcastically corrected a little girl who’d stepped up and asked for taffy: “You mean saltwater taffy!” he sneered. Vendor Joseph

of Joseph Marini III of Marini’s at the Beach on the Santa Cruz, Calif., boardwalk. Despite its name and seaside history, saltwater taffy contains no actual salt water. CHECK OUT: Fralinger’s, jamescandy.com; Marini’s Candies, mariniscandies.com

This IItalian meganamed for ssandwich, sa ndw Sicilian loaf on the round th r which it is assembled, whic firrst took shape in 1906 at Central Grocery in C New Orleans, where grocer Salvatore Lupo decided to make life easier for truck farmers from the nearby French Market. They’d come to his place at lunch and order meats, cheeses, and bread, then sit on barrels and try

the original is all about a balance of cold cuts, olive salad, and fresh bread. CHECK OUT: Central Grocery, 504-523-1620

to juggle everything without spilling. So Lupo took their favorites—including salami, mortadella, capicola, and provolone— topped them with chopped olive salad, and piled all of it into a sideways-sliced muffuletta loaf. Today, some places offer hot or vegetarian versions, but

CHIMICHANGAS

According to El Charro Café in Tucson, the chimichanga was invented in the mid-20th century when a stuffed burrito slipped from proprietor Monica Flin’s hands and into a vat of bubbling cooking oil; she dubbed the crisp morsel a chimichanga, meaning “thingamajig.” While other Arizona restaurants also claim to have created the chimi, there’s no denying the superiority of the giant chimichanga still served at El Charro. CHECK OUT: El Charro Café, elcharrocafe.com

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: ISTOCKPHOTO; THE NEW YORK TIMES/REDUX; PETER FRANK EDWARDS/REDUX

northern New Jersey circa 1920, when a customer at John Patrellis’s hot dog stand in Paterson reportedly brought his own cup of chili to use as dressing for his hot dogs. Patrellis took the idea and ran with it, preparing a meaty, beanless batch and dubbing his chilitopped dog a “Texas weiner” (spelled e-i, not i-e). The idea spread to southeastern New York and western Connecticut, where chili dogs are today known as Texas hots, and where they’re often split, grilled, and served in buns toasted on the griddle. Every part of the

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Š PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


Views

Share your dad’s grilling rules at

By Connie Schultz

Parade.com /connie

My Dad, the Grill King y sisters and I are trying to figure out when Dad abandoned his casual approach to the backyard barbecue and morphed into Conan the Grill King. Toni thinks it was after we all moved out and Dad needed a hobby. Of course she does. In Toni’s world, my parents’ lives lost all meaning once her career as a high school cheerleader was over. Leslie only recalls feeling waves of guilt every time Dad grilled because we made such a fuss about his steaks and failed to champion our mother’s salads. “I always tried to remember to thank Mom, too,” she said. “Greens matter.” Once a mama’s girl, always a mama’s girl. When I was in second grade, I helped Dad assemble a small, round charcoal grill, but I have no memory of his actually cooking on one until I was in college. He was inspired to try his skill at the grill after meeting with great success at the sewing machine. He mended his own pants after Mom stitched his pockets shut. Once he could thread a bobbin, the domestic life was his to conquer. I left for Kent State in the fall of ’75. When I pulled into the driveway the next spring, I was greeted by the sight of Dad engulfed in smoke, waving from a grill the size of a toolshed and wearing what would become his

Grill King uniform. Imagine a tall Barney Rubble in gym shorts and sandals cut from recycled tires and you’ve got a good picture of Chuck Schultz flippin’ burgers. Dad was a redhead, and the sun was not his friend. By midsummer the freckles on his massive, sunburned shoulders would merge, but his legs were skinny and as white as bleached bones. We weren’t allowed to point this out. We were, however, expected to fan him with a flattened milk carton as he cooked. My sisters and I can still recite Dad’s grilling rules: Rule No. 1: Dad is in charge.

“Spatula!” he’d yell. I’d slap the spatula into his palm, and then duck as he threw it back to me. “Not that!” he’d yell. “The serrated one with the carved wooden handle! Quick! We could lose this one!” This would go on for an hour. By the time his steaks were on the table, I looked as if the washer had just spit me out of the spin cycle. I have one other memory associated with Dad and cookouts. It goes back to that day in second grade when we sat down on the sidewalk to assemble his new grill. After wrestling with the metal legs for what seemed like forever, he threw up his hands and gave an exaggerated sigh. “I don’t know, Connie,” he said, handing me the instructions. “I can’t figure this out. Rule No. 2: Maybe you can.” DAD’S Repeat Rule No. 1. I was stunned. APPROACH Dad’s approach Dad knew how to TO GRILLING to grilling was more do everything. I WAS MORE complicated than an studied the sequence COMPLICATED Apollo space flight. of drawings. IncredTHAN AN Lots of secret APOLLO SPACE ibly, I thought I saw potions and handthe answer. FLIGHT. dried herbs and “Look, Dad,” giant utensils resembling the tools I said nervously, pointing. “Maybe of large-animal veterinarians. you need to do this. And this. Nobody but Dad could get And then this.” Dad smiled as he near his grill, except to ooh and snapped the legs in place. “Look aah over his wizardry. Sometimes what you did,” he said, beaming. one of us was recruited to hand I raced back into the house to him whatever he needed. This tell Mom, oblivious that Conan was very stressful. Helping Dad the Grill King had just worked grill was like assisting a surgery. his magic.

PHOTO: JACK LOUTH/GETTY IMAGES

M

He ruled not with a scepter, but with a fork. And woe be unto anyone who challenged his domain: the backyard barbecue.

14 • May 27, 2012

© PARADE Publications 2012. All rights reserved.


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