Page 1


CONTACT US Call toll-free: 800-228-0429 Cara Recine, Lifestyles and special projects editor cara.recine@thesouthern.com / ext. 5075 Adam Testa, Lifestyles writer adam.testa@thesouthern.com / ext. 5031 Brenda Kirkpatrick, lists, live music flipside@thesouthern.com / ext. 5089 Rhonda May, cover designer rhonda.may@thesouthern.com / ext. 5118 J.C. Dart, online jennifer.dart@thesouthern.com / ext. 5183 The Southern Illinoisan (USPS 258-908) is published daily at a yearly subscription rate of $178. It is published at 710 N. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, IL 62901. It is owned by Lee Enterprises of Davenport, Iowa.

COUPON

Happy Holiday SALE Two Days ONLY! Wed. Nov 21 & Fri. Nov 23

BOOKS

50% Off*

NO LIMIT - Good on your entire purchase of used books with this coupon*

Over 100,000 used books 50% off our already low price Eastgate Shopping Center

Carbondale 618.457.2665

Like us on Facebook *Coupon good for 50% off entire purchase of in-stock, qualifying used books on Wed. Nov 21 & Fri Nov 23, 2012 ONLY. NOT valid on new books, local author/regional interest books, merchandise, special orders, gift certificates or prior purchases. No cash value. Cannot be combined with any other offer or with trade credit.

COUPON

MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

Art Events Holiday Open House: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Friday-Sunday, Nov. 23-25, Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, 14967 Gun Creek Trail, Whittington; demonstrations; refreshments; 618-629-2220; www.museum.state.il.us/ ismsites/so-il Student Exhibit: 9:30 a.m.1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 29, Williamson County Programs on Aging, 1201 Weaver Road, Herrin; work by John A. Logan’s continuing education class, Landscape Painting Basics ART OVER EASY 8: The 8th annual Art Over Easy Auction, 7-9:30 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, Surplus Gallery at The Glove Factory, 432 S. Washington Ave., Carbondale; $30; www.artanddesign.siu.edu/ newsevents

PROVIDED

This painting, ‘Backlit Sunflower,’ by Missy Carstens is featured in the ‘Changes’ exhibition at Little Egypt Arts Centre in Marion.

through Dec. 8; www.museum. siu.edu; 618-453-5388 Lions & Tigers & Bears, Oh My: Animals in a humorous setting through poems on various artworks, University Museum, SIU; through Dec. 8; www.museum.siu.edu; 618Exhibits 453-5388 Sunshine Artists The Photography Project: Exhibition: Sallie Logan Public University Museum, SIU; by Library, 1808 Walnut St., high school students from Murphysboro; through Dec. 17; Cobden, Elverado, Eldorado, hours, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Monday- Zeigler-Royalton and Shawnee Thursday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Community College students; Friday and Saturday. through Dec. 8; www.museum. Changes: Two-Woman show siu.edu; 618-453-5388 by Patty Morrison and Missy Master of Fine Arts Carstens, Little Egypt Arts Candidates’ Preview: Centre, Marion; starts Sunday, University Museum, SIU; latest Dec. 2; focus, fine art and work from students who will functional pieces from recygraduate in 2013; through Dec. cled materials; through Jan. 3; 8; www.museum.siu.edu; www.littleegyptarts.com. 618-453-5388 Shepard Fairey’s Art: The The Mitchell Collection of Cox Gallery at Weaver’s Small Metal Treasures: Cottage, 1904 Bass Lane, University Museum, SIU; Carbondale; through, Nov. 25; through Dec. 8; 618-453-5388; 618-457-6823 www.museum.siu.edu Marlene Webb: Paintings Political Cartoons: From and drawings on display, the the Jerome M. Mileur Buzz, on the square, Benton; Collection, University Museum, through November; hours, 9 SIU; presidential memorabilia a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays and 9 collection; through Dec. 8; a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays; 618www.museum.siu.edu; 439-2899 618-453-5388 Primo Angeli: A Sensation, Revelation: Retrospective of Posters, Themes and Variations In Design & Brand Identity, Color and Form, University University Museum, SIU; Museum, SIU; artists include master designer Primo Angeli Josef Albers, Richard Anuszkgrew up in West Frankfort; iewicz, Patrick Caulfield, internationally know designer; Patrick Heron, John Hoyland, posters for the Olympics; Patrick Hughes, Kenneth

Martin and Victor Vasarely; through Dec. 8; www.museum. siu.edu; 618-453-5388 Obscure Stages: Graduate Association of Painters and Printmakers, The Gallery Space, Law office of Joni Beth Bailey, 1008 Walnut Street, Murphysboro; through Dec. 14; 618-521-5713 Off The Wall Exhibit: Holiday Group Artist Exhibition, anthill gallery and vintage curiosities, in conjunction with The Yellow Moon Café, both in downtown Cobden; over 60 artists; through Dec. 23 Mixed Medium Pastiche: Joan Skiver-Levy, Southern Illinois Art and Artisan Center, Rend Lake; a mini exhibition including a watercolor collage; through Dec. 31; 618-6292220 Group du Jour art: Harrisburg District Library; the nine artists in the group are members of the Paducah Area Painters Alliance; through December Art & Soul: By the Little Egypt Arts Association, The Pavilion, Marion; over 30 pieces of artwork with subjects ranging from patriotic themes to wildlife and florals; through December; 618 993-2657; www.littleegyptarts.com Holiday Extravaganza exhibit: Little Egypt Arts Centre, Marion; artwork, photos, jewelry, fiber pieces; works for sale; through Dec.

FESTIVALS

31; www.littleegyptarts.com Cedarhurst Exhibits: Cedarhurst Center For The Arts, 2600 Richview Road, Mount Vernon; exhibitions, The Joy Thornton-Walter and John Walter Collection of Contemporary Glass Art, Main Gallery; Kuenz Sculpture Park Photo Contest, Beal Grand Corridor Gallery; Shrode Photography Competition, Regenhardt Gallery at Shrode Art Center and C. W. Roelle: At Home with Nature, Beck Family Center Gallery; through Jan. 6; www. cedarhurst.org; 618-242-1236 On & Of Paper: Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, Whittington; paintings, drawings, photography, digital art, prints, woodblock, lithographs and etchings and constructed works created out of paper; through Jan. 27; hours, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; 618-6292220 When Nature Talks: Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, 14967 Gun Creek Trail, Whittington; artists, Les Barker, Lisa Goesling, Roger Grimes, Chris Main, Yuki Nyhan, Leonard Wilson; through March 10; 618-6292220 www.museum.state. il.us/ismsites/so-il Salvador Dali: The Playing Cards Suite, University Museum, SIU; The Ace, King, Queen and Jack of Diamonds and Spades are interpreted with the inimitable Daliesque flair in this exhibition of eight prints by the surrealist master; through March 29; www.museum.siu.edu; 618-453-5388

Receptions Harvest Time: Reception, 4-8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 26, Marion Carnegie Library, 206 S. Market St., Marion; artwork in partnership with the Little Egypt Arts Association; through December; 618 9935935; www.littleegyptarts.com Work by Kris Killman: Closing reception, 5-7 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30, Little Egypt Arts Centre, downtown Marion; refreshments; www.littleegyptarts.com

FLIPSIDE Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 2


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO ‘Harvest Time’ will feature more than 30 pieces of artwork at from 4 to 8 p.m. Nov. 26 at Marion Carnegie Library.

JOEL HAWKSLEY THE SOUTHERN

LEAA celebrating fall season with new exhibit ‘Harvest Time’ MARION — The Little Egypt Arts Association is celebrating the fall season with a special “Harvest Time” exhibit at the Marion Carnegie Library. The display features more than 30 pieces of artwork highlighting subjects from patriotic themes to wildlife and florals. Photography, fiber pieces and jewelry from local artists are included.

Gift Certificates available! Perfect for your significant other!

Many of the items in the show are available for purchase, with revenue supporting LEAA’s efforts. The exhibit will remain on display through December. A reception is scheduled for 4 to 8 p.m. Monday, Nov. 26, at the library. It is free and open to the public. — Adam Testa

Gourmet Chocolate Shop Bed & Breakfast

801 Ninth St., Highland, IL

618.654.9340

Only 30 minutes from Downtown St. Louis & Fairview Heights View the rooms at www.thechocolateaffair.com • Friend us on for shop updates FLIPSIDE Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 3


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

Program focuses on Civil War music CHESTER — A program at the Chester Public Library will take attendees back in time 150 years. In November of 1862, the United States were a different place. The Civil War raged on, Ambrose E. Burnside had assumed command of the Army of the Potomac and the battles of Bull Run, Shiloh and Antietam had already been fought. But what was life like in Randolph County? That’s the question Ted Mueller will aim to answer during his presentation, “What Did the Music of the Civil War Era Sound Like?” Mueller, a wellknown Chester artist, will talk about local life during the war and explain how music from that era evolved into genres still played today.

Mueller and his wife Dianna have been historical re-enactors for decades, and he was a member of Rose of Illinois, a Civil War string band that played at historical events through the Midwest. The group folded 10 years ago, but Mueller still plays. He also has an interest in 18th and 19th century clothing and presents a “fashion show” at Fort de Chartres in June. The presentation is scheduled for 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27. It is free and open to the public. This is the fourth installment in a series of Civil War programs at the library. A fifth, “Thomas Nast and Christmas during the Civil War” by Henry Wolf, is Dec. 11. — Adam Testa

Anna rings in the holiday season Saturday ANNA — Sixteen artists and crafters will be showing and selling their wares during the second annual Holiday Bazaar at the Anna Arts Center on Saturday, Nov. 24. The exhibition will run from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the center, 117 W. Davie

St. and features artists and crafters working in media, including stained glass, painting, goat-milk hand lotions, soaps, quilts, knives and more. The bazaar is part of the Christmas in Downtown Anna celebration. — Adam Testa

A Country Christmas

Christmas Classics & New Christmas Music by Taylor Swift, Lady Antebellum, Sugarland & more, that captures the heart of young & old alike!

Nov. 24th & 30th Dec. 1st, 4th, 8th,14th,15th, 21st & 22nd

Showtime Matinees 2 pm • Night Shows 7:30 pm

Adult $17 Senior $16 Student $10 Child $7

Page 4 Thursday, November 22, 2012 FLIPSIDE

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

Books & Authors Holiday Book Sale: Noon-6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1 and 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday, Dec. 3, Herrin City Library, 120 N. 13th St.; second-hand books, paperbacks, videos, vinyl records; $5 to 50 cents; no book sale in November; 618-942-6109

BOOKS

FESTIVALS

THEATER

For a full list of events, visit flipsideonline.com.

Pass; www.altovineyards.net; 618-893-4898 Reindeer Run: 8 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 24, Harrisburg Middle School; 5K Run/Walk sponsored by Saline County Chamber of Commerce; registration, $25; race begins 9 a.m.; 618-252-4192 Comedy Holiday Open House: The Carbondale Friday-Sunday Nov. 23-25, Comedians: 9 p.m. Mondays, Southern Illinois Art & Hangar 9, Carbondale; 10 Artisans Center, 14967 Gun p.m. Wednesdays, Station 13, Creek Trail, Whittington; Carbondale; see The demonstrations, Carbondale Comedians on refreshments; hours, Facebook 9 a.m.-5 p.m. daily; closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, Films New Year’s Day and Easter; 618-629-2220; mgalloway@ Community Cinema: museum.state.il.us Features Solar Mamas, Holiday Open House: 2:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24, Friday-Saturday, Nov. 23-24, Carbondale Public Library; Owl Creek Vineyard, 2655 part of a series of free film Water Valley Road, Cobden; screenings from the PBS series Independent Lens to be 618-893-2557 Holiday Open House: held at the library on the last 10 a.m. Friday-Sunday, Nov. Saturday of every month; refreshments; 618-453-6148; 23-25, Pheasant Hollow Winery, 14931 Illinois 37, vickie.devenport@wsiu.org; Whittington; 618-629-2302; pbs.org/independentlens/ www.pheasanthollowwinery. half-the-sky com Christmas Bazaar: 8 a.m.History 4 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24, Alto Pass Civic Center; Quilters Civil War presentation: and Friends Christmas Bazaar What Did the Music of the with baked goods, candles, Civil War Era Sound Like, crafts, refreshments; quilt 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 27, raffle Chester Public Library; Holiday Bazaar: 10 a.m.-5 presented by Ted Mueller, a p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24, Anna Chester artist, who will talk about local life during the war Arts Center, 117 W. Davie St.; part of the downtown Anna and explain how music from Christmas Celebration; that era evolved into genres exhibits by artists and still played today; free; crafters; 618-833-6525 618-826-3711 Hometown Christmas: 3-5 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24, Holiday Happenings Broadway Boulevard, Herrin Christmas downtown Johnston City; hot Celebration: 6 p.m. Friday, chocolate, cookies, pictures Nov. 23, downtown Herrin; with Santa and treat bags for Christmas lighted parade, children; craft fair; youngsters carolers, tree lighting; may make an ornament; 618-925-1073 lighting of the town tree, Holiday Open House: dusk; 618-927-3858; Noon-6 p.m. Friday-Saturday, ars528@yahoo.com. Nov. 23-24 and noon-5 p.m. Christmas Parade of Sunday, Nov. 25, Alto Lights: 5 p.m. Sunday, Nov. Vineyards, Illinois 127, Alto 25, downtown Cape

Girardeau; Old Town Cape’s annual Christmas Parade of Lights to kick off the holiday season; 573-334-8085; www.oldtowncape.org/events Holiday Craft Sale: Thursday-Saturday, Nov. 29-30 and Dec. 1, SIU Student Center; www.siucstudentcenter.org; 618-453-5209 Holiday Christmas Festival: 6:30 p.m. FridaySunday, Nov. 30, Dec. 1-2, Ste. Genevieve, Mo.; variety show, parade, concerts, performances, tree lighting ceremony, art show, carriage rides, pictures with Santa; 573-883-3686 Christmas on the River: 4-9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30; 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1; 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, Chester; lighted parade, arts, crafts, displays, food; Santa to arrive by barge; 618-826-1430 The Christmas Nativity Exhibit and Concerts: FridaySunday, Nov. 30-Dec. 2, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, 7168 Old Illinois 13, Carbondale; see nativities, 5-9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 30 with concert, 7 p.m. Friday; hours, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1; open, 1-9 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2 with a concert, 5 p.m. Sunday; free; christmasnativityexhibit.com; 618-529-4042 Holiday Light Display: Every evening Dec. 1 through Jan. 1, Coulterville City Park; features a million lights and 400 Christmas figurines, animated displays, walk through displays, play land Christmas in the Village: Saturday, Dec. 1, Cobden; bazaars, open houses, holiday activities, visit from Santa Claus, craft vendors, 5K Run/Walk, hay rides, live Nativity scene; 618-893-2425; www.cobdenil.com Santa’s Gift House: 9 a.m.3 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1, old Maytag building, 410 E. Lyerla Drive, Herrin; fundraiser for Williamson County Child

Advocacy Center; children, 4-12 may shop for Christmas gifts; for sign up information and times call 618-942-3800 Carbondale Lights Fantastic Parade: 6 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 1, downtown Carbondale; www.carbondalemainstreet. com Country Christmas Stroll & House Tours: Noon, Saturday-Sunday, Dec. 1-2, Okawville; includes four homes and the St. John’s UCC Church; $10/$5; Breakfast with Santa; flea market; Christmas in The Barn; 618-243-5694; tourokaw@606front.net Holiday Homes Tour: 1-5 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2; Franklin Hospital Auxiliary of Benton will host annual tour featuring homes of Michelle Atkins, Jarrod and Amy Calcaterra and Ray and Connie Morris; refreshments; $10; for information and map to homes call 618-435-2470 Carols at Candlelight: 4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, St. Anne’s Church, 507 S. Main St., Anna; caroling, refreshments; music; 618-833-9441

Theater The Three Musketeers: 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, Nov. 29-Dec. 1 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, McLeod Theater, SIU; $6/$16; 618-453-6000; southernticketsonline.com Madrigal Feaste: 6 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Nov. 30, Dec. 1 and 12:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, Performing Arts Center Theatre, Southeastern Illinois College, Harrisburg; $25; reserve, 618-252-5400, ext. 2486; boxoffice@sic.edu It’s a Wonderful Life: Presented by the Paradise Alley Players, 7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Nov. 30-Dec. 1 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 2, Marion Cultural and Civic Center; Friday and Saturday, $12 and Sunday, $10; 618-997-4030; www.marionccc.org


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

After rocky start, this is Lance Miller’s year COUNTRY SCENE Vince Hoffard

ance Miller thought 2004 was going to be his breakout year in country music. But it wasn’t. He finished fourth on Nashville Star and established a national fan base with a pure traditional sound, polished to perfection on the Southern Illinois honky tonk circuit. Three years later, he signed a major record deal with Warner Brothers, recorded an album and released a single. Things didn’t pan out in 2007, either. The single wasn’t a hit and he was dropped from the label. “Getting signed to a major label was an amazing experience. I wouldn’t trade it for a million dollars,” Miller said. “It was something I dreamed of as a little kid. Sure, I wish I had a bunch of hit records, but being in the middle of this incredible industry and seeing how the whole process works is something I’ll never forget.” A lesser man would’ve given up, packed his bags and headed back home to Fairfield. Miller, however, used the setback as simply a learning moment in his quest to become a contributing member of Nashville’s country music community. This year, all the pieces fell into place for the 42year-old former Jackson Junction lead singer. He co-wrote the Jerrod Niemann hit “Smilin’ on Me,” which was released in April and peaked at No. 17 on the Billboard singles chart. His co-writers were

L

PROVIDED

Lance Miller, former Jackson Junction lead singer, co-wrote Jerrod Niemann hit ‘Smilin’ on Me,’ which was released in April.

Niemann, Lee Brice and Rob Hatch. Miller also co-wrote “Beer with Jesus” with Rick Huckabee and Thomas Rhett, the artist that currently has the song soaring up the charts. The icing on the cake for the 1992 SIU Carbondale graduate was being personally invited by producer Buddy Cannon to add harmony vocals on the Willie Nelson “Heroes” album for a song featuring Nelson and Merle Haggard, one of Miller’s biggest musical influences. “It’s been a pretty good year, that’s for sure,” Miller said. “Honestly, I’ve been lucky enough to work with some really good cowriters. Lee Brice is a great singer and songwriter. His last two singles have gone to No. 1. in this business. It’s all about building good relationships.” Miller was a respected demo singer in Music City in early 2004, without the much-needed influential contacts on the elusive inner circle of the trade. He didn’t know it when he auditioned for Nashville Star at the Wildhorse Saloon, but that was about to change. His ticket was going to be punched by the zany judges for the event, Brad and

Brett Warren, better known as The Warren Brothers. The duo quickly bonded with Miller and a lasting friendship developed. The brothers produced Miller’s 2007 album “The Beach” and taught him valuable lessons about the songwriting craft. Miller said he is proud to join Sparta’s Noah Gordon, Herrin’s David Lee Murphy and Thompsonville’s Kendell Marvel in carrying the torch for Southern Illinoisans making an impact in Nashville. “I was writing a couple weeks ago with Jim Lauderdale. He’s one of the elite writers in town. He said, ‘Kendell Marvel is an incredible writer’ and it made me so proud to be a part of the group in Nashville representing Southern Illinois,” Miller said. While he was still pursuing his career as a solo artist, Miller met an unknown Niemann in the weight room of a hotel in Las Vegas. It was a contact that has paid big professional dividends. Earlier this year, Niemann and Marvel would earn a prestigious SESAC award for their work on “Shinin’ on Me.” SEE MILLER / PAGE 8

FLIPSIDE Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 5


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

By the Egyptian Combo, 8 Young musicians p.m.-midnight Friday, Nov. 23, sought Herrin Civic Center; sounds Young Artist Concerto of the 60s and 70s; dancing; Competition: For high school refreshments; admission, $5 students sponsored by the Christmas Concert: 7 p.m. Paducah Symphony Orchestra Tuesday, Nov. 27, RLC and Murray State University; Theatre, Rend Lake College, two divisions — one for Ina; 618-437-5321 pianists and one for other Buon Natale!: The orchestral instruments; Holidays from Italy presented $1,000 prize; application must by the SIU School of Music, be submitted online by Jan. 1; 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 4, www.paducahsymphony.org/ Shryock Auditorium SIU; education-community/young- $12/$6; music by the SIU artist-concerto-competition; Choral Union, Concert Choir 270-444-0065; amy@ and Southern Illinois paducahsymphony.org Symphony Orchestra; southernticketsonline.com; 618-453-6000 Concerts Doo Wop Christmas: Southern Illinois Presented by Blend, Black Friday Night Music: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 5,

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

Marion Cultural and Civic Center; A Capella night of Christmas favorites; $10; 618-997-4030; www.marionccc.org SIU Wind Ensemble: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 6, Shryock Auditorium, SIU; concert will feature Sousa, Bach, Grainger, Dello Joio, Chance and Robert Russell Bennett’s Symphonic Songs; $12/$6; southerntickets online.com; 618-453-6000 Holiday Hop: 7 p.m. FridaySaturday, Dec. 7-8, John A. Logan College, 700 Logan College Road, Carterville; Logan Choral and Chamber Ensembles; nostalgic trip down memory lane; hits of the ’50s and ’60s; $12/$7; 618-985-2828, ext. 8287

BOOKS

A Bluegrass Christmas: Presented by Dailey and Vincent, 7:30 p.m., Sunday, Dec. 9, Shryock Auditorium, SIU; $20/$25/$40; southernticketsonline.com; 618-453-6000 Old Timey Christmas: Concert by The Smoky Hollow String Band, 7 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 15, General John A. Logan Museum, 1613 Edith St. Murphysboro; refreshments; 618-684-4397

Kentucky A Country Christmas: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 24, Kentucky Opry, 88 Chilton Lane, Benton, Ky.; $17/$16/ $10/$7.50; www.kentucky opry.com; 888-459-8704

FESTIVALS

THEATER

SI native gets Triple Platinum Music Award A Frankfort Community High School alumnus recently received a Triple Platinum Music Award. Audio engineer Josh Conaughty was recognized for his work on Gym Class Heroes’ “Stereo Hearts, featuring Adam Levine of Maroon 5, which reached 3 million digital sales. Conaughty Conaughty previously taught at Full Sail University in Winter Park, Fla., and began touring in 2006. He has worked with legendary recording artists like Foo Fighters, Pearl Jam, Bruce Springsteen and the Zach Brown Band. He was the tour manager for In This Moment and has worked as an audio engineer for Bayside, New Found Glory, T-Pain and others. When he’s not on the road, the 2000 Frankfort graduate lives in Parker, Colo. He is the son of Colvin Conaughty of West Frankfort and Charlie Conaughty of Thompsonville. — Adam Testa

203 N. Williams St. 1400 S. 16th St. Murphysboro, Il Herrin, IL (618) 684-6254 (618) 942-8085

1330 W. McCord Centralia, IL (618) 533-5801

Sun-Thurs. 11am-10-pm • Fri-Sat. 11am-11pm

DAILY

Lunch $5 • Dinner $7 99 Lime Margaritas 12 oz. .............................. $1 Sun-Thurs 75 Draft Beer 32 oz. ................................................... $2 Everyday Margarita Pitcher ........................................ $10 SPECIALS

NEW W TWIST ON

PASTA STA T

Try our new pasta varieties. From meatless to steak or seafood d in a variety of delicious us sauces. We have ve it all.

Pasta Primavera

Steak St Stea teak ea ak Allfr Alfredo A fred do

Fresh seasonal Fett Fe Fettuccini ttuc ucccini ini aalfredo lfre reddo veggies, freshly grated totopp topped pppedd wi with thh oour urr parmesan, lightly cer certifi rtififiedd AAngus ngus sste steak teakk herbed cream sauce & & ffrfresh reshh sauté sautéed éedd bow tie noodles. mushrooms mushhrooms

Come me Tuesdayy night for Buyy One Get One1/2 Off

Page 6 Thursday, November 22, 2012 FLIPSIDE

Seafood S Se ea affoo oo d Linguine LLiing ngui gu uiin ne e Freshh shrimp, sshhriimpp, bay ba y ba scscallops scallops, p , ba bbacon con & lilinguini inguiinii wwith ithh ou oourr liligh light gghht whit wh white hitee wi wwine nee & lemon bbutter utter sauce. sauce.

993-8668

waltspizza.com

Monday - Thursday

Fri, Sat, & Sun

44 oz. Cinco De Mayo Margarita

...............

Fri, Sat, & Sun

Join Us on the Patio!

$10

$8 Fajitas!

Raspberry Margaritas

ALL WEEKEND LONG

$2 Everyday! Limited Time!

chicken or steak Thurs - Sun

12 oz


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

THURSDAY MARION Williamson County Fairground Hanna Building: Big Lake Country Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m.; music on Thanksgiving

FRIDAY CARBONDALE PK’s: Uncle Shifty Tres Hombres: Nasty Nate INA Ina Community Building: Friday Night Jam Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. MARION Marion Youth Center: Craig’s Country Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Bobby Orr and Friends, 7-10 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Old Country Store Dance Barn: Jeanita Spillman & The Sentimental Swing

Band, 7-10 p.m.

SATURDAY CARBONDALE Hangar 9: ADCB PK’s: Tim Whiteford Jamboree The Grotto Lounge/Newell House: Casey James, 9 p.m. Tres Hombres: Sam West/County Graves, 10 p.m.

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

SATURDAY Wil Maring & Robert Bowlin: 2-5 p.m. Blue Sky Vineyard

Todd Pierson: 2-5 p.m. Rustle Hill Winery The Swamp Tigers: 2-6 p.m., StarView Vineyards The Bill Bradley Band: 2-6 p.m., Owl Creek Vineyard Nyte Flyte: 2:30-5:30 p.m., Von Jakob Vineyard; holiday open house Shawn Dawson: 3-6 p.m. Walker’s Bluff Dirtwater Fox: 4-8 p.m. The Bluffs Phil Powell: 6-9 p.m. Rustle Hill Winery

Carbondale Our 37th year! Farmer’s Market Open for the season Come and shop our large variety of locally grown Produce, Plants, Flowers, Baked Goods, Beef, Canned Goods, Woodworking, Pet Products, Crafts, Jewelry and more!

Westowne Center, Rt. 13 West (Behind McDonald’s) Rain or Shine • OPEN Saturdays 8 am - Noon BUY LOCAL FOOD • SUSTAIN LOCAL FARMS

THEATER

WANT TO BE LISTED?

SUNDAY

Coffeehouses, Cafés

MARION Marion Eagles: White Lightnin’, 6-10 p.m.

Call 618-351-5089 or email brenda.kirkpatrick @thesouthern.com.

MONDAY

Woodenships: 6-9 p.m. Friday, Trail of Tears Lodge & Resort, 1575 Fair City Road, Jonesboro; 618-833-8697 Adam Williams: 6-9 p.m.

HERRIN N-Kahootz Night Club: Metal Toyz, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. MARION Hideout Restaurant: Bob Pina, piano 5:30-9:30 p.m. Marion Eagles: White Lightnin’, 8 p.m.-midnight. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: K & I Drifters, 7-10 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Swing “N” Country Band, 7-9:30 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Lil’ Boot & Classic Country, 7-10 p.m.

ELKVILLE Elkville Civic Center: Jerry’s Jammers, 7-9 p.m. MARION Marion Youth Center: Craig’s Country Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

TUESDAY CARBONDALE PK’s: Han Ma and the Camaroes MARION Hideout Restaurant: Bob Pina, piano 5:30-8:30 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Mike’s Band, 7-10 p.m. WEST FRANKFORT WB Ranch Barn: WB Ranch Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

Wineries FRIDAY Eli Tellor: 1-5 p.m., StarView Vineyards; holiday open house Ol’ Moose: 2-6 p.m., Owl Creek Vineyard Carmen and Grant: 2:30-5:30 p.m., Von Jakob Vineyard; holiday open house Marty’s Band: 6-9 p.m. Rustle Hill Winery Dan Barron: 7-10 p.m. Walker’s Bluff

FESTIVALS

FIND THEM HERE Blue Sky Vineyard, 3150 S. Rocky Comfort Road, Makanda The Bluffs Vineyard and Winery, 140 Buttermilk Hill Road, Ava Owl Creek Vineyard, 2655 Water Valley Road, Cobden Rustle Hill Winery, U.S. 51, Cobden StarView Vineyards, 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden WEDNESDAY Mike Aguirre: 6-8 p.m. Rustle Von Jakob Vineyard, 230 Illinois 127, Alto Pass Hill Winery Walker’s Bluff, 326 Vermont Road, Carterville

SUNDAY Brad & Bri: 1-4 p.m. Rustle Hill Winery Bill Harper: 2-5 p.m. Walker’s Bluff Dave Caputo Duo: 2:30-5:30 p.m. Von Jakob Vineyard; Brewery Ballroom grand opening Marty Davis Band: 3-7 p.m. The Bluffs

Saturday, Trail of Tears Lodge & Resort, Jonesboro Dirtwater Fox: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Trail of Tears Lodge & Resort

Directions & Digits 20’s Hideout Restaurant: 2602 Wanda Drive, Marion 618-997-8325 Corner Dance Hall: 200 Franklin St., Whittington 618-303-5266 Duncan Dance Barn: 13545 Spring Pond Road, Benton 618-4356161 Elkville: Elkville Civic Center, 405 S. 6th St., Elkville 618-201-1753 The Grotto Lounge/Newell House: 201 E. Main St., Carbondale 618649-6400 Hangar 9: 511 S. Illinois Ave.,

Carbondale 618-549-0511 Lion’s Cave: South Street, Thompsonville 618-218-4888 Marion American Legion: Longstreet Road, Marion 618-997-6168 Marion Eagles: Russell and Longstreet Roads, Marion 618-993-6300 Marion Youth Center: 211 E. Boulevard St., Marion 618-922-7853 N-Kahootz Night Club: 115 W. Cherry St., Herrin 618-942-9345 Old Country Store Dance Barn: Main Street, Thompsonville 618-218-4676

FREE WINE TASTING MONDAY-FRIDAY HUSBAN D NO EXCU S... SE WE HAVE , BEER! JOIN US FOR “SUNSET FRIDAYS” - THE SUN NEVER SETS BEFORE 7PM

Holiday Open House 11/23 & 11/24 Music • Local Artisans • Fine Wines Gift Baskets • Refreshments FRIDAY SATURDAY FrEE MUSIC 2-5

BUD SUMMERS from Alton, IL (Rock/Blues)

WIL MARING & ROBERT BOWLIN

(Folk/Americana) Fully decorated to highlight the season, our Tuscan Sun Pavilion is absolutely perfect for your event. Just think “Hassle Free Decorations”

CHECK C HEC CK OUT OUR SPECIALS

THURSDAY LIVE JAZZ WITH COULTER, GOOT, AND WALL @ 7PM FRIDAY • $4 WINE/$16 BOTTLES • $6 APPETIZERS SATURDAY LIVE BLUES WITH CASEY JAMES @ 9PM 201 E. MAIN ST. • DOWNTOWN CARBONDALE IN THE LOWER LEVEL OF NEWELL HOUSE • 618.549.6400

Book Your Holiday Parties Now! Our Logo Wear Sweatshirts, T-Shirts, Glasses, Amish Jellies, Gourmet Olive Oil, Salsa’s & Gift Cards Make Great Holiday Gifts! 3150 S. Rocky Comfort Rd. Makanda • 618-995-WINE www.blueskyvineyard.com

0RQ7KXUವ)ULವ6DWವ6XQ

FLIPSIDE Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 7


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

Egyptian Combo playing on Black Friday HERRIN — For many people, Friday’s festivities will begin bright and early in the morning, as they head out to stores and malls seeking the best Black Friday deals around. But the members of the Egyptian Combo are encouraging people to rest up during the day before heading back out for an evening of music, dancing and fun at the Herrin Civic Center. The band, which has been a staple of the Southern Illinois music

scene since the early 1960s, will headline Black Friday Night from 8 p.m. to midnight Friday, Nov. 23. Admission is $5. The group’s lineup has changed through the years, but presently consists of an eightmember crew committed to preserving the sounds of the 60s, on which they founded their success, as well as the 1970s. The playlist offers memories, dance tunes and classic beats. — Adam Testa

MILLER: This is his year FROM PAGE 5 Miller said Rhett, who is the son of country star Rhett Akins, had the idea for “Beer with Jesus” and he just added a few tweaks. “The concept is how cool it would be to just sit down with Jesus and ask him a few questions,” Miller said. “Many of good ole’ country boys I know like to do their talking over a cold beer. It’s about hanging out and getting important questions answered, not getting hammered.” Miller has written songs that have been recorded by Luke Bryan, Tim McGraw and Jason Aldean. He keeps waiting for the one magic song to flow from his heart to his pen and turn into a monster signa-

ture hit, methodically inching him towards songwriting masters like Lauderdale and Murphy. “I keep showing up and writing. I’m getting a swing at it. You write fast and furious and hope for the best,” he said. Miller keeps his vocal chops in order by performing at songwriter nights in Nashville, frequently at the famous Bluebird Café. He often travels to foreign countries like Sweden and Norway, areas with a solid core of traditional country fans that are drawn to his vocal style, especially his original tune “George Jones and Jesus.” VINCE HOFFARD can be

reached at 618-658-9095 or vincehoffard@ yahoo.com.

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

Red Dawn ** Rated PG-13 for sequences of intense war violence and action and for language; starring Chris Hemsworth, Adrianne Palicki, Josh Hutcherson, Josh Peck and Jeffrey Dean Morgan; directed by Dan Bradley; now showing at ShowPlace 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion STUDIO

BY ROGER MOORE MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

Josh Peck, Josh Hutcherson and Chris Hemsworth star in ‘Red Dawn,’ a modernized recreation of the 1980s film of the same name.

“Red Dawn” is a lot funnier than you remember. This remake is based on 1984’s Reagan-era rah-rah movie about rural footballers who run Russian invaders and their Cuban and Nicaraguan surrogates out of America. The new “Red Dawn” dispenses with a lot of that red-meat Red-State “reds” scariness and settles into a solid if silly action picture about what happens after the North Koreans invade. Stop laughing. A brisk news montage under the opening credits, featuring snippets of stories about global financial collapse, rogue state cyber-warfare programs, Obama and Biden warning about this threat or that foreign policy challenge, does all

that any “Red Dawn” could ever do to make this plausible. Yes, the North Koreans have a huge army and a government bent on creating global chaos. No, it won’t help the movie to worry about how they could transport that army to the Pacific Northwest. That’s where ex-jock/ current Marine Jed Eckert (Chris Hemsworth) is on leave, visiting his widowed police chief dad (Brett Cullen) and ball-hog quarterback younger sibling Matty (Josh Peck), when the paratroopers tumble in. “North Korea — it doesn’t make any sense.” But stuntman-turneddirector Dan Bradley doesn’t sit still long enough for that to sink in. In a jerky and jarring shaky-cam escape sequence, the Eckert brothers

16 8 99

99 750ML

750ML

LARGE SELECTION OF CHAMPAGNE FOR YOUR MIMOSA

DAILEYS COCKTAILS (HARD CIDER AND SPICED SANGRIA) FULTONS HARVEST PUMPKIN CREAM LIQUEUR (DRINK IT OR USE IT FOR COOKING)

1 99 $ 10 99 $

10 Oz

750ML

JOIN US FOR TASTINGS

FRIDAYS 4-6PM

3790 Hinkleville Rd. (Exit 4) Paducah

Page 8 Thursday, November 22, 2012 FLIPSIDE

THEATER

‘Red Dawn’ has North Koreans knocking down our door

Dirt Cheap Chicken Says: CAPOSALDO WINE $ (VERY DELICIOUS) “HAVE A SAFE AND HAPPY FLIP FLOP $ THANKSGIVING” THANKSGIVING ” BUBBLY

Surgeon General’s Warning: Quitting smoking now greatly reduces serious risks to your health

FESTIVALS

270-443-7737 STORE HOURS: M-T 8AM-9PM • FRI & SAT 8AM-11PM • SUN 9AM-5PM (TOBACCO ONLY)

and assorted friends and hangers-on — the tech nerd (Josh Hutcherson), the mayor’s son (Connor Cruise), assorted jocks and cheerleaders — head for the hills. Or the mountains. That’s where they plot America’s comeback. “We inherited our freedom,” Jed, who literally towers over the others, preaches. “Now it’s up to all of us to fight for it.” The original “Red Dawn” was co-written and directed by John Milius, a primal-violence primitivist and true believer when it came to the Soviet menace. His movie had a scruffy “Friday Night Lights”-meets-”Lord of the Flies” aura about it — rural kids comfortable with guns improvising their way to getting comfortable shooting Russians and Cubans. The new “Dawn” has the Thor-sized Marine teach kids insurgent warfare. Not better, just different. The original film was weepy — ex-jock Patrick Swayze mourning his father (Harry Dean Stanton), who had the best line not repeated here: “Avenge me, boys!” It had Jennifer Grey risking her neck and dying a good

death. Here, it’s mushycentered self-absorbed Josh Peck trying to free his imprisoned cheerleader girlfriend (Isabel Lucas). The new “Dawn” doesn’t have the moist-eyed heart that a true believer might have given it. Jeffrey Dean Morgan is the real soldier who stumbles into their midst (Powers Boothe played that role in the original). Will Yun Lee is the hapless North Korean captain chasing these “Wolverines,” insurgents who take their high school mascot’s name into combat. One area in which the remake matches the original is in school spirit, cheer-leading every ambush. It’s a real crowdpleaser. And it betters the first film with every fire fight, every improvised explosion. Bradley auditions for a future “Die Hard” here. And passes. Which is about where “Red Dawn” lands — a passing grade. Then and now, it doesn’t pay dividends to think too hard about how what happens, happens. If you need a villain, sometimes you’ve got to build him up to make it seem plausible.


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

‘Life of Pi’ ponders the big questions while on boat Life of Pi *** Rated PG for emotional thematic content throughout and some scary action sequences and peril; starring Suraj Sharma, Irrfan Khan, Rafe Spall, Tabu, Gerard Depardieu; directed by Ang Lee; now showing at University Place 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion BY ROGER MOORE MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

“Life of Pi,” Yann Martel’s fantastical folk parable about faith and spirituality, makes the journey to the big screen more or less intact, a meditative Ang Lee film with many of the same virtues and shortcomings of the novel. It’s a inscrutable morality tale for much of its length that explains itself, rather too overtly (like the novel) in the end, as if the author figures we need help jumping from inscrutable to scrutable. But its pleasures are undeniable and its mysteries rewarding to contemplate. And in Lee’s hands, a seemingly unfilmable fairy tale comes to life. A survival-at-sea story is framed within the conversation of a frustrated novelist (Rafe Spall) who has been sent to meet a man (Irrfan Khan) who endured 227 days adrift in a lifeboat. Their meeting has been given quite the build-up. The novelist has been told this man’s tale is “a story that would make me believe in God.” But Pi’s autobiography is too magical, far-fetched and “literary” to be believed. Take the character’s name: an Indian boy, raised in a zoo, named “Piscine” after a favorite relative’s love of swimming pools. The precocious child endures profane teasing about his name just long enough to invent his own nickname. He is “Pi,” like that magical mathematical constant, and his way of making sure that the name sticks is one of the film’s funnier indulgences. Pi grows up in 1950s India, a brilliant, curious child whose curiosity ranges from religions — he dabbles in Catholicism, Islam,

STUDIO

Suraj Sharma stars in director Ang Lee’s new movie, ‘Life of Pi.’ The film, rated PG, is now showing at University Place 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion.

Buddhism and Hinduism — to the animals in his father’s menagerie. “Animals have souls,” he insists to his father. “I have seen it in their eyes.” Pi is a committed vegetarian who reaches young adulthood only through the intervention of his nononsense father, a man who preaches that “religion is darkness” and warns against expecting to have a meeting of the minds with the zoo’s resident Bengal tiger — Richard Parker. The tiger would surely eat him, no matter how kind he is to it. That is put to the test when the family sells the zoo and the ship they and the animals are on sinks in the deepest corner of the Pacific. Pi (Suraj Sharma) finds himself on the lone lifeboat, stranded with an injured zebra, a mourning orangutan, a crazed hyena — and Richard Parker. Lee (“Brokeback Mountain”) manages to make this odd ark convincing, thanks to a seamless blending of real animals and digitally-tamed ones. The boat is just big enough to hide most of its inhabitants long enough for each to make an entrance. And there is just enough gear — food, water, life jackets — for Pi to keep his distance from the two critters who will surely kill him when starvation sets in. Special effects render the barren, glassy sea into a dreamland of illuminated jellyfish, serendipitous flying fish, overly-playful whales,

sharks that are scarier than the tiger and just enough food to keep the boy alive and to keep the peace with the tiger. No matter how dire circumstances turn, Lee finds playful and mystical touches to animate a fairly static story. Pi has a lot of piety to fall back on for this ordeal. The Buddhist in him grieves at having to kill to stay alive, and he refuses to do in the tiger, even when the opportunity arises. He turns his eyes skyward and prays, “God, I give myself to you, whatever comes.” There is a tendency among those from outside India to confer guru status on stories there, a cliche the novel embraces and that Lee is not above falling into. Lee also must return, again and again, to the act of storytelling. Khan (“A Mighty Heart,” “The Namesake,” last summer’s “Amazing Spider-Man”) is an interesting actor, but these static storytelling scenes play like the last third of a sermon that’s gone on too long. Still, the cryptic, spiritual nature of the story — the metaphorical treatment of faith — blesses “Pi” with at least a hint of the visionquest gravitas that the character, the author and the filmmaker were going for. Lee, whose last film grasped at but never quite got the “moment” of Woodstock, is on much surer ground with this magical realism, this floating, seemingly unfilmable parable for a spiritually adrift age.

FESTIVALS

THEATER

New on DVD You often see video releases tied to holidays. Something like that is at work about Thanksgiving — although the message seems to be that DVD and Bluray buyers want big doses of action with their turkey and green-bean casserole. In any case, this week’s new items include the oldguys-kick-ass epic “The Expendables 2” (Lionsgate, $29.95 DVD, $39.99 Blu-ray). Sylvester Stallone, Bruce Willis, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Chuck Norris, JeanClaude Van Damme and many, many others try to demonstrate that neither age nor cosmetic surgery will keep movie heroes from blowing up lots of stuff. “Tarantino XX” (Lionsgate, $119.99) is a Blu-ray collection of eight films with Quentin Tarantino ties. He directed seven: “Reservoir Dogs,” “Pulp Fiction,” “Inglorious Basterds,” “Jackie Brown,” the two parts of “Kill Bill” and “Death Proof.” Then there’s “True Romance,” which Tarantino wrote and Tony Scott directed. The swashbuckling Zorro has been played by actors including Guy Williams (star of the Disney TV version) and Antonio Banderas (in two big-screen films). But you may not be as aware of French actor Alain Delon’s turn in a colorful movie from 1975. “Somerville House” is giving the film its first authorized U.S. release on DVD ($19.98) and Blu-ray ($24.98). Finally, if you did not buy the epic “Game of Thrones: The Complete First Season” when it was released on DVD and Blu-ray four months ago, you get another shot (and more stuff) in the new Collector’s Edition (HBO Video, $99.97 for a Blu-ray/ DVD combo). Besides the show and the extras from the previous releases, the set has a dragon’s-egg paperweight, a plush package and a bonus Blu-ray with the first episode of the second season. “The Iron Petticoat,” a ‘50s romantic comedy starring Bob Hope and Katharine Hepburn (yes, you read that right) comes to DVD and Blu-ray via Turner Classic Movies’ website, www.tcm.com. And Ken Burns’ documentary “The Dust Bowl” is on DVD and Blu-ray, immediately after airing on PBS. — McClatchy-Tribune News

Savor the Flavor of Sweden

Swedish Cuisine • Award Winning Wines • Scandinavian Gift Shop

This Weekend’s Special: Pork Tenderloin with Three Sauces, Potatoes AuGratin Wine: Chambourcin

Swedish gourmet cheese Scandinavian Gift Shop Traditional Swedish Christmas Dinners Thursday, December 6 & December 13, 7PM both nights Reserveations required Opening Hours: 9 • Sun 12-5 Winery - Wed-Thurs 10-5 • Fri & Sat 10-9 9 • Sunday 12-5 Restaurant - Friday12-9

www.hedmanvineyards.com 560 Chestnut St., Alto Pass • (618) 893-4923 or (618) 521-2506

FLIPSIDE Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 9


COVER STORY

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

FESTIVALS

THEATER

Hollywood expects to have a happy holiday season at the box office I think that’s great for the movie business.” The latest James Bond film, the well-reviewed LOS ANGELES — Movie “Skyfall,” kicked off the theaters posted their worst holiday movie season and attendance since 1994 last hauled in an estimated year, but Hollywood is $87.8 million. poised for a big comeback Last week, multiplexes — with the help of a secret across the country were agent, a sullen vampire and swarmed by young women a hairy-footed hobbit. eager to see Kristen Stewart As of last week, domestic and Robert Pattinson in ticket sales were already up “The Twilight Saga: by 3 percent compared Breaking Dawn Part 2,” the with the same period last fifth and final installment year, and a bumper crop of of the vampire franchise. strong films this holiday In December comes “The season — including movies Hobbit: An Unexpected that will appeal to both Journey,” a prequel to Peter popular and discerning Jackson’s “Lord of the tastes — could push annual Rings” trilogy, which box office receipts above grossed more than $2.9 $11 billion for the first time. billion worldwide. A strong finish to the “There’s a good feeling year could ease the uncertainty gripping an STUDIO about the business right now,” said Amy Pascal, coindustry under pressure to Hugh Jackman and Anne Hathaway star in ‘Les Miserables.’ chair of Sony Pictures. “It cut costs and boost profits, really looks like we have a especially as revenue increasingly concerned Knight Rises,” “The Snider was referring to audience — so studios have lot of fantastic movies dwindles from onceAmazing Spider-Man” and about the movie business the anxiety rampant in to rationalize their costs,” reliable DVD sales and as ... there’s the feeling that it coming at the end of the Hollywood earlier this year, “The Hunger Games.” said Stacey Snider, chief more fans turn to videocould all sort of fall apart or year.” And some movies have executive of DreamWorks, amid the box office flop of In addition to the slew of on-demand and streaming which began released this at least be greatly diminibig-budget films including performed better than big-budget films hitting to catch the latest movies. shed,” said Ben Affleck, expected. One of those is month’s “Lincoln.” But she “John Carter” and theaters, an above-average “We’re still facing the who directed and stars in the Iranian hostage drama points out: “All that doom “Battleship.” But those same structural issues — disappointments have been “Argo,” which has taken in “Argo.” “But there is a huge array of less costly movies and gloom people were aimed at sophisticated the DVD business is crop of really interesting nearly $80 million since tempered by a handful of talking about after the filmgoers could provide a declining and there are movies coming out in the opening Oct. 12. summer ticket sales didn’t certified hits, including distractions for the next couple of months, and crucial assist for a box“I’m becoming “The Avengers,” “The Dark come to bear.” office record: Steven Spielberg’s “Lincoln”, the dramedy “Silver Linings Playbook” with Bradley Cooper, a star-studded version of Broadway’s hit musical “Les Miserables” + Free Nacho Bar + and “Zero Dark Thirty,” about the mission to kill Saturday, December 1st Friday, November 23 Osama bin Laden. 1:00pm-5:00pm 10:00 am - 5:00 pm “Unlike last year, which Eli Tellor had a very slow December, Music by the Dorians Saturday, November 24 the final six weeks of this Noon - 2 year are going to make up 2:00pm-6:00pm for that ... because of the Refreshments will be served The Swamp Tigers mix of summer-style Dec. Hours: Thurs - Sat 10-6 blockbusters and Oscarstarviewvineyards.com bait films,” said Paul 5100 Winghill Rd, Cobden, IL Mark Akin, Bookseller Dergarabedian, president On 51 S. go 6.3 miles South of the “Smiley Face” then left on Wing Hill Rd for 3.5 mi. of Hollywood.com. www.coramdeobooks.com

BY AMY KAUFMAN

MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

Christmas Open House

Holiday Open House

Hours: Sun - Fri: 12-5PM Sat: 12-6PM

(618) 893-WINE

SEE MOVIES / PAGE 11A

Page 10 Thursday, November 22, 2012 FLIPSIDE


COVER STORY

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

FESTIVALS

THEATER

MOVIES: Hollywood is expecting to have a happy holiday season at the box office this year FROM PAGE 10

Upcoming release schedule Here are some of the winter movie releases, opening between now and the end of the year:

Playing for Keeps: A former sports star who’s fallen on hard times starts coaching his son’s soccer team in an attempt to get his life together. Starring Jessica Biel and Gerard Butler. Directed by Gabriele Muccino. Rated PG-13.

Dec. 25

Django Unchained: With the help of his mentor, a slave-turned-bounty hunter sets out to rescue Nov. 30 his wife from a brutal Mississippi plantation The Collection: A man owner. Starring Leonardo who escapes from the DiCaprio, Jamie Foxx and vicious grips of the serial Samuel L. Jackson. killer known as “The Directed by Quentin Collector” is blackmailed Dec. 14 Tarantino. Unrated. to rescue an innocent girl Les Miserables: An from the killer’s boobyThe Hobbit: An adaptation of the trapped warehouse. Unexpected Journey: A successful stage musical Starring Emma curious Hobbit, Bilbo based on Victor Hugo’s Fitzpatrick, Josh Stewart Baggins, journeys to the classic novel set in 19thand Christopher Lonely Mountain with a century France, in which McDonald. Directed by vigorous group of a paroled prisoner named Marcus Dunstan. Rated Dwarves to reclaim a R. treasure stolen from them Jean Valjean seeks redemption. Starring Killing Them Softly: by the dragon Smaug. Jackie Cogan is a Starring Martin Freeman Russell Crowe, Hugh Jackman and Anne professional enforcer who and Ian McKellan. Hathaway. Directed by investigates a heist that Directed by Peter Tom Hooper. Rated PGwent down during a mob- Jackson. Not yet rated. 13. protected poker game. Parental Guidance: Artie Starring Brad Pitt, Ray Dec. 19 and Diane agree to look Liotta and Sam Rockwell. The Guilt Trip: An after their three Directed by Andrew inventor and his mom hit grandkids when their Dominik. Rated R. type-A helicopter parents Universal Soldier: Day of the road together so he need to leave town for Reckoning: John awakens can sell his latest invention. Starring Seth work. Problems arise from a coma to discover Rogen and Barbara when the kids’ 21sthis wife and daughter Streisand. Directed by century behaviors collide were slaughtered in a Anne Fletcher. Rated PG- with Artie and Diane’s brutal home invasion. old-school methods. Haunted by images of the 13. Starring Bette Midler, attack, he vows to kill the Billy Crystal and Marissa man responsible. Dec. 21 Tomei. Rated PG. Starring Jean-Claude Van Jack Reacher: A Damme, Scott Adkins homicide investigator and Dolph Lundgren. Dec. 28 Directed by John Hyams. digs deeper into a case involving a trained Quartet: At a home for Rated R. military sniper who shot retired opera singers, the five random victims. annual concert to Dec. 7 Starring Tom Cruise and celebrate Verdi’s birthday Rosamund Pike. Directed is disrupted by the arrival Dino Time: Three kids of Jean, an eternal diva who travel back in time to by Christopher McQuarrie. Rated PG-13. and the former wife of 65 million years ago, This is 40: A look at the one of the residents. where they are taken in lives of Pete and Debbie a Starring Maggie Smith, by a dinosaur. Starring the voices of Jane Lynch, few years after the events Billy Connolly and of “Knocked Up.” Michael Gambon. Rob Schneider and Tara Starring Paul Rudd and Directed by Dustin Strong. Directed by Yoon-suk Choi and John Leslie Mann. Directed by Hoffman. Unrated. — Sources: comingsoon.net, imdb.com Judd Apatow. Rated R. Kafka. Rated PG.

Still, there could be some costly misses. Director Ang Lee’s 3-D spectacle “Life of Pi” has earned favorable reviews in early screenings, but with a production cost of $120 million and an unknown 19-year-old lead, the holiday release is considered a big gamble for 20th Century Fox and its financial partners. “We all have a lot riding on these films, and you want people to be buying tickets,” said Elizabeth Gabler, whose Fox 2000 Pictures produced “Life of Pi.” “But I think ... the more exciting movies you can offer people will get them to the theater. When there’s a lot of energy there, that fosters excitement about the moviegoing experience.” Only two films released during the fourth quarter in 2011 had U.S. ticket sales top $200 million, and the season also brought some unexpectedly expensive misses in Martin Scorsese’s “Hugo” and the animated comedy “Arthur Christmas.” “Admissions going up is always good news. Would you like them to go up more? Of course,” said Warner Bros. Motion Picture Group President Jeff Robinov. “But the business is in flux — there’s a diversity of choices for consumers, home video is shrinking and there’s a debate over release windows.” Ticket sales have been trending down since hitting the 1.57 billion mark in 2002, falling to 1.28 billion last year, the lowest in 16 years. Box office revenue, by comparison, has shown modest gains — largely because of higher ticket

STUDIO

Martin Freeman plays Bilbo Baggins in ‘The Hobbit.’

prices and new premiums for Imax and 3-D showings. To end the year strong, Hollywood has to score a robust holiday season, which accounts for about 20 percent of annual boxoffice receipts. “We look forward to these last six weeks of the year to really ramp up

business,” said Gary Dupuis, the general manager of Montanabased Polson Theatres. “It’s one of the better holiday seasons coming up. I think that’s positive, because we are certainly still in the economy crunch where people know it’s not cheap to go to the movies.”

Holiday Open House

New Cafe Menu Ol’ Moose 11/23, 2-6pm d banck ley ) Bill Brapmd(Fo lk/Classic Ro

Featuring:

y/Folk) (Alt. Countr

11/24 2-6

2655 Water Valley Road, Cobden, Illinois

On 51S, go 6 miles South of “Smiley Face” then left on Water Valley 3 miles HOURS: Mon-Thurs 12-5; Fri 12-6pm; Sat 10am-6pm & Sun 12-6pm

FLIPSIDE Thursday, November 22, 2012 Page 11


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

FESTIVALS

THEATER

Animated ‘Guardians’ don’t rise to the occasion — not by a long shot Rise of the Guardians *1/2

films would take some of the pressure off this joyless, soul-dead piffle. Rated PG for thematic “Guardians” is the worst elements and some mildly animated movie to ever scary action; starring the wear the DreamWorks logo. It’s based on William voices of Chris Pine, Alec Joyce’s “The Guardians of Baldwin, Hugh Jackman, Childhood” books, about a Isla Fisher and Jude Law; team that includes The directed by Peter Ramsey; Easter Bunny, given an now showing at ShowPlace Aussie accent by Hugh 8 in Carbondale and AMC Jackman here; “North,” aka Centre 8 in Marion Santa, made all Slavic and silly by Alec Baldwin; The BY ROGER MOORE Tooth Fairy (Isla Fisher) MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS and the silent, roly-poly Sandman. DreamWorks Animation They need the help of president Jeffrey newcomer Jack Frost (Chris Katzenberg recently Pine) if they’re to have a lamented the dearth of prayer of stopping “Pitch,” holiday-themed movies short for “Pitch Black,” the headed to your multiplex night-terror voiced by Jude this year. But in foisting Law. He’s seeing to it that “Rise of the Guardians” kids across the world are upon unsuspecting giving up their belief in audiences for the holidays, magic and magical figures it’s clear he just wanted like themselves. And he’s some cover. Other holiday giving them night terrors.

Your Professional Footwear

All the Guardians have their public face, and their commando side. When action is called for, they team up to save childhood. Is Jack Frost worthy of their ranks? He’s an imp, a bit of a rogue, more into mischief than making the world safe for dreaming. He freezes this and that and makes with the mayhem. Kids, who can’t see him only his handiwork, don’t mind. North sees the threat that Pitch’s “touch of fear” carries, and summons his unruly troops. “Now, ve get down to tacks of brass,” he says, in silly Slavic. It’s amusing the way this guy swears, using Russian composers’ names as profanity — “Shostakovich! “Rimsky-Korsakov!” The Easter Bunny is more militant. He backs a boomerang and a chip on his kangaroo-sized shoulder.

STUDIO

Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny and other mythical beings must band together to fight an evil nemesis in DreamWorks’ new animated film, “Rise of the Guardians.” The movie, rated PG, is now showing at ShowPlace 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion.

It’s a confused ramble across some of the same ground covered by “Arthur Christmas,” “Monsters, Inc.” and “The Tooth Fairy,” a film more concerned with the mechanics of how Santa manages to make all those toys — he has zany, nonspeaking Yeti and elf assistants — than with telling an interesting story or giving the characters

anything much warm or funny to do. The assorted hummingbird-sized tooth fairy assistants are fascinating, visually. But is there a message, a lesson or a laugh in them? No. Was hiring David Lindsay-Abaire (“Rabbit Hole,” “Inkheart”) really the wisest choice for writing the script? “Rise of the Guardians”

is harmless enough, and the lack of easy popculture jokes represents the post-”Shrek” direction of DreamWorks well enough. But this is the studio’s least entertaining film. For a company that banks on building franchises of kiddie cartoons these Guardians don’t rise to the occasion — not by a long shot.

www.hivcareconnect.com

Providing assistance to physicians, patients and the community. $

5 Off Any Dansko Shoe!

Linkage to local services and financial support for those who are HIV+

Not valid with any other offer. Coupon required.

1-877-745-1424 222 W. Freeman Campus Shopping Center C Downtown Carbondale

((618) 529-2313 Page 12 Thursday, November 22, 2012 FLIPSIDE

Funded by Illinois Department of Public Health, AIDS Activity Section

Flipside 11-22  

Open Season – Hollywood makes big push between Thanksgiving and Christmas

Advertisement