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9 a.m.-6 p.m. FridaySaturday, Aug. 5-6, museum, Southern Illinois Flute downtown Cobden; in Choir: Aug. 22–Sept 3; conjunction with the flutists age 16 and older; Peach Festival; 618-893www.siflutes.org for audition 2425. information. Cobden Peach Festival: Friday-Saturday, Aug. 5-6, Books & Authors Cobden Community Park; carnival, queen contest, Book Discussion: Kite food, peach cobbler, bingo, Runner by Khaled Hosseini, spin & win for peaches and 6 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 16, entertainment; 5K run/ Sesser Public Library, 303 W. walk and 1-mile fun run, Franklin Ave.; part of book 7:30 a.m. Saturday; parade, club which meets every third 4:30 p.m. Saturday; park Tuesday of the month; activities begin 5 p.m. both 618-534-9499 or huts@ days; 618-893-2425. frontier.net. AKC Dog Shows: 9 a.m.4 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 6 and Classes 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 7, Williamson County Student Center Craft Pavilion, Marion; adults, $3; Shop: Variety of crafts and ages 3-12, $1; younger than classes offered, SIUC; 3, free; around 600 dogs 618-453-3636, www.siuc with 111 breeds represented; studentcenter.org. ring times,www.onofrio.com; vendors; concessions; Comedy president@craborchard kennelclub.org. The Carbondale Fort D Days: 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Comedians: Stand-up Saturday Aug. 6 and 9 a.m.comedy, 9-11 p.m. 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 7, Wednesday, Station #13, Fort D Historic Site, Cape 2400 W. Main St., Carbondale; attached to the Girardeau; Fort D protected old Royal Plaza Inn; 618-529- Cape Girardeau from attack during the Civil War; 2424. re-enactors will recreate life in a Civil War fort; Events 150th anniversary event; Union County Museum 573-651-3782; www.fortd celebration: 50th historicsite.com; www.visit Anniversary Observation, cape.com

Auditions

Call toll-free: 800-228-0429 Cara Recine, Lifestyles and special projects editor cara.recine@thesouthern.com / ext. 5075 Adam Testa, Lifestyles writer adam.testa@thesouthern.com / ext. 5031 Brenda Kirkpatrick, lists, live music flipside@thesouthern.com / ext. 5089 Rhonda Ethridge, cover designer rhonda.ethridge@thesouthern.com / ext. 5118 The Southern Illinoisan (USPS 258-908) is published daily at a yearly subscription rate of $178. It is published at 710 N. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, IL 62901. It is owned by Lee Enterprises of Davenport, Iowa.

WHAT’S INSIDE Things to do . . . . .2,4 Theater . . . . . . . . .2,3 Cover story . . . . . . . .3 Concerts . . . . . . . . . .5 Music . . . . . . . . . . . . .5

MOVIES

Live Music . . . . . . . . .6 Country Scene . . . . .7 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8,9 DVDs . . . . . . . . . . . .10 Movies . . . . . . . . .10,11

August 5th Free Concert by Another Dead Cover Band

NEW this week: FREE Bounce House inflatable, face-painting as well as other kid’s activities, sweet corn, peppers, zucchini and other fresh produce, jewelry and hair feathers, candles, pottery, AVON products, and more!

Every Friday Night 6:00-9:00pm April 22 - October 28, 2011 except for September 23

On the Town Square At the corner of 51N &13W 618-529-8040 www.carbondalemainstreet.com

Shows Every Friday & Saturday Night August 8th - Comedian Brad Tassell plus the Kentucky Opry Country Music Show Adult $20, Senior $19 Student $10, Child $8 Shawn Klush Worlds Greatest Elvis - August 13th Gene Watson - September 17th Oak Ridge Boys - November 18th

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

Hummingbird Festival: 9 a.m.-1 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 7, Trail of Tears State Forest, Jonesboro; features master bird-bander, Vernon Kleen; 618-683-2222; www. shawneeaudubon.org. Jour de Fete Arts, Crafts, Collectables and Gifts Festival: 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 13 and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14, downtown Ste. Genevieve, Mo.; 18th Century Home and Garden Tours, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; 573883-7097 or visit www.ste genevievejourdefete.com. Bocce Ball Tournament: 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 13, Herrin Bocce Courts; fourperson teams; $100 entry fee due by Aug. 6; proceeds to the Summer Art for All Children programs; 618-3229181. Pulaski County Fair: Sunday-Saturday, Aug. 1420, Pulaski; pageant, go-cart races, demolition derby, tractor pull, mud races; fair opens 2 p.m. Aug. 14 , horse show, grandstand; parade, 5 p.m., downtown Pulaski; gospel singing and community worship service, 7 p.m. Aug. 14, with Rob Arbeiter, Pastor of the Pulaski Christian Church officiating; 618-342-6212; 618-342-6412. Union County Fair: Saturday, Aug. 20-Saturday,

FESTIVALS

Aug. 27, fairgrounds, Anna; horse show, pageant, go kart racing, rodeo, mule and pony racing; demolition derby; 618-833-8923; www.union countyfair.net. Du Quoin State Fair: Aug. 26-Sept. 5, fairgrounds, Du Quoin; music, carnival, livestock, contests, food, pageant; Twilight Parade, 6 p.m. Friday, Aug 26; www.duquoin statefair.net. Little Black Dress Party: Fundraiser for The Women’s Center, Sept. 9, Walker’s Bluff, Carterville; $30; littleblackdressparty.net and www.southernticketsonline .com.

Films Megamind: On outdoor screen, 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 5, Walker’s Bluff, north on Reed Station Road, Carterville; 618-985-8463 or www.walkersbluff.com.

Theater/Performances The Taming of The Shrew: 7 p.m. Friday-Saturday, Aug. 12-13 and 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14, Liberty Theater, downtown Murphysboro; $8/$5; presented by Three Graces Theatre; threegraces theatre@gmail.com or 618-684-5880.

Live Entertainment Saturday, August 6th, 4pm-8pm

Bill Shotton Sunday, August 7th, 2pm-6pm

Dave Simmons & Jeff Bradley • 13 Award Winning wines • Wine slushies • Salads to sandwiches available in our cafe all day • Scenic views from our large deck overlooking the pond

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(618) 893-WINE

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Battle of the sexes Taming of the Shrew Shakespearean comedy; 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday, Aug. 12-13, and 2 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 14; Liberty Theater, Murphysboro; tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for children ages 6 to 12 and free for children younger than 6.

Shakespearean comedy gets a modern twist

BY ADAM TESTA THE SOUTHERN

S

tanding on the outside looking in has been a different perspective for Joey Johnson. Johnson has become accustomed to standing on the stage, projecting his voice and becoming any given character to this best of his abilities. With the Three Graces Theatre’s upcoming production of Shakespeare’s “Taming of the Shrew,” however, he finds himself helping other actors do the same. Johnson and Jared Shofstall are co-directors for the show, and both are stepping into that role for the first time in their respective theater careers. “It’s a challenge not being on the stage,” Johnson said. Additional challenges come from working with a directing partner with different ideologies and ideas. But the duo have managed to work it out, playing up each other’s strengths and using their collective thought processes to produce the best product possible. “It’s been a very, very good balance,” Johnson said. Johnson describes the classic play as “Shakespeare’s battle of the sexes.” The comedy tells the story of the courtship of Petruchio, a gentleman of Verona, and Katherina, the headstrong shrew. Katherina is an unwilling participant at first, but Petruchio tempers her with various psychological torments until she is an obedient bride. Johnson said the Three Graces’ interpretation of the tale has its own twist, including updating the setting to modern times. “We’ve got hipsters, we’ve got power execs, we’ve got geek and jocks,” he said. “We would have done a traditional setting, but it’s a lot more expensive because it’s a really big cast.” At the center of the cast are Dave

ALAN ROGERS / THE SOUTHERN

Members of the cast of ‘The Taming of the Shrew’ rehearse Thursday at the Liberty Theater in Murphysboro.

Beever, playing Petruchio, and Three Graces founder Susan Harrocks, portraying Katherina. Beever had originally been cast as Hortensio, and after he’d learned that entire part, an opportunity opened to move to the lead role. While the task seems daunting, he said it has been both rewarding and fun. Playing the lead role in this particular play is especially meaningful for him. “It’s my favorite Shakespeare comedy, so I couldn’t resist,” he said. “I like the subtlety of it. It’s not a comedy of errors, and it’s not too deep.” Both Johnson and Beever said fans in attendance at the show should expect to laugh and to be entertained. “It’s going to be very humorous,” Johnson said. “There are a lot of dirty Shakespeare jokes, but it’s still fun for the whole family.” “Taming of the Shrew” opens at 7 p.m. Friday, Aug. 12, at the historic Liberty Theater in downtown Murphysboro. Shows are also scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 13, and 2 p.m. Sunday,

Aug. 14. Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for children ages 6 to 12 and free for children younger than 6. For Lois Murphy, president of the Liberty Theater board of directors, said she’s excited to see live theater return to the Liberty, as it has been several years

since a theater troupe used the venue. “It’s really great,” she said. “We’re hoping to do some more of it in the future.” adam.testa@thesouthern.com 618-351-5031

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Crab Orchard Kennel Club will let the dogs out this weekend MARION — The Crab Orchard Kennel Club will present its annual AKC dog show at the Williamson County Pavilion this weekend. Almost 600 canines, representing 111 breeds, are entered this year. Saturday’s show will feature a fun match along with a microchip, hearing and eye clinics. Sunday’s show will have a raffle and a 50/50 drawing. A large selection of vendors will be on site

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

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FESTIVALS

Peach Festival returns to Cobden this weekend

carrying all types of dogrelated products. Only dogs entered in the show or attending the health clinics will be allowed in the venue. The event lasts from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 6, and 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 7, at the pavilion, behind the Illinois Star Centre mall. Admission is $3 for adults, $1 for children ages 3 to 12 and free for those younger than 3. — Adam Testa

THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

Linda Wiggs smiles after giving away a box of peaches at the 2010 Cobden Peach Festival.

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COBDEN — It’s all peachy in Cobden this weekend. Beginning Friday, the town’s annual Peach Festival will celebrate its 74th year. Sponsored by the Cobden’s Lions Club, the festival features carnival rides, games, karaoke, a walk/run, a raffle, food, music, a beauty pageant and, of course, lots of peaches. The Union County Museum will also be open and celebrating its 50th anniversary. All events take place in Cobden’s Village Park. Events include: Friday, Aug. 5: 5 p.m. Festival opens 5:30 p.m. The Smoky Hollow String Band 7 p.m. Fast Eddie’s DJ and Karaoke 8 p.m. Peach Queen swimsuit competition 9:15 p.m. Peach Queen evening gown competition Saturday, Aug. 6: 7 a.m. Cobden Runners and Walkers 5K walk/run 4:30 p.m. Peach Festival parade 7 p.m. Tom Hubbs and his Country/ Western Band 9:30 p.m. Coronation of the 2011 Peach Festival Queen

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THE SOUTHERN FILE PHOTO

A peach centerpiece is set out on the table under the pavilion at last year’s festival.

Accept MC, Visa & Discover

Regular Hours: Saturdays 10am-5pm

THEATER

100 s. illinois ave • 618.457.6900 lunch:11-2:45 mon-fri/dinner: 5-8:45 sun-thurs/dinner 5-9:45 fri & sat

Page 4 Thursday, August 4, 2011 FLIPSIDE

Von Jakob Vineyard

1309 Sadler Rd. Pomona, IL 62975

230 Hwy 127 N. Alto Pass, IL 62905

www.vonjakobvineyard.com

(618) 893-4500 (618) 893-4600


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SIUC grad, eclectic performer coming to Blue Boar COBDEN — A 1982 Southern Illinois University Carbondale graduate is coming home next weekend. Randall “Big Daddy” Webster of Tallahassee, Fla., has more than 25 years of experience performing his original music. He recently completed his 52nd international tour, having played in 28 countries through the years. He brings a world view of blues built on its indigenous African-American heritage and peppers it with soul, jazz and life designed to ignite one’s primal core, make them think and sooth the spirit. Webster recently completed his newest album, “The Wounded Healer,” and is touring to promote the music. He will be performing at the Sigma Pi fraternity house in Carbondale from 9 to 11 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 11, and at the Blue Boar in Cobden from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 12. Webster has opened for and shared the stage with B.B. King, Robert Cray, Bobby Rush, Keb Mo, Sam Lay, Clarence Brown and many other blues legends, as well as

rock acts like the Doobie Brothers, Huey Lewis and the News and Kool & The Gang. He tours solo and with his full band, Big Daddy and Red Hot Java. — Adam Testa

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COVER STORY

Concerts Southern Illinois The Smoky Hollow String Band: 5:30-6:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 5, Cobden; part of the Cobden Peach Festival; band members, John Basden, Joanne Long, Don and Lori Buedel, Fran Baumann, Jim Jennings, John Jeschke and Kenny Lipe. Grant Harp: Brown Bag Concert, noon-1 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 10, Town Square Pavilion, Carbondale; www.carbondalemainstreet .com. Battle of The Bands: 7-11 p.m. Friday, Aug. 12, Saint Andrew Church and School grounds, 723 Mulberry St. , Murphysboro; part of the school festival, FridaySaturday, Aug. 12-13; food, games, auction; music by Remedy, 7-11 p.m. Saturday; bring a lawn chair. Parsely & Sagebrush

FESTIVALS

Band: Brown Bag Concert, noon-1 p.m., Wednesday, Aug. 17, Town Square Pavilion, Carbondale; www.carbondale mainstreet.com. Du Quoin State Fair: Josh Turner, 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 27; Matthew West and the Jon Henninger Band, 7:30 p.m., Sunday, Aug. 28; Lynyrd Skynyrd, 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 31; Marty Stuart and Connie Smith, 7:30 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 1; Willie Nelson, 7:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 2; Finger Eleven, 7:30 p.m., Saturday Sept. 3; www.duquoinstatefair.net.

THEATER Stadium, Evansville; tickets now on sale; scheduled to be last country concert in Roberts Stadium before its planned closing this year; $49.50-$79.50; www. ticketmaster.com or 800-7453000. Twelve Days of Christmas: Vince Gill and Amy Grant, Friday, Dec. 16, The Aiken Theatre at The Centre, 715 Locust St., Evansville; tickets now on sale;$44.50-$79.50; www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000 or www. smgevansville.com.

Kentucky Indiana Jim Easter and The Artistics: 7 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 6, Boot City Opry, 11800 S. Highway 41, Terre Haute; oldies; $11; www.bootcity opry.com or 812-2998379. Kenny Chesney: 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 7, Roberts

Bluegrass Night: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Aug. 5, Kentucky Opry, 88 Chilton Lane, Benton, Ky.; free; www.kentuckyopry.com. Comedian Brad Tassell: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 6, Kentucky Opry, 88 Chilton Lane, Benton, Ky.; $8-$21; 270-527-3869; www. kentuckyopry.com.

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FLIPSIDE Thursday, August 4, 2011 Page 5


DIRECTIONS & DIGITS

CRAVING KARAOKE?

WEEK OF AUG. 4-10

Karaoke and DJ lists are online at flipside online.com.

Coffeehouses, Cafés and Eateries Magician David Ranalli: Comical sleight of hand, 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, The Blue Martin, 215 E. Main St., Carbondale; 618-549-4326; www.theblue martin.com.

Wineries Movin’ Mary: 6-9 p.m. Friday, Rustle Hill Winery Simmons & Bradley: 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Rustle Hill Winery Subject to Change Band: 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Blue Sky Vineyard Tracy Schubert Band: 3-6 p.m. Saturday, Von Jakob Orchard Dirtwater Fox: 4-8 p.m. Saturday, The Bluffs Winery Swamp Tigers: 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Rustle Hill Winery Crossfire: 7-10 Saturday, Walker’s Bluff

Bud Summers: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Blue Sky Vineyard New Arts Jazztet: 2-5 Sunday, Walker’s Bluff Ronny Lee: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Rustle Hill Winery Dave Caputo Duo: 3-6 p.m. Sunday, Von Jakob Orchard Marty Davis Band: 4-8 p.m. Sunday, The Bluffs Winery Brad & Bri: 6-9 p.m. Sunday, Rustle Hill Winery Tim Whiteford: 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, Rustle Hill Winery

Blue Sky Vineyard: 3150 S. Rocky Comfort Road, Makanda; 618-995-9463 or blueskyvineyard.com The Bluffs Vineyard and Winery: 140 Buttermilk Hill Road, Ava; 618-763-4447 or www.thebluffs winery.com. GenKota Winery: 301 N. 44th St., Mount Vernon; 618-246-9463 or www.genkotawine.com Honker Hill Winery: 4861 Spillway Road, Carbondale: 618-549-5517 Lau-Nae Winery: 1522 Illinois 3, Red Bud; 618-282-9463 or www.lau-naewinery.com Rustle Hill Winery: US 51, Cobden; 618-8932700 or www.rustlehillwinery.com Shawnee Winery: 200 Commercial St., Vienna; 618-658-8400; www.shawneewinery.com StarView Vineyards: 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618 893-9463 or starviewvineyards.com Von Jakob Orchard: 230 Illinois 127, Alto Pass; 618-893-4600 or www.vonjakobvineyard.com Walker’s Bluff: North on Reed Station Road, Carterville; 618-985-8463 or www.walkersbluff.com

Page 6 Thursday, August 4, 2011 FLIPSIDE

WANT TO BE LISTED? Call 618-351-5089 or email brenda.kirkpatrick@ thesouthern.com .

TONIGHT BENTON Duncan Dance Barn:: Spring Pond Opry Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. CARBONDALE Tres Hombres: Dub Club

MONDAY MARION Marion Youth Center: Ragtag Band, 7-10 p.m. WEST FRANKFORT Wit and Wisdom: George Sisk and Jim White, 7-10 p.m.

TUESDAY THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Mike’s Band, 7-10 p.m. WEST FRANKFORT Colyer’s: Righteous Rebel Band, 7-11 p.m. WB Ranch Barn: WB Ranch Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

FRIDAY CARBONDALE Pinch Penny/Copper Dragon: 17th Floor INA Ina Community Building: Friday Night Jam Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Bill Mitchem & the Country Ram Rods, 7-10 p.m.

THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Rebel Country Band, 7-10 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Jeanita Spillman & The Sentimental Swing Band, 7-10 p.m. WHITTINGTON Corner Dance Hall: Nice & Easy Band, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

SATURDAY CARBONDALE Pinch Penny/Copper Dragon: Dot Dot Dot Tres Hombres: Kid Tiger, 10 p.m. ELIZABETHTOWN E-Town Tap: Righteous Rebel, 8 p.m.-midnight HERRIN Perfect Shot: Four Deep JOHNSTON CITY Linemen’s Lounge: Whistle Pigs, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. MARION Marion American Legion: Dave Caputo, 7-11 p.m.

Marion Eagles: Feelin’ Country, 8 p.m.-midnight Ramesses: Souls & Camo MURPHYSBORO Murphysboro Senior Center: The Pridesmen, 6:30-9:30 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Danny & Country Sounds, 7-10 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Swing “N” Country Band, 7-9:30 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Lil’ Boot & Classic Country, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

SUNDAY CARBONDALE Key West: Blue Plate Specials, 8 p.m.-midnight

WEDNESDAY CARBONDALE Tres Hombres: SIU Dub Club, 10:30 p.m. HERRIN Herrin American Legion: Timberline, 7 p.m.

MARION Marion Eagles: Feelin’ Country, 6-10 p.m.

20’s Hideout Restaurant: 2602 Wanda Drive, Marion 618-9978325 Anna VFW: 70 VFW Lane, Anna 618833-5182 Carbondale Eagles: 1206 W. Linden, Carbondale 618-529-9345 Coloni’s Bar & Grill: 3 Park Plaza, Herrin 618-988-5341 Corner Dance Hall: 200 Franklin St., Whittington 618-303-5266 Coulterville VFW: 511 VFW St., Coulterville 618-758-9009 Duncan Dance Barn: 13545 Spring Pond Road, Benton 618-435-6161 Enrico’s: 208 S. Main St., Royalton 618-984-2071 Hangar 9: 511 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale; 618-549-0511. Ina Community Building: 504 Elm St., Ina 618-315-2373 John Brown’s on the Square: 1000 Tower Square, Marion 618-9972909 Key West: 1108 W. Main, Carbondale 618-351-5998 Kip & Traci’s Colonial Club: 1602 Old Creal Springs Road, Marion 618997-6989 Linemen’s Lounge: 100 E. Broadway, Johnston City Lion’s Cave: South Street, Thompsonville 618-218-4888 Mack’s Lake of Egypt Marina: 12024 Laguna Drive, Lake of Egypt 618Maddie’s Pub and Grub: 14960 Illinois 37, Johnston City 618-9838107 Marion American Legion: Longstreet Road, Marion 618-997-6168 Marion Eagles: Rural Route 3, Marion 618-993-6300 Marion Youth Center: 211 E. Boulevard St., Marion 618-9227853 Mollie’s: 107 E. Union St., Marion 618-997-3424 Murphysboro Elks Lodge: 1809 Shomaker Drive Murphysboro 618684-4541. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Main Street, Thompsonville 618-2184676 Park Plaza Pub: 3 Park Plaza, Herrin, 618-988-1556 Perfect Shot Bar & Billiards: 3029 S. Park Ave., Herrin, 618-942-4655 Pinch Penny Pub/Copper Dragon: 700 E. Grand, Carbondale 618549-3348 PK’s: 308 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale 618-529-1124 Pyramid Acres Marina: 12171 Marina Road, Marion 618-964-1184 Steelhorse Saloon and Campground: 202 Dewmaine Lane, Carterville 618-985-6713 The Crossing: 300 S. 9th St., Mount Vernon 618-244-6450 Trackside Dance Barn: 104 Rock St., Spillertown 618-993-3035 Tres Hombres: 119 N. Washington St., Carbondale 618-457-3308 Underground Grill & Pub: 717 S. University Ave., Carbondale 618351-0171 WB Ranch Barn: 1586 Pershing Road, West Frankfort 618-937-3718 Wit and Wisdom Nutritional Site: 225 E. Poplar St., West Frankfort 618-937-3070 Xrossroads: 101 Rushing Drive, Herrin 618-993-8393 Zeigler Eagles: 114 N. Main St., Zeigler 618-596-5651


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THEATER

Up-and-coming country star Chris Young brings show to Metropolis three No. 1 singles. It gave us a lot of momentum COUNTRY going into our third SCENE album.” His next single, “Yes,” Vince Hoffard will be released to radio later this month. Young seemed like a vibrant newcomer to the hris Young’s career is music world when he burst on fire. Two weeks on the scene in 2006 and ago, his third RCA captured the title of Nashville album, “Neon,” “Nashville Star,” a national debuted at No. 4 on the talent contest televised on Billboard chart. the USA cable network. Last week, the first Ironically, the two biggest single from the new stars the show produced — album, “Tomorrow,” Young and Miranda landed at the top of the Lambert — share the same charts. It is his fourth manager. consecutive No. 1 single. Despite his fresh-off-aOn Monday, he was Greyhound appearance in notified that his “The Man front of the national I Want to Be” album had audience, Young was a been certified gold for selling 500,000 units. The seasoned veteran of the record contained three No. music industry by the time he auditioned for the 1 singles, including actcompetition at the tender breaking “Gettin’ You age of 21. Home (The Black Dress Raised in Murfreesboro, Song),” a re-issue of Tenn., just a stone’s throw “Voices” and the title from Music City, Young track. Young will be in concert committed to a music at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 5, at career at an early age as he performed in numerous Harrah’s Casino in Metropolis. Tickets are $25 musical productions as a child. In high school, he and $35. Call 800-929had his own band and was 5905 for more playing 150 gigs a year. He information. made frequent trips to Enjoying a rare day off Music Row in pursuit of a last year, Young said he record deal. was blindsided by a As part of a college telephone call informing music class, he served as him that he was an intern at a publishing nominated for a Grammy company owned by the Award for Best Male wife of veteran producer Country Performance on James Stroud. The “Gettin’ You Home.” connection would serve “I was actually at home sitting on the couch when him well in the not-sodistant future. I found out about the Before he could finish nomination from my college, Young accepted an manager,” he admitted. “I offer to become the house was watching ESPN in a band at Cowboys, a pair of basketball shorts. I legendary Texas honky was surprised. It capped tonk. off my year perfectly. A “It was a great way to get culmination of a lot of experience,” Young said. “I hard work caused us to had a seven-piece band, break out in 2010 with

C

and we played three nights a week. Plus there were major acts constantly going in and out of there, so I’d get to watch their show and see how they worked the crowd. It was a good learning experience.” Young was soaking up musical knowledge like a sponge. When a fan made him aware of “Nashville Star” tryouts, he won the audition with his new arsenal of live performance tricks. He used his rich baritone voice to easily advance through each round, before knocking out Casey Rivers and Nicole Jamrose in the finals. A major part of the championship prize was a record deal with RCA, where he would once again cross paths with Stroud. The combination got off to a rocky start. Young’s self-titled debut album saw limited chart success. Neither of his first two singles, “Drinkin’ Me Lonely” and “You’re Gonna Love Me,” cracked the Top 40. A third single, “Voices,” stalled at No. 37 on Billboard. In today’s market, an overwhelming majority of artists would’ve been dropped from the label if they produced numbers like Young did on his debut album. He knew his career was in jeopardy. He had little to show for three years of work, and the pressure was building “Nobody actually came up to me and said this, but it was pretty well understood,” he said. “You can only go so long without having some sort of hit on the radio.” However, Stroud and RCA remained confident in the artist and the faith paid off with a sophomore

PROVIDED

Chris Young will perform at 8 p.m. Friday, Aug. 5, at Harrah’s Casino in Metropolis.

album that produced nothing but chart-topping singles. VINCE HOFFARD can be reached at 618-658-9095 or vincehoffard@ yahoo.com.

222 W. Freeman Campus Shopping Center Downtown Carbondale

(618) 529-2313

FLIPSIDE Thursday, August 4, 2011 Page 7


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Annual quilt exhibit returns to Cedarhurst MOUNT VERNON — Hours of work and lots of little stitches have combined with a true love for the art of quilting to help create a new installment of an annual exhibit at Cedarhurst Center for the Arts. The “Gathering of Quilts” features the works of the Cedarhurst Quilters, a local group of quilting enthusiasts. Because of the variety and size of the exhibit, quilts will be displayed in the Regenhardt Gallery at the Shrode Art Center and the Beal Grand Corridor Gallery inside the Mitchell Museum. The exhibit displays the textile talents of quilters of all ages and celebrates their love of fabrics, colors and an age-old craft. Several quilts in the show tell a family story or the design honors heritage or the memory of a loved one.

PROVIDED

Oliver’s work on display at coffeehouse

PROVIDED

‘Holly-Day Quilt’ (left) by Mary Dillman of Woodlawn and ‘Dream Man’ by Marie Samuels of Carbondale will be on display at the quilt exhibit at Cedarhurst Center for the Arts.

The exhibit opens Saturday, Aug. 6, and runs through October. An opening reception is 6:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday

in Beal Grand Corridor. A new exhibition in the Beck Family Center Gallery also continues the quilting theme. “Snuggle

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and Snooze: Quilts for Children” offers a display of whimsical childthemed quilts.

METROPOLIS — A Metropolis woman will be featured in a one-person art show at the new coffeehouse Shop Metro Now and Café 1210, 1210 12th St. Jerry Oliver’s “A Joyful Journey” will be presented from Tuesday, Aug. 9, through Sept. 9. Oliver lives in Metropolis with her husband Charles. She is selftaught and has participated in several workshops with well-known artists. She likes working in oils, watercolor and wood burning, and she uses her own life experiences as inspiration. Oliver’s work is part of several collections across the United States. Locally, she donates art to projects and groups including Friends of Fort Massac and The Carson Center in Paducah. This exhibit includes artwork depicting historic sites including the Massac County courthouse and the downtown theater. Originals and prints will be available for sale. — Adam Testa

— Adam Testa

Grant will help museum move into digital realm CARBONDALE — The University Museum at Southern Illinois University Carbondale is the recipient of a 2011 Museums for America grant from the federal Institute of Museum and Library Services that will help move the museum into the digital realm. The $149,955 grant for collections stewardship will help the museum implement the digitization phase of its 21st Century Collection Management Initiative through the next two years. Museum Director Dona Bachman said the first phase of the project began in 2005 and only recently

ended, with the museum entering 60,000 manual records and updated descriptive information through a focused inventory. Digitization is the last step in this multistep project. The IMLS grant allows the museum to focus on 3,797 artifacts in the museum’s ethnographic, archaeological and historic collections, representing 26 themes from Africa, Asia, the Americas and Oceania. Digitization, in this case, means that the artifacts will be part of 26 online collection portfolios, including photographs of the artifacts, within a researched context. Artifacts include jewelry,

clothing, musical instruments, masks, tools and other items. “This grant allows us to share the museum’s collection with a limitless number of people, of all ages and interests,” Bachman said. “The University Museum holds its collection in public trust on behalf of the public we serve as a program of SIUC. Lorilee C. Huffman, curator of collections and development officer, will serve as project director. Huffman has two other collection-related IMSL Museums for America grants to her credit already. — University Communications


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Competition entries to be showcased at Cedarhurst MOUNT VERNON — A favorite exhibition among artists and visitors returns the Cedarhurst Center for the Arts this weekend. The Southern Illinois Artist Open Competition invited artists from central and Southern Illinois, as well as St. Louis, Paducah and Evansville, to submit entries. The exhibit of selected works from the competition opens in the Mitchell Museum gallery on Saturday, Aug. 6. A panel of judges including Dona Bachman, director of the University

Museum at Southern Illinois University Carbondale; Olivia LahsGonzales, director of the Sheldon Art Galleries in St. Louis; and Duane Reed, owner of Duane Reed Gallery in St. Louis, judged 61 works. Monetary awards will be presented for best of show and first, second and third places at a reception, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday. A “Gallery Talk” by Cedarhurst’s Director of Visual Arts Rusty Freeman will take place prior to the reception at 6 p.m. — Adam Testa

COVER STORY

Art Classes

Exhibits

Beading classes: Noon6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 6 and Sunday, Aug. 7, Southpass Beads, 203 E. Ash St. Cobden; taught by visiting instructor, Vickie Muich; register by Friday, Aug. 5; 618-893-6170; louann. elwell@gmail.com or www.southpassbeads.com.

Snuggle and Snooze: Quilts for Children, starts Aug. 6, Beck Family Center Gallery at Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mount Vernon; through Oct. 16; 618-242-1236 or www.cedarhurst.org. The Mystic Southwest: An exhibit of paintings by Carbondale native Anne Strawn, Harrisburg District Library; through Sept. 8; all works are for sale; 618-2537455. A Joyful Journey: Features art by Jerry Oliver, Shop Metro Now and Café 1210, located at 1210 Twelfth St., Metropolis; starts Tuesday, Aug. 9; through Friday, Sept. 9; 6:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. Ben Gelman: Photo display by the former Southern Illinoisan columnist, University Museum, SIUC; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday; free; through Aug. 5; www.museum.siu.edu or 618-453-5388. Metals student Sarah Renshaw: University Museum, SIUC; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday; free; through Aug. 5; www.museum.siu.edu or 618-453-5388. Momentary Skyscrapers: Grain Elevators of the Midwest, a photographic exhibit by David Hammond, University Museum, SIUC; hours, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday; free; through Aug. 5; www.museum.siu.edu or 618-453-5388. Vincentennial: The Legacy of Vincent Price, Sheldon Art Galleries, 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis; artifacts and movie memorabilia; the actor was born in St. Louis 100 years ago; through Aug. 6; www.thesheldon.org or 314-533-9900. A New Twist on Tradition: Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, Rend Lake, north of Benton; quilt artists who have reinterpreted traditional quilt patterns into a unique vision include Gail Baar, Rod Butterfield, Sharon

Call for Entries

‘Gia’s Thought’ (top) by Lon Braver of Granite City and ‘Holy Cross Chapel in Slovakia’ by Tom Bell of Makanda will be on display at the art exhibition at Cedarhurst this weekend.

BOOKS

Artifacts and stories wanted: Carbondale Community Arts is searching for artifacts on the Good Luck Glove Factory; CCA representatives will be at the Varsity Center for the Arts, 418 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, from 10 a.m.4 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 10 and from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 13; information will be used in The Way We Worked Exhibit displayed Oct. 1 through Nov. 12; 618-457-5100. The 48 Hour Film Project: Filmmaking competition challenges teams to complete an entire film from writing and casting to filming and editing in a mere 48 hours; challenge comes to Paducah, Aug. 12-14; www.48hourfilm.com/ tour/how.php. Goin’ Fast and Lookin’ Good: Hot Rods in Southern Illinois exhibit seeks photos; stories to be displayed from Aug. 23Nov. 10, University Museum, SIUC; pictures of hot rods and racers in Southern Illinois and stories about hot rodding and racing sought; photos can be scanned; deadline, Aug. 23; 618-453-7413 or nstein@siu.edu. Heart & Soul Art Exhibit: Deadline Sept. 2, Paducah City Hall; non-professional artists; entries are limited; exhibition dates, Sept. 7-Oct. 3; acrylic, oils, watercolors, pastels, drawings, 3D, mixed media, collage and photography; 270-443-1200

FESTIVALS

DeLaCruz, Sherrie Grob, Deborah Fell, Robin Haller, Marie Samuel, Sue Spurlock, Ruth Stegmeyer, Susan Swisher, Laura Wasilowski and Sandra Werlich; through Aug. 21; 618-629-2220. Puppy Pepe: By Nelson Van Mere, Central Showcase at Realty Central, 1825 Murdale Shopping Center, Carbondale; through Aug. 27; Gallery Hours, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. MondayFriday and 9 a.m.-noon, Saturday. Fiber art: By Susan Lange, Corridor gallery, Carbondale Civic Center; colorful array of quilts; through August; 618457-5100. Michala’s Journey: Tribeca Gallery, 127 Market House Square, Paducah; by Michala Pepper: through Sept. 7; www.facebook.com/michala pepper or mspepper2007 @hotmail.com. Celebrating the Wildlife & Landscape of Campus Lake: Photography by Al Parr. Art Alley Gallery, second floor of the SIUC Student Center; through Sept. 15; www.dialparr.com. A Parade of Quilts: Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, Rend Lake, north of Benton; varied display of unique art quilts created by members of the Illinois Artisans Program; both traditional and modern designs; through Sept. 15;

THEATER 618-629-2220. Civil War Era Quilts: Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, Rend Lake, north of Benton; includes a quilt from Anna whose fabrics include both Union and Confederate uniforms, said to be the sons of the maker; an album quilt made by a neighbor of Abraham Lincoln and quilts made by mothers and sisters of soldiers; exit 77 off of Interstate 57; hours, 9-5 p.m. daily; free; through Sept. 30; 618-629-2220. Member’s Choice: Little Egypt Arts Centre, 601 Tower Square, Marion; paintings, fiber, photographs, mixed media, jewelry; through Sept. 30; www.littleegyptarts.com. Down On The Farm: Memories of Not That Long Ago, Logan Museum, 1613 Edith St., Murphysboro; through mid-November; 618-303-0569 or johnalogan museum@globaleyes.net. Ongoing art exhibit: Photographs of Juhree Veach, mosaics from Janet Altoff and sculpture from Tom Horn, StarView Vineyards, 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618-893-9463 or www. starviewvineyards.com. Jo Loomis: Williamson County Pavilion, Marion; paintings of landscapes, seascapes, people, pets; 618-889-5330 or vanjol @frontier.com.

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FLIPSIDE Thursday, August 4, 2011 Page 9


MOVIES

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Directed by Dick Lowry. Not rated. Rio: When Blu, a Stake Land: A vampire domesticated macaw from epidemic has swept across small-town Minnesota, what is left of the nation's meets the fiercely abandoned towns and cities. independent Jewel, he takes Starring Connor Paolo, Kelly off on an adventure to McGillis and Nick Damici. Rio de Janeiro. Starring the Directed by Jim Mickle, voices of Jesse Eisenberg Rated R. and Anne Hathaway. The Music Never Directed by Carlos Saldanha. Stopped: A father struggles Rated G. to bond with his estranged Soul Surfer: A teenage son Gabriel, after Gabriel surfer girl summons the suffers from a brain tumor courage to go back into the ocean after losing an arm in that prevents him from forming new memories. a shark attack. Starring Starring J.K. Simmons and AnnaSophia Robb and Lou Taylor Pucci. Directed by Dennis Quaid. Directed by Jim Kohlberg. Rated PG. Sean McNamara. Jane Eyre: A mousy Jesse Stone: Innocents governess who softens the Lost: After his involuntary heart of her employer soon retirement, Jesse Stone discovers that he's hiding a investigates the suspicious death of a young friend while terrible secret. Starring Mia Wasikowska and Michael the police force deals with Fassbender. Directed by the arrogant new chief. Cary Fukunaga. Rated PG-13. Starring Tom Selleck, Joe the Dog and Rae Ritke. — Adam Testa

New on DVD

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COVER STORY

FESTIVALS

THEATER

‘The Change-Up’ pushes the envelope of gross-out humor The Change-Up ** Rated R for pervasive strong crude sexual content and language, some graphic nudity and drug use; starring Ryan Reynolds, Jason Bateman, Leslie Mann, Olivia Wilde and Alan Arkin; directed by David Dobkin; opening Friday at ShowPlace 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion BY ROGER MOORE MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

The comedy envelope has been pushed, pulled, twisted and torn during this current run of smash hit R-rated sex comedies. But “The Change-Up,” the punctuation at the end of the summer of

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BOOKS

“Bridesmaids,” “Bad Teacher” and “Friends With Benefits,” dares to ask and answer the question that’s been out there since “The 40 YearOld Virgin” and “Wedding Crashers” kicked off the craze: How far is too far, and when does amusingly raunchy just seem coarse? I’d say any time you’ve filmed a script with the phrase “projectile pooping” you’ve arrived at crass. Baby diapering scenes? Sure. Let’s turn them bottom’s up and see — in close, anatomical detail — what pops out. And adults leave little to the bathroom imagination either in this cute and crude romp through the merits of married life as opposed to single life, and vice versa. “Change-Up” is an adult variation on the old bodyswitch idea, a “Freaky Friday” with a dose of the freaky deaky. Jason Bateman is Dave, a noseto-the-grindstone lawyer whose marriage has become a series of “your turn” diaper changes (three kids, twin infants among them) and drives to and from school and after school activities. He’s married to Jamie, played by the vulnerable yet hilariously brassy and bossy Leslie Mann. Somehow Dave has stayed friends with his polar opposite. Mitch (Ryan Reynolds, channeling his “Van Wilder” past) is a slacker, a pothead actor and womanizer, irresponsible in the extreme and given to shouting inappropriate profanity at Dave’s tiny kids and into Dave’s speaker phone at the office. A night of drinking leads them a shared moment at

STUDIO

Jason Bateman (left) and Ryan Reynolds star in ‘The Change-Up,’ which opens Friday in Carbondale and Marion.

the urinal — in this case, an ornate fountain in one of Atlanta’s parks. They kvetch. They complain. Next thing you know, they’ve said “I wish I had your life” and they’ve switched bodies. The humor here comes not so much from the Jon Lucas-Scott Moore script or David “Fred Claus” Dobkin’s perfunctory direction of it, but in seeing Bateman, the master of the buttoneddown introverted slow burn, take on the hyper patter of Reynolds. As he fakes his way through the day, we see Dave as a bad lawyer, bad husband and bad father. His daughter’s getting tripped at ballet? Trip her back. “Always solve your problems with violence!” Dave, who looks like Mitch, must take on the actor’s next role — reluctantly. He must deal with Mitch’s semiestranged dad (Alan Arkin, given nothing funny to play). And Mitch, who looks like Dave, must cope with the big business deal his firm has been working on and fight Dave’s ongoing crush on the office hottie, played by Olivia

Wilde as a sexy, smart vamp. She doesn’t have the funny or the touching scenes Mann delivers in her wife-and-mother role, but then, Wilde has yet to earn them. Bateman has the more fun role and makes more of the transition. We don’t get nearly enough of the pitter-patter of Reynolds in the early scenes to make up for how mild-mannered and in-over-his-head he has to play (not nearly as funny) as he takes on Bateman’s acting-asreacting shtick. Nudity, sex, raw language and trips to the toilet — while fitfully amusing — are here simply for the shock value. This overlong and overly obvious movie has little flow to it, no comic momentum to take us to the ending we see coming pretty much right at the beginning. Yes, it’s a body-switch comedy where each character “learns” about himself and the other guy’s life and is the better for it. The trouble with “The Change-Up” is that it doesn’t change-up enough of the formula to render this new.


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‘Rise’ showcases performance capture technology, makes idea work Rise of the Planet of the Apes ***1/2 Rated PG-13 for intense and frightening sequences of action and violence; starring James Franco, Andy Serkis, Freida Pinto, Brian Cox and Tom Felton; directed by Rupert Wyatt; opening Friday at University Place 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion. BY ROGER MOORE MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

Audacious, violent and disquieting, “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” is a summer sequel that’s better than it has any right to be. This movie about how apes rise up against the humans who would trap them, cage them and use them in medical experiments is a stunning job of backengineering the familiar “Planet of the Apes” story and another leap forward in performance capture animation. As alarming and sometimes bloody as it is, “Rise” doesn’t require a “No apes were harmed in the making of this movie” credit. They’re all digital, a performance capture cast led by Andy Serkis (Gollum in “Lord of the Rings”) that is so convincing as to render every earlier ape “Planet” movie camp. Not that they weren’t already. “Rise” tells the story of Caesar, the son of a smart chimpanzee made even smarter by a viral serum given to him by a scientist, Dr. Will Rodman (James Franco) in pursuit of a cure for his father’s (John Lithgow) Alzheimer’s disease. When the corporate boss

STUDIO

‘Rise of the Planet of the Apes’ opens Friday at University Place 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion.

(David Oyelowo) decides the current test-crop of apes is “contaminated” and must be “put down,” Will takes Caesar home and raises him as one of the family. Dad gives him the name Caesar. And when Caesar’s intelligence shows, Will gives Dad the drug and seemingly cures his degenerative brain disease. Early scenes of Caesar gamboling through the rafters of their big, old San Francisco two-story are reminiscent of Disney’s animated “Tarzan,” long swooping takes of the chimp swinging, clambering, leaping and frolicking. When Will meets a cute and sympathetic zoo vet (Freida Pinto) they even take Caesar to the Muir

Woods park to climb the redwoods. But Caesar is still a wild, impulsive and sometimes violent animal, prone to escape and annoy the neighbors. And the vet has a word of warning: “I love chimpanzees. I’m also afraid of them. It’s appropriate to be afraid of them.” Serkis, the king of motion capture acting, gives Caesar a cautious physicality and a wary hooded stare. And the animators capture the glint of intelligence in his eyes. The film’s first electric moment is a glance between doctor and ape as the now-adult Caesar sees and understands, the instant Will does, that his father is regressing back into Alzheimer’s.

Director Rupert Wyatt stages the film’s second half — Caesar’s imprisonment in a “primate shelter” — with prison movie verve, letting us imagine how he will establish himself in his cell block and how he might stage his coup de chimp. “Rise of the Planet of the Apes” uses standardissue animal care cliches that are exactly the same as those in “Zookeeper” — from the sexy veterinarian to the cruel zookeepers (Tom Felton and Brian Cox). It’s clever enough to summon up memories of Pierre Boulle’s Vietnam War-era sci-fi novel and make you ponder it as moral and racial parable. And it’s so brilliantly

executed as to render the original version of this part of the apes’ story (1972’s “Conquest of the Planet of the Apes”)

laughable, and Tim Burton’s handsome remake of the original “Planet of the Apes” forgettable.

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