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Kinsey Report bringing Chicago blues to Carbondale

Call toll-free: 800-228-0429 Cara Recine, Lifestyles and special projects editor cara.recine@thesouthern.com / ext. 5075 Adam Testa, Lifestyles writer adam.testa@thesouthern.com / ext. 5031

Peterik will be joined by special guests Dennis Morgan and Greg Barnhill. The critically acclaimed Waymores will close out the weekend on Sunday with a performance from 2 to 5 p.m. Peterik, who wrote hit songs “Eye of the Tiger” and “Hold on Loosely and the book “Songwriting for Dummies,” will host the workshop under the depot at Walker’s Bluff from 3 to 4 p.m. Saturday. Registration is $20.

CARBONDALE — Nearly 15 years have passed since Indiana-based Kinsey Report first burst onto the national blues scene with a unique brand of streetsmart, up-to-the-minute, funky blues rock. The band has produced four critically acclaimed albums and toured nationally. Original guitarist and vocalist Donald, drummer Ralph and bassist Kenneth, all brothers, have blazed a modern trail of powerful, original radio-friendly music aimed at grabbing both die-hard blues fans and rockers who love supercharged guitar and bone-shaking vocals. Now the group is heading for Carbondale, as part of the Sunset Concert series. The group will perform at 7 p.m. tonight, July 14, on the steps of Shryock Auditorium.

— The Southern

— The Southern

Brenda Kirkpatrick, lists, live music flipside@thesouthern.com / ext. 5089 Rhonda Ethridge, cover designer rhonda.ethridge@thesouthern.com / ext. 5118 The Southern Illinoisan (USPS 258-908) is published daily at a yearly subscription rate of $178. It is published at 710 N. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, IL 62901. It is owned by Lee Enterprises of Davenport, Iowa. PROVIDED

Songwriter and author Jim Peterik will be at Walker’s Bluff on Saturday.

WHAT’S INSIDE Wineries . . . . . . . . .2,5 Concerts . . . . . . . . . .3 Music . . . . . . . . .3,4,5 Coffeehouses . . . . . .5 Live music . . . . . . . . .5

Cover story . . . . . .6,7 Movies . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Theater . . . . . . . . . . .9 Things to do . . . . . .10 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11

COVER STORY

‘Eye of the Tiger’ author hosting singer-songwriter workshop CARTERVILLE — Grammy Awardwinning songwriter and author Jim Peterik will host a songwriting workshop and perform a concert this weekend at Walker’s Bluff. The workshop highlights the venue’s “Singer Songwriter Weekend,” which will feature artists performing their original compositions. Singer-songwriter Dan Barron will perform from 4 to 7 p.m. Saturday, before Peterick’s performance that evening.

Fish Fry Fridays! 4-7pm $6.50 Per Plate - Fish and 2 Sides

Ivas John Unplugged! Tuesday July 19th 7-10PM

On

Patio

Wine Wednesday

1/2 Price Wines All Day!

Solo guitarist on the patio 6-9PM

Indoor & Outdoor Karaoke s y Sunda Fun for the whole family! BELLA TERRA WINERY Creal Springs, IL 618-658-8882 Open Daily 11am- 6pm www.bellatwinery.com

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LUNCHEON BUFFET

Tues. Wed. Thurs.

Patio Open Relaxed Adult Atmosphere

99

Only 6

213 S. Court, Marion

993-8668 waltspizza.com

Sun-Mon. 4pm-11pm Tues-Thurs. 11am-11pm Fri-Sat. 11am-Midnight


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Concerts

www.vonjakobvineyard.com.

Southern Illinois

Indiana

The Kinsey Report: 7 p.m., Thursday, July 14, steps of Shryock Auditorium, SIUC, part of Sunset Concert Series; Chicago Blues; 618-536-3393 or www.spc4fun.com. The Black Lillies: 7 p.m., Thursday, July 21, Turley Park, Carbondale, part of Sunset Concert Series; Americana folk, country; 618-536-3393 or www.spc4fun.com. The Boat Drunks: Nationally known Jimmy Buffett Tribute Band, 3:30–7:30 pm., Saturday, July 23, Von Jakob Vineyard, 230 Illinois 127, Alto Pass; $15 cover charge includes souvenir glass of wine; doors open 10 a.m.; lunch available, noon; 618-893-4600 or

The Backstreet Cruisers: 7 p.m. Saturday, July 16, Boot City Opry, 11800 S. Highway 41, Terre Haute; www.bootcityopry.com or 812-299-8379. Bob Dylan and His Band: 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 2, Roberts Stadium, Evansville; tickets now on sale; $25-$55; www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Kenny Chesney: 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 7, Roberts Stadium, Evansville; tickets now on sale; scheduled to be last country concert in Roberts Stadium before its planned closing this year; $49.50-$79.50; www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000. Twelve Days of Christmas: Vince Gill and Amy Grant,

THINGS TO DO Friday, Dec. 16, The Aiken Theatre at The Centre, 715 Locust St., Evansville; tickets now on sale;$44.50-$79.50; www.ticketmaster.com or 800-745-3000 or www.smgevansville.com.

Kentucky Little Big Town: 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 15, the Carson Center, Paducah; $75/$45/$35/$25; 270-450-4444 or www.the carsoncenter.org. Stars of Tomorrow: 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 15, Kentucky Opry, 88 Chilton Lane, Benton, Ky.; $16-$7.50; www.kentucky opry.com. Karissa Stepter: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 16, Kentucky Opry, 88 Chilton Lane, Benton, Ky.; 270-527-3869; www.kentuckyopry.com.

Grab a Spoon All you can eat soup & salad. From 11am-2pm Monday - Friday

Just $7.99 • Ceasar Salad • Chopped Salad • Tuscan Salad

• Chicken Tortilla • Potato Soup • French Onion

2310 Reed Station Rd | Carbondale | 618.457.4020 FLIPSIDE Thursday, July 14, 2011 Page 3


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Jennifer Thompson, a well-known local musician, is preparing to try out for NBC’s ‘The Voice’ the area. Absent from local venues for the past couple years, the Sandoval native Vince Hoffard definitely has not quit the business or even slowed down. She performs nearly every weekend as the ennifer Thompson has female lead singer for the been a driving force on Glendale Riders, a popular Southern rock party band the Southern Illinois music scene for nearly two from Bunker Hill playing predominately in the St. decades. Various configurations of her bands Louis area. Thompson is have electrified large owner/operator of a day audiences at the care center and, as a Du Quoin State Fair, certified instructor, she has HerrinFesta Italiana and watched the Zumba dance major clubs throughout fitness craze explode. “I have a partner and we teach Zumba classes four to six times a week,” she said. “People just love it. We take current music and work it into our program to

COUNTRY SCENE

J

Specializing in Christian Literature Mark J. Akin • Bookseller

home of

The pursuit of musical stardom was forced to the back burner because her plate was overflowing with other current interests, until the fateful night she was skimming through the channels and found “The Voice,” a new NBC program hosted by Carson Daly. Based on the top-rated TV show in Holland, famous singers from a wide genre of musical styles pick eight team members through a blind audition process and the teams compete against each other until only one person is left on each squad. Guided by their captains, the four then battle each other and the audience picks the winner. “I watched the show and thought it was really cool,”

an authentic thai cuisine experience

The Irish Store

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VINCE HOFFARD can be

reached at 618-658-9095 or vincehoffard@ yahoo.com.

July 15th Marbin NEW this week: Freshly picked peaches, blackberries, green beans, cucumbers, zucchini, green peppers, greeting cards and pens, feather jewelry and hair extensions, The Church of Contemporary Art, and information from Green Earth. Presbyterian Preschool offering facepainting.

Every Friday Night 6:00-9:00pm April 22 - October 28, 2011 except for September 23

On the Town Square At the corner of 51N &13W

1/2 way to Walker’s Bluff on Reed Station Rd.

Carbondale, IL 618 • 457 • 5282 www.coramdeobooks.com

favorite in the Jefferson County area. Jennifer grew up singing the hardcore country songs of Tanya Tucker and Patsy Cline on stage with her dad. She eventually would branch out and start her own band, Jen & Tonic, which was popular throughout the area. After several years of success, she took time off to start a family. Thompson would ease back into music as a member of her brother Jim’s rock band Twister before putting together her own band again. Thompson loves where she is at with the Glendale Riders, a band of talented musicians who love to harmonize, especially on songs by Alabama and the Eagles. They are one of the few bands that perform Rodney Carrington covers.

Lunch Special

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Thompson said. “My Zumba dance partner found out about auditions for next season and she signed me up. I thought about it and figured I’d give it a shot. Music is in my blood. I can’t give it up.” The auditions are July 29 and 30 in Nashville. She hasn’t been notified of the exact location but figures it will be at the Wildhorse Saloon. She plans to go down a few days early, stay at a friend’s condo and visits a few clubs before making a final decision on songs for her tryout. “You get to choose your own material. I may try something pop or an old rock song. I just don’t know yet,” she said. “Country music is my bread-and-butter, but I’m not afraid to whip out Norah Jones or Colbie Caillat.” Thompson is the daughter of Bill Thompson, leader of the Country Flame band, a longtime

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keep things fresh. We have 102 students and are always growing.” A single mom raising two boys, in addition to handling two jobs and a flourishing musical hobby, Thompson is often utterly exhausted when she crashes onto the couch at the end of the day. Out of habit, she picks up the television remote and flips through the channels. Thompson has made countless trips to Nashville to pursue her musical dream. Club owners on Lower Broadway know her and have open invitations for her to perform on their famous stages. Several times she felt she was close to securing the elusive record deal, but it never happened.

100 s. illinois ave • 618.457.6900 lunch:11-2:45 mon-fri/dinner: 5-8:45 sun-thurs/dinner 5-9:45 fri & sat

Page 4 Thursday, July 14, 2011 FLIPSIDE

618-529-8040 www.carbondalemainstreet.com


DIRECTIONS & DIGITS

CRAVING KARAOKE?

WEEK OF JULY 14-20

Karaoke and DJ lists are online at flipside online.com.

Coffeehouses, Cafés and Eateries Magician David Ranalli: Comical sleight of hand, 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday, The Blue Martin, 215 E. Main St., Carbondale; 618-549-4326;

WANT TO BE LISTED? Call 618-351-5089 or email brenda.kirkpatrick@ thesouthern.com .

Wineries Bill Harper: 6-9 p.m. Friday, Rustle Hill Winery The J Brown Band: 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Rustle Hill Winery Nyte Flyte: 3-6 p.m. Saturday, Von Jakob Orchard Marty Davis: 4-8 p.m. Saturday, The Bluffs Winery Swamp Tigers: 4-8 p.m. Saturday, StarView Vineyards Rural Kings: 5-9 p.m. Saturday, Rustle Hill Winery Jim Peterik: 7-10 Saturday, Walker’s Bluff

FRIDAY Barry Cloyd: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Blue Sky Vineyard Marty Davis: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Rustle Hill Winery Waymores: 2-5 Sunday, Walker’s Bluff One Night Stand: 3-6 p.m. Sunday, Von Jakob Orchard Bill Harper: 4-8 p.m. Sunday, The Bluffs Winery Eli Tellor: 2-6 p.m. Sunday, StarView Vineyards Boondock Billies: 5-8 p.m. Sunday, Rustle Hill Winery Giant City Slickers: 8 p.m. Wednesday, Rustle Hill Winery

Blue Sky Vineyard: 3150 S. Rocky Comfort Road, Makanda; 618-995-9463 or www.blueskyvineyard.com The Bluffs Vineyard and Winery: 140 Buttermilk Hill Road, Ava; 618-763-4447 or www.thebluffswinery.com. GenKota Winery: 301 N. 44th St., Mount Vernon; 618-246-9463 or www.genkotawine.com Honker Hill Winery: 4861 Spillway Road, Carbondale: 618-549-5517 Lau-Nae Winery: 1522 Illinois 3, Red Bud; 618-2829463 or www.lau-naewinery.com Rustle Hill Winery: US 51, Cobden; 618-893-2700 or www.rustlehillwinery.com Shawnee Winery: 200 Commercial St., Vienna; 618658-8400; www.shawneewinery.com StarView Vineyards: 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618 893-9463 or starviewvineyards.com Von Jakob Orchard: 230 Illinois 127, Alto Pass; 618893-4600 or www.vonjakobvineyard.com Walker’s Bluff: North on Reed Station Road, Carterville; 618-985-8463 or www.walkersbluff.com

TONIGHT BENTON Duncan Dance Barn:: Spring Pond Opry Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. CARBONDALE Hangar 9: WDBX Bash; benefit PK’s: Marbin

SUNDAY CARBONDALE Key West: Blue Plate Specials, 8 p.m.midnight MARION Marion Eagles: Liberty Road Band, 6-10 p.m.

MONDAY MARION Marion Youth Center: Ragtag Band, 7-10 p.m.

TUESDAY CARBONDALE PK’s: Manx THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Mike’s Band, 7-10 p.m. WEST FRANKFORT Colyer’s: Righteous Rebel Band, 7-11 p.m. WB Ranch Barn: WB Ranch Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

CARBONDALE Hangar 9: White Water Ramble/Django Billies Pinch Penny/Copper Dragon: Rock U PK’s: Bosco & Whiteford INA Ina Community Building: Friday Night Jam Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. MARION John Brown’s on the Square: The Sam West Trio, 8:30 p.m. Ramesses: Mixed Company SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Bill

Mitchem & Country Ram Rods, 7-10 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Rebel Country Band, 7-10 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Sentimental Swing, 7-10 p.m. WHITEASH The Whiteash Barn: Lindell and Bob and the Boys, 7-10 p.m. WHITTINGTON Corner Dance Hall: Swing N Country Band, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

SATURDAY CARBONDALE Hangar 9: Rusty Nail; Big Muddy String Band Pinch Penny/Copper Dragon: Rod Tuff Curtis & The Bench Press PK’s: South of 70 Tres Hombres: County Line, 10 p.m. COELLO The Italian Club: Twin Bridges, 8 p.m.-midnight HERRIN Perfect Shot: Shakey Jake JOHNSTON CITY Linemen’s Lounge: Sixx Killer, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. MARION John Brown’s on the Square: Marbin, 8:30 p.m.

Kip & Traci’s Colonial Club: King Juba, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Marion Eagles: Liberty Road Band, 8 p.m.midnight Ramesses: Mixed Company SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Danny & Country Sound, 7-10 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Swing “N” Country Band, 7-9:30 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Lil’ Boot & Classic Country, 7:30-10:30 p.m. WHITTINGTON Corner Dance Hall: As Time Goes By Band, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY CARBONDALE Tres Hombres: SIU Dub Club, 10:30 p.m.

20’s Hideout Restaurant: 2602 Wanda Drive, Marion 618-9978325 Anna VFW: 70 VFW Lane, Anna 618833-5182 Carbondale Eagles: 1206 W. Linden, Carbondale 618-529-9345 Coloni’s Bar & Grill: 3 Park Plaza, Herrin 618-988-5341 Corner Dance Hall: 200 Franklin St., Whittington 618-303-5266 Coulterville VFW: 511 VFW St., Coulterville 618-758-9009 Duncan Dance Barn: 13545 Spring Pond Road, Benton 618-435-6161 Enrico’s: 208 S. Main St., Royalton 618-984-2071 Hangar 9: 511 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale; 618-549-0511. Ina Community Building: 504 Elm St., Ina 618-315-2373 John Brown’s on the Square: 1000 Tower Square, Marion 618-9972909 Key West: 1108 W. Main, Carbondale 618-351-5998 Kip & Traci’s Colonial Club: 1602 Old Creal Springs Road, Marion 618997-6989 Linemen’s Lounge: 100 E. Broadway, Johnston City Lion’s Cave: South Street, Thompsonville 618-218-4888 Mack’s Lake of Egypt Marina: 12024 Laguna Drive, Lake of Egypt 618Maddie’s Pub and Grub: 14960 Illinois 37, Johnston City 618-9838107 Marion American Legion: Longstreet Road, Marion 618-997-6168 Marion Eagles: Rural Route 3, Marion 618-993-6300 Marion Youth Center: 211 E. Boulevard St., Marion 618-9227853 Mollie’s: 107 E. Union St., Marion 618-997-3424 Murphysboro Elks Lodge: 1809 Shomaker Drive Murphysboro 618684-4541. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Main Street, Thompsonville 618-2184676 Park Plaza Pub: 3 Park Plaza, Herrin, 618-988-1556 Perfect Shot Bar & Billiards: 3029 S. Park Ave., Herrin, 618-942-4655 Pinch Penny Pub/Copper Dragon: 700 E. Grand, Carbondale 618549-3348 PK’s: 308 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale 618-529-1124 Pyramid Acres Marina: 12171 Marina Road, Marion 618-964-1184 Steelhorse Saloon and Campground: 202 Dewmaine Lane, Carterville 618-985-6713 The Crossing: 300 S. 9th St., Mount Vernon 618-244-6450 Trackside Dance Barn: 104 Rock St., Spillertown 618-993-3035 Tres Hombres: 119 N. Washington St., Carbondale 618-457-3308 Underground Grill & Pub: 717 S. University Ave., Carbondale 618351-0171 WB Ranch Barn: 1586 Pershing Road, West Frankfort 618-937-3718 Whiteash Barn: 207 Potter St., White Ash 618-997-4979 Wit and Wisdom Nutritional Site: 225 E. Poplar St., West Frankfort 618-937-3070 Xrossroads: 101 Rushing Drive, Herrin 618-993-8393 Zeigler Eagles: 114 N. Main St., Zeigler 618-596-5651

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z FESTIVALS z ART z MUSIC z WINERIES z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z FESTIVALS z THEATER z MOVIES z ART z MUSIC z COVER STORY z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z THEATER z MOVIES z ART z MUSIC z WINERIES z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z FESTIVALS z

Tonight marks the end of an era

The Final Chapter

BY ADAM TESTA THE SOUTHERN

T

‘Deathly Hallows: Part 2’ makes Potter series a true classic ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2’ **** Rated PG-13 for some sequences of intense action violence and frightening images; starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint and Ralph Fiennes; directed by David Yates; opening Friday at ShowPlace 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion BY COLIN COVERT MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

W

ith its haunted vistas, clanking battles, inspired effects, heroism, treachery, fragile alliances and moral ambiguity, the blockbuster finale of the Harry Potter saga achieves a supernatural splendor. The series has sputtered here and there over the last decade, losing its focus and tempo, but this climax is a triumph of spectacle and well-earned sentiment. “Potter” is the anti-“Transformers,” high adventure with heart and soul to spare. Daniel Radcliffe has matured into a solid actor, impressive in tense scenes of deadly combat and quiet moments of subtle, shifting emotion. He puts those skills to good use in Harry’s showdown with Lord Voldemort, the snake-faced tyrant who killed Harry’s parents and aims to crush the world beneath his heel. With Hermione (Emma Watson, her iron-jawed selfconfidence draining away) and Ron (Rupert Grint, whose befuddled expression suits his overwhelmed character) Harry returns to Hogwarts to find and destroy the remaining Horcruxes, the containers in which Voldemort has hidden fragments of his malignant soul. How the school has changed from the joyous theme park of old. Dementors float above the courtyard, their tattered shrouds trailing like jellyfish tentacles. Students march in prison camp formation. Overseeing it all from a high window is Voldemort’s ally, Prof. Snape (Alan Rickman, delivering each line of dialog as if savoring a plum). His expression is stoic but ... could that be a flicker of regret? The story has an epic war-movie feel, as Voldemort’s army strikes back against Harry’s student and staff rebellion. Director David Yates keeps the ebb and flow of combat clear; for all its blitzkreig energy, the battle never feels incoherent. What distinguishes this from other summer shrapnel-fests is the way it follows individuals that we care about through the conflict. Second fiddles Neville Longbottom (Matthew Lewis) and Prof. McGonagall (Maggie Smith) step forward to play pivotal roles. The film creates a world where heroism and deceit spring from unexpected sources. It’s one of the glories of the

Page 6 Thursday, July 14, 2011 FLIPSIDE

STUDIO

‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2’ opens Friday.

Potter series that it can deliver a childlike sense of wonder without requiring a childish black-and-white worldview. And what wonders are on display! The power bolts, spells and invisibility cloaks are beautifully realized, absurd yet persuasive. The brutish ogres and giant tarantulas Voldemort unleashes in the final battle inspire genuine shivers of fear. And there are witty miracles; the dragon demolition of Gringott’s goblin bank is a riotous image of a corrupt financial firm’s collapse. When Hermione transforms herself into a double of Bellatrix Lestrange (Helena Bonham Carter) for a spy mission, Bonham Carter plays Watson impersonating Bellatrix to hilarious effect. Near the climax, Harry’s mentor Albus Dumbledore (Michael Gambon) returns in a vision to advise the young wizard that words are potent forms of enchantment, rich with the power to hurt or heal. Here the secret of the series is revealed. If the Potter franchise had been cooked up in a studio pitch meeting with storyboards and visual-effects demos, it could never become the generation-defining phenomenon that it is. It captured the imagination of an era like no cultural event since Beatlemania because it stands on a solid million-word foundation created by J.K. Rowling. She put story and character front and center, and when they’re succeeding, the Potter films do, too. For all the movies’ dazzle and flash and Hippogriffs, the characters are more vivid than the special effects. It is our emotional involvement with the threedimensional heroes and villains, sidekicks and background players that draws us back time after time. The final chapter ends with an epilogue that puts a lump in your throat and makes you want to watch them all again from the beginning. That’s the definition of a classic.

STUDIO

Daniel Radcliffe has played Harry Potter throughout the series, which began in 2001.

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW ‘HARRY’? The eighth and final “Harry Potter” film, “The Deathly Hallows: Part 2,” opens Friday. Are you ready? Check your preparedness with this eight-question quiz:

6. Legend has it that the three Deathly Hallows combined make their owner “the master of death.” Which of these is not a Hallow? a. Deluminator; b. Cloak of Invisibility; c. Elder Wand; d. Resurrection Stone

1. In his vile effort to achieve immortality, Voldemort created Horcruxes containing pieces of his soul. Which of these objects is not a Horcrux? a. Tom Riddle’s diary; b. Marvolo Gaunt’s ring; c. Neville Longbottom’s Rememberall; d. Salazar Slytherin’s locket

7. What village was once home to the Potters and may hold secrets to Dumbledore’s past? a. Little Hangleton; b. Ottery St. Catchpole; c. Prairie Village; d. Godric’s Hollow

2. In the films, Ralph Fiennes plays Voldemort. How do you pronounce the actor’s name? a. Ralf Feens; b. Rafe Fines; c. Rolf Fie-ness; d. Real Fiend

8. Who betrayed Harry’s parents? a. Peter Pettigrew; b. Stan Shunpike; c. Phineus Nigellus Black; d. Sirius Black

Answers 1. C. And more will be revealed in the last movie. 2. B. “Rafe Fines”— that’s how the Brits say it. 3. C. Newton Scamander wrote “Fantastical Beasts & Where to Find Them” (with the help of author J.K. Rowling). 4. D. Confundo simply causes confusion. 5. B. Dementors. 4. Voldemort and his Death Eaters are only too happy to cast 6. A. In his will, Dumbledore bequeathed his Deluminator to Unforgivable Curses. Which of these is not one of them? Ron Weasley. a. Avada Kedavra; b. Crucio; c. Imperio; d. Confundo 7. D. It’s also the birthplace of Hogwarts founder Godric 5. Which creatures drain peace, hope and happiness from the air Gryffindor. 8. A. Peter Pettigrew did it, but Sirius Black was blamed for around them? it. a. Boggarts; b. Dementors; c. Grindylows; d. Your in-laws 3. Voldemort may have created Horcruxes from objects tied to the founders of Hogwarts. Who was not one of the founders? a. Rowena Ravenclaw; b. Godric Gryffindor; c. Newton Scamander; d. Helga Hufflepuff

onight at midnight, an era comes to an end. Fourteen years after the release of “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” the fictitious young wizard and his band of unlikely hero companions continue to captivate the interest of audiences of all ages. The Harry Potter series seemed destined for success from the beginning. Author J.K. Rowling, an unknown writer, struck gold by creating a world complete with realistic characters struggling against problems both of the “Muggle” world and the realm of witchcraft and wizardry. By 2001, the first book had been transformed into a theatrical release, and the franchise boomed to new heights. Now, the final film of the franchise, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II,” hits theaters at midnight, and fans in Southern Illinois find themselves filled with mixed emotions. Seventeen-year-old Paige Beuligmann of Carterville remembers her parents reading “Sorcerer’s Stone” aloud to her as a child, and as soon as she could read on her own, she picked up the rest of the books. With tickets and Gryffindor shirts in hand, she and her friends are excited for opening day. “I’m also sad at the same time,” she said. “The books ended (in 2007), but I always had

the movies to look forward to, and now they’re coming to an end, too.” For Beuligmann, Potter has been almost like a childhood friend, as they’ve grown up together. Rowling also succeeded in crafting a tale that conveys with potential to sway young readers with positive role models and influences. “I’ve grown up with Harry Potter,” Beuligmann said. “I’m part of the Potter Generation, as they call it. It’s been a part of who I am. The message just really hit home.” Twenty-five-year-old Lauren Kemp of Carbondale knows the feeling. She began reading the Potter books in sixth grade as part of an accelerated reading program and has been a fan ever since. The latter movies became somewhat of a tradition, too, as she and her now-husband would see them together on opening night.

STUDIO

Ralph Fiennes plays Lord Voldemort (above). Emma Watson (bottom, from left) portrays Hermione Granger, Ruper Grint plays Ron Weasley and Daniel Radcliffe is Harry Potter.

They plan to do the same Friday, as they’ll travel to St. Louis to watch the final scenes of the franchise unfold on an IMAX screen. She often talks with friends about the translations of the books to movie form, and while she understands the length of the novels and intricate subplots are too much to fit into a twohour movie, there’s one element she really hopes

to see shine through in this last movie. “They’ve made Harry out to be kind of a pansy,” she said. “He never does anything on his own; he relies on everyone else. That’s not how he is in the books. We need to see him step up and really be the hero.” adam.testa@thesouthern.com 618-351-5031 On Twitter: AdamTestaSI

FLIPSIDE Thursday, July 14, 2011 Page 7


z FESTIVALS z ART z MUSIC z WINERIES z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z FESTIVALS z THEATER z MOVIES z ART z MUSIC z COVER STORY z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z THEATER z MOVIES z ART z MUSIC z WINERIES z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z FESTIVALS z

Tonight marks the end of an era

The Final Chapter

BY ADAM TESTA THE SOUTHERN

T

‘Deathly Hallows: Part 2’ makes Potter series a true classic ‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2’ **** Rated PG-13 for some sequences of intense action violence and frightening images; starring Daniel Radcliffe, Emma Watson, Rupert Grint and Ralph Fiennes; directed by David Yates; opening Friday at ShowPlace 8 in Carbondale and AMC Centre 8 in Marion BY COLIN COVERT MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

W

ith its haunted vistas, clanking battles, inspired effects, heroism, treachery, fragile alliances and moral ambiguity, the blockbuster finale of the Harry Potter saga achieves a supernatural splendor. The series has sputtered here and there over the last decade, losing its focus and tempo, but this climax is a triumph of spectacle and well-earned sentiment. “Potter” is the anti-“Transformers,” high adventure with heart and soul to spare. Daniel Radcliffe has matured into a solid actor, impressive in tense scenes of deadly combat and quiet moments of subtle, shifting emotion. He puts those skills to good use in Harry’s showdown with Lord Voldemort, the snake-faced tyrant who killed Harry’s parents and aims to crush the world beneath his heel. With Hermione (Emma Watson, her iron-jawed selfconfidence draining away) and Ron (Rupert Grint, whose befuddled expression suits his overwhelmed character) Harry returns to Hogwarts to find and destroy the remaining Horcruxes, the containers in which Voldemort has hidden fragments of his malignant soul. How the school has changed from the joyous theme park of old. Dementors float above the courtyard, their tattered shrouds trailing like jellyfish tentacles. Students march in prison camp formation. Overseeing it all from a high window is Voldemort’s ally, Prof. Snape (Alan Rickman, delivering each line of dialog as if savoring a plum). His expression is stoic but ... could that be a flicker of regret? The story has an epic war-movie feel, as Voldemort’s army strikes back against Harry’s student and staff rebellion. Director David Yates keeps the ebb and flow of combat clear; for all its blitzkreig energy, the battle never feels incoherent. What distinguishes this from other summer shrapnel-fests is the way it follows individuals that we care about through the conflict. Second fiddles Neville Longbottom (Matthew Lewis) and Prof. McGonagall (Maggie Smith) step forward to play pivotal roles. The film creates a world where heroism and deceit spring from unexpected sources. It’s one of the glories of the

Page 6 Thursday, July 14, 2011 FLIPSIDE

STUDIO

‘Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 2’ opens Friday.

Potter series that it can deliver a childlike sense of wonder without requiring a childish black-and-white worldview. And what wonders are on display! The power bolts, spells and invisibility cloaks are beautifully realized, absurd yet persuasive. The brutish ogres and giant tarantulas Voldemort unleashes in the final battle inspire genuine shivers of fear. And there are witty miracles; the dragon demolition of Gringott’s goblin bank is a riotous image of a corrupt financial firm’s collapse. When Hermione transforms herself into a double of Bellatrix Lestrange (Helena Bonham Carter) for a spy mission, Bonham Carter plays Watson impersonating Bellatrix to hilarious effect. Near the climax, Harry’s mentor Albus Dumbledore (Michael Gambon) returns in a vision to advise the young wizard that words are potent forms of enchantment, rich with the power to hurt or heal. Here the secret of the series is revealed. If the Potter franchise had been cooked up in a studio pitch meeting with storyboards and visual-effects demos, it could never become the generation-defining phenomenon that it is. It captured the imagination of an era like no cultural event since Beatlemania because it stands on a solid million-word foundation created by J.K. Rowling. She put story and character front and center, and when they’re succeeding, the Potter films do, too. For all the movies’ dazzle and flash and Hippogriffs, the characters are more vivid than the special effects. It is our emotional involvement with the threedimensional heroes and villains, sidekicks and background players that draws us back time after time. The final chapter ends with an epilogue that puts a lump in your throat and makes you want to watch them all again from the beginning. That’s the definition of a classic.

STUDIO

Daniel Radcliffe has played Harry Potter throughout the series, which began in 2001.

HOW WELL DO YOU KNOW ‘HARRY’? The eighth and final “Harry Potter” film, “The Deathly Hallows: Part 2,” opens Friday. Are you ready? Check your preparedness with this eight-question quiz:

6. Legend has it that the three Deathly Hallows combined make their owner “the master of death.” Which of these is not a Hallow? a. Deluminator; b. Cloak of Invisibility; c. Elder Wand; d. Resurrection Stone

1. In his vile effort to achieve immortality, Voldemort created Horcruxes containing pieces of his soul. Which of these objects is not a Horcrux? a. Tom Riddle’s diary; b. Marvolo Gaunt’s ring; c. Neville Longbottom’s Rememberall; d. Salazar Slytherin’s locket

7. What village was once home to the Potters and may hold secrets to Dumbledore’s past? a. Little Hangleton; b. Ottery St. Catchpole; c. Prairie Village; d. Godric’s Hollow

2. In the films, Ralph Fiennes plays Voldemort. How do you pronounce the actor’s name? a. Ralf Feens; b. Rafe Fines; c. Rolf Fie-ness; d. Real Fiend

8. Who betrayed Harry’s parents? a. Peter Pettigrew; b. Stan Shunpike; c. Phineus Nigellus Black; d. Sirius Black

Answers 1. C. And more will be revealed in the last movie. 2. B. “Rafe Fines”— that’s how the Brits say it. 3. C. Newton Scamander wrote “Fantastical Beasts & Where to Find Them” (with the help of author J.K. Rowling). 4. D. Confundo simply causes confusion. 5. B. Dementors. 4. Voldemort and his Death Eaters are only too happy to cast 6. A. In his will, Dumbledore bequeathed his Deluminator to Unforgivable Curses. Which of these is not one of them? Ron Weasley. a. Avada Kedavra; b. Crucio; c. Imperio; d. Confundo 7. D. It’s also the birthplace of Hogwarts founder Godric 5. Which creatures drain peace, hope and happiness from the air Gryffindor. 8. A. Peter Pettigrew did it, but Sirius Black was blamed for around them? it. a. Boggarts; b. Dementors; c. Grindylows; d. Your in-laws 3. Voldemort may have created Horcruxes from objects tied to the founders of Hogwarts. Who was not one of the founders? a. Rowena Ravenclaw; b. Godric Gryffindor; c. Newton Scamander; d. Helga Hufflepuff

onight at midnight, an era comes to an end. Fourteen years after the release of “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone,” the fictitious young wizard and his band of unlikely hero companions continue to captivate the interest of audiences of all ages. The Harry Potter series seemed destined for success from the beginning. Author J.K. Rowling, an unknown writer, struck gold by creating a world complete with realistic characters struggling against problems both of the “Muggle” world and the realm of witchcraft and wizardry. By 2001, the first book had been transformed into a theatrical release, and the franchise boomed to new heights. Now, the final film of the franchise, “Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part II,” hits theaters at midnight, and fans in Southern Illinois find themselves filled with mixed emotions. Seventeen-year-old Paige Beuligmann of Carterville remembers her parents reading “Sorcerer’s Stone” aloud to her as a child, and as soon as she could read on her own, she picked up the rest of the books. With tickets and Gryffindor shirts in hand, she and her friends are excited for opening day. “I’m also sad at the same time,” she said. “The books ended (in 2007), but I always had

the movies to look forward to, and now they’re coming to an end, too.” For Beuligmann, Potter has been almost like a childhood friend, as they’ve grown up together. Rowling also succeeded in crafting a tale that conveys with potential to sway young readers with positive role models and influences. “I’ve grown up with Harry Potter,” Beuligmann said. “I’m part of the Potter Generation, as they call it. It’s been a part of who I am. The message just really hit home.” Twenty-five-year-old Lauren Kemp of Carbondale knows the feeling. She began reading the Potter books in sixth grade as part of an accelerated reading program and has been a fan ever since. The latter movies became somewhat of a tradition, too, as she and her now-husband would see them together on opening night.

STUDIO

Ralph Fiennes plays Lord Voldemort (above). Emma Watson (bottom, from left) portrays Hermione Granger, Ruper Grint plays Ron Weasley and Daniel Radcliffe is Harry Potter.

They plan to do the same Friday, as they’ll travel to St. Louis to watch the final scenes of the franchise unfold on an IMAX screen. She often talks with friends about the translations of the books to movie form, and while she understands the length of the novels and intricate subplots are too much to fit into a twohour movie, there’s one element she really hopes

to see shine through in this last movie. “They’ve made Harry out to be kind of a pansy,” she said. “He never does anything on his own; he relies on everyone else. That’s not how he is in the books. We need to see him step up and really be the hero.” adam.testa@thesouthern.com 618-351-5031 On Twitter: AdamTestaSI

FLIPSIDE Thursday, July 14, 2011 Page 7


MOVIES New on DVD Rango: Rango is an ordinary chameleon who accidentally winds up in the town of Dirt, a lawless outpost in the Wild West in desperate need of a new sheriff. Starring the voices of Johnny Depp and Timothy Olyphant. Directed by Gore Verbinski. Rated PG. The Lincoln Lawyer: A lawyer conducts business from the back of his Lincoln town car while representing a client. Starring Marisa Tomei and Matthew McConaughey. Directed by Brad Furman. Rated R. Insidious: A family looks to prevent evil spirits from

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

trapping their comatose child. Starring Patrick Wilson and Rose Byrne. Directed by James Wan. Rated PG-13. Arthur: A playboy stands to lose a wealthy inheritance when he falls for a woman his family doesn't like. Starring Russell Brand and Greta Gerwig. Directed by James Winer. Rated PG-13. [Rec] 2: A medical officer and a SWAT team outfitted with video cameras are sent into the sealed off apartment. Starring Jonathan Mellor. Directed by Jaume Balagueró and Paco Plaza. Rated R. — Adam Testa

BELLEVILLE

ANTIQUE

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

COVER STORY

‘Winnie the Pooh’ ***

first trek to the multiplex and for parents and Rated G; starring Jim grandparents with fond Cummings, Craig memories of the Ferguson, John Cleese and “Hundred Acre Wood.” Kristen Anderson-Lopez; This “Pooh” is a directed by Stephen J. musical homage to the 1960s Pooh short films, Anderson and Don Hall; adding new songs (by opening Friday at “Book of Mormon” University Place 8 in composer Robert Lopez Carbondale and AMC and Kristen AndersonCentre 8 in Marion Lopez) and a lovely revival of the “Winnie the Pooh” BY ROGER MOORE title tune, winsomely MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS sung by Zooey Deschanel. And if the animation “Winnie the Pooh,” doesn’t have quite the Disney’s latest film hand-colored warmth of revival of A.A. Milne’s those older cel-animated “willy, nilly, silly old classics, it more than bear,” is longer on charm does justice to the world’s than it is on laughs. Or favorite “tubby little length. But it’s a treat for cubby all stuffed with children making their fluff.”

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Page 8 Thursday, July 14, 2011 FLIPSIDE

THEATER

‘Winnie the Pooh’ a perfect first movie for children

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Co-writer/directors Stephen J. Anderson (“Meet the Robinsons) and Don Hall, with the help of five other credited screenwriters, emphasize Pooh’s literary roots, making Winnie work his way through paragraphs and pages of words — literal words that collapse into piles of letters at Pooh’s bidding. “Is there honey in this paragraph?” There had better be, because “I am a bear of very little brain and long words bother me,” he sighs. Voice actor Jim Cummings does a great impersonation of the late Sterling Holloway, the original Pooh, as well as Paul Winchell, the original voice of Tigger. The story is as simple as any Pooh picture. The bear is out of honey “and a Pooh bear takes care of his tummy.” But Pooh also has “a very important thing to do.” Sad old Eeyore (voiced by Bud Luckey) has lost his tail and the manic Rabbit (Tom Kenny) and verbose Owl (Craig Ferguson) make

various plans and proposals for rounding up a replacement. Eeyore is all about the puns this time out. A balloon as a substitute tail? “I’m still up in the air about it.” There’s a lovely little chalkboard animation interlude, some mild moments of alarm as Owl misreads “Back Soon” on Christopher Robin’s note as “Backson,” a beast that must have kidnapped the little boy who usually solves their problems for them. And Pooh sings, especially when he hallucinates about his favorite treat — “Everything is Honey.” It’s a funnier, more sophisticated and more nostalgic trip to the woods than “Pooh’s Heffalump Movie” or the most recent Tigger and Piglet pictures. The messages sink in about childish forgetfulness and putting the needs of others ahead of your own honey lust. Mainly, though, it’s nice to see that Disney wants to introduce tykes to the magic of going to the movies with family fare this gentle and warm. As always, “Pooh” stars in a very short movie, the idea being that like his youngest fans, he doesn’t have the attention span to carry a full-length feature. But this “Winnie the Pooh” is augmented by a delightful 2-D animated short, “The Ballad of Nessie,” a fanciful version of how the Loch Ness Monster came to create Loch Ness. “Nessie” is narrated in Dr. Seuss-style rhymes by Scottish comic Billy Connolly.


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

BOOKS

COVER STORY

Three classic fairy tales to come to life at SIU Arena CARBONDALE — For one day this November, Carbondale will be transformed into the happiest place on Earth. As part of the annual Southern Lights Entertainment series, Disney Live! will present its “Three Classic Fairy Tales” show Friday, Nov. 11, at the SIU Arena. The show features more than 25 famous Disney characters and is produced by Feld Entertainment, the same group behind Disney on Ice. Mickey, Minnie, Donald and Goofy will take the audience on a captivating journey and bring three timeless fairy tale adventures to life on stage. Fans will join Snow White as she searches for her one true love, Cinderella as she gets ready for her magical night at the ball and Belle as she discovers happiness in the most unusual of places. Anchored amidst a transforming set, captivating choreography, innovative lighting and breathtaking costumes, this authentically-woven tale of “happily-ever-

PROVIDED

Southern Lights Entertainment will present Disney Live! on Friday, Nov. 11, at SIU Arena.

after” is a heart-warming Disney experience for the entire family. “We are delighted to offer this high-quality, family-oriented theatrical production at the SIU Arena,” said Bryan Rives, director of SIU Event Services. “‘Disney Live!’ is

Live Entertainment

‘

‘

Saturday, July 16th, 4pm-8pm

a high-quality theatrical show at an extremely affordable price and we hope all the parents with young kids in Southern Illinois take advantage of this opportunity.” Two performances will be featured at 3:30 and 6:30 p.m. Nov. 11. Tickets

are $15 and $24, and VIP seating is available. Children aged one and older need a ticket. They can be purchased online at SouthernLightsEntertain ment.com or by calling 618-453-6000. —The Southern

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FESTIVALS

THEATER

PAST hosts ‘Mitford Tea Party’ event ANNA — Plays written and adapted by retired drama coach and school teacher Lynn Stevenson has become legend in Union County. Through her Christian Circle Theater, she brings a sense of joy and satisfaction to many people across Southern Illinois. For years, she’s claimed each production would be her last but follows it up with yet another new idea. Now, she has arranged a cameo collection of her past works, all based on Jan Karon’s “Mitford” books, for a special presentation in Anna. Promoting Appreciation for Structural Treasures, a Union County-based historical preservation

organization, will host the performance as “A Mitford Tea Party.” The event is scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, July 16 and 17, at the historic St. Anne’s Church on South Main Street in Anna. Tickets are $10, and proceeds will support the restoration and preservation of the church venue. Light refreshments will be served, and entertainment will be provided by characters from the series, including Father Tim, Cynthia, Uncle Billy, Miss Rose and more. A number of items, including tea hats, will also be available for sale. — Adam Testa

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FLIPSIDE Thursday, July 14, 2011 Page 9


MOVIES Book & Authors The Amazing Appleknockers: By Teri Campbell and Anne Ryman, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, July 17, The Union County Museum, Cobden.

Classes Student Center Craft Shop: Variety of crafts and classes offered, SIUC; 618-453-3636, www.siuc studentcenter.org.

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

THINGS TO DO

Farm Toy Show: 6-9 p.m. Friday, July 15 and 9 a.m.-2:30 The Carbondale p.m. Saturday, July 16, 4476 Comedians: Stand-up comedy, Korte Road, Metropolis; 9-11 p.m. Wednesday, Station Tractor & Old Machinery Show, No. 13, 2400 W. Main St., 8 a.m., Saturday-Sunday, July Carbondale; 618-529-2424. 16-17, Metropolis; parade, 6 p.m. Saturday, downtown Events Metropolis; second parade, 2 p.m. Sunday, July 17, Williamson County Fair: fairgrounds; 618-524-2909; Today through Saturday, July 618-524-7048 or 16, fairgrounds, Marion; demolition derby, horse shows; cdwill@maxbb.com. Dog Days of Summer: Dog concerts; www.williamson wash, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday, countyillinoisfair.com.

Comedy

BOOKS

COVER STORY

July 16, Turley Park, Carbondale; donation requested; $5 for small pets, $10 for large; proceeds to area animal shelters; music by RognboB, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; appearance by Grey Dawg; 618-319-2715 or jerry@ neighborhood.coop. Cruise Night: 5-8 p.m. Saturday, July 16, city hall and Dairy Queen parking lots, Steeleville; 618-965-3253.

Films The Twilight Saga: Eclipse: On outdoor screening, 7 p.m. Friday, July 15, Walker’s Bluff, north on Reed Station Road, Carterville; 618-985-8463 or www.walkersbluff.com. Confidence Man: Documentary, 7 and 9 p.m., Saturday, July 16, Liberty Theater, Murphysboro; subject, Hugh DeNeal; $7; 618-684-5880. Viewing Issues of Labor and Capital: Film series, 2 p.m. July 17, Aug. 14 and Sept. 18, Varsity Center for the Arts; first film, Bread and Roses, Sunday, July 17; starring Adrien Brody; 618-351-7005.

FESTIVALS

Theater/Performances The Sound of Music: TodaySunday, July 14-17, McLeod Theatre, SIUC; 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday; $25/$10; playhouse.siuc.edu; www. southernticketsonline.com or 618-453-6000. A Mitford Tea Party: 2 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, July 16-17, St. Anne’s Church, South Main Street, Anna; proceeds benefit PAST in Union County; play based on books by Jan Karon; $10; reserve at 618-833-4307 or 618-833-3228. Chicago: Musical, 7 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, July 21-23, O’Neil Auditorium, John A. Logan College. Carterville; presented by Dance4Grandma Theatricals; $12; 618-9852828 or 618-457-7676, ext. 8287. Peter Pan: ThursdaySunday, July 28-31 and Monday, Aug. 1, McLeod Theatre, SIUC; 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays and Monday and 2 p.m. Sunday; $16/$8; playhouse .siuc.edu; www.southern ticketsonline.com or 618-4536000.

222 W. Freeman Campus Shopping Center Downtown Carbondale

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THEATER

Al Parr’s Campus Lake photos on display at SIUC CARBONDALE — Al Parr of Carbondale doesn’t buy the “familiarity breeds contempt” concept. A retired Southern Illinois University Carbondale employee, Parr began taking daily walks around Campus Lake in 2006. It didn’t take long before he began to appreciate the beauty of the lake and the critters that call it home. A former photography student, Parr began documenting his walks with photographs. “I just go,” he said. “The opportunities just present themselves. I think the secret is, I just walk the lake so often, I’m so familiar. If anything out of the ordinary catches my eye, I’ll go investigate it.” Remarkably, most of Parr’s incredible photos are taken from the path surrounding the lake. “I seldom leave the trail, especially in the summer because of the poison ivy,” he said. “There is an awful lot to see out there. As small as it is, people are surprised I see as much as I do.” Now, Southern Illinoisans are invited to see Parr’s works for themselves, as nearly 80 of his photographs are on display in the Art Alley Gallery on the second floor of the SIUC Student Center. The photos will remain on display through Sept. 15. A reception is scheduled for 4:30 to 6 p.m. Friday, July 22. — The Southern

Page 10 Thursday, July 14, 2011 FLIPSIDE


MOVIES

ART

MUSIC

WINERIES

Galleries, 3648 Washington Blvd., St. Louis; artifacts and Young Artists’ Workshop movie memorabilia; gallery series: Drawing, painting, talk, 6 p.m. Tuesday, July 19 by sculpture classes at the Little Tom Stockman; through Aug. Egypt Arts Centre, Marion; 6; www.thesheldon.org or sessions start Monday, July 18; 314-533-9900. 618-997-0421 or allencarstens The Fantastic Worlds of @frontier.com. Ralph Guy: Beal Grand Patterning Beadweaving: Corridor Gallery, Cedarhurst Saturday, July 23 and Sunday, Center for the Arts, Mount July 24, Southpass Beads, 203 Vernon; through July 24; E. Ash St. Cobden; 618-893www.cedarhurst.org or 6170; louann.elwell@gmail. 618-242-1236. com or www.southpassbeads. Through The Looking com. Glass: Disney to Vegas; the work of Michael Sarver, Call For Entries Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mount Vernon; through July Open Photography 24; www.cedarhurst.org or Competition: By the Little 618-242-1236. Egypt Arts Association, CitiBlocs: Cedarhurst Marion; deadline, July 31; call Center for The Arts, Mount 618-998-8530. Vernon; hands-on gallery Heart & Soul Art Exhibit: Deadline Sept. 2, Paducah City exhibit for families; through July 24; www.cedarhurst.org Hall; entries are limited; exhibition dates, Sept. 7-Oct. 3; or 618-242-1236. Tradition and Innovation: acrylic, oils, watercolors, Three Visions of Craft, Mitchell pastels, drawings, 3D, mixed Museum Gallery at media, collage and Cedarhurst, Mount Vernon; photography; 270-443-1200 features Dick Codding, Marilyn Codding Boysen and Bill Exhibits Boysen; through July 24; Vincentennial: The Legacy www.cedarhurst.org or of Vincent Price, Sheldon Art 618-242-1236.

Art Classes

THINGS TO DO

Guises and Appearances: Art of Jeffrey Stewart Mondy, Harrisburg District Library; through July 25; 618-2537455. Sunrise and Sunset: Photography show, Little Egypt Art Centre, 601 Tower Square, Marion; through July 31; www.littleegyptarts.com. R. Buckminster Fuller: Works relating to the life of R. Buckminster Fuller, Holistic Wellness Institute, Murdale Shopping Center, Carbondale; original dymaxiam map and photos of the construction of his geodesic dome, through July; 618-319-4751. Ben Gelman: Photo display by the former Southern Illinoisan columnist, University Museum, SIUC; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday; free; through Aug. 5; www.museum.siu.edu or 618-453-5388. Metals student Sarah Renshaw: University Museum, SIUC; 10 a.m.-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday; through Aug. 5; www.museum .siu.edu or 618-453-5388. Momentary Skyscrapers: Grain Elevators of the Midwest, a photographic exhibit by

BOOKS

COVER STORY

David Hammond, University Museum, SIUC; hours, 10 a.m.4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday; free; through Aug. 5; www.museum.siu.edu or 618-453-5388. A New Twist on Tradition: Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, Rend Lake, north of Benton; quilt artists; through Aug. 21; 618-629-2220. A Parade of Quilts: Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, Rend Lake, north of Benton; varied display of unique art quilts; through Sept. 15; 618-629-2220. Civil War Era Quilts: Southern Illinois Art & Artisans Center, Rend Lake, north of Benton; an album quilt made by a neighbor of Abraham Lincoln and quilts made by soldiers’ family members; exit 77 off of Interstate 57; hours, 9-5 p.m. daily; free; through Sept. 30; 618-629-2220. Down On The Farm: Memories of Not That Long

FESTIVALS

Ago, Logan Museum, 1613 Edith St., Murphysboro; through mid-November; 618-303-0569 or johnalogan museum@globaleyes.net. Ongoing art exhibit: Photographs of Juhree Veach, mosaics from Janet Altoff and sculpture from Tom Horn, StarView Vineyards, 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618-8939463 or www.starview vineyards.com. Jo Loomis: Williamson County Pavilion, Marion; paintings; 618-889-5330 or vanjol@frontier.com.

Receptions Michala’s Journey: Reception, 5:30 -7:30 p.m. today, July 14, Tribeca Gallery, 127 Market House Square, Paducah; by Michala Pepper: through Sept. 7; www. facebook.com/michalapepper or mspepper2007@hotmail. com.

THEATER Art as Frozen Music: By Joyce Hesketh, Central Showcase, 1825 W. Main St. Carbondale; Realty Central, Murdale Shopping Center; multimedia artist and musician; closing reception, 4-6 p.m., Friday, July 15. John F. Boyd: A Retrospective Exhibit, anthill gallery & vintage curiosities, 102 Front St., Cobden; Boyd awarded an 1997 Emmy for a program “The Rainbow Trail;” his works in watercolor, pen and ink and mixed media will be on display; reception, 6-8 p.m. Saturday, July 16; through July 31; 618-303-3183 or www.anthillgallery.com. Celebrating the Wildlife & Landscape of Campus Lake: Photography by Al Parr. Art Alley Gallery, second floor of the SIUC Student Center; July 15 through Sept. 15; reception, 4:30-6 p.m. Friday, July 22; 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; www. dialparr.com.

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Harry Potter's Final Spell – 'Deathly Hallows: Part 2' marks the end of an era

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