Issuu on Google+


z CONTACT US z Call toll-free: 800-228-0429 Cara Recine, Lifestyles and special projects editor cara.recine@thesouthern.com / ext. 5075 Brenda Kirkpatrick, lists, live music flipside@thesouthern.com / ext. 5089 Rhonda Ethridge, cover designer rhonda.ethridge@thesouthern.com / ext. 5118 The Southern Illinoisan (USPS 258-908) is published daily at a yearly subscription rate of $178. It is published at 710 N. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, IL 62901. It is owned by Lee Enterprises of Davenport, Iowa.

WHAT’S INSIDE Live music . . . . . . .4 Music . . . . . . . . . .4-6 Concerts . . . . . . . . .6 Cover story . . .6-7, 9

Things to do . . . . . .8 Theater . . . . . . . . . .8 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . .9 Movies . . . . . . .10-11

Page 2 Thursday, March 4, 2010 FLIPSIDE

Top 20 Restaurant of the Week: Houlihan’s BY DAVID ZOELLER SPECIAL ADVERTISING COPY

CARBONDALE — Houlihan’s Restaurant, just east of Carbondale on Illinois 13 at Reed Station Parkway, is a place where upscale and casual dining come together. “Menu-wise, we have a variety that would suit anybody,” said Shane Smith, general manager of the restaurant, which opened about six years ago. From burgers to pasta, filet mignon to Mexican dishes, the fare covers a broad range. A lot of the items are standard across Houlihan’s restaurants nationwide, “but we do have the freedom to keep a few things on the menu, such as our Reubens and Marsala penne pasta, items that we have noticed people in the area really like,” Smith said. Houlihan’s is adjacent to the Holiday Inn and provides room service and catering to the hotel guests and special functions. The restaurant has also been catering other events in the area, such as the Carbondale Chamber of Commerce banquet. “The catering business is definitively taking off,” Smith said. “We’ve got the equipment, the personnel and the organization, which is what it takes to get catering events taken care of,” Smith said. Groups of all sizes can be accommodated for business or personal functions. Fresh ingredients arrive daily and everything is homemade, from the dressings on down, Smith said. “Being that everything is homemade, we can pretty much deal with anything,

DAVID ZOELLER / THE SOUTHERN

Patrons enjoy a meal at Houlihan’s in Carbondale, this week’s Top 20 Restaurant of the Week.

‘The city of Carbondale and SIU have treated us really well.’ SHANE SMITH GENERAL MANAGER OF HOULIHAN’S

such as people who have (food) allergies and stuff like that,” he said. In addition to the business generated from travelers staying at the hotel, the restaurant has a loyal local following. According to Smith, business has been good since the eatery opened. “The city of Carbondale and SIU have treated us really well,” he said. “This business is always challenging and you try to keep on top of things.” New menu items are always under consideration, like a small plates menu where diners can create their meals from smaller portions of several different items. “We’re trying to decide

Buy one entrée and get one free at this restaurant and other featured restaurants across Southern Illinois with the 2010 Top 20 Dining Card. Top 20 Cards are available for purchase at The Southern offices in Carbondale and Marion by calling 618-529-5454 or online at www.thesouthern.com/top20. Cards are $20 each plus $1 per order for cards to be mailed. Some exclusions may apply. See card for details.

DETAILS Who: Houlihan’s What: Upscale, casual dining, sandwiches, chicken, pasta, steak, seafood Where: 2310 Reed Station Parkway, Carbondale Hours: 6-10 a.m. daily for breakfast; 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. for lunch and dinner Sunday through Thursday; 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday; bar open one hour later. Phone: 618-457-4020 Did you know? Houlihan’s also offers catering for outside events if that’s something we want to do,” Smith said. Prices for entrées can range from $10 for a drink and sandwich to up to $35 or $40 for a filet mignon and glass of wine. “We’ve always got something going on where people can save money,”

Smith said, including halfprice appetizers from 4 to 6 p.m. each day, to daily drink specials and a variety of coupons and discounts. “We try to give them different avenues to enjoy our restaurant,” Smith said.


A new kind of church recruitment tool NEWS OF THE WEIRD Chuck Shepherd

P

astor John Renken’s Xtreme Ministries of Memphis, Tenn., is one of a supposedly growing number of churches that use “mixed martial arts” events to recruit wayward young men to the Christian gospel. Typically, after leading his flock in solemn prayer to a loving God, Renken adjourns the session to the back room, where a New York Times reporter found him in February shouting encouragement to his violent parishioners: “Hard punches!” Renken yelled. “Finish the fight! To the head! To the head!” One participant told the Times that fight nights bring a greater masculinity to religion, which he said had, in recent years, gone soft.

Government in action! Over-connecting the dots: At age 8, Mike Hicks is a frequent air traveler with his mother, and while she is seldom noticed by airport screeners, “Mikey” almost always is because he shares a name with someone on the enhanced-security list that is one level below “no fly” (one of 1,600 such Michael Hickses in the U.S.). His mother told The New York Times in January that Mikey has been patted down by security since he was 2. Too much diversity: In January, the U.S. Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division posted a job announcement supposedly in line with current affirmative-action policy. The division is seeking “experienced attorneys” and was encouraging “qualified applicants with targeted disabilities” to apply. Legally protected “targeted disabilities” include the traditional, such as blindness, but also “mental retardation.”

Great art! Just after Christmas, the Anglican Church of St. Peter in Great Limber, England, unveiled artist Adam Sheldon’s 6-foot-high representation of the crucifixion

crashed into the Country Boy Family Restaurant in Dunedin, Fla. (October). An 82-year-old man crashed into the Egypt Star Bakery in Whitehall Township, Pa. (November). A 78-year-old woman drove off of a 30-foot cliff (but the Chutzpah car’s plunge was halted when it Former Stoughton, Mass., police lodged against a tree) near Hannibal, sergeant David Cohen was convicted Mo. (August). A 92-year-old man in 2007 of attempted extortion and crashed into the Biscuits ‘N’ Gravy witness-tampering and sentenced and More restaurant in Port Orange, to 30 months in jail. In November Fla. (January) (but was not deterred 2009, he filed a formal demand for amidst the rubble he created, as he payment of at least $113,000 he said calmly went inside, sat down and the department owes him for ordered breakfast). unused vacation, sick leave and comp time. He also claims extra pay Tough guys because, while still on the job, he had to spend 481 hours in court and (1) A 31-year-old man was 280 hours preparing in order to stabbed in St. Cloud, Minn., in defend himself against the criminal January. He told police that he and charges. another man were approaching each other on a sidewalk, and when neither man gave way, the other It’s good to be a criminal man stabbed him. (2) Scott Elder, z Victim Debra Wilson testified 22, was charged with shooting a that she had been driven nearly into 24-year-old man in Savannah, Ga., bankruptcy by loan shark Robert in October after an escalating Reynolds, 39, who extorted over argument that started when one of time the equivalent of about the two strangers sent a text $135,000. In December, Reynolds message to a wrong number. One was convicted in Durham Crown comment led to another, and the Court but ordered to repay only the men agreed to meet in a downtown equivalent of about $2,300. parking lot to settle things. z In September 2008, veteran (3) Lankward Harrington, 25, was criminal Waled Salem and two walking past a gardener working on partners were discovered lawn in Washington, D.C., in burglarizing the home of October 2006 when grass clippings businessman Munir Hussain. Salem, blew onto his clothes. At his trial in wielding a knife, restrained Hussain, October 2009, Harrington was his wife, and children and resumed convicted of murder for shooting the ransacking. Hussain freed the gardener four times in the face. himself and chased the men away, Said Harrington, on the witness catching up only with Salem, whom stand: “He got grass on me. (I) take he then beat with a cricket bat. In pride in my appearance.” December 2009 in Reading Crown Court, Salem was sentenced to Bright ideas probation, but Hussain got 30 months in jail for assault. Lenoir County, N.C., sheriff’s deputies raided a suspected Now, which one is the brake? marijuana farm in January and learned that the grow operation was Elderly drivers’ recent lapses of all underground. The 60 live plants concentration, accidentally were being cultivated inside an confusing the brake pedal with the abandoned school bus, which had gas: An 89-year-old man crashed been completely buried, using through the front of Sussex Eyecare several backhoes, accessible by a opticians in Seaford, England (June). tunnel and with a garage built on top A driver “in her late 80s” crashed of it. into the Buttonwood Bakery in Hanover Township, Pa. SEND ITEMS to weirdnews@ (September). An 86-year-old man earthlink.net. consisting of 153 pieces of toast. Sheldon browned the bread himself, then painstakingly either scraped (to lighten) or torched (to darken) each piece to fashion the tableau.

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 4, 2010 Page 3


CRAVING KARAOKE?

WEEK OF MARCH 4-10

WANT TO BE LISTED? Coffeehouses, Cafés and Eateries Laurie McClain with The Gordons: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Cousin Andy’s Coffeehouse, Fellowship Hall, Church of the Good Shepherd, 515 Orchard Drive, Carbondale; www.cousinandy.org, Etherton Switch: 8 p.m. Saturday, Yellow Moon Café, 110 N. Front St., Cobden; www.yellowmooncafe.com; 618-893-2233. Giant City Slickers: 7 p.m. Friday, Crazy Joe’s Fish House 708 Suchman Road, Ava, 618-763-4417.

Wineries Loose Gravel: 6-9 p.m. Friday, Rustle Hill Winery Mel Goot: 6-9 p.m. Friday, Walker’s Bluff Sharon & Guest: 2-5 p.m., Saturday, Von Jakob Orchard J. Brown & The Workin’ Man’s Blues Band: 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Blue Sky Vineyard Blue Afternoon: 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Orlandini Vineyard. Marty Davis:

2-6 p.m. Saturday, StarView Vineyards. The Natives: 5-9 p.m. Saturday, Rustle Hill. Rich Fabec: 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Walker’s Bluff Concordia: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Blue Sky Vineyard Ivas John: 2-5 p.m., Sunday, Von Jakob Orchard Christine Bauer: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Rustle Hill Winery

Blue Sky Vineyard: 3150 S. Rocky Comfort Road, Makanda; 618-995-9463. Orlandini Vineyard: 410 Thorn Lane, Makanda; 618-995-2307. Rustle Hill Winery: U.S. 51, Cobden; 618893-2700. StarView Vineyards: 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618 893-9463. Von Jakob Orchard: 230 Illinois 127, Alto Pass; 618-893-4600. Walker’s Bluff: North on Reed Station Road, Carterville; 618-985-8463.

Page 4 Thursday, March 4, 2010 FLIPSIDE

Karaoke and DJ lists are online at flipside online.com.

Call 618-351-5089 or e-mail brenda.kirkpatrick@thesouthern.com

z FRIDAY

z TONIGHT BENTON Duncan Dance Barn:: Spring Pond Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. CARBONDALE PK’s: Defined Perception Tres Hombres: The Giving Tree Band MOUNT VERNON The Tavern on 10th: Live Blues Trio, 7-11 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Mike’s Band, 7-10 p.m. WEST FRANKFORT WB Ranch Barn: Little Egypt Country Band 6:30 - 9:30 p.m.

CARBONDALE Pinch Penny/Copper Dragon: The Join, 10 p.m. PK’s: Joe Swank with Purple Hank Tres Hombres: County Line w/Josh Brown, 10 p.m.1 a.m. INA Ina Community Building: Friday Night Jam Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Robert Ray and

Yesterday’s Country, 7-10 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Rebel Country, 7-10 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Country Sidekicks, 7-10 p.m. WHITE ASH The White Ash Barn: The Vintage Country Band, 7-10 p.m. WHITTINGTON Corner Dance Hall: Jacks R Better, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

z SATURDAY CARBONDALE PK’s: Allison Floyd DU QUOIN The Wet Spot: Lonell and The Petty Thieves, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. HERRIN American Legion: Stagefright, 8:30 p.m. JOHNSTON CITY Linemen’s Lounge: Mixed

Company, 9 p.m.-1 a.m. LAKE OF EGYPT Ramesse: Sixx Killers, 9 p.m.1 a.m. MARION Marion Eagles: Feelin’ Country, 8 p.m.-midnight MOUNT VERNON Double K’s Kickin Country: Cobb County, 7-10:30 p.m.

z TUESDAY

z SUNDAY CARBONDALE Key West: Ivas John Blues Band MARION Marion Eagles: Feelin’

Country, 6-10 p.m. WHITE ASH The White Ash Barn: The Stoffels, 2-4 p.m.

z MONDAY MARION Marion Youth Center: Ragtag Band, 7-10 p.m.

SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Danny & Country Sounds, 7-10 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Weekenders, 7-10 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Lil’ Boot & Classic Country, 7-10 p.m.

WEST FRANKFORT Wit and Wisdom: As Time Goes By, 7-10 p.m.

z WEDNESDAY DU QUOIN CARBONDALE Tres Hombres: The Giant Ten Pin Alley: Piano Bob, City Slickers/Black Yodel 6-9 p.m.

CARBONDALE PK’s: Whistle Pigs Tres Hombres: Patrick Meyers and Open Mic Night MOUNT VERNON Double K’s Kickin Country: Jacks-RBetter, 7-10:30 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Rebel Country, 7-10 p.m. WEST FRANKFORT WB Ranch Barn: WB Ranch Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. WHITE ASH The White Ash Barn: The Heartland Country Band, 7-10 p.m.

DIRECTIONS & DIGITS Anna VFW: 70 VFW Lane, Anna 618-833-5182 Corner Dance Hall: 200 Franklin St., Whittington 618-303-5266 Duncan Dance Barn: 13545 Spring Pond Road, Benton 618-435-6161 The Get-Away: 804 N. Douglas St., West Frankfort 618-937-3545 Ina Community Building: 504 Elm St., Ina 618-315-2373 John Brown’s on the Square: 1000 Tower Square, Marion 618-997-2909 Key West: 1108 W. Main, Carbondale 618-351-5998 Linemen’s Lounge: 100 E. Broadway, Johnston City Lion’s Cave: South Street, Thompsonville 618-218-4888 Marion American Legion: Longstreet Road, Marion 618-997-6168 Marion Eagles: Rural Route 3, Marion / 618-993-6300 Mollie’s: 107 E. Union St., Marion 618-997-3424 Old Country Store Dance Barn: Main Street, Thompsonville, 618-927-2770. Orient American Legion: 404 Jackson St., Orient 618-932-2060 Perfect Shot: 3029 S. Park Ave., Herrin / 618-942-4655 Pinch Penny Pub/Copper Dragon: 700 E. Grand, Carbondale / 618-549-3348 PK’s: 308 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale / 618-529-1124 Ramesse: 1754 Illinois 37, Lake of Eygpt, 618-995-9104 Steelhorse Saloon: 202 Dewmain Lane, Carterville 618-985-3549 Tavern on 10th: 224 S. 10th St., Mount Vernon 618-244-7821 Tomigirl’s Rollin-in: 14960 Illinois 37, Johnston City 618-983-7655 Trackside Dance Barn: 104 Rock St., Spillertown 618-993-3035 WB Ranch Barn: 1586 Pershing Road, West Frankfort 618-937-3718 Walt’s Pizza — Pasta Grill: 213 S. Court St., Marion 618-993-8668 Whisker Willy’s Bar & Grill 13510 N. Illinois 37, Marion 618-983-5300 White Ash Barn: 207 Potter St., White Ash / 618-997-4979 Wit and Wisdom Nutritional Site: 225 E. Poplar St., West Frankfort / 618-937-3070 Xrossroads: 101 Rushing Drive, Herrin / 618-993-8393 The Zone Lounge: 14711 Illinois 37, Whittington 618-629-2039


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z

ABBA tribute band Waterloo to play Paducah PADUCAH — Experience the music of ABBA and “Mamma Mia” all over again as ABBA tribute band Waterloo takes to the stage March 11 at The Carson Center. With the original sound and matching clothes, Katja Nord and Camilla Hedrén will try to bring

pop history back to life. The band, Waterloo, was formed by Nord and Camilla Dahlin (now Hedrén) and started performing in clubs around Sweden in 1996. The former ABBA sax player, Uffe Andersson, was the band’s guest of honor at the very first

Waterloo show. Over the years, Waterloo has been called the U.S.’s top ABBA tribute band. The show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $29, $39 and $49. For more information call 270-4504444 or go to www.the carsoncenter.org. — The Southern

Herrin native invited to CMA Series in NYC At the same time, he would hit songs for Brooks COUNTRY write & Dunn, Gary Allan and SCENE Montgomery Gentry. To date, his most Vince Hoffard recognizable work has been “The More I Drink” by Blake Shelton, “Living avid Lee Murphy might be the smartest in Fast Forward” by Kenny Chesney and Jason man in Nashville. Aldean’s monster “Big The Herrin native tore Green Tractor.” up the country charts in For his effort, Murphy 1995 with hits like “Out has been invited to appear with a Bang” and chartat the Country Music topping “Dust on the Association’s Songwriters Bottle.” During this very Series on March 25. He successful year, his road will share the bill with house anthem “Party Dierks Bentley, Jim Crowd” was the most Beavers and Bob DiPiero. played song on radio. After years of struggling, Advance notice is being he made it to the top. The given to Southern Illinois fans to allow for travel lean years of paying dues turned him into a creative time. The concert will be at Joe’s Pub in New York genius that was fully City. Tickets are $25 and prepared for his big break can be purchased at Joe’s at MCA Records. Pub Web site. Gazing out at the giant The pub was chosen for Arizona cactus as his its special vibe and massive Silver Eagle tour incredible acoustics, bus glided down the highway in the late 1990s, which is appealing to a superstar like Bentley, who Murphy realized he had thrives in a small, intimate finally conquered the setting. country music world. On this night, fog Murphy was at the machines, laser lights and height of his popularity jumbo video screens are when he figured out an scrapped for the stripped even better way of doing down sound of a business. He changed songwriters showcase. directions and began to The participants will give focus on songwriting. a brief narrative of what Staying on his spacious inspired them to write farm on the outskirts of Music City, he was able to before performing. Murphy wrote “Good spend more time with his wife and three young boys. One Comin’ On” for

D

Blackberry Smoke. The video for the song was at No. 3 on CMT last week. The group will be on friendly soil Saturday and Sunday when they perform at the Atlanta Motor Speedway. Murphy penned the current Josh Thompson single “Way Out Here,” giving the listener a new concept of truly being out in the sticks. As the opening act for Eric Church, Thompson revved up a capacity crowd at the Copper Dragon in Carbondale last year with his debut single “Beer on the Table.” “I really love the position I’m in right now,” Murphys said. “Other artists call me up and go ‘Hey man, I need a particular kind of song,’ and I try to write it for them. I get to live on my farm, write songs and just love what I’m doing. I get to be creative and still make music.” SI Opry: A performance of the SI Opry on Saturday at the Marion Cultural and Civic Center has been canceled. Herrin native Lori Eisenhauer was scheduled to perform. The show is rescheduled for Sept. 10. VINCE HOFFARD can be reached at 618-658-9095 or vincehoffard@yahoo. com.

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 4, 2010 Page 5


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z COVER STORY z THEATER zTHINGS TO DO z BOOKS z 7469 or metropolis.frontgatetickets.com. Brazilian guitar: David Burgess 7 p.m. Southern Illinois Friday, March 19, O’Neil Auditorium, John A Logan College, Carterville; 618-985-2828 ext. Benefit concert: 6 p.m. today, Benton Civic Center, 414 Hudelson St.; benefit for Bill 8287. Kevin Skinner: 8 p.m. Saturday, April 17, Raby; music by Jonathan Raby, Lester White, Harrah’s Metropolis Casino, Riverfront Event Courtney Cox, the First Christian Church Center; winner of NBC’s 2009 “America’s Choir, David Phelps; $5; doors open 6 p.m.; Got Talent;” $15; metropolis.frontgate concessions available; 618-435-5700. tickets.com or 888-512-7469; www.mykevin Piano, cello: 7:30 p.m. today, Old Baptist skinner.com. Foundation Recital Hal, SIUC; by Eric Lenz, Joe Bonamassa: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, assistant professor of cello at SIUC and Yuko Kato, assistant professor of piano; neoclassic May 5, Shryock Auditorium, SIUC; 618-4536000 or go online at www.southern musical era, early 20th century. lightsentertainment.com. The Join: With DJ Nasty Nate & DJ Thibault, 10 p.m. Friday, March 5, Copper Kentucky Dragon, 700 E. Grand Ave., Carbondale; featuring members of The Disco Biscuits and Paula Cole: 7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday, Carson The New Deal; doors open at 9 p.m.; 19 and Center, Myre River Room, Paducah; $39; over; $12 in advance, $15 day of show; 618270-450-4444 or www.thecarsoncenter.org. 549-3348 ABBA — The Music: Tribute band Branson Comes to Metropolis: Jim Waterloo, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 11, Stafford, 8 p.m., Friday-Saturday, March 12Carson Center, Paducah; $29, $39, $49; 13, Harrah’s Metropolis; $29.99; 888-512270-450-4444 or www.thecarsoncenter.org.

Concerts

presents

Between the ropes BY ADAM TESTA THE SOUTHERN

B

lack tarps cover the aluminum walls of Metropolis’ RPW Arena, while a series of makeshift plywood dividers separate the main stage area from a backstage lounge and dressing room. A decades-old wrestling ring sits in the center of the room, topped with a worn canvas mat. A spray-painted sign hangs above, while a doorway adorned with streamers faces the ring, serving as an entrance ramp for the evening’s competitors. And on a particularly rainy

Friday night, drips of water leak through the ceiling as musclebound CJ Popp and Mike Michaels double team their opponent, a much smaller but more agile Panic. But the performers and fans of Renegade Pro Wrestling don’t seem to mind, electing instead to embrace the environment and the character it adds to the show. Casual fans of professional wrestling may smirk at the facility, which pales in comparison to the pyrotechnics and special effects used almost daily on nationally televised programming produced by industry monolith World

Indy pro wrestling is finding its footing in the region — and it’s not the kind you’re used to watching on TV Wrestling Entertainment and its growing rival Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. But for those who understand and embrace independent wrestling, it’s not about the glitz and glamour; it’s about the heart and soul, devotion, dedication and opportunity to entertain hundreds of fans while improving skills inside and out of the ring. “Indy wrestling is necessary. Everyone comes from somewhere. People need to always be looking to hone their craft and get better,” said Matt Cage, a four-year wrestling veteran based in the St. Louis area. “I’m not going to lie, right TOM BARKER / THE SOUTHERN now our wrestling scene is Panic, a Renegade Pro Wrestling fan favorite, splashes his opponent CJ Popp in the corner during a three-way floundering. It’s a struggle to match also including Popp’s partner, Mike Michaels, on Feb. 5 at the RPW Arena in Metropolis. Popp’s strength do, but it’s something I overcame Panic’s agility, as the larger competitor scored the pinfall later in the match. wouldn’t trade for the world.”

dominates the Southern Illinois independent scene, hosting a traveling monthly show mostly Through the years, built around local performers. Philadelphia has established Renegade Pro Wrestling hosts itself as the American capital of shows from the spirited RPW independent wrestling, which Arena each week, and several derives its name from the other companies promote independent contractor status shows in the Metro East area, of performers and, in most bringing regional and national cases, lack of national media stars within driving distance exposure. While geographically isolated for many Southern Illinoisans. And for the performers who from traditional hotbeds like the travel to the region to entertain East Coast and California, crowds ranging from anywhere Southern Illinois has made strides in establishing itself as a from 30 to several hundred, the trip usually pays off, and not TOM BARKER / THE SOUTHERN small pocket of sports entertainment in a state flooded only with a smaller-thanMatt Cage, a St. Louis-based performer who frequently appears in publicly-assumed paycheck. with fly-by-night promotions Southern Illinois, lifts his opponent, Marcus Crane, during a tag team “(Midwest fans) really get into match also featuring Neil Diamond Cutter and Gunner Franks. Cage, a four- with less-than-respectable year veteran of the business, said independent wrestling has become a the action and drama of reputations. hard path to follow, but it’s something he wouldn’t trade for the world. wrestling, and they aren’t afraid All-American Pro Wrestling

For the fans

The Musical Charles Dickens’ touching tale of an orphan boy who runs away from the orphanage and tries to pick a pocket or two for Fagin, but gets caught. As Fagin tries to save him, all Oliver wants to do is go to his uncle, and live a good life.

at the Marion Cultural & Civic Center March 25th, 26th, & 27th @ 7:00pm Sunday, March 28th @ 2:00pm

Purchase tickets at Civic Center box office or by calling 997-4030.

Music, Lyrics and Book by Lionel Bart. Licensed by Arrangement with Olivery Productions, Ltd. and Olivery Promotions, Ltd.

Page 6 Thursday, March 4, 2010 FLIPSIDE

SEE IT LIVE

to let you know how they feel. I’ve wrestled quite a bit in Illinois over the past two years, especially southern Illinois, and those fans are very vocal,” said Mike Korklan, a St. Louis native and frequent AAPW performer who wrestles under the ring name Mike Sydal. He received the 2009 Rookie of the Year Award from Pro Wrestling Illustrated, the industry’s leading magazine. “Southern and central Illinois are great areas to live in right now if you’re a wrestler or wrestling fan, because the business is really heating up around there.” Sean Chambers, who founded AAPW in 2006, said the company aims to serve as a

throwback reminder to the territorial days of the wrestling industry before Vince McMahon’s WWE dominated the business. In those days, wrestling had a more regional focus than national, and aimed to provide top-notch, in-ring action more so than the theatrics many associate with the modern business model. Today, people tend to expect the same kind of product offered on television at independent shows, and the business carries the burden of a stigma of blood, sex and violence on its shoulders. During those days, future stars of the industry would frequently perform in areas like

To experience Southern Illinois’ independent wrestling scene for yourself, check out these regional promotions. Each company hosts a different style of wrestling, and some might not be appropriate for all-age audiences. Check their Web sites for additional information and upcoming dates and locations. All-American Pro Wrestling, runs monthly shows throughout Southern Illinois: www.allamericanprowrestling.com. Chaos Pro Wrestling, runs monthly shows in Metropolis: www.myspace.com/chaosprowrestling. High Voltage Wrestling Midwest, runs monthly shows in Granite City: www.highvoltagewrestling.wordpress.com. Illinois Championship Alliance Wrestling, runs periodic shows in Anna: www.myspace.com/icaw1. IWA Productions, runs weekly and monthly shows in Olney: www.iwaproductions.com. Metro East Championship Wrestling, runs monthly shows in Wood River: www.mecwrestling.net. Renegade Pro Wrestling, runs weekly shows on Fridays and Saturdays in Metropolis: www.myspace.com/devilsanddiamonds. Southern Illinois, and the crowds were wild with anticipation and excitement. That’s a feeling many in the business see re-emerging in the region. “It kind of reminds me of the type of crowds I use to be a part of when I was going to independent wrestling events growing up,” said Edmund “Livewire” McGuire, a homegrown Southern Illinois star and top fan favorite in AAPW. “The area fans respect wrestling and pay to see a show, and that’s exactly what we strive to give them. A lot of people don’t give the history of prowrestling in this area its just due.”

community,” said Tojo Yamamoto Jr., the founder and promoter of Renege Pro whose namesake father gained notoriety competing during the territory in a career spanning four decades. “I believe in giving back. These people that made my father have a good living for 30 years, and my mom instilled in me the spirit of giving back.” Renegade Pro sponsors an after-school program for children in the Metropolis area and pays the electricity bill for one local, low-income family each month. Recently, the promotion also sponsored a benefit show to raise money for the victim’s of the devastating earthquake in Haiti. Yamamoto’s wife, Dee Outside the ring Yamamoto, herself a wrestler During each two- to threeknown as Diabla, said children hour live event, wrestling stars today have lost their direction, and promoters focus on and she and her husband aim to providing top-notch help put them on the right entertainment and providing track. the paying fans with a solid Wrestling presents the battle show. between good and evil in a But for many, independent relatable format and teaches wrestling represents much more youth about the importance of than in-ring action; it also the heroes overcoming their offers a chance to give back to a enemies. community, a charity or the Providing a weekly affordable profession that has offered so source of entertainment also many opportunities in the past. helps keep youth off the street “From day one, my shows SEE WRESTLING / PAGE 9 have always given back to the

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 4, 2010 Page 7


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z COVER STORY z THEATER zTHINGS TO DO z BOOKS z 7469 or metropolis.frontgatetickets.com. Brazilian guitar: David Burgess 7 p.m. Southern Illinois Friday, March 19, O’Neil Auditorium, John A Logan College, Carterville; 618-985-2828 ext. Benefit concert: 6 p.m. today, Benton Civic Center, 414 Hudelson St.; benefit for Bill 8287. Kevin Skinner: 8 p.m. Saturday, April 17, Raby; music by Jonathan Raby, Lester White, Harrah’s Metropolis Casino, Riverfront Event Courtney Cox, the First Christian Church Center; winner of NBC’s 2009 “America’s Choir, David Phelps; $5; doors open 6 p.m.; Got Talent;” $15; metropolis.frontgate concessions available; 618-435-5700. tickets.com or 888-512-7469; www.mykevin Piano, cello: 7:30 p.m. today, Old Baptist skinner.com. Foundation Recital Hal, SIUC; by Eric Lenz, Joe Bonamassa: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, assistant professor of cello at SIUC and Yuko Kato, assistant professor of piano; neoclassic May 5, Shryock Auditorium, SIUC; 618-4536000 or go online at www.southern musical era, early 20th century. lightsentertainment.com. The Join: With DJ Nasty Nate & DJ Thibault, 10 p.m. Friday, March 5, Copper Kentucky Dragon, 700 E. Grand Ave., Carbondale; featuring members of The Disco Biscuits and Paula Cole: 7 and 9:30 p.m. Friday, Carson The New Deal; doors open at 9 p.m.; 19 and Center, Myre River Room, Paducah; $39; over; $12 in advance, $15 day of show; 618270-450-4444 or www.thecarsoncenter.org. 549-3348 ABBA — The Music: Tribute band Branson Comes to Metropolis: Jim Waterloo, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, March 11, Stafford, 8 p.m., Friday-Saturday, March 12Carson Center, Paducah; $29, $39, $49; 13, Harrah’s Metropolis; $29.99; 888-512270-450-4444 or www.thecarsoncenter.org.

Concerts

presents

Between the ropes BY ADAM TESTA THE SOUTHERN

B

lack tarps cover the aluminum walls of Metropolis’ RPW Arena, while a series of makeshift plywood dividers separate the main stage area from a backstage lounge and dressing room. A decades-old wrestling ring sits in the center of the room, topped with a worn canvas mat. A spray-painted sign hangs above, while a doorway adorned with streamers faces the ring, serving as an entrance ramp for the evening’s competitors. And on a particularly rainy

Friday night, drips of water leak through the ceiling as musclebound CJ Popp and Mike Michaels double team their opponent, a much smaller but more agile Panic. But the performers and fans of Renegade Pro Wrestling don’t seem to mind, electing instead to embrace the environment and the character it adds to the show. Casual fans of professional wrestling may smirk at the facility, which pales in comparison to the pyrotechnics and special effects used almost daily on nationally televised programming produced by industry monolith World

Indy pro wrestling is finding its footing in the region — and it’s not the kind you’re used to watching on TV Wrestling Entertainment and its growing rival Total Nonstop Action Wrestling. But for those who understand and embrace independent wrestling, it’s not about the glitz and glamour; it’s about the heart and soul, devotion, dedication and opportunity to entertain hundreds of fans while improving skills inside and out of the ring. “Indy wrestling is necessary. Everyone comes from somewhere. People need to always be looking to hone their craft and get better,” said Matt Cage, a four-year wrestling veteran based in the St. Louis area. “I’m not going to lie, right TOM BARKER / THE SOUTHERN now our wrestling scene is Panic, a Renegade Pro Wrestling fan favorite, splashes his opponent CJ Popp in the corner during a three-way floundering. It’s a struggle to match also including Popp’s partner, Mike Michaels, on Feb. 5 at the RPW Arena in Metropolis. Popp’s strength do, but it’s something I overcame Panic’s agility, as the larger competitor scored the pinfall later in the match. wouldn’t trade for the world.”

dominates the Southern Illinois independent scene, hosting a traveling monthly show mostly Through the years, built around local performers. Philadelphia has established Renegade Pro Wrestling hosts itself as the American capital of shows from the spirited RPW independent wrestling, which Arena each week, and several derives its name from the other companies promote independent contractor status shows in the Metro East area, of performers and, in most bringing regional and national cases, lack of national media stars within driving distance exposure. While geographically isolated for many Southern Illinoisans. And for the performers who from traditional hotbeds like the travel to the region to entertain East Coast and California, crowds ranging from anywhere Southern Illinois has made strides in establishing itself as a from 30 to several hundred, the trip usually pays off, and not TOM BARKER / THE SOUTHERN small pocket of sports entertainment in a state flooded only with a smaller-thanMatt Cage, a St. Louis-based performer who frequently appears in publicly-assumed paycheck. with fly-by-night promotions Southern Illinois, lifts his opponent, Marcus Crane, during a tag team “(Midwest fans) really get into match also featuring Neil Diamond Cutter and Gunner Franks. Cage, a four- with less-than-respectable year veteran of the business, said independent wrestling has become a the action and drama of reputations. hard path to follow, but it’s something he wouldn’t trade for the world. wrestling, and they aren’t afraid All-American Pro Wrestling

For the fans

The Musical Charles Dickens’ touching tale of an orphan boy who runs away from the orphanage and tries to pick a pocket or two for Fagin, but gets caught. As Fagin tries to save him, all Oliver wants to do is go to his uncle, and live a good life.

at the Marion Cultural & Civic Center March 25th, 26th, & 27th @ 7:00pm Sunday, March 28th @ 2:00pm

Purchase tickets at Civic Center box office or by calling 997-4030.

Music, Lyrics and Book by Lionel Bart. Licensed by Arrangement with Olivery Productions, Ltd. and Olivery Promotions, Ltd.

Page 6 Thursday, March 4, 2010 FLIPSIDE

SEE IT LIVE

to let you know how they feel. I’ve wrestled quite a bit in Illinois over the past two years, especially southern Illinois, and those fans are very vocal,” said Mike Korklan, a St. Louis native and frequent AAPW performer who wrestles under the ring name Mike Sydal. He received the 2009 Rookie of the Year Award from Pro Wrestling Illustrated, the industry’s leading magazine. “Southern and central Illinois are great areas to live in right now if you’re a wrestler or wrestling fan, because the business is really heating up around there.” Sean Chambers, who founded AAPW in 2006, said the company aims to serve as a

throwback reminder to the territorial days of the wrestling industry before Vince McMahon’s WWE dominated the business. In those days, wrestling had a more regional focus than national, and aimed to provide top-notch, in-ring action more so than the theatrics many associate with the modern business model. Today, people tend to expect the same kind of product offered on television at independent shows, and the business carries the burden of a stigma of blood, sex and violence on its shoulders. During those days, future stars of the industry would frequently perform in areas like

To experience Southern Illinois’ independent wrestling scene for yourself, check out these regional promotions. Each company hosts a different style of wrestling, and some might not be appropriate for all-age audiences. Check their Web sites for additional information and upcoming dates and locations. All-American Pro Wrestling, runs monthly shows throughout Southern Illinois: www.allamericanprowrestling.com. Chaos Pro Wrestling, runs monthly shows in Metropolis: www.myspace.com/chaosprowrestling. High Voltage Wrestling Midwest, runs monthly shows in Granite City: www.highvoltagewrestling.wordpress.com. Illinois Championship Alliance Wrestling, runs periodic shows in Anna: www.myspace.com/icaw1. IWA Productions, runs weekly and monthly shows in Olney: www.iwaproductions.com. Metro East Championship Wrestling, runs monthly shows in Wood River: www.mecwrestling.net. Renegade Pro Wrestling, runs weekly shows on Fridays and Saturdays in Metropolis: www.myspace.com/devilsanddiamonds. Southern Illinois, and the crowds were wild with anticipation and excitement. That’s a feeling many in the business see re-emerging in the region. “It kind of reminds me of the type of crowds I use to be a part of when I was going to independent wrestling events growing up,” said Edmund “Livewire” McGuire, a homegrown Southern Illinois star and top fan favorite in AAPW. “The area fans respect wrestling and pay to see a show, and that’s exactly what we strive to give them. A lot of people don’t give the history of prowrestling in this area its just due.”

community,” said Tojo Yamamoto Jr., the founder and promoter of Renege Pro whose namesake father gained notoriety competing during the territory in a career spanning four decades. “I believe in giving back. These people that made my father have a good living for 30 years, and my mom instilled in me the spirit of giving back.” Renegade Pro sponsors an after-school program for children in the Metropolis area and pays the electricity bill for one local, low-income family each month. Recently, the promotion also sponsored a benefit show to raise money for the victim’s of the devastating earthquake in Haiti. Yamamoto’s wife, Dee Outside the ring Yamamoto, herself a wrestler During each two- to threeknown as Diabla, said children hour live event, wrestling stars today have lost their direction, and promoters focus on and she and her husband aim to providing top-notch help put them on the right entertainment and providing track. the paying fans with a solid Wrestling presents the battle show. between good and evil in a But for many, independent relatable format and teaches wrestling represents much more youth about the importance of than in-ring action; it also the heroes overcoming their offers a chance to give back to a enemies. community, a charity or the Providing a weekly affordable profession that has offered so source of entertainment also many opportunities in the past. helps keep youth off the street “From day one, my shows SEE WRESTLING / PAGE 9 have always given back to the

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 4, 2010 Page 7


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z book signing, 2 p.m. Sunday, Union County Museum, 117 S. Reckoning at Eagle Creek Appleknocker Drive, Cobden; — The Secret Legacy of Coal a portion of the proceeds will in the Heartland: Author Jeff go toward the upkeep of the Biggers will read from his museum; sponsored by The book, 7 p.m. Saturday; Union County Historical and Mississippi Flyway, Murdale Genealogy Society; 618-893Shopping Center, 1925 W. Main St., Carbondale; book is 2567, 618-893-2865. Edmond P. DeRousse: free; dinner, 5 p.m.; www.jeff Author of “The Adventures of biggers.com, 618-521-1030. Giant City State Park and a Common Man,: will sign copies of his newest book, the Civilian Conservation Corps: A History in Words and 6:30 p.m. Tuesday, Du Quoin Pictures by Kay Rippelmeyer; Public Library; reception.

Books, Authors

Events Comic Book & Toy Show: 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday, Harrah’s Riverfront Event Center, Metropolis; featuring Mark Goddard, actor from the TV show, “Lost in Space;” sponsored by Comic City; $5; 615-573-4537. www.comiccity tn.com. Geology of the Cache: 10 a.m.-noon, Saturday, Cache River Wetlands Center, 8885 Illinois 37, Cypress; history of the Cache River; 618 657-2064. Comedian Ron White: 7:30 p.m., April 18, Shryock Auditorium, SIUC; 618-4536000 or www.southern lightsentertainment.com.

Theater/Performance Annie Get Your Gun: 7:30 p.m. today-Friday, Marion Cultural and Civic Center; presented by Marion High School Choral Department; the 1999 revival of Irving Berlin’s 1946 musical fantasy depicting the love affair between Annie Oakley and Frank Butler; $10; www. marionccc.org or 618-9974030. Cabaret: Today-Sunday, Rend Lake College, Ina; musical written by Joe Masteroff, featuring John Kander and Fred Ebb; 7 p.m., today-Saturday and 2 p.m., Sunday; $12; 618-437-5321, ext. 1467. Great Falls: 7 p.m. FridaySaturday, O’Neil Auditorium, John A. Logan College, Carterville; 17 and up; $8/$5; 618-985-2828 ext. 8287. Disney’s Beauty and the Beast: 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, and 3 p.m. Sunday, Carson Center, Paducah; $29-$59; 270-450-4444 or www.thecarsoncenter.org. Oliver: 7 p.m. March 25-27 and 2 p.m. March 28, Marion Cultural and Civic Center; stage adaption of Charles Dickens’ novel, Oliver Twist; musical presented by Artstart; $12; 618-997-4030 or visit www.marionccc.org.

Page 8 Thursday, March 4, 2010 FLIPSIDE

‘Cabaret’ takes over at RLC Cabaret 7 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, and 2 p.m. Sunday; Rend Lake College Theater, Ina; tickets are $12; call 618437-5321 ext. 1467. INA — Life will be a “Cabaret” this weekend at Rend Lake College as the theater department presents the popular show as its annual spring musical. The Tony Awardwinning musical went on to become an Academy Award-winning film featuring Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles. Following Minnelli’s tour de force might be intimidating for some, but RLC Theatre Director Tracey Webb said her “Sally” is more than capable of taking on the daunting task. Webb cast Jordan McCoy of Mount Vernon in the role. McCoy’s impressive resumé includes a run on the “American Juniors” competition. “She just happened to be on hiatus and back home for awhile,” Webb

PROVIDED

Starring in ‘Cabaret’ are (from left) Quinton Sledge of Mount Vernon, who plays the Emcee; Jordan McCoy of Mount Vernon, who plays Sally Bowles; and Levi Overturf of Mount Vernon who plays Clifford Bradshaw.

said. “She is phenomenal, as is the rest of the cast.” Set in 1930s Berlin, the musical tells the story of American writer Cliff Bradshaw and Bowles, the hottest dancer at the Kit Kat Club. “I love the music in ‘Cabaret.’ And the dance, the burlesque, is pretty hot. Fishnets will be popular after this,” Webb said with a laugh. In addition to the music and dance, theater-goers

will also get a history lesson on Nazi Germany, Webb said. “It’s really a departure from a lot of shows I’ve done. It requires strong acting, because it’s not just comedy. It’s drama, too, but we’ve got the talent.” In addition to McCoy, the 30-member cast includes Matt Howard of Benton and Quinton Sledge and Levi Overturf of Mount Vernon. — The Southern

Vintage Arts Month along the wine trail Celebrate the diversity, culture and creativity of Southern Illinois arts and wines. All 12 wineries on the Shanwee Hills Wine Trail will participate with local artists, whose works will be exhibited and sold at the wineries. Blue Sky Vineyard in Makanda will host an artist’s reception from noon to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday for Spencer Meagher. Meagher will be available at the winery Saturday to discuss his

works and talk about “Project 50,” where he will paint a 5-inch by 7-inch watercolor every day for 50 days. View his collection of diverse watercolors at Blue Sky Vineyard. Among his work are landscapes, pet paintings and still life paintings. Some wineries and featured artists on the schedule are Hedman Vineyard featuring Joe Pape, American folk art, oil paintings on canvas;

Orlandini Vineyard featuring George Ions, paintings; Kite Hill Vineyards featuring Christine Deshazo; Hickory Ridge Vineyard featuring Julie Solomen jewelry and Kaelyn Tingle in mixed media; and Von Jakob Vineyard featuring Amy Peradotta. For more information and winery locations, to go www.shawnee winetrail.com/vintagearts month.html. — The Southern


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z Call for Art Juried Art Exhibition: Entries sought for exhibition March 30-April 3, Surplus Gallery, the Glove Factory, 432 S. Washington Ave., Carbondale; drop-off entries from noon-8 p.m. March 27 and 9 a.m.noon March 28; advance entry forms available in the SIUC School of Art and Design offices, Allyn Building at SIUC.

Classes, Workshops Artistic Blacksmithing: Beyond the Basics, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturday, Jefferson County Historical Village, Thomas Atkins Blacksmith Shop, Mount Vernon; 14 and older; $50; register at 618-437-5321, ext. 1267/1367. Little Egypt Arts Centre classes: Beginning photography, drawing, art history classes, 601 Tower Square, Marion; register at 618-998-8530. Student Center Craft Shop: Variety of crafts and classes offered, SIUC; 618-453-3636, www.siuc studentcenter.org.

Events Making Eye Contact: A Performance: Noon-1 p.m. today, SIUC; Mary Beth Edelson directs the performance art as participants make eye contact with those around them; original soundtrack by Ron Coulter, percussion lecturer for the School of Music, will resound from the Pulliam Clock Tower audio system as the performance moves about campus. Vintage Arts Month: Wineries on the Shawnee Hills Wine Trail will participate with local artists whose works will be exhibited and sold at the wineries during the month of March; www.shawneewinetrail.com.

Exhibits, Displays A Stroll Through Downtown: Vintage postcards of Union County, 1-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, Union County Museum and General Store, 117 South Appleknocker Drive, Cobden; also by appointment; free; 618-893-2567 or 618-8932865. Abstract Stitches: Quilts by Gary Estergard, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday and 1-4 p.m. SaturdaySunday, University Museum, SIUC; through Friday;

www.museum.siu.edu or 618-4535388. Ansel Adams: The Man Who Captured The Earth’s Beauty: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, University Museum, SIUC, Faner Hall; $5; all students free; through March 21; www.museum.siu.edu or 618-4535388 George Ions: Orlandini Vineyard, 410 Thorn Lane, Makanda; Italian landscapes compliment vineyard décor; through March 31; 618-9952307; www.orlandinivineyard.com; george.ions@yahoo.com. Mrs. B’s Illustrations: By Andi Butler, Beck Family Center Gallery, Cedarhurst, Mount Vernon; Butler, features whimsical/retro illustrations; through April 4; www.cedarhurst.org; 618-242-1236. Quilts of the Coastal South: The National Quilt Museum, 215 Jefferson St., Paducah; 10 a.m. 5 p.m. Monday-Saturday; through April 6; 270-442-8856 or www.nationalquiltmuseum.org Masters of Photography: University Museum, SIUC; highlights from the museum’s permanent collection; includes photograph of silent film siren Gloria Swanson; through May; free. A Warrior’s Story: Oglala Sioux Buffalo Robe, University Museum, SIUC; through May; free; www. museum.siu.edu or 618-453-5388 Carolyn Gassan Plochmann display: Work and life of Carbondale artist, Morris Library, SIUC; view the display in the cases outside the Hall of Presidents on the first floor of the library; see artwork in the Special Collections Research Center reading room and other locations within the library; 618-453-2516 or http:// archives.lib.siu.edu/index.php?p collections/controlcard&id2459. Ongoing art exhibit: Featuring photographs of Juhree Veach, mosaics from Janet Altoff and sculpture from Tom Horn, StarView Vineyards, 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618-893-9463 or www.starviewvineyards.com.

Receptions Kat Shaffner: Central Showcase at Realty Central, 1825 W. Main St, Murdale Shopping Center, Carbondale; reception, 4-6 p.m. today; gallery hours, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and 9 a.m.-noon

Saturday; through April 3; 618-4574663. The MALE art show: More than 40 pieces of art created strictly by males including works by Allen Carstens, Mike Faris, Kris Killman, and Tom Rabideau, Little Egypt Arts Centre, Tower Square, Marion; reception, 5-7 p.m. Friday; through March 31; 618- 998-8530, or killman@mchsi.com. Real and Abstract Landscape: Reception, 5-7 p.m. Friday, Little Egypt Arts Centre, Tower Square, Marion; through March 31; 618-9988530 or www.littleeygptarts.com. Homily: Qualis Vita, Finis Ita: Oil paintings by Jed Jackson, Main Gallery, Mitchell Museum, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts. 2600 Richview Road, Mount Vernon; opening reception, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Saturday; hours, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday; free; through May 9; 618-242-1236 or www.cedarhurst.org. Artist reception: Featuring Spencer Meagher, noon-5 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Blue Sky Vineyard, 3150 S. Rocky Comfort Road, Makanda; 618-995-9463, www.blueskyvineyard.com. SIUC Photography Exhibit: Works from the Department of Cinema and Photography at SIUC, Beal Grand Corridor Gallery, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mount Vernon; reception, 6:30 p.m. Saturday; through May 9; 618-2421236, www.cedarhurst.org . Shrode Art & Craft Competition Exhibition: Paintings, drawings, printmaking, clay, fiber, mixed media, wood, fine jewelry and metal, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mount Vernon, Regenhardt Gallery of the Shrode Art Center; opening reception, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Saturday; 618-242-1236, ext. 249, www.cedarhurst.org. Stewart Wessel: A Carpenter’s Son, The Gallery Space, law office of Joni Beth Bailey, 1008 Walnut St., Murphysboro; large wooden 3D sculpture; reception, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Saturday; through March 26; 618684-8668. The History of The Division: By Matthew Schultz, opening reception, 4-7 p.m. March 19, University Museum, SIUC; see behind the scenes of the secret organization of The Division; closing reception, 4-7 p.m. March 26.

WRESTLING: Takes hold in region FROM PAGE 7 and away from potential negative influences, she said. “If we touch one person’s life, if we change one person’s mind, then we’ve done our job,” she said. For Chambers and AAPW, it’s a similar situation. While the promotion grew out of the closing of another local company, charity support has been at the core since the first show in 2006 raised money for area child who had been burned in a fire. Through the past three years, the company has also sponsored events to support area schools and not-forprofits, in addition to launching an annual event to raise money for the American Cancer Society. Supporting these causes not only lends a helping hand to those in need but also helps fight the stigmas associated with professional wrestling, Chambers said. “It looks good for AAPW and indy wrestling as a whole because we’re willing to give any money we make back to the cause,” he said.

Future opportunities The entire U.S. independent wrestling scene faces more challenges today than at any point in the past. From the aforementioned stigmas associated with the product to a challenging economy to the rise in popularity of other similar yet different entertainment venues like mixed martial arts and cage fighting, new threats appear every day. “Indy wrestling’s just not what it used to be,” Chambers said, specifically mentioning the death of “kayfabe,” a wrestling term for the presentation and treatment of storylines and characters as reality, rather than scripted and pre-determined angles. In past generations,

performers have remained in character during public appearances and the inner workings of the industry weren’t exposed to the general public. Many attribute the rise of the Internet and other technologies as the beginning of the end for this aspect of the business. Despite the challenges, several local promotions have discovered dedicated fan bases and continue to work on expanding awareness of their products. “It’s been an uphill struggle to re-establish a pro wrestling fan base in this area, but for the past three and a half years, we’ve managed to maintain a following, and we are grateful for that,” said McGuire, an eight-year veteran and former AAPW Heavyweight Champion. McGuire hopes to see AAPW, and independent wrestling as a whole, become as much a staple to the Southern Illinois sports and entertainment scene as Marion’s Southern Illinois Miners minor league baseball team and Southern Illinois University athletics. Yamamoto’s Renegade Pro has already taken steps in that direction, as it became the second entry in the Metropolis Chamber of Commerce’s entertainment listings, joining Harrah’s casino. While many share the same long-term goals, they also recognize the need for smaller steps that will gradually build toward the ultimate payoff, and those steps begin with wrestling fans taking the initiative to attend a local promotion’s live events. “I’m hoping there’s a turn some day,” Chambers said. “I wish people would just give it a chance to see that it can be fun and it can be a good time.” adam.testa@thesouthern.com 618-351-5031

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 4, 2010 Page 9


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z toxin in the water supply turns everyone exposed to it Avatar James Cameron’s into mindless killers in this marvel is also a whole lot of terrifying reinvention of the fun: A gamer generation’s 1973 George Romero horror “Dances With Wolves,” with a classic. With Timothy human soldier (and his Olyphant, Radha Mitchell, Joe avatar) falling in love with a Anderson and Danielle blue-skinned alien from the Panabaker. Directed by Breck planet Pandora. PG-13 Eisner. R. Cop Out Two longtime Crazy Heart Jeff Bridges NYPD partners on the trail of delivers an Oscar-worthy — a stolen, rare, mint-condition no, Oscar-required — baseball card find themselves performance as a whiskeyup against a merciless, soaked one-time country memorabilia-obsessed legend trying to put his life gangster. With Bruce Willis, back together in this sublime Tracy Morgan, Adam Brody, American indie. Maggie Kevin Pollak, Guillermo Diaz, Gyllenhaal, Robert Duvall and Seann William Scott and an uncredited Colin Farrell all Jason Lee. Written by Robb offer up memorable turns. A Cullen and Mark Cullen. low-key, down-home gem. R Directed by Kevin Smith. R. Dear John A young soldier The Crazies A husband and home on leave falls in love wife in a small Midwestern with an idealistic college town find themselves battling student during her spring for survival as their friends vacation, and over the next and family descend into few years they meet only madness after a mysterious sporadically and correspond through love letter. With Channing Tatum, Amanda Seyfried, Henry Thomas, Scott Porter and Richard Jenkins; directed by Lasse Hallstrom. PG-13 S HOW T IMES FOR M ARCH 1 ST - 4 TH Dear John (PG-13) 3:50 6:40 9:30 Edge of Darkness A Edge Of Darkness (R) 4:40 7:20 10:10 veteran Boston homicide When In Rome (PG-13) detective embarks on a 4:30 7:10* *10:05 *Not shown Thursday The Book of Eli (R) 4:50 7:40 10:20 mission to find out about his The Wolfman (R) 4:00 7:00 9:50 24-year-old daughter’s secret 3D Avatar (PG-13) 5:00 8:30 life after she is murdered on Shutter Island (R) 3:40 4:20 6:50 the steps of his home. With 7:30 10:00 10:40 Half The Sky (NR) 7:30 Thursday Only Mel Gibson, Ray Winstone, Danny Huston, Bojana Novakovic and Shawn Roberts. Written by William Monahan and Andrew Bovell. Valentine’s Day (PG-13) 3:40 7:00 9:50 Based on the television series

Still Playing

Crazy Heart (R) 4:15 7:20 10:10 The Crazies (R) 4:50 7:30 10:00 Cop Out (R) 4:00 5:00 6:50 7:50 9:40 10:20 Percy Jackson & the Olympians (PG) 3:50 6:40 9:30

Shutter Island (R) 3:40 7:10 Cop Out (PG-13) 4:30 7:20 Valentine’s Day (PG-13) 4:10 7:00 Dear John (PG-13) 4:15 6:50 Tooth Fairy (PG) 3:40 6:30 The Crazies (R) 4:50 7:40 Percy Jackson & the Olympians (PG) 3:50 6:40 The Wolfman (R) 4:40 7:30

written by Troy Kennedy Martin. Directed by Martin Campbell. R. Percy Jackson & the Olympians: The Lightning Thief A young boy discovers he’s the descendant of a Greek god and sets out on an adventure to settle an ongoing battle between the gods. With Logan Lerman, Brandon T. Jackson, Alexandra Daddario, Sean Bean, Pierce Brosnan, Steve Coogan, Rosario Dawson, Catherine Keener, Kevin McKidd, Joe Pantoliano and Uma Thurman. Screenplay by Craig Titley, based on the book by Rick Riordan. PG The Book of Eli Albert and Allen Hughes’ haunting and inspirational allegory is framed like a spaghetti Western. It stars Denzel Washington as a pilgrim of the post-apocalypse fighting cannibals and scavengers in order to carry out a holy mission. With Gary Oldman and Mila Kunis. R The Wolfman Lawrence Talbot, a haunted nobleman, is lured back to his family estate after his brother vanishes. Reunited with his estranged father, he searches for his brother and discovers his horrifying destiny. With Benicio Del Toro, Anthony Hopkins, Emily Blunt, Hugo Weaving and Art Malik. R Tooth Fairy When a hardcharging hockey player, nicknamed “the tooth fairy” for separating opposing players from their bicuspids, discourages a youngster’s

dreams, he’s sentenced to one week’s hard labor as a real tooth fairy; with Dwayne Johnson, Ashley Judd, Julie Andrews, Stephen Merchant and Ryan Sheckler. PG Shutter Island Two U.S. marshals are summoned to a fortress-like island housing a hospital for the criminally insane to investigate the implausible disappearance of a multiple murderess from a locked room. With Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley, Michelle Williams, Patricia Clarkson, Emily Mortimer, Jackie Earle Haley and Max Von Sydow. Screenplay by Laeta Kalogridis, based on the novel by Dennis Lehane. Directed by Martin Scorsese. R Valentine’s Day The stories of a group of Angelenos as they find their way through romance over the course of one Valentine’s Day are told in intersecting storylines. With Julia Roberts, Emma Roberts, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Alba, Kathy Bates, Jessica Biel, Bradley Cooper, Eric Dane and Patrick Dempsey. PG-13 When in Rome A young New Yorker, disillusioned with romance, takes a whirlwind trip to Rome, where she plucks magic coins from a fountain of love, inexplicably igniting the passion of an odd group of suitors. With Kristen Bell, Danny DeVito, Jon Heder, Will Arnett, Dax Shepard and Josh Duhamel. PG-13. — The Associated Press, McClatchy-Tribune News

New on DVD 2012 The Earth’s core is overheating, causing worldwide catastrophes, who will survive and how? With John Cusack, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Danny Glover, Woody Harrelson. PG-13 (intense disaster sequences and some profanity) Cold Souls A procedure to cleanse one’s soul of angst is jeopardized when thieves begin smuggling the souls. With Paul Giamatti, Boris Leskin. PG-13 (nudity and profanity) Where the Wild Things Are Maurice Sendak’s children’s classic about Max, a disobedient 9-year-old who runs away and becomes king of the wild creatures. With Max Records, Catherine Keener, Mark Ruffalo, Lauren Ambrose. PG (mild thematic elements, some adventure action and brief profanity) Ponyo A goldfish transforms herself into a human girl when she falls in love with the young boy who rescues her. With Noah Lindsey Cyrus, Frankie Jonas, Cate Blanchett, Liam Neeson, Tina Fey. G (subtitled)

Page 10 Thursday, March 4, 2010 FLIPSIDE

— McClatchy-Tribune News

STUDIO

‘Brooklyn’s Finest’ opens Friday in Carbondale.

Not quite the ‘Finest’ wants a promotion, but will he sell out a childhood pal (Wesley Snipes, terrific) to get it? And Ethan Hawke is an overwhelmed Catholic detective with too many kids, two more on the way, a wife made sick by the mold in their home and little hope of raising BY ROGER MOORE the cash to move. MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS The movie’s tone is set A crowded cast of some in a talky, thoughtful and of the finest actors in the shocking opening. cinema act the hell out of Cheadle and Snipes a gimmicky, episodic, have the best exchanges, hit-or-miss script in with Snipes returning to “Brooklyn’s Finest,” his “New Jack City” guise Antoine Fuqua’s latest as an elder statesman of attempt to relive the the drug trade, lifting his glories of “Training Day.” long-dormant game to Richard Gere plays a hold his own with the drunken burnout case great Cheadle. But for with seven days to go every tasty moment, until retirement, an there’s another so overunpopular loner whose the-top that the movie resume would feature the stops dead in its tracks. word “undistinguished.” And it goes on and on. He’s in love with a You can see why the prostitute half his age, actors were drawn to this and he keeps his gun — good characters, nice empty — his way of monologues, a few delaying a suicide explosive scenes. But in attempt. He’s saddled keeping all of them happy with assorted rookies he’s and still making room for supposed to show the his own excesses, Fuqua ropes to on his last days loses any sense of pacing. on the job. He tells us where we’re Don Cheadle is on his going, but is so in love game as an undercover with even the scenes that officer whose years don’t advance the story hanging with drug that he can’t bear to take dealers have cost him his us there. Not quickly, marriage. He desperately anyway.

Brooklyn’s Finest

Rated R; starring Richard Gere, Don Cheadle, Ethan Hawke, Wesley Snipes, Ellen Barkin; directed by Antoine Fuqua; opening Friday at ShowPlace 8 in Carbondale.


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z

Tim Burton creates another ‘Wonderland’ in latest film Alice in Wonderland

since childhood and she thinks, in between shrinkings and expansions and encounters with caterpillars, Cheshire cats, March hares and the like, that if she pinches herself, she’ll wake up. But no. Burton has imagined what at times is a literally eye-popping world of beasties, Scots accents and gloom. “Logic and proportion” go out the window as Alice drinks this and shrinks, eats that and grows, and everything around her is stretched, bulbously blown up or otherwise deformed in endlessly inventive ways. Whatever the virtues of “Avatar,” this is the most fanciful use of 3D ever to hit the big screen. And Burton has cast it near perfectly. Anne Hathaway is a pale and dainty “Glenda the Good Witch” sort of White Queen. Huge-headed Helena Bonham Carter is the eternally ill-tempered Red Queen, barking at her court of freaks and frogs and her playing-card soldiers in an Elizabethan temper. And Johnny Depp, as a madder-than-usual hatter in revolt against that tyrant, toys with a Highland accent. What Wolverton turned this wondrous and metaphorical journey into is a fairly conventional, “Shrek”-ish fairytale of the forces of good rallying behind Alice who is shoved into battle with the evil Red Queen’s champion — the dragon Jabberwocky. Purists will squeal, but it’s a workable and watchable liberty to take with an oft-filmed yet impossible to film STUDIO novel. This returning Alice Mia Wasikowska stars as Alice in ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ which opens Friday at ShowPlace 8 in Carbondale. (Mia Wasikowska) may not Wonderland” and Rated PG. Starring Johnny “Through the Looking Glass,” but also, Depp, Mia Wasikowska, apparently, by Slick’s Helena Bonham Carter. psychedelic ’60s anthem, Directed by Tim Burton. “White Rabbit.” It’s a trip, Opens Friday at ShowPlace man. 8 in Carbondale. “Wonderland” becomes “Underland” in Burton’s film of Linda Wolverton’s BY ROGER MOORE script, as an older Alice MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS drops out of her engagement party in Tim Burton’s “Alice in Victorian England and Wonderland” is equal back down that rabbit hole parts Lewis Carroll and of her youth. It’s been the Grace Slick. It’s inspired source of her nightmares by Carroll’s “Alice in

STUDIO

Johnny Depp stars as the Mad Hatter in ‘Alice in Wonderland,’ which opens Friday.

be “the real Alice.” That’s the silky, smokey opinion of the wise caterpillar. She has to remember how to be Alice. Wasikowska may be more a lovely but blankfaced blonde presence than a spunky, charismatic and curious Alice. But Stephen Fry is a

deliciously above-it-all Cheshire Cat, Michael Sheen a less-addledthan-we’d-like White Rabbit and Timothy Spall voices the ever-faithful bloodhound Bayard. Crispin Glover is stretched and eye-patched to perfection as the Knave of Hearts.

Snatches of Carroll poetry and jibber-jabber pepper the oftnonsensical and occasionally unfathomable dialogue. But the Carroll characters are here, mostly as you remember them. And if it’s not the Alice of your Disney childhood, enjoy the trip.

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 4, 2010 Page 11


Page 12 Thursday, March 4, 2010 FLIPSIDE


Flipside 03-04