Page 1


z CONTACT US z Call toll-free: 800-228-0429 Cara Recine, Lifestyles and special projects editor cara.recine@thesouthern.com / ext. 5075 Brenda Kirkpatrick, lists, live music flipside@thesouthern.com / ext. 5089 Rhonda Ethridge, cover designer rhonda.ethridge@thesouthern.com / ext. 5118 The Southern Illinoisan (USPS 258-908) is published daily at a yearly subscription rate of $178. It is published at 710 N. Illinois Ave., Carbondale, IL 62901. It is owned by Lee Enterprises of Davenport, Iowa.

WHAT’S INSIDE Things to do . . . .4-5 Theater . . . . . . . .4-5 Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Cover story . . . . .6-7

Live music . . . . . . .8 Music . . . . . . . . .8-10 Concerts . . . . . . . . .9 Movies . . . . . . .10-11

Page 2 Thursday, March 25, 2010 FLIPSIDE

Top 20 Restaurant of the Week: Mackie’s Pizza BY DAVID ZOELLER SPECIAL ADVERTISING COPY

MARION — When officials of Mackie’s Pizza were looking to expand their Harrisburg-based restaurant business four years ago, they wanted a unique design for their new location at the former Rusty Spur western store. They seem to have come up with one. Among the first things you notice about the main dining area is that it is round, just like the famous food Mackie’s serves. “The concept is pizza,” said John McPeek, general manager. “We wanted to go with circles and curves. We just thought it was something different. Everybody has a square design.” In terms of expansion, Marion seemed like a logical choice, mainly because of Rent One Park, home of the Southern Illinois Miners. “We chose Marion because we thought with the new ball stadium coming in and all the traffic from the interstate, it would be a good location. We’ve always had a lot of customers from the Marion and Carbondale area, so we just thought it was time to expand,” McPeek said. The interior design is not the only unique thing about Mackie’s Pizza. Its signature thin crust has been a staple of the restaurant since its inception in Harrisburg in 1972 by Mackie and Roxanna Nicholes. “Our crust is made from scratch every day,” McPeek said. “It’s really thin.” Customers can choose a pizza with local flavor, like the Marion Delight, which features pepperoni, onion, bell peppers, sausage, and mushrooms; and the

DAVID ZOELLER / THE SOUTHERN

Diners often make a special trip just to eat at Mackie’s Pizza in Marion. That includes (clockwise from bottom left) Barbara and Bob Taylor of Vienna, Megan and Brandon Kindle of Murray, Ky., and Ben and Jan Westin of Vienna.

Saluki Special, which features some traditional toppings like hamburger, onions, olives and bell peppers, along with a topping you might not associate with pizza – apples. “At first we had a hard time getting people to try the apples over here, but now it’s becoming a pretty popular item,” McPeek said. A number of other specialty pizzas are offered, such as a baked potato pizza and barbecue chicken pizza. Mama Rox’s Mediterranean Pizza has hummus as the base instead of pizza sauce with mozzarella cheese, red onions, sliced tomatoes and feta cheese sprinkled on top. Mackie’s also offers spaghetti and a variety of sandwiches and salads. The Marion restaurant employs about 32 people, including several students, some who have worked there since its opening. The 12,000-square-foot

Buy one entrée and get one free at this restaurant and other featured restaurants across Southern Illinois with the 2010 Top 20 Dining Card. Top 20 Cards are available for purchase at The Southern offices in Carbondale and Marion by calling 618-529-5454 or online at www.thesouthern.com/top20. Cards are $20 each plus $1 per order for cards to be mailed. Some exclusions may apply. See card for details.

DETAILS Who: Mackie’s Pizza What: Pizza, pasta, sandwiches, salads Where: 2704 Walton Way, Marion Hours: 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m. daily Phone: 618-997-4100 building can hold up to 300 people, according to McPeek, so even when the parking lot seems full the staff can usually seat patrons. There is also a private dining area. “We do a lot of wedding rehearsal dinners and birthday parties and retirement parties,” he said, “and we can do food other than pizza.” Business groups and a weekly bridge group meet

there regularly. Carry-out and delivery are available. While some customers contend a Mackie’s pizza from the Harrisburg restaurant is better than one from the Marion location, or vice versa, McPeek said there is no difference. “That’s why people come here,” he said. “They want consistency. That’s the good thing about our pizza. It’s always the same.”


It’s only available for a limited time NEWS OF THE WEIRD Chuck Shepherd

I

t’s a simple recipe, said A-List New York City chef Daniel Angerer: a cheese derived from the breast milk of his wife, who is nursing the couple’s 3-month-old daughter. As a chef, he said, “you look out for something new and what you can do with it,” and what Angerer could do is make about two quarts of “flavor(ful)” cheese out of two gallons of mother’s milk. “(T)astes just like really sweet cow’s milk.” He posted the recipe, “My Spouse’s Mommy Milk Cheese,” on his blog and invited readers’ participation: “Our baby has plenty (of) back-up mother’s milk in the freezer, so whoever wants to try it is welcome to try it as long as supply lasts (please consider cheese aging time).”

Cultural diversity z Florida’s Agriculture Department, acting on a tip, confiscated Giant African Snails believed to have been smuggled into the country by Charles Stewart of Hialeah, Fla., for use in the religion Ifa Orisha, which encourages followers to drink the snails’ mucus for its supposed healing powers. Actually, said the department (joined in the investigation by two federal agencies), bacteria in the mucus causes frequent violent vomiting, among other symptoms. At press time, Stewart had not been charged with a crime. z A growing drug problem facing Shanghai, China, is stepped-up use of methamphetamine, cocaine and other drugs at all-night parties, but not the “rave” parties favored by young fast-lane types in the U.S. These Shanghai druggies, according to a February dispatch in London’s Guardian, are often middle-aged and retired people, who use the drugs to give them strength for allnight games of Mah Jongg played at out-of-the-way parlors around the city.

z Modernization kept at bay: (1) Despite Fiji’s strides into the 21st century, the island nation’s court system remains relatively primitive, according to a January report from Agence France-Presse. Transcriptions of court proceedings are still made by ordinary reporters, writing out the dialogue by hand and thus calling on judges, lawyers and witnesses to periodically slow down or repeat themselves when they speak. (2) Papua New Guinea retains many of its historical tribal conflicts, and one flared up in January, according to a dispatch by an Australian Broadcasting Corp. reporter. Two people were killed in skirmishes that were provoked in a quite contemporary way — when a member of one tribe sent a member of another a pornographic text message.

Latest religious messages

A 7-year-old girl died in February in Oroville, Calif., and her 11-yearold sister was hospitalized needing critical care, after being “lovingly” beaten by their adoptive parents, Kevin and Elizabeth Schatz, who are followers of religion-based corporal punishment. The Schatzes, as recommended by a fundamentalist Web site, had whipped the girls with quarter-inch-wide plumbers’ rubber tubing to supposedly make the children “happier” and “more obedient to God.” Criminal charges against the couple were pending at press time.

Alcohol: That miracle drug (1) Toni Tramel, 31, angry at being jailed in Owensboro, Ky., for public intoxication in March, had “assaulting a police officer” added to the charges when, changing into a jail uniform, she allegedly pointed her lactating breast at a female officer and squirted her in the face. (2) Deanne Elsholz, 44, was charged with domestic battery in Wesley Chapel, Fla., in February after hitting her husband, David, in the face with a glass. David, intoxicated, had enraged Deanne by apparently completely missing the toilet bowl as he stood to urinate. (Deanne then angrily charged after him but lost her footing on the slippery floor.)

Japan’s Mantokuji temple in Gumma province was historically the place where women went to cleanse themselves in divorce, aided by the temple’s iconic toilets, into which the bad spirits from the failed liaisons could be shed and flushed forever. The toilets have been modernized, according to a February Reuters dispatch, and today the temple is used by the faithful to rid themselves of all types of problems. (The upgrades also Update permitted a solution to a In 2005, News of the Weird longstanding annoyance at the reported the bustling sales for artist temple, of visitors mistaking the Erin Crowe’s series of oil paintings iconic toilets for regular of Federal Reserve Chairman Alan commodes.) Greenspan, who was then riding high, with Greenspan-worshipping Child-unfriendly religions money managers quickly buying up her inventory for thousands of Jeff and Marci Beagley were sentenced to 16 months in prison in dollars each. A Wall Street Journal reporter tracked down Crowe and March after a jury in Oregon City, some of her customers in February Ore., found them guilty of criminally negligent homicide in the 2010 and found, obviously, subdued demand (with some customers death of their teenage son, whose having hidden or discarded their congenital urinary tract blockage was treated only with oils and prayer Greenspans). Crowe said that one of her Greenspan customers had prescribed by the Beagleys’ Followers of Christ Church. Doctors recently asked her to paint a Ben Bernanke for him, but for about half said the boy could have been saved the fee that he had earlier paid for a with medical treatment right up until the day he died. (The Beagleys’ Greenspan. infant granddaughter died in 2008 under similar circumstances, but no SEND ITEMS to weirdnews@ criminal conviction resulted.) earthlink.net.

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 25, 2010 Page 3


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z Books & Authors David Conrad: Book signing, 2 p.m. Saturday, The Bookworm, Carbondale’s Eastgate Shopping Center; mystery, Perfect Murder; story takes place in Depression-era Southern Illinois; Conrad is a retired history professor from SIUC; $22.95/$12.95; 618-4572665.

Comedy So Ill Improv Comedy Festival: Thursday-Saturday, Longbranch Coffeehouse and Varsity Center for the Arts, Carbondale; featuring The Improvised Shakespeare Company from Chicago; 800383-3006; www.soillimprov. com. Ron White: 7:30 p.m., Sunday, April 18, Shryock

Auditorium, SIUC; 618-4536000 or www.southern lightsentertainment.com.

Lipizzaner Stallions: 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Roberts Stadium, Evansville, Ind.; Dancing With Horses Tour; $19.50-$26.50; www.smg Events evansville.com; www.ticket Trivia fundraiser: 6 p.m. master.com; 800-745-3000. Friday, Goreville High School; Metro East Postcard each team must consist of at Show: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. April 2 least one high school student; and 9 a.m.-4 p.m. April 3, VFW $10 per player; also taco Hall, 1234 Vandalia St., supper, 5:30 p.m. before the Collinsville; sell or have trivia games; adults, $5 and postcards appraised or learn children, $3; proceeds used more about collecting to purchase books for the postcards; free; 618-5314189. 2011 Illinois reading lists for Cruise Nights: 6-9 p.m. students in K-12. April 3, Murphysboro; Spring Fling Trivia: 7 p.m. Friday, Carterville Community attendance prizes, tee shirts, hotdogs; first Saturday of the Center; doors open, 6 p.m.; month through September; $150 per table, eight at a table; cash prizes; bring food come see cars, trucks, motorcycles around the and drinks; prize for best decorated table; proceeds to Smysor Plaza area in downtown Murphysboro; 618Hospice of Southern Illinois; 559-6265. 618-997-3030.

available; performance dates, July 29-31 and Aug. 1-2, Under These Same Stars: McLeod Summer Playhouse The Céladon Affair, 7:30 p.m. stage; 618 457-3689. Friday, Liberty Theater, 1333 Theta Xi Variety Show: Walnut St., Murphysboro; 6 p.m. Saturday,, Shryock shot in Ste. Genevieve, Mo., Auditorium, SIUC; $15/$10; and Southern Illinois; $5; 618- www.ticketmaster.com. 684-5880 or www.underthese Steeling the Heart: Women samestars.com. Turning the Tide During World Photos for Hamlet: The War II, 8 p.m. ThursdayMet Live in HD series, 1 p.m. Saturday, Kleinau Theater, Saturday, Carbondale SIUC; directed by Jamie ShowPlace 8 Theatre; www. Huber; general admission $7; metoperafamily.org/hdlive. students, $5; 618-453-5618; kleinau@siu.edu. Theater/Performance Journeys 2010: One-act plays 7:30 p.m. ThursdayAuditions: For The Wizard Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday, of Oz, 10 a.m. Saturday, Carbondale Community High Christian H. Moe Theater, SIUC; $6; mcleod.siuc.edu or School, Walnut Street and Giant City Road; All Southern 618-453-3001. Oliver: 7 p.m. ThursdayHigh School Theatre Project; Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday, grades 8-12; fee for this fiveMarion Cultural and Civic week program is $250 per Center; stage adaption of student; scholarships are

Films

Charles Dickens’ novel, Oliver Twist; musical presented by Artstart; $12; 618 997-4030 Nickelodeon Presents Storytime Live! FridaySaturday, the Carson Center, Paducah; $15-35; 270-4504444 or www.thecarson center.org. The Seafarer: Single reading performance, 2 p.m. April 3, The Renascence House, Makanda; mature theme, not for children; directed by Christian Moe; presented by The University Players; $4 donation suggested; 618-457-5130. 101 Dalmatians Kids: The Musical, 7:30 p.m. April 17 and 2 p.m. April 18, Marion Cultural and Civic Center; presented by the Paradise Alley Players; adults, $10; children, $7; www.marionccc. org or 618-997-4030.

Journeys 2010: ‘Out of Character’ at Moe Theater CARBONDALE — The annual Journeys program showcases SIUC theater student playwrights. This year’s Journeys, subtitled “Out of Character,” will consist of one bill of four new plays presented today through Sunday. Here are the plays: “What a Maroon” by Travis Westbrook: “The Bugs Bunny Show” meets “Undercover Cop” when a policeman with rhotacism tries to catch a nasty drug dealer and stop international terrorism in this comedy riff of cartoons and crime dramas. “Gods Play” by David Clark: The stage erupts with the fast-paced thrills, sizzling romance and high-speed chases of an action movie when a prideful playwright boasts he is a better writer than God, in this case, a successful film producer. “Unser Zuverlässiges Haus” (Our Reliable Home) by Kiri Palm: A student meets obstacles of epic proportions in the form of a tyrannical head of university housing and his employees when she tries to change her roommate assignment in this funny and dark Expressionistic piece. “Four Actors in Search of a Moment” by Jeff Nichols: Actors lost in a performance and trapped in an endless word game struggle to rediscover who they really are among the tangled and torn pages of their own scripts.

Page 4 Thursday, March 25, 2010 FLIPSIDE

PROVIDED

Jimmy Heisner and Angie Fisher rehearse ‘Four Actors in Search of a Moment.’

Performances are at 7:30 p.m. today, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday in the Christian H. Moe Theater in the Communications Building at SIUC. Tickets are $6 at the main theater box office from noon to 5:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and one hour before each performance. Call 618-453-3001. — The Southern


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z

Summer Playhouse bill announced Spring is here, and summer isn’t far behind. One of the sure signs that summer is coming is the announcement of the 2010 season of the McLeod Summer Playhouse at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. The McLeod Summer Playhouse is Southern Illinois’ only professional summer theater. Here are planned productions: “Unnecessary Farce,” a door-banging comedy; June 17, 19, 27 and 27 “The 25th annual Putnam County Spelling Bee,” a musical; June 18, 20, 24, 26 “The Drowsy Chaperone,” a musical, July 9, 10, 11, 16, 17 and 18 “The Wizard of Oz,” the annual high school theater project; July 29, 30, 30 and Aug 1, 2 Theatergoers can become a Friend of McLeod Summer Playhouse. As a support of the summer season, friends receive: z First-choice seating during a two-week pre-box office opening period z Recognition in the season’s program z Free admission to Meet the Cast Review and Friends Curtain Call Contributions of $500 to $999 receive two season tickets; contributions of $1,000 or more receive four free season tickets. For more information about the season or becoming a friend of the playhouse, call 618-4535741. — The Southern

Theta Xi Variety Show Film encore plays Friday at the Liberty comes to Shryock CARBONDALE — One of the longest-standing and most popular traditions at Southern Illinois University Carbondale returns Saturday. It’s the Theta Xi Variety Show, and it’s set for 6 p.m. at Shryock Auditorium. University students and student groups will demonstrate their artistry with song, dance and acting. The performances will illustrate the ingenuity and talents of the performers, according to Kathleen Dickey, director of the Theta Xi Variety Show and senior fashion design and merchandising student from Auburn. The Inter-Greek Council uses a portion of the show proceeds to fund the prestigious annual Service to Southern Award. This annual award, the highest recognizing a student for involvement in co-curricular activities, goes to a graduating senior and includes a scholarship. Tickets are $15 for reserved seating or $10 for general admission. — SIUC University Communications

MURPHYSBORO — “Under These Same Stars — The Céladon Affair” is a feature film shot locally with actors from Southern Illinois and Missouri. The movie will be making an encore appearance Friday night. The film tells the tale of a mixed-race hunter, Céladon, and his struggles with love, loss and a life divided between town and the Ozark wilderness. Céladon urges Marianne, a Native slave, to flee Ste. Genevieve. Her refusal, and his decision to take another Native slave in her place, sets dramatic events in motion: manhunts, mysterious deaths, arrests and interrogations. The incident caused something of an international incident

Performance to tell stories of Navy women volunteers CARBONDALE — In 1942, women returned to general U.S. Navy service for the first time in 23 years. “Steeling the Heart: Women Turning the Tide During World War II,” a performance art presentation produced by a team of Southern Illinois University Carbondale graduate students, seeks to tell their stories. The performance brings alive the narratives of some of the many thousands of women in WAVES (Women Accepted for Volunteer Emergency Service), exploring themes of gender relations, industrialization, war and peace, class and race. Navy WAVES were active in some of the traditionally female secretarial and clerical jobs, but also became

active in other areas including aviation, communications, intelligence, and science and technology. By the end of World War II, more than 8,000 women held officer positions and many more were active uniformed personnel. Performances are at 8 p.m. tonight, Friday and Saturday in the Marion Kleinau Theatre on the second floor of the Communications Building at SIUC. Tickets are $7 for general admission and $5 for students with an ID. — SIUC University Communications

PROVIDED

An actor portrays Céladon, a hunter who gets caught up in love, loss and an international incident.

between French and British colonists. The movie is based on a true story from 1773 as detailed in “Stealing Indian Women” by Illinois State University emeritus professor Carl Ekberg.

Check out this showing at 7:30 p.m. Friday at the Liberty Theater, 1333 Walnut St. in Murphysboro. Tickets are $5. Call 618684-5880 for tickets or purchase at the door. — The Southern

World Famous Grammy Award

Eroica Trio Performing Beethoven’s Triple Concerto with the Southern Illinois Symphony Orchestra

Tuesday, April 13 at 7:30 p.m. Shryock Auditorium

Call 453-6000 for information and tickets. Sponsored in part by the SIUC Student Fine Arts Activity Fee FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 25, 2010 Page 5


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES zCOVER STORY z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z through Saturday; 270-442-2453 or www.theyeiser.org Juried Art Exhibition: Entries sought Keyth Kahrs: Yeiser Art Center, 200 for exhibition Tuesday-April 3, Surplus Broadway St., Paducah; landscape and Gallery, Glove Factory, 432 S. pet portrait paintings; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Washington Ave., Carbondale; drop-off through Saturday; 270-442-2453. entries from noon-8 p.m. Saturday and Corin Perez: Tuesday-April 9, SIUC 9 a.m.-noon Sunday; entry forms University Museum, Faner Hall; 10 a.m.available in the SIUC School of Art and 4 p.m., Tuesday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. Design offices, Allyn Building. Saturday-Sunday; www.museum.siu.edu 19th District Congressional Art or 618-453-5388. Competition: Open to high school The MALE art show: More than 40 students in the 19th congressional pieces of art created by males including district; deadline, April 30; 217-492works by Allen Carstens, Mike Faris, Kris 5090 or www.shimkus.house.gov. Killman, and Tom Rabideau, Little Egypt HerrinFesta Italiana Art Arts Centre, Tower Square, Marion; Competition: Accepting entries through through Wednesday; 618-998-8530, May 5; artwork must be registered; killman@mchsi.com. delivery of artwork, May 15; show runs Real and Abstract Landscape: Little from May 27-May 31; www.herrinfesta. Egypt Arts Centre, Tower Square, Marion; com/art or 618-559-7379. through Wednesday. Logan Days Photo Exhibit: Entries Five-year anniversary exhibit: needed for John A. Logan Museum Leaping Trout Studio, 723 Madison St., display; amateur photographers may Paducah; exhibit features work by owner submit photos of the sights, scenes and Keyth Kahrs; through Wednesday; 270personalities of Southern Illinois; entries 441-7050 or kahrsk@bellsouth.net. on display in the Logan museum, 1613 Laurie Blakely: noon-5 p.m. Edith St., Murphysboro, from May to weekdays; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and mid-September; also, junior division for noon-6 p.m. Sunday, Owl Creek Winery, ages 10-17; deadline, May 6; 2655 Water Valley Road, Cobden; bowls, www.loganmuseum.org. platters and light fixtures made of clay, Paducah Photo ‘10 Juried silk and glass; to April 1; 618-529-2919. Photography Exhibition: The Yeiser Art Kat Shaffner: Central Showcase at Center, 200 Broadway St.; open to all Realty Central, 1825 W. Main St, Murdale photographers working in digital or film Shopping Center, Carbondale; gallery photography; original work, completed hours, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and in the last three years; cash prizes 9 a.m.-noon Saturday; through April 3; totaling $1,700; deadline for early 618-457-4663. submissions, May 1; final deadline, May Feminist Art of Indiana: New 7; www.paducahphoto.com. Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art, corner of Church and Main Streets, New Classes, Workshops Harmony, Ind; 812-682-3156; through April 3; www.nhgallery.com;. Little Egypt Arts Centre classes: Mrs. B’s Illustrations: By Andi Butler, Beginning photography, drawing, art Beck Family Center Gallery, Cedarhurst, history classes, 601 Tower Square, Mount Vernon; Butler, retro/whimsical Marion; register at 618-998-8530. Student Center Craft Shop: Variety of illustrations; through April 4; www.cedarhurst.org; 618-242-1236. crafts and classes offered, SIUC; 618Quilts of the Coastal South: The 453-3636, www.siucstudentcenter.org. National Quilt Museum, 215 Jefferson St., Paducah; 10 a.m. 5 p.m. MondayExhibits Saturday; through April 6; 270-442-8856 On and Off the Wall: 3-5 and 6-8 p.m., or www.nationalquiltmuseum.org Friday, Hughes Gallery, 1603 Edith St., Eileen Doman and Kat Shaffner: Murphysboro; art by students from 3-D Corridor Gallery, Carbondale Civic Design class at John A. Logan College. Center; closing reception, 5-8 p.m. April Stewart Wessel: A Carpenter’s Son, 8; 618-457-5100; cca@neondsl.com; The Gallery Space, law office of Joni www.absolutearts.com/portfolios/d/ Beth Bailey, 1008 Walnut St., doman/artist_biography.html or www. Murphysboro; large wooden sculpture; kathleenshaffner.com/Kathleen_ Shaffner/Welcome.html. through Friday; 618- 684-8668. Student Art Show: Rend Lake College, Landscape Musings: Artwork by Jake 468 N. Ken Gray Parkway, Ina; through Wells and M. Ben Cohan, Yeiser Art April 15; 618-437-5321 or www.rlc.edu Center, 200 Broadway St., Paducah; Patrick Williams sculptures: SIUC paintings and mixed media works;

Calls for Art

Page 6 Thursday, March 25, 2010 FLIPSIDE

University Museum; through April 25. George Ions: Orlandini Vineyard, 410 Thorn Lane, Makanda; Italian landscapes; through April 30; 618-9952307; www.orlandinivineyard.com george.ions@yahoo.com. Skyscapes, Queens & Still Lifes: By Wil & Carolyn MacKay, Tribeca Gallery, downtown Paducah; through May 6; plumbart@bellsouth.net, 270-210-1753. Homily: Qualis Vita, Finis Ita: Oil paintings by Jed Jackson, Main Gallery, Mitchell Museum, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts. 2600 Richview Road, Mount Vernon; hours, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday; free; through May 9; 618-242-1236 or www.cedarhurst.org. SIUC Photography Exhibit: Works from the Department of Cinema and Photography at SIUC, Beal Grand Corridor Gallery, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mount Vernon; through May 9. Shrode Art & Craft Competition Exhibition: Paintings, drawings, printmaking, clay, fiber, mixed media, wood, fine jewelry and metal, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mount Vernon, Regenhardt Gallery of the Shrode Art Center; through May 9. Masters of Photography: University Museum, SIUC; highlights from the museum’s collection; through May; free. A Warrior’s Story: Oglala Sioux Buffalo Robe, University Museum, SIUC; through May; free. Carolyn Gassan Plochmann display: Work and life of Carbondale artist, Morris Library, SIUC; in the cases outside the Hall of Presidents, Special Collections Research Center reading room and other locations; 618-453-2516. Ongoing art exhibit: Featuring photographs of Juhree Veach, mosaics from Janet Altoff and sculpture from Tom Horn, StarView Vineyards, 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618-893-9463 or www.starviewvineyards.com.

Lectures Glenn Adamson, art historian: 7 p.m. Monday, April 5, University Museum Auditorium, SIUC; free; artanddesign.siuc.edu/newsevents/ visiting_artist.html.

Receptions The History of The Division: By Matthew Schultz, University Museum, SIUC; closing reception, 4-7 p.m. Friday. Senior citizens artwork: Closing reception, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, conference room, Harrisburg District Library.

Documenting a dream

An Antarctic expedition of sights and sounds

Antarctic Dreams Multimedia gallery installation by Gary Kolb and Jay Needham; Tuesday through May 9 in the Mitchell Gallery in the University Museum at Faner Hall, SIUC; hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; admission is free; reception is 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, April 2 at the gallery.

replaced with the memory that we’ve preserved in the photographs and in the sound and the memory that’s in our head. It becomes this mix of some sort of document and some sort of dreamscape.”

The artists’ process

The sheer volume of material brought back from Antarctica by the artists created a long and thoughtprovoking editing process. Kolb said he took nearly 2,700 images on the BY STEPHEN RICKERL trip, while Needham recorded more THE SOUTHERN than 25 hours of audio. The artists said An idea first conceived in an alpine editing that much content down to 45 valley near Steamboat Springs, Colo., photographs and five short audio loops and executed on the isolated continent for exhibition has been a collaborative of Antarctica has resulted in a unique process several months in the making. gallery exhibition by two Southern Kolb said his photographs went Illinois artists. through a number of edits and re-edits “Antarctic Dreams,” an exhibition by before he ended up with a pool of 300 Gary Kolb and Jay Needham, opens images from which he would draw the Tuesday in the Mitchell Gallery at the final images for the show. Needham University Museum. A reception will said his editing process is similar. be from 4 to 7 p.m. April 2. “It is a similar process,” Needham Kolb is a photographer and dean of said. “You’re reflecting on what you’ve the College of Mass Communication gathered in the field, then you begin to and Media Arts at Southern Illinois make art out of it. One of the nice University Carbondale, and Needham things of traveling and making work is is a sound researcher and associate returning and reflecting on where professor in radio and television at the you’ve been and what you’ve done. I university. really like that process because I think Their multimedia exhibit will feature it re-informs my work.” photographs and audio recordings Kolb said throughout the made during the artists’ 2008 trip to development of the idea, the direction Antarctica. Forty-five of Kolb’s of the project changed. He said a photographs and five sound pivotal moment came in October when sculptures, which consist of Needham played a recording he had Needham’s audio recordings played been mixing for Kolb. Kolb said the over antique gramophone horns audio track gave the artists the idea of customized for the exhibit, will be on having a central installation within the display. The artists said the show that would be a hinge point for installation is a combination of everything else. The hinge point was document and dream, and it was inspired by a place called Deception inspired by early Antarctic Island, a caldera with a dark past tied expeditions, the history of the to the whaling industry. continent and their experiences on the “It completely changed my journey. conception of how I thought about “Over time your experience of the what we were doing,” Kolb said. “It place becomes less clear-cut, less sounded like whale songs, but it hard-edged” Kolb said. “And it’s sounded like tortured whale songs,

PROVIDED

PAUL NEWTON / THE SOUTHERN

Jay Needham (left) and Gary Kolb of the SIUC College of Mass Communications and Media Arts look over a contact sheet with some of Kolb’s photos from the pair’s trip to Antarctica in 2008.

which was perfect for this place. I mean it was like an epiphany.” Needham said he finds the scale of sound interesting and that he’ll often listen for subtle, barely audible sounds, which he found on Deception Island in over-sized oil tanks left behind by whalers. He said because it’s a place of intense isolation, Antarctica is full of what he calls lonely sounds. “When you see Gary’s images of the Antarctic landscape, you see a very isolated space,” Needham said. “Something similar happens when making field recordings in that environment; the sounds one hears in Antarctica are intensely isolating. Just listening to the environment there, is a form of forced introspection.”

Antarctic history Kolb said he and Needham were inspired by two events that affected the history of Antarctica, the whaling industry’s operation on Deception Island in the early 20th century and the era of exploration, especially that of Ernest Shackleton. Kolb said Deception Island is a caldera of an ancient volcano, which

Photos from the exhibit include a grave on Deception Island (top) and icebergs in Antarctica in 2008.

viewers move through. He said some of the collages will be of wildlife recordings, the engine of the boat that took them on their journey and recordings of Antarctic wind. He said there will be a form of has a gap that ships are able to sail interactivity in that the viewers can through, finding a natural harbor create their own mixes of sounds protected from the sea. It is in this depending on their viewing habits. harbor where the whaling industry “The nice part about this from the would send factory ships to process standpoint of the human element is whales. you’ll be able to walk around and Kolb said from roughly 1910 to create your own mix,” Needham said. around 1940, the industry would “You’ll be able to hear them, but it will process whales onboard, pump the oil depend on where you’re walking, how into large tanks on Deception Island, fast you’re walking and what pieces drag the whale carcasses back into the are playing and when.” Gallery installation harbor for disposal and then pump the Toward the back of the gallery, much The exhibition is the culmination of like an island, a freestanding, dimly lit oil back onboard the ships. Over the course of 30 years, Kolb estimated that Kolb’s and Needham’s artistic octagonal room will display the processes, collaboration and historic tens of thousands of whales were photographs from Deception Island. slaughtered and boiled down there, influence. Some of Kolb’s photographs The soundtrack for this room is the resulting in whalebones being spread will be displayed around the outer same soundtrack that provided the across the beach. walls of the gallery with Needham’s artists with their pivotal moment of “It’s a place that historically is really sound sculptures interspersed. The inspiration last October, what Kolb important, and emotionally when you soundtrack to the exhibit will be described as whale songs. go there it’s like walking through a played through gramophone horns Kolb said his photographs of cemetery or graveyard where all the hanging by ropes from the ceiling, whalebones, as well as an aerial bones have been unearthed and all the which references the technology of the photograph of Deception Island, will graves are on the surface,” he said. early Antarctic expeditions. be on display. Shackleton’s expedition turned Needham said the audio portion of SEE ANTARCTIC / PAGE 11 tragic when his ship became trapped in the exhibit will act as a collage as

To watch a video about Gary Kolb and Jay Needham’s experiences, go to this story online at www.flipsideonline.com.

the ice and was eventually crushed by ice floes. The crew had to survive by living for months in lifeboats on the ice floes. Eventually the explorers sailed the lifeboats hundreds of miles across the open ocean to safety. The artists said old photographs of the expedition showing gramophones and whiskey crates in the Antarctic environment inspired a portion of their work. Needham constructed a replica whiskey crate for the show and inscribed on it an unpublished Shackleton poem, which was discovered in a hotel ledger in 2009.

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 25, 2010 Page 7


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES zCOVER STORY z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z through Saturday; 270-442-2453 or www.theyeiser.org Juried Art Exhibition: Entries sought Keyth Kahrs: Yeiser Art Center, 200 for exhibition Tuesday-April 3, Surplus Broadway St., Paducah; landscape and Gallery, Glove Factory, 432 S. pet portrait paintings; 10 a.m.-4 p.m.; Washington Ave., Carbondale; drop-off through Saturday; 270-442-2453. entries from noon-8 p.m. Saturday and Corin Perez: Tuesday-April 9, SIUC 9 a.m.-noon Sunday; entry forms University Museum, Faner Hall; 10 a.m.available in the SIUC School of Art and 4 p.m., Tuesday-Friday and 1-4 p.m. Design offices, Allyn Building. Saturday-Sunday; www.museum.siu.edu 19th District Congressional Art or 618-453-5388. Competition: Open to high school The MALE art show: More than 40 students in the 19th congressional pieces of art created by males including district; deadline, April 30; 217-492works by Allen Carstens, Mike Faris, Kris 5090 or www.shimkus.house.gov. Killman, and Tom Rabideau, Little Egypt HerrinFesta Italiana Art Arts Centre, Tower Square, Marion; Competition: Accepting entries through through Wednesday; 618-998-8530, May 5; artwork must be registered; killman@mchsi.com. delivery of artwork, May 15; show runs Real and Abstract Landscape: Little from May 27-May 31; www.herrinfesta. Egypt Arts Centre, Tower Square, Marion; com/art or 618-559-7379. through Wednesday. Logan Days Photo Exhibit: Entries Five-year anniversary exhibit: needed for John A. Logan Museum Leaping Trout Studio, 723 Madison St., display; amateur photographers may Paducah; exhibit features work by owner submit photos of the sights, scenes and Keyth Kahrs; through Wednesday; 270personalities of Southern Illinois; entries 441-7050 or kahrsk@bellsouth.net. on display in the Logan museum, 1613 Laurie Blakely: noon-5 p.m. Edith St., Murphysboro, from May to weekdays; 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday and mid-September; also, junior division for noon-6 p.m. Sunday, Owl Creek Winery, ages 10-17; deadline, May 6; 2655 Water Valley Road, Cobden; bowls, www.loganmuseum.org. platters and light fixtures made of clay, Paducah Photo ‘10 Juried silk and glass; to April 1; 618-529-2919. Photography Exhibition: The Yeiser Art Kat Shaffner: Central Showcase at Center, 200 Broadway St.; open to all Realty Central, 1825 W. Main St, Murdale photographers working in digital or film Shopping Center, Carbondale; gallery photography; original work, completed hours, 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and in the last three years; cash prizes 9 a.m.-noon Saturday; through April 3; totaling $1,700; deadline for early 618-457-4663. submissions, May 1; final deadline, May Feminist Art of Indiana: New 7; www.paducahphoto.com. Harmony Gallery of Contemporary Art, corner of Church and Main Streets, New Classes, Workshops Harmony, Ind; 812-682-3156; through April 3; www.nhgallery.com;. Little Egypt Arts Centre classes: Mrs. B’s Illustrations: By Andi Butler, Beginning photography, drawing, art Beck Family Center Gallery, Cedarhurst, history classes, 601 Tower Square, Mount Vernon; Butler, retro/whimsical Marion; register at 618-998-8530. Student Center Craft Shop: Variety of illustrations; through April 4; www.cedarhurst.org; 618-242-1236. crafts and classes offered, SIUC; 618Quilts of the Coastal South: The 453-3636, www.siucstudentcenter.org. National Quilt Museum, 215 Jefferson St., Paducah; 10 a.m. 5 p.m. MondayExhibits Saturday; through April 6; 270-442-8856 On and Off the Wall: 3-5 and 6-8 p.m., or www.nationalquiltmuseum.org Friday, Hughes Gallery, 1603 Edith St., Eileen Doman and Kat Shaffner: Murphysboro; art by students from 3-D Corridor Gallery, Carbondale Civic Design class at John A. Logan College. Center; closing reception, 5-8 p.m. April Stewart Wessel: A Carpenter’s Son, 8; 618-457-5100; cca@neondsl.com; The Gallery Space, law office of Joni www.absolutearts.com/portfolios/d/ Beth Bailey, 1008 Walnut St., doman/artist_biography.html or www. Murphysboro; large wooden sculpture; kathleenshaffner.com/Kathleen_ Shaffner/Welcome.html. through Friday; 618- 684-8668. Student Art Show: Rend Lake College, Landscape Musings: Artwork by Jake 468 N. Ken Gray Parkway, Ina; through Wells and M. Ben Cohan, Yeiser Art April 15; 618-437-5321 or www.rlc.edu Center, 200 Broadway St., Paducah; Patrick Williams sculptures: SIUC paintings and mixed media works;

Calls for Art

Page 6 Thursday, March 25, 2010 FLIPSIDE

University Museum; through April 25. George Ions: Orlandini Vineyard, 410 Thorn Lane, Makanda; Italian landscapes; through April 30; 618-9952307; www.orlandinivineyard.com george.ions@yahoo.com. Skyscapes, Queens & Still Lifes: By Wil & Carolyn MacKay, Tribeca Gallery, downtown Paducah; through May 6; plumbart@bellsouth.net, 270-210-1753. Homily: Qualis Vita, Finis Ita: Oil paintings by Jed Jackson, Main Gallery, Mitchell Museum, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts. 2600 Richview Road, Mount Vernon; hours, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday and 1-5 p.m. Sunday; free; through May 9; 618-242-1236 or www.cedarhurst.org. SIUC Photography Exhibit: Works from the Department of Cinema and Photography at SIUC, Beal Grand Corridor Gallery, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mount Vernon; through May 9. Shrode Art & Craft Competition Exhibition: Paintings, drawings, printmaking, clay, fiber, mixed media, wood, fine jewelry and metal, Cedarhurst Center for the Arts, Mount Vernon, Regenhardt Gallery of the Shrode Art Center; through May 9. Masters of Photography: University Museum, SIUC; highlights from the museum’s collection; through May; free. A Warrior’s Story: Oglala Sioux Buffalo Robe, University Museum, SIUC; through May; free. Carolyn Gassan Plochmann display: Work and life of Carbondale artist, Morris Library, SIUC; in the cases outside the Hall of Presidents, Special Collections Research Center reading room and other locations; 618-453-2516. Ongoing art exhibit: Featuring photographs of Juhree Veach, mosaics from Janet Altoff and sculpture from Tom Horn, StarView Vineyards, 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618-893-9463 or www.starviewvineyards.com.

Lectures Glenn Adamson, art historian: 7 p.m. Monday, April 5, University Museum Auditorium, SIUC; free; artanddesign.siuc.edu/newsevents/ visiting_artist.html.

Receptions The History of The Division: By Matthew Schultz, University Museum, SIUC; closing reception, 4-7 p.m. Friday. Senior citizens artwork: Closing reception, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, conference room, Harrisburg District Library.

Documenting a dream

An Antarctic expedition of sights and sounds

Antarctic Dreams Multimedia gallery installation by Gary Kolb and Jay Needham; Tuesday through May 9 in the Mitchell Gallery in the University Museum at Faner Hall, SIUC; hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday; admission is free; reception is 4 to 7 p.m. Friday, April 2 at the gallery.

replaced with the memory that we’ve preserved in the photographs and in the sound and the memory that’s in our head. It becomes this mix of some sort of document and some sort of dreamscape.”

The artists’ process

The sheer volume of material brought back from Antarctica by the artists created a long and thoughtprovoking editing process. Kolb said he took nearly 2,700 images on the BY STEPHEN RICKERL trip, while Needham recorded more THE SOUTHERN than 25 hours of audio. The artists said An idea first conceived in an alpine editing that much content down to 45 valley near Steamboat Springs, Colo., photographs and five short audio loops and executed on the isolated continent for exhibition has been a collaborative of Antarctica has resulted in a unique process several months in the making. gallery exhibition by two Southern Kolb said his photographs went Illinois artists. through a number of edits and re-edits “Antarctic Dreams,” an exhibition by before he ended up with a pool of 300 Gary Kolb and Jay Needham, opens images from which he would draw the Tuesday in the Mitchell Gallery at the final images for the show. Needham University Museum. A reception will said his editing process is similar. be from 4 to 7 p.m. April 2. “It is a similar process,” Needham Kolb is a photographer and dean of said. “You’re reflecting on what you’ve the College of Mass Communication gathered in the field, then you begin to and Media Arts at Southern Illinois make art out of it. One of the nice University Carbondale, and Needham things of traveling and making work is is a sound researcher and associate returning and reflecting on where professor in radio and television at the you’ve been and what you’ve done. I university. really like that process because I think Their multimedia exhibit will feature it re-informs my work.” photographs and audio recordings Kolb said throughout the made during the artists’ 2008 trip to development of the idea, the direction Antarctica. Forty-five of Kolb’s of the project changed. He said a photographs and five sound pivotal moment came in October when sculptures, which consist of Needham played a recording he had Needham’s audio recordings played been mixing for Kolb. Kolb said the over antique gramophone horns audio track gave the artists the idea of customized for the exhibit, will be on having a central installation within the display. The artists said the show that would be a hinge point for installation is a combination of everything else. The hinge point was document and dream, and it was inspired by a place called Deception inspired by early Antarctic Island, a caldera with a dark past tied expeditions, the history of the to the whaling industry. continent and their experiences on the “It completely changed my journey. conception of how I thought about “Over time your experience of the what we were doing,” Kolb said. “It place becomes less clear-cut, less sounded like whale songs, but it hard-edged” Kolb said. “And it’s sounded like tortured whale songs,

PROVIDED

PAUL NEWTON / THE SOUTHERN

Jay Needham (left) and Gary Kolb of the SIUC College of Mass Communications and Media Arts look over a contact sheet with some of Kolb’s photos from the pair’s trip to Antarctica in 2008.

which was perfect for this place. I mean it was like an epiphany.” Needham said he finds the scale of sound interesting and that he’ll often listen for subtle, barely audible sounds, which he found on Deception Island in over-sized oil tanks left behind by whalers. He said because it’s a place of intense isolation, Antarctica is full of what he calls lonely sounds. “When you see Gary’s images of the Antarctic landscape, you see a very isolated space,” Needham said. “Something similar happens when making field recordings in that environment; the sounds one hears in Antarctica are intensely isolating. Just listening to the environment there, is a form of forced introspection.”

Antarctic history Kolb said he and Needham were inspired by two events that affected the history of Antarctica, the whaling industry’s operation on Deception Island in the early 20th century and the era of exploration, especially that of Ernest Shackleton. Kolb said Deception Island is a caldera of an ancient volcano, which

Photos from the exhibit include a grave on Deception Island (top) and icebergs in Antarctica in 2008.

viewers move through. He said some of the collages will be of wildlife recordings, the engine of the boat that took them on their journey and recordings of Antarctic wind. He said there will be a form of has a gap that ships are able to sail interactivity in that the viewers can through, finding a natural harbor create their own mixes of sounds protected from the sea. It is in this depending on their viewing habits. harbor where the whaling industry “The nice part about this from the would send factory ships to process standpoint of the human element is whales. you’ll be able to walk around and Kolb said from roughly 1910 to create your own mix,” Needham said. around 1940, the industry would “You’ll be able to hear them, but it will process whales onboard, pump the oil depend on where you’re walking, how into large tanks on Deception Island, fast you’re walking and what pieces drag the whale carcasses back into the are playing and when.” Gallery installation harbor for disposal and then pump the Toward the back of the gallery, much The exhibition is the culmination of like an island, a freestanding, dimly lit oil back onboard the ships. Over the course of 30 years, Kolb estimated that Kolb’s and Needham’s artistic octagonal room will display the processes, collaboration and historic tens of thousands of whales were photographs from Deception Island. slaughtered and boiled down there, influence. Some of Kolb’s photographs The soundtrack for this room is the resulting in whalebones being spread will be displayed around the outer same soundtrack that provided the across the beach. walls of the gallery with Needham’s artists with their pivotal moment of “It’s a place that historically is really sound sculptures interspersed. The inspiration last October, what Kolb important, and emotionally when you soundtrack to the exhibit will be described as whale songs. go there it’s like walking through a played through gramophone horns Kolb said his photographs of cemetery or graveyard where all the hanging by ropes from the ceiling, whalebones, as well as an aerial bones have been unearthed and all the which references the technology of the photograph of Deception Island, will graves are on the surface,” he said. early Antarctic expeditions. be on display. Shackleton’s expedition turned Needham said the audio portion of SEE ANTARCTIC / PAGE 11 tragic when his ship became trapped in the exhibit will act as a collage as

To watch a video about Gary Kolb and Jay Needham’s experiences, go to this story online at www.flipsideonline.com.

the ice and was eventually crushed by ice floes. The crew had to survive by living for months in lifeboats on the ice floes. Eventually the explorers sailed the lifeboats hundreds of miles across the open ocean to safety. The artists said old photographs of the expedition showing gramophones and whiskey crates in the Antarctic environment inspired a portion of their work. Needham constructed a replica whiskey crate for the show and inscribed on it an unpublished Shackleton poem, which was discovered in a hotel ledger in 2009.

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 25, 2010 Page 7


CRAVING KARAOKE?

WEEK OF MARCH 25-31

Karaoke and DJ lists are online at flipsideonline.com.

Coffeehouses, Cafés and Eateries Rik Palieri: 7:30 p.m. Friday, Cousin Andy’s Coffeehouse, Fellowship Hall, Church of the Good Shepherd, United Church of Christ, 515 Orchard Drive, Carbondale; suggested donation, $10; www.cousinandy.org Whistle Pigs: 7 p.m. Friday, Crazy Joe’s Fish House 708 Suchman Road, Ava, 618-763-4417 Blues Bandits: 8:30 p.m. Friday, Palace Pizzeria, 215 Appleknocker Drive, Cobden; 618-893-4415 Cabaret Decadence: 8 p.m.-midnight Saturday, Yellow Moon Café, 110 N. Front St., Cobden; fundraiser benefits children in Africa; www.yellowmooncafe.com; 618-893-2233 The Natives: 8:30 p.m. Saturday, Palace Pizzeria, 215 Appleknocker Drive, Cobden; 618-893-4415

Wineries Movin’ Mary: 6-9 p.m. Friday, Rustle Hill Winery Marty Davis: 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Blue Sky Vineyard Bill Booth: 2-5 p.m. Saturday, Rustle Hill Winery Bottom Line: Spring Fling Dinner & Dance, 6-10 p.m., Saturday, Von Jakob Orchard Breeden, Bradley & Maze: 2-6 p.m. Saturday, StarView Vineyards Kristen Kearns: 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Rustle Hill Winery

Joe Palermo: 6-9 p.m. Saturday, Walker’s Bluff Whisker & Biscuit: 1-4 p.m. Sunday, LauNae Winery Carlos Alberto: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Blue Sky Vineyard Dan Wiethop: 2-5 p.m. Sunday, Rustle Hill Winery Dave Caputo: 3-6 p.m., Sunday, Von Jakob Orchard Slippery Elm: Cigars & Guitars Under the Stars smoke-in, 5-9 p.m. Sunday, Rustle Hill Winery

Blue Sky Vineyard: 3150 S. Rocky Comfort Road, Makanda; 618995-9463. Lau-Nae Winery: 1522 Illinois 3, Red Bud; 618-282-9463. Rustle Hill Winery: U.S. 51, Cobden; 618893-2700.

StarView Vineyards: 5100 Wing Hill Road, Cobden; 618 893-9463. Von Jakob Orchard: 230 Illinois 127, Alto Pass; 618-893-4600. Walker’s Bluff: North on Reed Station Road, Carterville; 618-9858463.

Page 8 Thursday, March 25, 2010 FLIPSIDE

WANT TO BE LISTED?

z FRIDAY

z TONIGHT BENTON Duncan Dance Barn:: Spring Pond Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. CARBONDALE Pinch Penny/Copper Dragon: This Must Be the Band, Talking Heads Tribute, 9 p.m. PK’s: Leveld Tres Hombres: The Ivas John Band GALATIA Galatia Community Center: Bill

Call 618-351-5089 or e-mail brenda.kirkpatrick@thesouthern.com

Mitchem & The Country Crossroads, 6:30-9:30 p.m. MOUNT VERNON The Tavern on 10th: Live Blues Trio, 7-11 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Mike’s Band, 7-10 p.m. WEST FRANKFORT WB Ranch Barn: Little Egypt Country Band 6:30-9:30 p.m.

CARBONDALE Pinch Penny/Copper Dragon: Mike and Joe PK’s: Tawl Paul & Slappin’ Henry Blue Tres Hombres: Pokey Lefarge and the South City Three MARION John Brown’s on the Square: Lynn Drury, 8:30-11:30 p.m. INA Ina Community Building: Friday Night Jam Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m.

SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Mike’s Band, 7-10 p.m. THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Rebel Country, 7-10 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Country Sidekicks, 7-10 p.m. WHITE ASH The White Ash Barn: The Vintage Country Band,7-10 p.m. WHITTINGTON Corner Dance Hall: Waste Band, 7:30-10:30 p.m.

z SATURDAY CARBONDALE Pinch Penny/Copper Dragon: Clayton Anderson Band PK’s: Tawl Paul & Slappin’ Henry Blue Tres Hombres: Summercamp On The Road w/Mathien, Spread, The Sam West Trio MARION Marion American Legion: Dirtwater Fox, 8 p.m.-

midnight. Marion Eagles: Black Lace, 8 p.m.-midnight MOUNT VERNON Double K’s Kickin Country: Santa Fe Ride Band, 7-10:30 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Robert Ray and Yesterday’s Country, 7-10 p.m.

z SUNDAY CARBONDALE Key West: Ivas John Blues Band

z TUESDAY MARION Marion Eagles: Black Lace, 6-10 p.m.

z MONDAY CARBONDALE Tres Hombres: The Transpoetic Playground

z WEDNESDAY DU QUOIN Ten Pin Alley: Piano Bob, 6-9 p.m.

THOMPSONVILLE Lion’s Cave: Weekenders, 7-10 p.m. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Lil’ Boot & Classic Country, 7-10 p.m. WHITTINGTON The Zone Lounge: Tommy Gunn, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.

MARION Marion Youth Center: Ragtag Band, 7-10 p.m.

CARBONDALE PK’s: Whistle Pigs MOUNT VERNON Double K’s Kickin Country: Jacks-RBetter, 7-10:30 p.m. SPILLERTOWN Track Side Dance Barn: Rebel Country, 7-10 p.m. WEST FRANKFORT WB Ranch Barn: WB Ranch Band, 6:30-9:30 p.m. WHITE ASH The White Ash Barn: The Heartland Country Band, 7-10 p.m.

DIRECTIONS & DIGITS Corner Dance Hall: 200 Franklin St., Whittington 618-303-5266 Double K’s Kickin Country: Illinois 37, Mount Vernon 618-359-0455 Duncan Dance Barn: 13545 Spring Pond Road, Benton 618-435-6161 The Get-Away: 804 N. Douglas St., West Frankfort 618-937-3545 Ina Community Building: 504 Elm St., Ina/618-315-2373 John Brown’s on the Square: 1000 Tower Square, Marion 618-997-2909 Key West: 1108 W. Main, Carbondale 618-351-5998 Linemen’s Lounge: 100 E. Broadway, Johnston City Lion’s Cave: South Street, Thompsonville/618-218-4888 Marion American Legion: Longstreet Road, Marion 618-997-6168 Marion Eagles: Rural Route 3, Marion/618-993-6300 Marion Youth Center: 211 E. Boulevard St., Marion 618-922-7853 Mollie’s: 107 E. Union St., Marion 618-997-3424 Murphysboro Elks Lodge: 1809 Shomaker Drive Murphysboro 618-684-4541. Old Country Store Dance Barn: Main Street, Thompsonville, 618-927-2770. Orient American Legion: 404 Jackson St., Orient 618-932-2060 Perfect Shot: 3029 S. Park Ave., Herrin/618-942-4655 Pinch Penny Pub/Copper Dragon: 700 E. Grand, Carbondale/618-549-3348 PK’s: 308 S. Illinois Ave., Carbondale/618-529-1124 Ramesse: 1754 Illinois 37, Lake of Eygpt/618-995-9104 Steelhorse Saloon: 202 Dewmain Lane, Carterville 618-985-3549 Tavern on 10th: 224 S. 10th St., Mount Vernon/618-244-7821 Tomigirl’s Rollin-in: 14960 Illinois 37, Johnston City 618-983-7655 Trackside Dance Barn: 104 Rock St., Spillertown 618-993-3035 Tres Hombres: 119 N. Washington St., Carbondale 618-457-3308 WB Ranch Barn: 1586 Pershing Road, West Frankfort 618-937-3718 Whisker Willy’s Bar & Grill 13510 N. Illinois 37, Marion 618-983-5300 White Ash Barn: 207 Potter St., White Ash / 618-997-4979 Xrossroads: 101 Rushing Drive, Herrin / 618-993-8393 The Zone Lounge: 14711 Illinois 37, Whittington/618-6292039


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z

LoCash Cowboys, Clayton Anderson Band to rock at Copper event wrapped up Sunday, not before hundreds of COUNTRY but bands played in every nook and cranny of the state SCENE Vince Hoffard capital nearly nonstop for four days. Music fans in Southern Illinois don’t have to travel At the Copper Dragon a thousand miles or spend The Clayton Anderson a week fighting enormous Band with special guest crowds to discover amazing talent. Names Core Cox, Saturday, $5; like Clayton Anderson and LoCash Cowboys with LoCash Cowboys may not opening act Brushfire, be found in the music Friday, April 2, $8; 700 E. department at Wal-Mart, Grand Avenue, Carbondale; but after watching a live doors open at 9 p.m., performance, don’t be music starts at surprised if you’re not scratching your head and 10 p.m.; 618-549-3348. wondering why. Both acts are touring rganizers of the South nonstop in the Midwest by Southwest Music Conference in Austin, and will perform soon at the Copper Dragon in Texas, built the popular Carbondale. festival on the simple The Clayton Anderson premise of being a showcase for cutting-edge Band with special guest Core Cox will perform entertainment. This is Saturday. Admission is $5. where you hear LoCash Cowboys will independent artists that will soon be gobbled up by perform April 2. Central Illinois country band major record labels and Brushfire will be the played on the radio in a opening act. Tickets are $8 couple years. in advance. The 24th edition of the

O

Concerts Southern Illinois The Great Collaborators: John A. Logan, Rend Lake and Southeastern Illinois college choirs, 7 p.m. Thursday, RLC Theater, Ina; 7 p.m. Friday, O’Neil Auditorium, JALC, Carterville; 7 p.m. Saturday, SIC, Harrisburg; all $5. Kevin Skinner: 8 p.m. April 17, Harrah’s Metropolis Casino, Riverfront Event Center; $15; 888-512-7469. Joe Bonamassa: 7:30 p.m. May 5, Shryock Auditorium; 618-453-6000.

Kentucky Suzanne Vega: 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Saturday, April 17,

shows for Kenny Chesney, Eric Church and Luke Bryan. In June, Anderson took home $10,000 after surviving three weeks of competition from 15 other contestants to win a battle of the bands contest at the French Lick Resort. The LoCash Cowboys may have a Nashville address, but they play Southern Illinois enough to officially establish PROVIDED residency. The Clayton Anderson Band will play at 10 p.m. Saturday at “We love these guys,” Copper Dragon in Carbondale. Tickets are $5. Karayiannis said. “No one can possibly play with more energy and or Southeastern Doors open at 9 p.m. enthusiasm.” and music starts at 10 p.m. Conferences. He is in the LoCash is duo Preston For more information, call regular rotation at Joe’s Brust and Chris Lucas. Bar in Chicago, the 618-549-3348. Lucas was a high school “I had Clayton here once Academy of Country before in the beer garden,” Music’s Venue of the Year. football star in Maryland. His coach didn’t like the He has built a huge fan said Copper Dragon fact he was also a base with high energy manager James superstar break dancer. He Karayiannis. “He puts on a concerts which are a mixture of cover tunes and would migrate to Nashville great show that is a lot of in search of hit records original songs such as fun.” after his prep career. He “California Sunshine,” Anderson, a native of had a band with a regular “Pretty Eyes,” “Good Bloomington, Ind., and a Idea,” “Stay with Me Indiana University graduate, normally tries to Tonight” and “For What It’s Worth.” schedule concerts in Anderson has opened college towns of the Big 10

Southern Illinois Chamber Music Society: Café’ Music featuring Yuko Kato, 3 p.m. Sunday, Carbondale Unitarian Fellowship, 105 N. Parrish Lane; $15/$3. Outside the Box Tatsuya Nakatani: Music Festival Guest recital: Randall Hall, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Altgeld Hall, room 112; with the SIUC saxophone and Jonathon Improvisation Unit, Kirk, laptop computer, percussion; free. 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Old Chicago Composers Baptist Foundation Recital Hall, SIUC; workshop, 4 p.m., Consortium: With the SIUC Percussion Group, 7:30 p.m. Altgeld Hall, room 112; free; Monday, Altgeld Hall, room 618-536-8742; www.music. siuc.edu/outsidethebox2010. 112; Ron Coulter, director; free. Tatsuya Nakatani: Music from China: Percussion Improvisation Traditional Chinese Workshop, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, instruments, featuring Altgeld Hall, room 112, SIUC; concert, 7:30 p.m. Old Baptist composers Chen Yi and Zhou Foundation Recital Hall; free. Long, 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Old

Myre River Room, Carson Center, Paducah; tickets on sale; $39; 270-450-4444 or www.thecarsoncenter.org.

Baptist Foundation Recital Hall, SIUC; $7.50/$5. SIUC Emerging Composers: 5 p.m. Wednesday, Old Baptist Foundation Recital Hall; Frank Stemper, coordinator; free. Altgeld Chamber Players: 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Old Baptist Foundation Recital Hall, SIUC; Eric Mandat, coordinator; $7.50/$5. SIUC Wind Ensemble: 7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 1, Shryock Auditorium, SIUC; features SIUC Concert Choir, SIUC Percussion Group with Music From China; $10/$5. Steppenwolf Multimedia Event: 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 2, Altgeld Hall, room 112; free.

gig at the Wildhorse Saloon. Brust grew up in Kokomo, Ind., the son of a preacher. He loved to sing at church, but his real passion was choreography. He would follow his calling to Music City, where he met Lucas on his first day in town and was invited to join his band. With a full throttle approach, the duo played nearly every night, selling 60,000 copies of a homemade CD. Eventually, they won a spot on “Tuckerville,” record for Mark Miller of Sawyer Brown fame and opened for ZZ Top and Charlies Daniels. Signed to Stroudavarious Records, the duo has new music due out this spring. VINCE HOFFARD can be reached at 618-658-9095 or vincehoffard@yahoo. com.

Get your Spring party supplies now: Tableware • Plates • Cups • Table Covers • Banners • Signage & more Need a costume? Largest selection in Southern Illinois In Business 25 Years

The Party Shop 3033 S. Park Ave.

1/2 Mi. North of New Rt. 13 on Hw y 148 (Across from Affordable Home Furniture)

Herrin, Il • (618) 942-4431

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 25, 2010 Page 9


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z

Outside the Box new music festival opens Saturday SCHEDULE: See the Concerts listings for upcoming performances at the festival. Page 9 BY ANDREA HAHN SIUC UNIVERSITY COMMUNICATIONS

CARBONDALE — Spring weather is here, so it must be time to get outside the box. The fourth annual Outside the Box new music festival returns to Southern Illinois University Carbondale with a truly international flavor. The festival runs Saturday through April 2 with concerts, master classes and social events highlighting the contemporary music of guest composers, Chen Yi and Zhou Long, and other guests including the ensemble Music from China and percussionist Tatsuya Nakatani. Many of the events are free. Several of the musical performances blend with events promoted during Asian American Heritage Month.

Outside the Box coordinator Kathleen Ginther, a composer in the School of Music at SIUC, said she is happy the events coincide because it demonstrates the broad appeal of new music, even when it’s not mainstream. “This year’s Festival has an Asian theme, and that’s partly because the SIUC Concert Choir and the SIUC Wind Ensemble went to China last May and performed in Beijing, Shanghai and Xian,” Ginther said. “It was a fabulous experience for everyone, and we just decided to extend it a little into Outside The Box this year. So part of this year’s festival focuses on traditional and contemporary music by ChineseAmerican composers, performed on Chinese and western instruments. With the large international population at SIUC and the recent visit of our chancellor and other university administrators to China, Outside The Box 2010 is our contribution to enhancing the connection between East and West.”

violence, drug and sexual references) The Twilight Saga: New Men Who Stare at Goats Moon When Bella and her The U.S. military can defeat family leave Forks, the its enemies with psychic heartbroken teen puts power ... or so claims a herself in jeopardy to see member of a secret Army Edward. PG-13 (some unit. R (profanity, some violence and action) drug content and brief The Blind Side Sandra nudity) Bullock won an Oscar for her Fantastic Mr Fox The sly portrayal ofs Leigh Anne Mr. Fox, bored with being a Tuohy, an affluent white responsible family man, woman who took in a plans one last raid of the homeless, African American local farms. Meryl Streep, teenager and helped him George Clooney, Owen become an All-American Wilson. PG (action, smoking football star. PG-13 (one and slang humor) scene involving brief — McClatchy-Tribune News

New on DVD S HOW T IMES FOR M ARCH 22 ND - 25 TH Avatar (PG-13) 5:15 8:45 Green Zone (R) 4:40 7:30 10:10 3D Alice in Wonderland (P G) 3:40 6:30 9:20 Bounty Hunter (PG-13) 4:10 7:00 9:5 0 Shutter Island (R) 4:00 7:20 10:20 Alice in Wonderland (P G) 4:30 7:10 10:00 Our Family Wedding (PG-13) 4:20 6:50 9:30 Diary of a Wimpy Kid (P G) 3:50 6:40 9:10

Repo Men (R) 4:40 7:30 10:15 Hurt Locker (R) 3:40 6:50 10:00 Remember Me (PG-13) 3:50 6:40 9:30 The Crazies (R) 4:50 7:50 10:20 Crazy Heart (R) 4:15 7:20 10:10 She’s Out of My L eague (R) 4:30 7:10 9:45

We’re Makin’ Dolls A Porcelain Doll Shop

Quality heirlooms for tomorrow’s keepsakes. Shutter Island (R) 4:10 7:10 Bounty Hunter (PG-13) 4:20 7:00 Remember Me (P G-13) 3:40 6:40 Green Zone (R) 4:30 7:20 She’s Out of My L eague (R) 5:00 7:40 Repo Men (R) 4:50 7:30 Alice in Wonderland (P G) 3:30 6:20 Diary of a Wimpy Kid (P G) 3:50 6:30

$5 Doll Sale

Hundreds to choose from, we have something for everyone! 1318 Walnut Street • Murphysboro, IL • 618-6 687-4 4101 Hours: Tue. - Fri. 10am - 4pm • Mon. & Sat. 10am - 2pm Anytime by appointment www.weremakindolls.com • www.facebook.com/weremakindolls

Page 10 Thursday, March 25, 2010 FLIPSIDE

Still Playing Alice in Wonderland Alice returns to the whimsical world she first encountered as a young girl to find her true destiny and end the Red Queen’s reign of terror. With Johnny Depp, Anne Hathaway, Helena Bonham Carter, Crispin Glover, Matt Lucas and Mia Wasikowska. From the books by Lewis Carroll. Directed by Tim Burton. In Disney Digital 3D and IMAX 3D. PG (fantasy action/violence involving scary images and situations and for a smoking caterpillar) Avatar James Cameron’s mega-expensive, technological marvel is also a whole lot of fun: A gamer generation’s “Dances With Wolves,” with a human soldier (and his avatar) falling in love with a blue-skinned alien from the planet Pandora. PG-13 (violence, aggressive action, alien beasts, adult themes) Bounty Hunter A down-onhis-luck bounty hunter gets his dream job when he is assigned to track down his bail-jumping ex-wife, a reporter chasing a lead on a murder cover-up. With Jennifer Anniston and Gerard Butler. Written by Sarah Thorp. Directed by Andy Tennant. PG-13 (sexual content including suggestive comments, language and some violence Crazies A husband and wife in a small Midwestern town find themselves battling for survival as their friends and family descend into madness after a mysterious toxin in the water supply turns everyone exposed to it into mindless killers in this terrifying reinvention of the 1973 George Romero horror classic. With Timothy Olyphant, Radha Mitchell, Joe Anderson and Danielle Panabaker. Directed by Breck Eisner. R. Crazy Heart Jeff Bridges delivers an Oscar-worthy — no, Oscar-required — performance as a whiskeysoaked one-time country

legend trying to put his life back together in this sublime American indie. Maggie Gyllenhaal, Robert Duvall and an uncredited Colin Farrell all offer up memorable turns. A low-key, down-home gem. R (profanity, alcohol abuse, adult themes) Diary of a Wimpy Kid The adventures of wise-cracking middle school student Greg Heffley, who must somehow survive the scariest time of anyone’s life: middle school. Based on the best-selling illustrated novel by Jeff Kinney. With Zachary Gordon, Robert Capron and Devon Bostick. Directed by Thor Freudenthal. PG (some rude humor, language) Green Zone Various intelligence-gathering agencies clash in the chaotic early days of the Iraq war when no one could be trusted and every decision could detonate unforeseen consequences. With Matt Damon, Greg Kinnear, Brendan Gleeson, Amy Ryan, Yigal Naor, Khalid Abdalla and Jason Isaacs. Based on the book “Imperial Life in the Emerald City” by Rajiv Chandrasekaran. Directed by Paul Greengrass. R (violence, language, graphic war images) Hurt Locker Kathryn Bigelow’s riveting and profoundly tense war movie, set in Baghdad, 2004, follows the members of a bomb squad as they go looking for IEDs, looking to stay alive. Far and away one of the strongest of the films to come out of the Iraq conflict — a whiteknuckle war movie. The movie and the director won Academy Awards Sunday. Actor Jeremy Renner, who stars in the movie, was nominated for best actor. Also starring Anthony Mackie, Brian Geraghty, David Morse, Ralph Fiennes and Guy Pearce. R (violence, heavy gore, profanity, adult themes) Our Family Wedding A newly engaged couple learn the hard way that the path to saying “I do” can be rife with

familial strife. With Forest Whitaker, America Ferrera, Regina King, Hayley Marie Norman and Lance Gross. Directed by Rick Famuyiwa. PG-13 (some sexual content, brief strong language) Remember Me A rebellious young man in New York City finds love after a family tragedy separates his family. With Robert Pattinson, Emilie de Ravin, Pierce Brosnan, Chris Cooper and Lena Olin. Directed by Allen Coulter. PG13 (violence, sexual content, language, smoking) She’s Out of My League A teen romantic comedy in which an average Joe meets the perfect woman, but his lack of confidence and the influence of his friends and family begin to pick away at the relationship. With Jay Baruchel, Lindsay Sloane, Alice Eve and Debra Jo Rupp. Directed by Jim Field Smith. R (language, sexual content) Repo Men Set in the near future when artificial organs can be bought on credit, a heart transplant patient struggling to make payments on his recent purchase goes on the run before his ticker is repossessed. With Jude Law, Forest Whitaker and Liev Schriber. Written by Eric Garcia and Garrett Lerner, based on Garcia’s novel. Directed by Miguel Sapochnik. R (strong bloody violence, grisly images, language, sexuality, nudity). Shutter Island Two U.S. marshals are summoned to a fortress-like island housing a hospital for the criminally insane to investigate the implausible disappearance of a multiple murderess from a locked room. With Leonardo DiCaprio, Mark Ruffalo, Ben Kingsley, Michelle Williams, Patricia Clarkson, Emily Mortimer and Max Von Sydow. Screenplay by Laeta Kalogridis, based on the novel by Dennis Lehane. Directed by Martin Scorsese. R (disturbing, violent content, language and some nudity) — The Associated Press, McClatchy-Tribune News


z MOVIES z POP CULTURE z ART z MUSIC zWINERIES z THEATER z THINGS TO DO z BOOKS z

Dragon training seems too easy in this film How to Train Your Dragon Rated PG for sequences of intense action and some scary images, brief mild language; animated with the voices of Jay Baruchel, Gerard Butler, America Ferrera, Craig Ferguson; directed by Chris Sanders, Dean DeBlois; opening Friday only at Illinois Centre 8 in Marion. BY ROGER MOORE MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

The Vikings on the island of Berk have this pest problem — dragons. They’re dogged by dragons of every shape, size and description — the Thunder Drum variety and the “Scaldrons,” who won’t burn you with fire, but with scalding hot water. Whispering Death is a particular nuisance. Worst of all is the Night Fury. You can’t even see that dragon when it plunges out of the darkness to snatch people and livestock, burn barns and homes, and generally lower property values. But the burly Vikings of Berk fight fire with fire, and dragons with burrs — Scottish burrs. They all sound like Gerard Butler and Craig Ferguson, you see. Or the adult ones do. Hiccup (voiced by Jay Baruchel) is a scrawny kid who longs to do his part because “killing a dragon is everything around here.” But he’ll have to do it with inventions. He’s plainly not tough enough to handle a broadsword or battleaxe to the satisfaction of

STUDIO

This animated movie emphasizes heart over one-liners and message over laughs. It opens Friday at Illinois Centre 8 in Marion.

his dad, the stoic chieftain Stoick the Vast (Gerard Butler). Hiccup’s lack of a killer instinct and inability to impress his dad come to a head when he captures a Night Fury. Because once he sees how gentle dragons can be (he can ride them, just like in “Avatar”), Dad will no longer be upset that Hiccup can’t kill them. Hiccup learns “How to Train Your Dragon.” Won’t the Vikings be pleased? Or at least shocked? Dreamworks hired the directors of “Lilo & Stitch” to turn Cressida Cowell’s romp of a novel into an animated film and can’t be too surprised that they made, in essence, “Hiccup and Stitch.” It’s a cuddly cartoon character comedy that emphasizes heart over oneliners, message over laughs. Casting funny folks like Jonah Hill and Kristin Wiig in supporting roles to little effect, they emphasize the father-son, boy-community dynamic, with Hiccup as a reluctant dragon slayer among manly hack-first,

ask questions later Vikings. “It’s only fun if you get pain out of it!” But as sweet as it is, there’s not enough heart or farcical action (dragon slaying training) to make up for the lack of ready laughs. No matter how adorably Stitch-like the Night Fury is (rolling on his back like a dog, making those big Disney eyes), I wanted more Viking jokes, more bluster from Butler, more zingers from Ferguson (the latenight host voices a peg-legged blacksmith). “Oh, Thor almighty” doesn’t cut it. Casting Baruchel as the lead ensures that this will be the wimpiest Viking movie ever, which may be the point. This harks back to that 1980s movie and TV series, “The Reluctant Dragon.” It’s more coming-ofage dramedy or “everything about your world view is wrong” message movie than it is a comedy. And that seems like a waste of a funny book, some very funny actors and some darned witty animation.

ANTARCTIC: Exhibit highlights expedition’s loneliness FROM PAGE 7 He said the aerial photograph of the island looks uncannily like a whalebone. Kolb said the idea for the exhibit was a long time in the making. It was in an alpine valley on a backpacking trip with Needham four years ago to

Mount Zirkel Wilderness area near Steamboat Springs when the idea was first suggested. Kolb said Needham brought his recording equipment, and he had his camera, and the idea came to them as they were hiking out. “We were hiking back out, and we were saying we have to do something with this,’” Kolb

said. “We need to do a show together with sound and pictures. So we’ve been thinking about this for a long time, and this opportunity was just kind of the one to push us over the edge.” stephen.rickerl@thesouthern.com 618-351-5823

STUDIO

Craig Robinson, Rob Corddry, John Cusack and Clark Duke star in ‘Hot Tub Time Machine,’ which opens Friday in Carbondale and Marion.

This Time Machine’s not a dud Hot Tub Time Machine Rated R for strong crude and sexual content, nudity, drug use and pervasive language; starring John Cusack, Craig Robinson, Rob Corddry, Clark Duke, Crispin Glover; directed by Steve Pink; opening Friday at ShowPlace 8 in Carbondale and Illinois Centre 8 in Marion. BY ROGER MOORE MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE NEWS

“Hot Tub Time Machine’s” title may say it all. But just in case it doesn’t, here’s an alternative — “Back to The Hangover.” A sloppy, raucous, time travel farce in the grown-men-gonewild “Hangover” style, it’s a surprisingly satisfying, if not exactly “LMAO,” riot. Nick (Craig Robinson) works at a dog grooming parlor. But back in the day, he had a band. Adam (John Cusack) just got dumped. Again. He’s a lonely insurance agent, but once upon a time, he had friends. And Lou (Rob Corddry) has become a “raging alcoholic,” a guy whose life is so trapped in the past that he’s hospitalized after jamming out to hair metal in his vintage Trans Am in his garage — nearly asphyxiating himself. He used to be the life of the party, “Lou-cipher, aka

Violator.” Lou’s carbon monoxide moment forces all of them to ask “What happened to us?” They resolve to recapture past glory by making a road trip to the ski lodge of their youth, reviving Lou with a little snow and hedonism. Kodiak Valley is now a dump, the bellhop (Crispin Glover) now an embittered, one-armed jerk. But a short circuit in a hot tub changes everything — the hair, the clothes, “Alf” playing on the TV. The male-bonders have landed back in their alleged heyday: the ’80s. Adam’s nerdy nephew (Clark Duke) is the one to figure it out, because “I write ‘Stargate’ fan fiction!” What follows is a hit-or-miss riff on a decade that has never provoked the sort of fond nostalgia that the ’50s, ’60s or ’70s did. But as they struggle to take what they know of time travel from bad movies, they discover where they went wrong, the details their memories got wrong, how they let each other down, how their “momentum” changed. There are some big laughs, a few great running gags and the “Back to the Future” sweet moments of reflection mostly work. It’s not “The Hangover,” but at least this “Hot Tub” won’t have you hating yourself in the morning.

FLIPSIDE Thursday, March 25, 2010 Page 11


Page 12 Thursday, March 25, 2010 FLIPSIDE


Flipside 03-25  

This Weeks Entertainment Guide

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you