Page 1

BEND IN THE ROAD

Outside Grand Island, Neb., settled in the 1850s by German immigrants. The small city’s demographics have changed rapidly in recent years. S U N DAY, J U LY 1 4 , 2 01 3 | PA R A D E .CO M

IN SEARCH OF OF

Acclaimed A l i d author h Phili Philip C Caputo ddrove from Florida to Alaska to try to understand what unites a nation that is as vast as it is diverse. What he found in Nebraska underscores the cohesive power of hope. Š PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


BEND IN THE ROAD

Outside Grand Island, Neb., settled in the 1850s by German immigrants. The small city’s demographics have changed rapidly in recent years. S U N DAY, J U LY 1 4 , 2 0 1 3 | PA R A D E .C O M

IN SEARCH OF

Acclaimed A l i d author h Philip Phili Caputo C ddrove from Florida to Alaska to try to understand what unites a nation that is as vast as it is diverse. What he found in Nebraska underscores the cohesive power of hope. Š PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


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Did you always want to be a musician? I did. When I was a little girl, I thought I’d go into musical theater, and that’s still something I want to explore. In fact, I’m working with some wonderful collaborators on adapting the film Waitress into a musical for the stage. I don’t exactly know what I’m doing, but I’m working hard to figure it out. Is there an artist you particularly admire? Carole King. I had the pleasure of meeting her for a brief second on the side of the stage at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony [in 2012]. I was honoring Laura Nyro, and I was terrified and nervous. Carole King was standing beside me and gave me a pep talk. She said, “You’re going to be great. They’ll love you. Enjoy yourself.” It was a moment I won’t ever forget. The gods were shining down on me that day. You’re giving a special performance at an event that raises awareness for Concern Worldwide [concernusa.org], an organization dedicated to eradicating poverty. Is giving back important to you? Really important. I feel very connected to service. It’s rewarding to be aligned with an organization that’s making a difference in a visceral way.

Q: Do the hosts of The Talk get along well off the set? —Ellen S., Salem, Mass. A: “Yes, that’s when we can really speak frankly!” says Aisha Tyler. “Plus there’s so much enthusiasm for everyone’s successes.” Tyler, 42, says the women have

been big supporters of her side projects: Starting Tuesday, she’ll host the CW’s Whose Line Is It Anyway?, and her new book, Self-Inflicted Wounds, is out this month. < From left: Talk hosts

Sheryl Underwood, Sara Gilbert, Sharon Osbourne, Aisha Tyler, and Julie Chen

Q: Glenn Close is auctioning off her wardrobe from Damages to raise money for her charity. How did she get the producers to agree to that? —Sally T., Chicago A: “There’s a clause in my contracts that I get to keep my costumes,” says Close, 66. “I think De Niro has the same kind of collection. What costumes bring to a character is just invaluable.” Through July 20 on eBay, she is selling clothing and accessories from Damages—including items by Prada and Armani—to aid Bring

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—BILL O’REILLY, O’REILL THE O’REILLY FACTORR ((FOX NEWS)

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THE NEWSROOM

TV | In season two of Aaron Sorkin’s thoughtful, addictive cable news dramedy (starting tonight on HBO), actual events like Occupy Wall Street will bump up against fictional ones, and the journalists led by Jeff Daniels, Emily Mortimer, and Sam Waterston will continue to talk very fast. Are real newspeople watching? We asked, and they weighed in (above); go to parade.com/newsroom for more.

MUSIC | The Preservation Hall Jazz Band’s new album, That’s It!, is steeped in New Orleans jazz tradition, but it’s their first of all original material. Recorded with the help of My Morning Jacket’s Jim James, it’s a French Quarter parade of unflappable horns, playful, loping piano, and upbeat, soulful vocals. Download: “Dear Lord (Give Me Strength)”

READING CORNER

The Humans An alien sent to Earth to carry out a critical mission inhabits the body of an odious mathematician and, hilariously, proves himself to be the better man while learning about our species. Matt Haig is a novelist of stunning talent, with a laser eye for the absurd and endless reserves of compassion. The Guns at Last Light In the final volume of his sweeping World War II trilogy, Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson recounts the battle for Western Europe (from D-day to V-E Day) through the eyes of those who were on the front lines, masterfully bringing this pivotal chapter of history back to vivid life. Imperfect Harmony Journalist Stacy Horn, an amateur soprano in the Choral Society of Grace Church in New York, blends memoir, social history, and science to proclaim the joys, surprising health benefits, and comforts (even while getting over a bad boyfriend) of raising your voice in song.

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(voiced by Ryan Reynolds) feels the need for speed; too bad he’s a snail. One night, though, he gets mysteriously supercharged and prepares to compete in the Indy 500, in an animated adventure that will appeal to kids who loved Cars. (PG) th

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One Nation, Indivisible Deadhorse, Alaska

For his new book, The Longest Road, Philip Caputo drove across the country in search of what binds Americans together and pushes us apart. In this excerpt, he arrives in Grand Island, Neb., to find tension over new immigrants— but also evidence that the American dream is still alive and well.

Grand Island, Neb.

Cover and inside photographs by Richard Foulser

tanding on a wind-scoured island off the Alaskan coast years ago, I marveled that its Inupiat Eskimo schoolchildren pledge allegiance to the same flag as the children of Cuban immigrants in Key West, almost 6,000 miles away. And a question began to take shape: How does the United States, peopled by every race on earth, remain united? I resolved that one day I’d drive diagonally from the nation’s southernmost point to the northernmost point reachable by road, talking to everyday Americans about their lives and asking how they would answer my question. So it was that in 2011, in an America more divided than in living memory, I, my wife, and our two English setters made our way in a Toyota truck and Airstream trailer from Key West, Fla., to

PHOTO CREDITS WILL GO HERE AS SHOWN

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Key West, Fla.

6 | JULY 14, 2013

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PHOTO CREDITS WILL GO HERE AS SHOWN

Around Grand Island Clockwise from top right: An actor on the grounds of the Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer; the owners of the Coney Island Lunch Room; a Lutheran church, built in 1888; outdoor art at the G.I. Body Shop; Filemon and Ana Sanchez at Sanchez Plaza with two of their kids; one of the local bingo halls. For more photos of life in this Nebraska city, go to parade.com/gi

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Deadhorse, Alaska. Along the way, I spoke to everyone from a West Virginia couple saving souls to a Native American shaman and taco entrepreneur. In Grand Island, Neb., I found a city of some 48,500 that included newly arrived Sudanese, Somalis, Laotians, and Mexicans living alongside older families, many of them descendants of the area’s original German settlers. The magnet that had drawn the foreign-born was the huge JBS meatpacking plant on the east side of the city. Grand Island’s complexion was changing rapidly—whites are projected to become a minority here between 2020 and 2030. Languages differed, cultures clashed, and tensions between Latino and African workers in the JBS plant had resulted in strikes and labor strife. This melting pot seemed to be on high simmer. We drove into Grand Island on the Henry Fonda Memorial Highway (the actor was born in the town in 1905). Mexican restaurants spiced up the South Locust Street commercial strip; American eateries appeared to be in the minority. South Locust led downtown, past a concert hall with “Liederkrantz” chiseled in stone above its front door. In the Salvation Army Thrift Store, near the Union Pacific tracks and a grain elevator, every tag and sign was in both Spanish and English, and Latinos and whites shopped together for bargains. A few blocks away, in Nathan Detroit’s, an old movie theater converted into a bar, restaurant, 8 | JULY 14, 2013

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Deadhorse, Alaska. Along the way, I spoke to everyone from a West Virginia couple saving souls to a Native American shaman and taco entrepreneur. In Grand Island, Neb., I found a city of some 48,500 that included newly arrived Sudanese, Somalis, Laotians, and Mexicans living alongside older families, many of them descendants of the area’s original German settlers. The magnet that had drawn the foreign-born was the huge JBS meatpacking plant on the east side of the city. Grand Island’s complexion was changing rapidly—whites are projected to become a minority here between 2020 and 2030. Languages differed, cultures clashed, and tensions between Latino and African workers in the JBS plant had resulted in strikes and labor strife. This melting pot seemed to be on high simmer. We drove into Grand Island on the Henry Fonda Memorial Highway (the actor was born in the town in 1905). Mexican restaurants spiced up the South Locust Street commercial strip; American eateries appeared to be in the minority. South Locust led downtown, past a concert hall with “Liederkrantz” chiseled in stone above its front door. In the Salvation Army Thrift Store, near the Union Pacific tracks and a grain elevator, every tag and sign was in both Spanish and English, and Latinos and whites shopped together for bargains. A few blocks away, in Nathan Detroit’s, an old movie theater converted into a bar, restaurant, 8 | JULY 14, 2013

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


and pool hall, Anglo retirees gathered to eat lunch and shoot eight ball.

I

’d grown up in a city that was home to people from half the world: Irish, Poles, Italians, Germans, African-Americans, Chinese, Swedes, Norwegians, Mexicans, Czechs, Jews, Serbs, Croatians, and Greeks, among others, lived in ethnic and racial enclaves. Up through the ’50s, Chicagoans identified themselves by their ethnicity. I recall a conversation I had with Mike Royko, the great Chicago Daily News columnist, in the Billy Goat Tavern (owned by a Greek, Billy Sianis). Royko (Polish-Ukrainian) had taken his family to visit friends in California, where Royko’s kids reported disturbing news. “Dad, they aren’t anything,” they said of the friends’ kids. “What do you mean, they’re not anything?” Royko replied. “We asked them what nationality they were, and they said they were American!” The American blender did not work its homogenizing magic until after World War II, when the children and grandchildren of the immigrant generations began an exodus to the suburbs. They had to get along because now they were neighbors; and they made the astonishing discovery that they had more in common than not. They all wanted the same things—fresh air, a house, a car, decent schools for their kids. But what about Grand Island? Would the center hold here in the center of the U.S.? continued on page 11

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STEP 1 Cut each cake layer into 2 semicircles, one slightly larger than other.

Scan here to watch a how-to video!

Circus peanut candy

Swedish Fish

STEP 2 Sandwich 1 small and 1 large semicircle together with some yellow frosting, standing them upright on their flat, cut sides to make a taco shape (one side higher than other); repeat with other 2 semicircles.

Whipped cream

Cornflakes

Taco Cakes 1. Bake 2 (8-inch) round cake layers from a mix. Let cool. 2. Using 1 (16-oz) can vanilla frosting, tint 3 Tbsp bright green with green and yellow food coloring; tint remaining frosting light yellow with yellow food coloring. Spoon 1 cup canned chocolate frosting into a zip-top freezer bag. 3. Trim cake tops to make flat. Cut, sandwich, and arrange layers as shown at right. 4. Microwave green frosting in a bowl, 5 seconds. Stir and toss with 1 cup cornflakes (for “lettuce”); spread on waxed paper to dry. 5. Slice 5 orange

Chocolatecovered raisins or chocolate crunch candy

Family Time

Shell Game Don’t be fooled—this taco platter has a sweet side BY KAREN TACK AND ALAN RICHARDSON

circus peanuts into strips (for “cheese”). Dice 5 red Swedish Fish into bits (for “tomatoes”). 6. Spread yellow frosting over both cakes. Press about 1 cup finely crushed vanilla wafer crumbs all over each and transfer to a serving platter. 7. Snip ¼ inch from 1 corner of zip-top bag and pipe chocolate frosting down center of each cake. 8. Top with ½ cup chocolate-covered raisins or chocolate crunch candy. Sprinkle green cornflakes, circus peanut strips, and Swedish Fish bits over each. Top with whipped cream.

STEP 3 Freeze cakes 30 minutes. Remove 1 cake from freezer. Hollow out space for “taco” filling: With a knife, cut a wedge from top center of cake (see illustration below). Remove inner scraps of cake. Repeat with remaining cake.

PHOTO: SHERI GIBLIN; FOOD STYLING, LIZA JERNOW; PROP STYLING, PAIGE HICKS. ILLUSTRATIONS: BROWN BIRD DESIGN

Table Around the

3 Easy Steps

10 | JULY 14, 2013

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


One Nation | from page 9

From the Carolinas, the crew headed west to Nebraska’s soybean fields, and there Sanchez underwent a kind of conversion experience. “My idea was that I would stay here for two years and save $20,000 and go back to school in Mexico,” he said over a love ballad’s brassy riff. “But after a couple of months in this country, I saw that there were more opportunities here, and I decided I didn’t want to go back.” He threw a fleeting smile across the table while I ate a chicken fajita and marveled at America’s power to beguile and bedazzle. The only opportunity it had given him was the A

H A L L M A R K

C H A N N E L

O R I G I N A L

S E R I E S

ANDIE MACDOWELL

Immigrant entrepreneur Filemon Sanchez with his son, Filemon Jr., at his restaurant-store.

Filemon Sanchez’s story provided a cause for optimism. I met Sanchez at his creation, Sanchez Plaza, a restaurant, grocery store, and bakery. I might have been in Mexico instead of the heart of Nebraska: coral-colored walls outside, terra-cotta tiles inside, mariachis trilling on the sound system, shelves crammed with red beans and black beans, poblano and serrano and jalapeño peppers, piquant sauces, many varieties of rice, and a bakery case with Spanish breads and thickly sugared pastries. Sanchez is short, muscular, late 40s, with restless eyes deep-set in a strong, square face. You could think of him as ordinary—a small businessman in a small city in a sparsely populated state. But the obstacles he had to overcome to get from where he’d been to where he was made him remarkable. He was born in southern Mexico, one of eight children, his father a subsistence farmer. “Our life was very poor,” he said. “I wanted an education. I told my father that I wanted to stay in school, but he couldn’t help. When I saw there was no way out, I decided to come to the U.S.” In 1986, he signed up with a crew of migratory field hands bound for Florida. He picked oranges and grapefruit from sunrise to sunset, then moved on to North Carolina to harvest cucumbers and tomatoes, making 40 cents a bucket. The more he picked, the more he earned, but it was hard to earn much. “We were on our knees all day, and sometimes you couldn’t take it anymore and had to stop.”

opportunity to break his back in the dirt 12 hours a day for pocket change, and yet he saw a possibility to better himself. It’s as if a magical pollen swirls in the air of this country, summoning up dreams in the waking mind. Sanchez landed a job with a roofing contractor, then hired on with JBS, called Swift and Co. at the time, pulling down $7.50 an hour cleaning hog bellies in the tripe room. He had to stop working four years later, disabled by injuries to his neck and shoulders. He found less arduous employment with a program educating the Latino continued on page 13

DEBBIE MACOMBER ’S

SMALL TOWN. BIG HEART.

2 Hour Series Premiere July 20 SATURDAYS 8/7C

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One Nation | from page 9

Filemon Sanchez’s story provided a cause for optimism. I met Sanchez at his creation, Sanchez Plaza, a restaurant, grocery store, and bakery. I might have been in Mexico instead of the heart of Nebraska: coral-colored walls outside, terra-cotta tiles inside, mariachis trilling on the sound system, shelves crammed with red beans and black beans, poblano and serrano and jalapeño peppers, piquant sauces, many varieties of rice, and a bakery case with Spanish breads and thickly sugared pastries. Sanchez is short, muscular, late 40s, with restless eyes deep-set in a strong, square face. You could think of him as ordinary—a small businessman in a small city in a sparsely populated state. But the obstacles he had to overcome to get from where he’d been to where he was made him remarkable. He was born in southern Mexico, one of eight children, his father a subsistence farmer. “Our life was very poor,” he said. “I wanted an education. I told my father that I wanted to stay in school, but he couldn’t help. When I saw there was no way out, I Immigrant entrepreneur Filemon Sanchez with his son, Filemon Jr., at his restaurant-store. decided to come to the U.S.” In 1986, he signed up with a crew of migratory field hands bound for Florida. He picked oranges and grapefruit from sunrise to sunset, then moved on to North Carolina to harvest cucumbers and tomatoes, making 40 cents a bucket. The more he picked, the more he earned, but it was hard to earn much. “We were on our knees all day, and sometimes you couldn’t take it anymore and had to stop.” From the Carolinas, the crew headed west to Nebraska’s soybean fields, and there Sanchez underwent a kind of conversion experience. “My idea was that I would stay here for two years and save $20,000 and go back to school in Mexico,” he said over a love ballad’s brassy riff. “But after a couple of months in this country, I saw that there were more opportunities here, and I decided I didn’t want to go back.” He threw a fleeting smile across the table while I ate a chicken fajita and marveled at America’s power to beguile and bedazzle. The only opportunity it had given him was the opportunity to break his back in the dirt 12 hours a day for pocket change, and yet he saw a possibility to better himself. It’s as if a magical pollen swirls in the air of this country, summoning up dreams in the waking mind. Sanchez landed a job with a roofing contractor, then hired on with JBS, called Swift and Co. at the time, pulling down $7.50 an hour cleaning hog bellies in the tripe room. He had to stop working four years later, disabled by injuries to his neck and shoulders. He found less arduous employment with a program educating the Latino continued on page 13

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


STORIES

Riding High

How a struggling town found a way to create a little magic By Susan G. Hauser

Beasts of Wonder The animal above, named Quigga, is modeled after the quagga, an extinct subspecies of zebra from South Africa. Right, Wendy Kirbey with Fredrick the hare, an animal she sponsored in memory of her son.

personal touch. Little Sheba the Palomino, for example, was inspired by Sharon Edwards’s beloved horse. The project has showcased the diverse skills and creative talents of Albany (pop. 50,000). One volunteer, who helps design the animals, used to work for the PBS cartoon series Dragon Tales; another worked with George Lucas to dream up fanciful beings for Star Wars. A retired art teacher organizes the painting crews, and an auto body shop owner applies clearcoat to the finished animals in his garage.

“The amazing thing about this endeavor is that whenever we’ve needed something, it’s been provided for us,” says Kirbey. “Somebody’s aunt knows somebody’s uncle who comes down to lend a hand.” William

Dentzel III, from Port Townsend, Wash. (280 miles to the north), is one of those people. He showed up in the fall of 2003 and introduced himself as the great-grandson of Gustav Dentzel, one of the earliest carousel builders in America. William’s family donated a 1909 carousel mechanism that was later refurbished with the help of machinists who once worked at an Albany paper mill. Kirbey estimates it will take two more years to complete the project. But the carousel is already working its magic. “It is our region’s No. 1 attraction,” says Rod Porsche of the Albany Visitors Association. As the animals are completed, they’re put on display in local hotels, restaurants, and shops; people who come to see the fantastical figures around town and tour the workshop (as many as 2,000 visitors a month) are helping to bring Albany’s economy back to life. “I can’t imagine how great it’s going to be when the carousel is up and running,” Porsche says. Until that day comes, the volunteers are enjoying the ride. “Without the carousel, I never would’ve met most of these people,” says board member Stella Reimers, gazing at the townfolk working away on a Saturday afternoon. “And now we’re friends.” To see more photos of the Albany Carousel creatures, or to make a donation, go to parade.com/carousel

PHOTOS, FROM TOP: TRACEY WHITNEY/OREGON PUBLIC BROADCASTING; COURTESY OF THE ALBANY CAROUSEL PROJECT

L

ike many old mill towns in the forested valleys of the Northwest, Albany, Ore., has seen its share of ups and downs over the years, but when the local timber economy began to decline some 15 years ago, the downs seemed to outnumber the ups. “Albany was changing completely. We had to find a way to reinvent ourselves,” says Wendy Kirbey, the daughter of a logger and the former proprietor of a coffee shop downtown. So in 2002, Kirbey, 69, proposed a project she hoped would help her community, 70 miles south of Portland, rediscover its pride: a Victorian-style carousel, the animals carved by the residents themselves. “It felt like the perfect fit for our historical town,” she says. “I was picturing a beautiful menagerie.” Despite a skeptical city council and a starting budget of only $150, Kirbey and a handful of volunteers got to work. Ten years later, more than 300 people have logged nearly 150,000 hours on the Albany Carousel. They can be found six days a week in a warehouse downtown, chiseling, sanding, and painting a lively herd of whimsical creatures, including a roaring Chinese dragon, a horse with a brightly colored fish tail, and a Chinook salmon with a lily pad saddle and more than 4,000 sculpted scales. Each of the 52 animals has been “adopted” by a sponsor, who oversees its creation and often adds a

AMERICAN

12 | JULY 14, 2013

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


One Nation | from page 11

community about HIV-AIDS. A turning point came when Swift offered a settlement for his injuries, he said. “I had to start something with that money. A friend of mine from Chicago taught me how to bake Spanish breads and pastries. I started baking in my house. I knew the Latino community from working with the program. I went door to door, and I made maybe 40 bucks a day.” Business grew; he rented space in his present location and opened a bakery and, eventually, this restaurant. I looked around the busy place and asked, was this what he’d dreamed of the moment he’d decided he wasn’t going back to Mexico? No, he said. “This came up … ,” Sanchez hesitated. “I think this came up thanks to the guy who showed me how to make pastries. … And that guy told me, ‘You gotta open a business.’ That’s what motivated me.” He was drilling the value of education and of a dollar into the heads of his children. His three daughters have jobs in the family business, waitressing, working the register; his young son sits beside him when he’s behind the counter. “A lot of kids, they say, ‘Poppy will buy it.’ I tell mine that’s not how it works. You have to earn it. I don’t want you at home watching TV or playing silly games on the computer.” He dismissed the tensions in Grand Island. Yes, Latinos had marched in the streets for immigration reform; yes, there had been attempts to pass

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


anti-immigrant laws; but no, Sanchez had seldom gotten a hostile look or any other cue that he wasn’t welcome. “Maybe sometimes I say hi to someone and they don’t answer. I’m the kind of guy who smiles a lot. It’s my way of saying hi. And maybe someone doesn’t smile back at me or say hi, but that doesn’t stop me.”

T

he day before, near St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, I had seen kids from a Christian youth group, some white, some black, skipping rope, supervised by a young man and a woman. The kids lined up and took turns at jumping the rope, twirled to a sung cadence by a white girl holding one end, a Sudanese girl the other. There was much laughter and chatter, and the whole scene was so heartwarming I could have believed it was staged to show that harmony between native and newcomer was possible. I cautioned myself not to make too much of that small moment, but I hoped that that Sudanese girl and the other seedlings blown here from far away would not sprout up separately. I hoped that they would be allowed to graft themselves onto the American tree as Sanchez had, even as my own forefathers had. Excerpted from The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America, from Key West to the Arctic Circle, to be published July 16 by Henry Holt and Company, LLC. Copyright © 2013 by Philip Caputo. All rights reserved.

14 | JULY 14, 2013

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


HAVE YOU RESORTED TO THIS? Kennections By Ken Jennings HOW TO PLAY

All five correct answers have something in common. Can you figure out what it is? 1. What name for New Orleans was popularized by socialite Betty Guillaud, for the city’s laid-back pace?

Great for Men Too!

✎ 2. What’s the more common name for Carcharodon carcharias, the largest predatory fish on earth?

✎ 3. What poet became the “first modern celebrity” when his Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage was published in 1812?

✎ 4. In honor of the city’s official symbol, what prize is given to the best movie every year at the Berlin Film Festival?

✎ 5. What was the name of the pet mutt on The Brady Bunch?

✎ WHAT’S THE “KENNECTION” BETWEEN ALL FIVE ANSWERS?

Play trivia puzzles by Ken Jennings and readers at parade.com/ken ANSWERS: 1. THE BIG EASY; 2. GREAT WHITE SHARK; 3. LORD BYRON; 4. GOLDEN BEAR; 5. TIGER ALL ARE NICKNAMES OF FAMOUS GOLFERS

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T ’S

PARADE Hank Aaron

WALTER SCOTT ASKS…

SARA BAREILLES The musician, 33, has a new album, The Blessed Unrest, out July 16.

SEND QUESTIONS TO PERSONALITY@ PARADE.COM OR P.O. BOX 5001, GRAND CENTRAL STATION, NEW YORK, N.Y. 10163-5001

Did you always want to be a musician? I did. When I was a little girl, I thought I’d go into musical theater, and that’s still something I want to explore. In fact, I’m working with some wonderful collaborators on adapting the film Waitress into a musical for the stage. I don’t exactly know what I’m doing, but I’m working hard to figure it out. Is there an artist you particularly admire? Carole King. I had the pleasure of meeting her for a brief second on the side of the stage at the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony [in 2012]. I was honoring Laura Nyro, and I was terrified and nervous. Carole King was standing beside me and gave me a pep talk. She said, “You’re going to be great. They’ll love you. Enjoy yourself.” It was a moment I won’t ever forget. The gods were shining down on me that day. You’re giving a special performance at an event that raises awareness for Concern Worldwide [concernusa.org], an organization dedicated to eradicating poverty. Is giving back important to you? Really important. I feel very connected to service. It’s rewarding to be aligned with an organization that’s making a difference in a visceral way.

Q: Do the hosts of The Talk get along well off the set? —Ellen S., Salem, Mass. A: “Yes, that’s when we can really speak frankly!” says Aisha Tyler. “Plus there’s so much enthusiasm for everyone’s successes.” Tyler, 42, says the women have

been big supporters of her side projects: Starting Tuesday, she’ll host the CW’s Whose Line Is It Anyway?, and her new book, Self-Inflicted Wounds, is out this month. < From left: Talk hosts

Sheryl Underwood, Sara Gilbert, Sharon Osbourne, Aisha Tyler, and Julie Chen

Q: Glenn Close is auctioning off her wardrobe from Damages to raise money for her charity. How did she get the producers to agree to that? —Sally T., Chicago A: “There’s a clause in my contracts that I get to keep my costumes,” says Close, 66. “I think De Niro has the same kind of collection. What costumes bring to a character is just invaluable.” Through July 20 on eBay, she is selling clothing and accessories from Damages—including items by Prada and Armani—to aid Bring

From left: Close in character in Sunset Boulevard, Damages, and 101 Dalmatians

Change 2 Mind, which is “committed to changing the attitude of people toward mental illness,” she says. Visit parade .com/close for details.

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Q: Who has been chosen for the most MLB All-Star Games? —Thomas R., Nesconset, N.Y. A: Hank Aaron tops the list with 25; Willie Mays and Stan Musial each had 24. And it’s unlikely anyone will catch them because all three played during a period—1959 to 1962—when there were two All-Star Games per season. This year’s game airs July 16 on Fox. Q: Does Debbie Macomber have a say in the Hallmark Channel’s new show based on her books? —Phil C., Atlanta A: “I have script approval,” says the author. “They’ve been very solicitous of me.” Sharp-eyed fans will also see her in one episode of Debbie Macomber’s Cedar Cove, which bows July 20: “I’ll be in the background, knitting,” she says. Join us for a chat with Macomber July 17 at 2 p.m. ET at facebook.com/parademag.

FREEBIE Enter for your chance to win Damages: The Final Season on DVD, signed by Glenn Close, at parade.com/win Debbie Macomber

SUNDAY FREEBIE: NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. TO ENTER, GO TO PARADE.COM/WIN. STARTS 5:00 P.M. ET, 7/19/13, AND ENDS 4:59 P.M. ET, 7/26/13. OPEN TO LEGAL RESIDENTS OF THE 50 UNITED STATES (D.C.) 13 YEARS AND OLDER, EXCEPT EMPLOYEES OF SPONSOR, THEIR IMMEDIATE FAMILIES, AND THOSE LIVING IN THE SAME HOUSEHOLD. ODDS OF WINNING DEPEND ON THE NUMBER OF ENTRIES RECEIVED. VOID OUTSIDE THE 50 UNITED STATES (D.C.) AND WHERE PROHIBITED. A.R.V. OF THE 5 PRIZES: $45.99 EACH. SPONSOR: PARADE PUBLICATIONS. PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: DANNY CLINCH; FOCUS ON SPORT/GETTY IMAGES (2); JOHN G. ZIMMERMAN/SPORTS ILLUSTRATED/GETTY IMAGES; JASON KEMPIN/GETTY IMAGES; JOHN PAUL FILO/CBS VIA GETTY IMAGES; RON GALELLA/WIREIMAGE; EVERETT COLLECTION; STARSTOCK/ PHOTOSHOT/EVERETT COLLECTION

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—BILL O’REILLY, O’REILL THE O’REILLY FACTORR ((FOX NEWS)

—PIERS MORGAN, PIERS MORGAN LIVE (CNN)

THE NEWSROOM TV | In season two of Aaron Sorkin’s thoughtful, addictive cable news dramedy (starting tonight on HBO), actual events like Occupy Wall Street will bump up against fictional ones, and the journalists led by Jeff Daniels, Emily Mortimer, and Sam Waterston will continue to talk very fast. Are real newspeople watching? We asked, and they weighed in (above); go to parade.com/newsroom for more.

MUSIC | The Preservation Hall Jazz Band’s new album, That’s It!, is steeped in New Orleans jazz tradition, but it’s their first of all original material. Recorded with the help of My Morning Jacket’s Jim James, it’s a French Quarter parade of unflappable horns, playful, loping piano, and upbeat, soulful vocals. Download: “Dear Lord (Give Me Strength)”

READING CORNER

The Humans An alien sent to Earth to carry out a critical mission inhabits the body of an odious mathematician and, hilariously, proves himself to be the better man while learning about our species. Matt Haig is a novelist of stunning talent, with a laser eye for the absurd and endless reserves of compassion. The Guns at Last Light In the final volume of his sweeping World War II trilogy, Pulitzer Prize winner Rick Atkinson recounts the battle for Western Europe (from D-day to V-E Day) through the eyes of those who were on the front lines, masterfully bringing this pivotal chapter of history back to vivid life. Imperfect Harmony Journalist Stacy Horn, an amateur soprano in the Choral Society of Grace Church in New York, blends memoir, social history, and science to proclaim the joys, surprising health benefits, and comforts (even while getting over a bad boyfriend) of raising your voice in song.

MOVIES | The title character in Turbo M

(voiced by Ryan Reynolds) feels the need for speed; too bad he’s a snail. One night, though, he gets mysteriously supercharged and prepares to compete in the Indy 500, in an animated adventure that th will appeal to kids who loved Cars. (PG)

PHOTOS, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: MICHAEL LOCCISANO/FILMMAGIC; STEPHEN LOVEKIN/GETTY IMAGES; JASON LAVERIS/FILMMAGIC; DREAMWORKS ANIMATION; ISTOCKPHOTO. ILLUSTRATION: LUIS GRAÑENA

“AN INTERESTING PROGRAM FOR THOSE OF US IN THAT WORLD. I REALLY LIKE JEFF DANIELS’S CCHARACTER.”

4 | JULY 14, 2013

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Ask Marilyn By Marilyn vos Savant Once and for all, how long does a bottle of perfume last? I like to tease my mother by telling her she’s using perfume from the last century, but I’ve found so many different answers online, I don’t know the right thing to do myself.

For contact lenses or dry eyes. When you have an eye care need, Alcon has a solution.

—B. Barnes, Grosse Pointe, Mich.

I believe this is the final answer: Perfume lasts as long as you continue to like the way it smells. Why should you discard a bottle of pleasing fragrance just because it’s six months or two years or two decades old? The decision is entirely up to your nose, as it was when the bottle was new. No expert can argue otherwise. If you think the perfume smells good, it is good! Got a question for Marilyn? Visit parade.com/askmarilyn CLEAR CARE® & OPTI-FREE® REPLENISH®

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One Nation, Indivisible Deadhorse, Alaska

For his new book, The Longest Road, Philip Caputo drove across the country in search of what binds Americans together and pushes us apart. In this excerpt, he arrives in Grand Island, Neb., to find tension over new immigrants— but also evidence that the American dream is still alive and well.

Grand Island, Neb.

Cover and inside photographs by Richard Foulser

S

tanding on a wind-scoured island off the Alaskan coast years ago, I marveled that its Inupiat Eskimo schoolchildren pledge allegiance to the same flag as the children of Cuban immigrants in Key West, almost 6,000 miles away. And a question began to take shape: How does the United States, peopled by every race on earth, remain united? I resolved that one day I’d drive diagonally from the nation’s southernmost point to the northernmost point reachable by road, talking to everyday Americans about their lives and asking how they would answer my question. So it was that in 2011, in an America more divided than in living memory, I, my wife, and our two English setters made our way in a Toyota truck and Airstream trailer from Key West, Fla., to

PHOTO CREDITS WILL GO HERE AS SHOWN

Key West, Fla.

6 | JULY 14, 2013

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


PHOTO CREDITS WILL GO HERE AS SHOWN

Around Grand Island Clockwise from top right: An actor on the grounds of the Stuhr Museum of the Prairie Pioneer; the owners of the Coney Island Lunch Room; a Lutheran church, built in 1888; outdoor art at the G.I. Body Shop; Filemon and Ana Sanchez at Sanchez Plaza with two of their kids; one of the local bingo halls. For more photos of life in this Nebraska city, go to parade.com/gi

Š PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


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Deadhorse, Alaska. Along the way, I spoke to everyone from a West Virginia couple saving souls to a Native American shaman and taco entrepreneur. In Grand Island, Neb., I found a city of some 48,500 that included newly arrived Sudanese, Somalis, Laotians, and Mexicans living alongside older families, many of them descendants of the area’s original German settlers. The magnet that had drawn the foreign-born was the huge JBS meatpacking plant on the east side of the city. Grand Island’s complexion was changing rapidly—whites are projected to become a minority here between 2020 and 2030. Languages differed, cultures clashed, and tensions between Latino and African workers in the JBS plant had resulted in strikes and labor strife. This melting pot seemed to be on high simmer. We drove into Grand Island on the Henry Fonda Memorial Highway (the actor was born in the town in 1905). Mexican restaurants spiced up the South Locust Street commercial strip; American eateries appeared to be in the minority. South Locust led downtown, past a concert hall with “Liederkrantz” chiseled in stone above its front door. In the Salvation Army Thrift Store, near the Union Pacific tracks and a grain elevator, every tag and sign was in both Spanish and English, and Latinos and whites shopped together for bargains. A few blocks away, in Nathan Detroit’s, an old movie theater converted into a bar, restaurant, 8 | JULY 14, 2013

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Deadhorse, Alaska. Along the way, I spoke to everyone from a West Virginia couple saving souls to a Native American shaman and taco entrepreneur. In Grand Island, Neb., I found a city of some 48,500 that included newly arrived Sudanese, Somalis, Laotians, and Mexicans living alongside older families, many of them descendants of the area’s original German settlers. The magnet that had drawn the foreign-born was the huge JBS meatpacking plant on the east side of the city. Grand Island’s complexion was changing rapidly—whites are projected to become a minority here between 2020 and 2030. Languages differed, cultures clashed, and tensions between Latino and African workers in the JBS plant had resulted in strikes and labor strife. This melting pot seemed to be on high simmer. We drove into Grand Island on the Henry Fonda Memorial Highway (the actor was born in the town in 1905). Mexican restaurants spiced up the South Locust Street commercial strip; American eateries appeared to be in the minority. South Locust led downtown, past a concert hall with “Liederkrantz” chiseled in stone above its front door. In the Salvation Army Thrift Store, near the Union Pacific tracks and a grain elevator, every tag and sign was in both Spanish and English, and Latinos and whites shopped together for bargains. A few blocks away, in Nathan Detroit’s, an old movie theater converted into a bar, restaurant, 8 | JULY 14, 2013

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


and pool hall, Anglo retirees gathered to eat lunch and shoot eight ball.

I

’d grown up in a city that was home to people from half the world: Irish, Poles, Italians, Germans, African-Americans, Chinese, Swedes, Norwegians, Mexicans, Czechs, Jews, Serbs, Croatians, and Greeks, among others, lived in ethnic and racial enclaves. Up through the ’50s, Chicagoans identified themselves by their ethnicity. I recall a conversation I had with Mike Royko, the great Chicago Daily News columnist, in the Billy Goat Tavern (owned by a Greek, Billy Sianis). Royko (Polish-Ukrainian) had taken his family to visit friends in California, where Royko’s kids reported disturbing news. “Dad, they aren’t anything,” they said of the friends’ kids. “What do you mean, they’re not anything?” Royko replied. “We asked them what nationality they were, and they said they were American!” The American blender did not work its homogenizing magic until after World War II, when the children and grandchildren of the immigrant generations began an exodus to the suburbs. They had to get along because now they were neighbors; and they made the astonishing discovery that they had more in common than not. They all wanted the same things—fresh air, a house, a car, decent schools for their kids. But what about Grand Island? Would the center hold here in the center of the U.S.? continued on page 11

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Table Around the

3 Easy Steps Scan here to watch a how-to video!

STEP 1 Cut each cake layer into 2 semicircles, one slightly larger than other.

Swedish Fish

STEP 2 Sandwich 1 small and 1 large semicircle together with some yellow frosting, standing them upright on their flat, cut sides to make a taco shape (one side higher than other); repeat with other 2 semicircles.

Whipped cream

Cornflakes

Taco Cakes 1. Bake 2 (8-inch) round cake layers from a mix. Let cool. 2. Using 1 (16-oz) can vanilla frosting, tint 3 Tbsp bright green with green and yellow food coloring; tint remaining frosting light yellow with yellow food coloring. Spoon 1 cup canned chocolate frosting into a zip-top freezer bag. 3. Trim cake tops to make flat. Cut, sandwich, and arrange layers as shown at right. 4. Microwave green frosting in a bowl, 5 seconds. Stir and toss with 1 cup cornflakes (for “lettuce”); spread on waxed paper to dry. 5. Slice 5 orange

Chocolatecovered raisins or chocolate crunch candy

Family Time

Shell Game Don’t be fooled—this taco platter has a sweet side BY KAREN TACK AND ALAN RICHARDSON

circus peanuts into strips (for “cheese”). Dice 5 red Swedish Fish into bits (for “tomatoes”). 6. Spread yellow frosting over both cakes. Press about 1 cup finely crushed vanilla wafer crumbs all over each and transfer to a serving platter. 7. Snip ¼ inch from 1 corner of zip-top bag and pipe chocolate frosting down center of each cake. 8. Top with ½ cup chocolate-covered raisins or chocolate crunch candy. Sprinkle green cornflakes, circus peanut strips, and Swedish Fish bits over each. Top with whipped cream.

STEP 3 Freeze cakes 30 minutes. Remove 1 cake from freezer. Hollow out space for “taco” filling: With a knife, cut a wedge from top center of cake (see illustration below). Remove inner scraps of cake. Repeat with remaining cake.

PHOTO: SHERI GIBLIN; FOOD STYLING, LIZA JERNOW; PROP STYLING, PAIGE HICKS. ILLUSTRATIONS: BROWN BIRD DESIGN

Circus peanut candy

10 | JULY 14, 2013

© PARADE Publications 2013. All rights reserved


One Nation | from page 9

From the Carolinas, the crew headed west to Nebraska’s soybean fields, and there Sanchez underwent a kind of conversion experience. “My idea was that I would stay here for two years and save $20,000 and go back to school in Mexico,” he said over a love ballad’s brassy riff. “But after a couple of months in this country, I saw that there were more opportunities here, and I decided I didn’t want to go back.” He threw a fleeting smile across the table while I ate a chicken fajita and marveled at America’s power to beguile and bedazzle. The only opportunity it had given him was the

A

H A L L M A R K

C H A N N E L

O R I G I N A L

S E R I E S

ANDIE MACDOWELL

Immigrant entrepreneur Filemon Sanchez with his son, Filemon Jr., at his restaurant-store.

Filemon Sanchez’s story provided a cause for optimism. I met Sanchez at his creation, Sanchez Plaza, a restaurant, grocery store, and bakery. I might have been in Mexico instead of the heart of Nebraska: coral-colored walls outside, terra-cotta tiles inside, mariachis trilling on the sound system, shelves crammed with red beans and black beans, poblano and serrano and jalapeño peppers, piquant sauces, many varieties of rice, and a bakery case with Spanish breads and thickly sugared pastries. Sanchez is short, muscular, late 40s, with restless eyes deep-set in a strong, square face. You could think of him as ordinary—a small businessman in a small city in a sparsely populated state. But the obstacles he had to overcome to get from where he’d been to where he was made him remarkable. He was born in southern Mexico, one of eight children, his father a subsistence farmer. “Our life was very poor,” he said. “I wanted an education. I told my father that I wanted to stay in school, but he couldn’t help. When I saw there was no way out, I decided to come to the U.S.” In 1986, he signed up with a crew of migratory field hands bound for Florida. He picked oranges and grapefruit from sunrise to sunset, then moved on to North Carolina to harvest cucumbers and tomatoes, making 40 cents a bucket. The more he picked, the more he earned, but it was hard to earn much. “We were on our knees all day, and sometimes you couldn’t take it anymore and had to stop.”

opportunity to break his back in the dirt 12 hours a day for pocket change, and yet he saw a possibility to better himself. It’s as if a magical pollen swirls in the air of this country, summoning up dreams in the waking mind. Sanchez landed a job with a roofing contractor, then hired on with JBS, called Swift and Co. at the time, pulling down $7.50 an hour cleaning hog bellies in the tripe room. He had to stop working four years later, disabled by injuries to his neck and shoulders. He found less arduous employment with a program continued on page 13 educating the Latino

DEBBIE MACOMBER ’S

SMALL TOWN. BIG HEART.

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One Nation | from page 9

Filemon Sanchez’s story provided a cause for optimism. I met Sanchez at his creation, Sanchez Plaza, a restaurant, grocery store, and bakery. I might have been in Mexico instead of the heart of Nebraska: coral-colored walls outside, terra-cotta tiles inside, mariachis trilling on the sound system, shelves crammed with red beans and black beans, poblano and serrano and jalapeño peppers, piquant sauces, many varieties of rice, and a bakery case with Spanish breads and thickly sugared pastries. Sanchez is short, muscular, late 40s, with restless eyes deep-set in a strong, square face. You could think of him as ordinary—a small businessman in a small city in a sparsely populated state. But the obstacles he had to overcome to get from where he’d been to where he was made him remarkable. He was born in southern Mexico, one of eight children, his father a subsistence farmer. “Our life was very poor,” he said. “I wanted an education. I told my father that I wanted to stay in school, but he couldn’t help. When I saw there was no way out, I Immigrant entrepreneur Filemon Sanchez with his son, Filemon Jr., at his restaurant-store. decided to come to the U.S.” In 1986, he signed up with a crew of migratory field hands bound for Florida. He picked oranges and grapefruit from sunrise to sunset, then moved on to North Carolina to harvest cucumbers and tomatoes, making 40 cents a bucket. The more he picked, the more he earned, but it was hard to earn much. “We were on our knees all day, and sometimes you couldn’t take it anymore and had to stop.” From the Carolinas, the crew headed west to Nebraska’s soybean fields, and there Sanchez underwent a kind of conversion experience. “My idea was that I would stay here for two years and save $20,000 and go back to school in Mexico,” he said over a love ballad’s brassy riff. “But after a couple of months in this country, I saw that there were more opportunities here, and I decided I didn’t want to go back.” He threw a fleeting smile across the table while I ate a chicken fajita and marveled at America’s power to beguile and bedazzle. The only opportunity it had given him was the opportunity to break his back in the dirt 12 hours a day for pocket change, and yet he saw a possibility to better himself. It’s as if a magical pollen swirls in the air of this country, summoning up dreams in the waking mind. Sanchez landed a job with a roofing contractor, then hired on with JBS, called Swift and Co. at the time, pulling down $7.50 an hour cleaning hog bellies in the tripe room. He had to stop working four years later, disabled by injuries to his neck and shoulders. He found less arduous employment with a program educating the Latino continued on page 13

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ike many old mill towns in the forested valleys of the Northwest, Albany, Ore., has seen its share of ups and downs over the years, but when the local timber economy began to decline some 15 years ago, the downs seemed to outnumber the ups. “Albany was changing completely. We had to find a way to reinvent ourselves,” says Wendy Kirbey, the daughter of a logger and the former proprietor of a coffee shop downtown. So in 2002, Kirbey, 69, proposed a project she hoped would help her community, 70 miles south of Portland, rediscover its pride: a Victorian-style carousel, the animals carved by the residents themselves. “It felt like the perfect fit for our historical town,” she says. “I was picturing a beautiful menagerie.” Despite a skeptical city council and a starting budget of only $150, Kirbey and a handful of volunteers got to work. Ten years later, more than 300 people have logged nearly 150,000 hours on the Albany Carousel. They can be found six days a week in a warehouse downtown, chiseling, sanding, and painting a lively herd of whimsical creatures, including a roaring Chinese dragon, a horse with a brightly colored fish tail, and a Chinook salmon with a lily pad saddle and more than 4,000 sculpted scales. Each of the 52 animals has been “adopted” by a sponsor, who oversees its creation and often adds a

L

STORIES

Riding High How a struggling town found a way to create a little magic By Susan G. Hauser

Beasts of Wonder The animal above, named Quigga, is modeled after the quagga, an extinct subspecies of zebra from South Africa. Right, Wendy Kirbey with Fredrick the hare, an animal she sponsored in memory of her son.

personal touch. Little Sheba the Palomino, for example, was inspired by Sharon Edwards’s beloved horse. The project has showcased the diverse skills and creative talents of Albany (pop. 50,000). One volunteer, who helps design the animals, used to work for the PBS cartoon series Dragon Tales; another worked with George Lucas to dream up fanciful beings for Star Wars. A retired art teacher organizes the painting crews, and an auto body shop owner applies clearcoat to the finished animals in his garage.

“The amazing thing about this endeavor is that whenever we’ve needed something, it’s been provided for us,” says Kirbey. “Somebody’s aunt knows somebody’s uncle who comes down to lend a hand.” William

Dentzel III, from Port Townsend, Wash. (280 miles to the north), is one of those people. He showed up in the fall of 2003 and introduced himself as the great-grandson of Gustav Dentzel, one of the earliest carousel builders in America. William’s family donated a 1909 carousel mechanism that was later refurbished with the help of machinists who once worked at an Albany paper mill. Kirbey estimates it will take two more years to complete the project. But the carousel is already working its magic. “It is our region’s No. 1 attraction,” says Rod Porsche of the Albany Visitors Association. As the animals are completed, they’re put on display in local hotels, restaurants, and shops; people who come to see the fantastical figures around town and tour the workshop (as many as 2,000 visitors a month) are helping to bring Albany’s economy back to life. “I can’t imagine how great it’s going to be when the carousel is up and running,” Porsche says. Until that day comes, the volunteers are enjoying the ride. “Without the carousel, I never would’ve met most of these people,” says board member Stella Reimers, gazing at the townfolk working away on a Saturday afternoon. “And now we’re friends.” To see more photos of the Albany Carousel creatures, or to make a donation, go to parade.com/carousel

PHOTOS, FROM TOP: TRACEY WHITNEY/OREGON PUBLIC BROADCASTING; COURTESY OF THE ALBANY CAROUSEL PROJECT

AMERICAN

12 | JULY 14, 2013

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One Nation | from page 11

community about HIV-AIDS. A turning point came when Swift offered a settlement for his injuries, he said. “I had to start something with that money. A friend of mine from Chicago taught me how to bake Spanish breads and pastries. I started baking in my house. I knew the Latino community from working with the program. I went door to door, and I made maybe 40 bucks a day.” Business grew; he rented space in his present location and opened a bakery and, eventually, this restaurant. I looked around the busy place and asked, was this what he’d dreamed of the moment he’d decided he wasn’t going back to Mexico? No, he said. “This came up … ,” Sanchez hesitated. “I think this came up thanks to the guy who showed me how to make pastries. … And that guy told me, ‘You gotta open a business.’ That’s what motivated me.” He was drilling the value of education and of a dollar into the heads of his children. His three daughters have jobs in the family business, waitressing, working the register; his young son sits beside him when he’s behind the counter. “A lot of kids, they say, ‘Poppy will buy it.’ I tell mine that’s not how it works. You have to earn it. I don’t want you at home watching TV or playing silly games on the computer.” He dismissed the tensions in Grand Island. Yes, Latinos had marched in the streets for immigration reform; yes, there had been attempts to pass

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anti-immigrant laws; but no, Sanchez had seldom gotten a hostile look or any other cue that he wasn’t welcome. “Maybe sometimes I say hi to someone and they don’t answer. I’m the kind of guy who smiles a lot. It’s my way of saying hi. And maybe someone doesn’t smile back at me or say hi, but that doesn’t stop me.”

T

he day before, near St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, I had seen kids from a Christian youth group, some white, some black, skipping rope, supervised by a young man and a woman. The kids lined up and took turns at jumping the rope, twirled to a sung cadence by a white girl holding one end, a Sudanese girl the other. There was much laughter and chatter, and the whole scene was so heartwarming I could have believed it was staged to show that harmony between native and newcomer was possible. I cautioned myself not to make too much of that small moment, but I hoped that that Sudanese girl and the other seedlings blown here from far away would not sprout up separately. I hoped that they would be allowed to graft themselves onto the American tree as Sanchez had, even as my own forefathers had. Excerpted from The Longest Road: Overland in Search of America, from Key West to the Arctic Circle, to be published July 16 by Henry Holt and Company, LLC. Copyright © 2013 by Philip Caputo. All rights reserved.

14 | JULY 14, 2013

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In Search of America  

Acclaimed author Phillip Caputo drove from Florida to Alaska to try to understand what unites a nation that is as vast as it is diverse. Wha...

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