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Taking time to live well

Embracing winter Nordic knowhow Big scarves Breakfast pizza

January

WISH

A day of lazing & grazing • Magical deer • Travelling mindfully Good mood foods • Reflecting on dreams • Dry cocktails Why we love a diary • Small hill adventures • Japanese calm


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s upon a h s i w u elief. When ye oout of hope than hbe time

or just t it’s m ar is e y e w e e n sm. T h And th optimi f o re d n rnal a is ki ew jou for th n a f o ist or pages d-do l l u crisp o c ut r a ect. B ace fo a proj the pl f o lls g nd sti ginnin ness a k r the be a d the also a ledge ter is n i w d acknow i g, oo. M lectin days t nd ref a short g n i nk han or thi ther t time f ly, ra p e e body d eping d your e e l e s F r . g fo to hievin hment and ac nouris s a doing w dream d no g. Day ur min n o i y r p d s n a ugh to d u thro e worl see yo and th r e n r o osy c place. in a c armer w a m ee will s

Lisa

ES A SYK R LIS EDITO lething p m si #my


STYLING AND PHOTOGRAPHY: EMMA HARRIS

FRESH Things to buy, cook, read and do this month p7 LIVING Simple style and gatherings, tea and cake p20 ESCAPE Outings, places to explore and city guides p54 THINK Things to make you stop, read and wonder p83 NEST Loving your home inside and out p101 MISCELLANY The practical and the playful p123 Looking for a particular article? Our index is on page 128.


Ahlmann candleholders | £14.90–£24 each Like a forest floor bursting with mushrooms. aram.co.uk

Soni Spot cushion | £60 100% linen with hand printed spots. gailbryson.co.uk

THINGS TO WANT AND WISH FOR Many dreamy things to covet and buy, from candles to pyjamas, carefully selected by LOUISE GORROD

Bird vessels | £49–£105 Limited edition collaboration between Abigail Edwards and Muck Ceramics. abigailedwards.com

LOUISE GORROD Our Wishlist Editor blogs, bakes and photographs at Buttercup Days: buttercupdays.com. On Instagram: louise_buttercupdays

Atlas candle | £39 The warm, woody and comforting smells of winter in a candle. laboratoryperfumes.com

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TSF01 toaster | £99.95 Beautiful retro styling and two extra-wide slots. smeguk.com


FRESH | JANUARY THINGS

Bowl | £10; side plate | £12; large plate | £14; seagrass placemats | £20 for 4; seagrass coasters | £6 for 4; seagrass bread basket | £30; mangowood whitewashed trug | £50, all from the Krem range Tableware inspired by Japan and Scandinavia. alsohome.com

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ALL-DAY MENU

Pizza for breakfast Hearty oxtail soup with parsnip & potato mash Twilight apple-ginger toddies Baked veg crisps with sour cream dip Citrus & pomegranate salad Goats’ cheese & walnut salad Roasted cherry tomatoes Homemade chocolate

Lazing & grazing GOOD FOOD AND EASY COMPANY CAN TURN A DAY INDOORS INTO SOMETHING DREAMY. HERE’S OUR RECIPE FOR STAYING PUT AND STAYING HAPPY Photography: ØIVIND HAUG/TAVERNE AGENCY Recipes & styling: ANNE MAEHLUM


LIVING | GATHERING

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ou don’t need to be in the depths of snowy Norway to appreciate that some January days are just made for hunkering down and staying cosy indoors. Let this be your excuse to dedicate time to small pleasures – a good book, a long-awaited boxset and, of course, sharing good food. Our menu shouldn’t eat into your sofa time too much. There are tasty snacks, salads and slow-cooked soup that’s worth the wait. Less a gathering – more like an indulgent retreat for one, or two…

Good morning pizza START THE DAY WITH A BREAKFAST WORTH LINGERING OVER Serves 2 Readymade pizza dough, halved to form 2 circles 2 eggs Baby spinach Grated cheddar or mozzarella Pine nuts 1 Preheat oven to 220C/Fan 200C/ 425F. Spread about 4 tbsp grated cheese over each base. Top with roughly chopped baby spinach leaves making a slight ‘nest’ in the centre. 2 Carefully break an egg in the centre. Sprinkle the pine nuts around the egg. 3 Bake for 15 mins, or until the base is brown and crisp and the egg has set. Season with sea salt and freshly ground pepper, and serve. » 25


ESCAPE | OUTING

The hills are alive with the sound of walkers‌ discovering the pleasures of a less-ambitious ascent

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Head for(little)the hills OFTEN OVERSHADOWED BY MOUNTAINS, OUR LESSER PEAKS ARE EASIER TO GET TO, TAKE LESS TIME TO CLIMB, AND ARE, OF COURSE, MASSES OF FUN Words: PHOEBE SMITH

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TA S T E B U D T R AV E L S FOOD AND DRINK CONJURE UP HOLIDAY MEMORIES LIKE NOTHING ELSE. HERE ARE SIX CLASSIC RECIPES THAT SAVOUR THE TASTES AND SMELLS OF MEMORABLE PLACES Food photography: IAN GARLICK

1–2 dried red chillies, finely chopped 1 fresh green chilli, finely chopped 1 onion, peeled ond finely chopped 4 tbsp frozen peas (optional) to garnish

Finely chopped fresh red chilli 2 tbsp chopped fresh coriander Shavings of fresh coconut

EGYPT

Sahlab Drunk everywhere from Istanbul to Beirut, this recipe originally used ground orchid roots, prized both as a digestif and aphrodisiac. We prize it as a fragrant, hot milky drink. Serves 2 450ml milk 1½ tbsp caster sugar 1 tbsp cornflour 1 tsp rose water to serve

Ground cinnamon 2 tbsp finely chopped pistachios 1 Pour 50ml of the milk into a jug. Pour the rest into a saucepan. Add sugar. 2 Mix the cornflour with the milk in the jug, stirring until completely smooth. 3 Heat the milk in the saucepan until it comes to the boil. Pour into the jug, stirring or whisking constantly and then return the mixture to the pan. 4 Stir constantly over a low heat for 5 mins until smooth and thickened*. 5 Remove the saucepan from the heat and stir in the rose water. Pour into two heatproof glasses and dust the tops with a little ground cinnamon. Sprinkle over the pistachios and serve.

INDIA

Aloo gobi Homemade rather than takeaway, this dry, potato and cauliflower curry is a revelation. Originally from the Punjab, it is now popular across India and Pakistan.

1 Boil the potatoes in their skins until just tender when pierced with a skewer. Drain, leave to cool completely and then peel and cut into chunks. 2 Blanch the cauliflower in a pan of boiling water for 2 mins. Drain, cool and divide into small florets. 3 Heat the oil in a large shallow pan, add the mustard seeds and fry until they begin to pop. Add the fenugreek seeds, cumin seeds and ground spices, along with the chillies and onion. Stir well and fry over a low heat until the onion is soft and golden brown – approx 10 mins. 4 Add the cauliflower, cover the pan and cook for 5 mins or until almost tender. Add the peas (if using) and potato chunks, season with salt and re-cover the pan. Cook for l0 mins or until the potatoes are heated through. 5 Serve garnished with chopped red chilli and coriander leaves, plus shavings of fresh coconut. »

Serves 2 (or 4 as a side) 3 medium potatoes 1 medium cauliflower 4–5 tbsp vegetable or rapeseed oil ½ tsp block mustard seeds About 12 fenugreek seeds ½ tsp cumin seeds 1 tsp ground coriander ½ tsp each of ground turmeric and ground cumin

* Stirring continuously should prevent lumps from forming. If it does begin to feel lumpy, remove from the heat and stir or whisk briskly until smooth again.


TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHY: EXODUS TRAVELS; THINKSTOCK; SHUTTERSTOCK

ESCAPE | EATING WELL

This curry-house classic is an altogether fresher dish when homemade

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JAPAN

ARMCHAIR TOURIST IN THE FIRST OF OUR VIRTUAL DESIGN TRIPS, WE EMBRACE THE QUIET SPIRIT OF WABI-SABI AND BRING A LITTLE JAPANESE CALM AND MODESTY INTO THE HOME Words: CLARE GOGERTY

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ESCAPE | HOME STYLE

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he Japanese have always known how to do minimalism – if you disregard the crazy, multi-sensory experience of their cities, that is. True Japanese style is all about modest, careful choices and the possession of a few, good-quality items. The ancient philosophy of wabi-sabi, which accepts impermanence and imperfection rather than resisting it, encourages living humbly and simply. In the home, this means the introduction of raw, natural materials such as wood, bamboo, linen and clay, that get better as they are battered by

age, and being selective about what items you buy. The point is to fill the home with things that don’t demand attention but rather sit unassumingly and serve their function well. It’s a style that we can at least aspire to if not wholeheartedly embrace. The introduction of a few carefully chosen things – a handmade bowl or a bamboo steamer, perhaps, or a single chrysanthemum (the emblem of Imperial Japan) laid on a table – could do it. At its heart, wabi-sabi encourages a slower, quieter approach to life and that’s an idea we can all get behind.

Kenmore hand-textured vase, £50, habitat.co.uk 2 Mount Fuji print, £120, kingandmcgaw.com 3 Tokyo Design Studio plate gift set, £40 for 6 pieces, johnlewis.com 4 Fish trap pendant light, from £60, oggetto.com 5 Salad bowl, £30; servers, £19.50, both oggetto.com 6 Kimono gown, £115, toa.st 7 Kokka Japanese floral print fabric, £22 per metre, johnlewis.com 8 Two-tier bamboo steamer, £9.49, robertdyas.co.uk 9 Go Cook meat cleaver, £16, tesco.com 10 Oriental tea cup, £7.50, decoratorsnotebook.co.uk 11 Pink chrysanthemum, £16, abigailahern.com 12 Naoko grey and yellow armchair, £595, habitat.co.uk 13 Wabi-sabi Welcome by Julie Pointer Adams (Artisan Books) 1

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SIMPLE STYLE THE WINTER SCARF

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hatever the vagaries of fashion throw at us, during the winter months scarves remain steadfastly looped around our necks. This is mostly because they are very good at doing what they do best: keeping the wearer warm by withstanding chilly gusts. But it is also because they are an affordable and easy way to update a weary winter wardrobe. Easy, that is, if you know the right way to wear one. The scarf is a versatile garment and can be worn in countless ways – it can be draped, tossed over one shoulder, tied in knots, or simply dangled – but the danger is that not all of these are fashionable. The days of wearing your scarf folded in half with the loose ends pulled through the loop, for example, are long gone. And no one wears a scarf like a neckerchief (folded into a triangle and tied behind the neck) any more, unless perhaps, they’re a cowboy. These days, it’s all about the loose dangle. In recent winters, scarves turned voluminous and shawl-like, smothering wearers’ heads in fold upon fold of woollen fabric. There is still much to recommend this snug and muffled look, but if you want to look ‘up to the minute’, this winter it is all about the long knitted scarf. Preferably this

Doctor Who (Tom Baker) in his 20ft of knitted warmth, with K9

“These days it’s all about the loose dangle, preferably in multi-coloured stripes”

scarf should be of multi-coloured stripes, as pioneered by Tom Baker, right, in seven series of Doctor Who. (Interesting aside: Baker’s scarf was knitted by Begonia Pope, who used all the wool given to her in a great big bundle by the costume designer, resulting in the 20ft legendary garment we all came to love and that Tom Baker has never been able to shake off.) Although the scarf’s origins date back to Roman times, when they were used to mop sweat from the necks of men, they didn’t become fashionable until the 19th century. During the Victorian era, they indicated wealth and status, although these were usually made of silk and chiffon and tucked into bodices or worn as a cravat. Before you buy one of your own, though, take heed from the story of dance pioneer Isadora Duncan. A champion of both the long scarf, which she often involved in her dances, and of the convertible car, the two combined disastrously when the former caught in the hub cap of the latter and strangled her. Be careful where your scarf dangles, you never know where it will end up. Just saying.

THE UPDATE

TWO GREAT TWISTS

THE CLASSIC

Islay Breton Stripe Pom scarf | £70 Channeling the spirit of Tom Baker’s original but a lot nicer, actually. jigsaw-online.com

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Bow neck tie | £22.50 A neat solution to scarf management: just pull one end through the other and you’re sorted. seasaltcornwall.co.uk

Forest green pom pom scarf | £35 Who can resist a pompom? Not us. And certainly not this tasteful pom pom fringing. sophieallport.com

PHOTOGRAPHY: GETTY IMAGES

Words: CLARE GOGERTY


HOW IT WORKS AND HOW TO HAVE MORE OF IT Illustration: LISA EVANS/FOLIO ART Words: JANE ALEXANDER


Dennis (opposite) with wife Valesca and children, Boaz and Indy, describes the style of their home as ‘romantic industrial’. He made much of the furniture, including the kitchen table, himself


NEST | HOME TOUR

TIMBER LAND THIS DUTCH COUPLE TURNED AN OLD-FASHIONED HOUSE INTO A CRAFTED, MODERN HOME BY FILLING IT WITH HANDMADE FURNITURE AND ALL MANNER OF WHIMSICAL ITEMS Photography: ANOUK DE KLEERMAEKER Styling: ILONA DE KONING Words: CLARE GOGERTY

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The simple things january 2018  
The simple things january 2018  
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