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Taking time to live well

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PAU S E

Finding magic on your doorstep • The point of poetry A life unplugged • Campfire peaches • Appreciating weeds Minibreaks for the mind • Why we love a bakery 11


OUTDOORS

AWAY FROM IT ALL SLEEPING UNDER CANVAS (OR IN A CABIN), COOKING OUTDOORS AND RELAXING UNDER THE STARS… A RECIPE TO HELP YOU SLOW DOWN AND LEAVE THE REAL WORLD BEHIND FOR A WHILE Photography: JONATHAN CHERRY Recipes: BEX LONG Projects: MATT LONG Styling: GEMMA CHERRY


A walk that’s about noticing dappled shade and fresh green pine cones, or the joys of hanging off a gate… A pitch where you’re happy to sit awhile… In these moments of stillness is the alchemy that turns camping into relaxing

Treat yourself to the luxury of time* – whether it’s to wander through the woods or literally watch a pot boil

* Discover the joys of glamping in Devon, with a good dose of nature thrown in, on page 118.

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Loafing around WHETHER IT’S A GEM YOU STUMBLE ACROSS ON HOLIDAY, OR A HALLOWED PART OF YOUR DAILY COMMUTE, FINDING A GREAT LOCAL BAKERY IS A PLEASURE THAT’S ON THE RISE AGAIN. HERE’S A BATCH TO GET YOUR TUM RUMBLING Words: SARAH GUY

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EATING WELL

Baker Tom’s

Earth’s Crust

CASTLE DOUGLAS, DUMFRIES AND GALLOWAY Tom van Rooyen and his wife Pavlina started in a converted garage in 2011, developing a name for themselves with an earthy, crusty sourdough that flew off the shelves at farmers’ markets. They opened up the current shop and café in 2016. The van Rooyens believe the quality of their local produce is a key to their success: fruit from their neighbours’ gardens finds its way into wicked patisserie. 36–38 St Andrews Street, Castle Douglas; earthscrustbakery.co.uk

Baker’s Table at Talgarth Mill

TALGARTH, BRECON The café and bakery at the Talgarth Mill complex are part of a community initiative. Every loaf produced here uses wholemeal flour from the Talgarth watermill, a restored 18th-century mill that grinds three or four days a week. A variety of flours and breadmaking kits are available to buy. Watch the mill in action, or head straight to the café for bara brith, scones and cakes. Its bestselling loaf is a white and rye mix known as bara havard. Talgarth Mill, The Square, Talgarth, Brecon; talgarthmill.com

FALMOUTH, CORNWALL The Baker Tom story started over ten years ago, with two loaves pedalled on Tom Hazzeldine’s bike over to the local farm shop where he worked. Before long he opened a small shop in Truro (now closed) and now has four bakeries. There’s something pleasingly unpretentious about their evolving selection, which includes everyday pleasures such as a white tin loaf or flapjack. Its saffron buns – a Cornish speciality – are suitably golden and distinctively spiced. 10c Church Street, Falmouth, Cornwall; bakertom.co.uk

Baltic Bakehouse

LIVERPOOL Bread is the big story at Baltic, started in Liverpool’s Baltic Triangle by Brenda Henley, her daughter Grace and son Sam, gifted bakers all. A second branch at Allerton Road boasts a restaurant and café. Baltic Wild, an oft-praised sourdough loaf, is a chewy, tangy revelation. Pastries and croissants are the reason many a commuter takes the Baltic route to work (see lemon cruffin, a croissant-muffin cross, above). And then there are the much-lauded doughnuts… Baltic Triangle, 46 Bridgewater St, Liverpool; balticbakehouse.co.uk

Bread Source

AYLSHAM, NORFOLK Steve Winter does nothing by halves. In his quest to create truly local loaves, he seeks out slow-growing wheat from Norfolk farmers, which is delivered to his own stone mill for grinding, before being set on the long, slowproving and fermenting journey to create exceptionally tasty bread. The densely satisfying sourdough is a daily bestseller, but weekend shoppers make a beeline for the granola loaf, with its sweet and sticky fruit and nut crust. 13 Red Lion Street, Aylsham, Norfolk; bread-source.co.uk

Violet

LONDON Although well known to east Londoners and Guardian readers (owner Claire Ptak had a column in the paper), Violet reached another level of fame when it was announced that the bakery would be providing Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s wedding cake (lemon and elderflower). Its two-storey, white-painted premises are small and unassuming, your eye instantly drawn to the tidy rows of pristine cupcakes in ever-changing flavours. The namesake violet cupcake is a delicate must-try. 47 Wilton Way, Dalston, London; violetcakes.com » 23


Velvet & Rattan pendant ceiling light | £185 With a tactile tier of velvet. rockettstgeorge.co.uk

Things to want and wish for

Khmer fan | £9.50 Lollipop sweet. toa.st

Cotton Chloe dress | £195 Thirties-inspired prettiness in floral cotton. justinetabak.co.uk

Loving your home, inside and out. Books and treats for you to enjoy. Chosen by Louise Gorrod

Iringa basket | £45 Textured storage tub with neat stripes. oggetto.com

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Bamboo garden lantern | £53 Hang from a branch – admire at leisure. andshine.co.uk


WISHLIST

Solar bamboo Tiki garden torches | ÂŁ9.99 for two; Carnival solar festoon lights (on van) | ÂŁ24.99 for 20 For lighting paths and flowerbeds in style. Vintage van optional. lights4fun.co.uk


HOME TOUR

S TA M F O R D

MY NEIGHBOURHOOD THE LINCOLNSHIRE MARKET TOWN PROVIDES COMMUNITY – AND INSPIRATION – FOR TEXTILE DESIGNER NICOLA CLIFFE Photography: CRISTIAN BARNETT Words: CLARE GOGERTY

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Nicola takes Ernie, her Parson Russell terrier for his morning walk through the town. Opposite: Ernie at ease in the living room. The cushions are covered with fabric from Nicola’s own range, Madder & Cutch


COMPETITION

CASE OF THE MISSING ENDING A murder mystery that’s so mysterious the conclusion isn’t even written yet! Channel your inner Poirot and enter our writing competition

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hy do we love a good murder mystery? The theory is that we enjoy a story that has a resolution – some 60% of UK fiction book sales are of crime and thrillers. Are you someone who likes to second guess the end or prefers being twisted and turned, then led astray before gradually coming to a conclusion. Either way, it’s satisfying to solve a whodunnit and afterwards to admire the handiwork that goes into plotting, character development and creation of atmosphere. We asked well known crime writer Sophie Hannah, who is author of the New Hercule Poirot Mysteries, to write an original short story for us (turn the page to read it), but to leave the end hanging and – here’s the twist – that’s where you come in… »

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ILLUSTRATION: SARA MULVANNY. WORDS: CLARE GOGERTY

ILLUSTRATION: SARA MULVANNY. WORDS: CLARE GOGERTY

GROWING GROWING

SWEETLY SWEETLY SCENTED SCENTED ANNUALS ANNUALS becrlsimbers d clim e d r e u r colo -coonlofulowenrfilnogwering y n Ma aMt akneeyp t keep o th tha

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Box of delights: holiday souvenirs can be keys that unlock memories, but if you’re going to give them pride of place, remember to buy things you’d want to actually display...


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HOW WE LIVE

comfort of things SOUVENIRS

There are certain things in the home that are like old friends: they always cheer you up. This month, we feel the love for things found on holiday Words: CLARE GOGERTY

PHOTOGRAPHY: PLAIN PICTURE; SHUTTERSTOCK

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he best souvenirs are the ones that mean nothing to other people. No one else knows that the lump of black stone gathering dust on a shelf in the kitchen is actually a piece of volcanic rock picked up in Iceland on a romantic weekend break. Or that you found that unremarkable little basket, now filled with cotton wool balls, on gap-year travels to Malaysia and carried it home in your rucksack. These are the mementoes that sing to you and to you alone. They trigger the memory, taking you back to happy times. Unlike a digital image, they can be held in the hand and “It’s like extending treasured. They are a the holiday, by taking conduit across time and continents, connecting a piece of it home” you to that moment. Travel and holidays are markers in our lives: memorable weeks that stand proud above the flat routine of the every day. The impulse to bring something back that reminds us of these precious times is hard to resist. It’s feels like extending the holiday by taking a piece of it home. The internet age means that most things are available to everyone all the time, but it’s still possible to find something unique. Buying traditional crafts, even if they are made for tourists, is like adopting a piece of the country’s culture. For the unabashed, it also, provides bragging rights: “Oh, that figure of Ganesh? I picked it up in Bali.” Some souvenirs, however, are not tasteful at all. We are talking here of the mass-produced tat that fills gift shops and airports and which are often purchased as presents, wanted or otherwise. Whereas they may have kitsch or ironic charm, no one really wants a reminder of someone else’s holiday, and you will soon tire of them. Best to steer clear of anything that declares itself a souvenir, and stick to things that have some sort of personal meaning. * But don’t be tempted by that colourful bottle of liqueur enjoyed last night at dinner. It will never be drunk when you get it back home.

B R I N G I T B AC K

Where to find the best souvenirs

In the wild Sometimes the most meaningful mementoes are the simplest. An interesting piece of bark or a pressed flower are potential memoryjoggers. A pebble or shell found on the beach is redolent of holidays but remember that pebble removal is illegal on many beaches. Craft shops A search for traditional craftspeople can result in finding a one-off piece that you wouldn’t be able to buy at home. Handthrown bowls are a good bet as they’re easy to pack and will remind you of happy times as you eat your granola. Supermarkets When abroad, look beyond the food aisles (although they may offer all manner of tasty, local delights*) and wander towards the homeware shelves, for gadgets, ceramics and glassware not available back home. Museum and gallery shops Even if you don’t fancy the exhibition, a shop attached to an art gallery or museum offers rich pickings for souvenirs. Museums specialising in design are generally the best and sell arty objects you won’t see elsewhere. » 67


Seafood & sandcastles STICK ANOTHER PRAWN ON THE BARBIE… WE’RE GRILLING (AND CHILLING) WITH A SEASIDE FEAST Photography, recipes & styling: CATHERINE FRAWLEY

E

ating seafood out in the sea air, the sound of waves gently breaking nearby, is a treat that’s not just for tastebuds, but helps restore mind and body, too… Let a beach barbecue be your excuse to hang out with friends, light the grill and cool a beer or two – with nothing more strenuous than sandcastles and a paddle on the horizon. Our menu is as laid-back as your surroundings: crab burgers, simple prawn skewers, and packable salads and puds that impress with flavour not fuss. Enjoy! »

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Fresh flavours, sea air, the sound of waves breaking and a barbecue crackling. Everything tastes better on the beach


GATHERING


MY CITY*

VA N C O U V E R

PHOTOGRAPHY: SANDRA HARRIS

BLESSED BY NATURE, WITH A VIBRANT FOOD AND ARTS SCENE, SANDRA HARRIS’S CANADIAN HOMETOWN HAS MUCH TO OFFER

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MY CITY

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* There’s no better way to get to the heart of a city than through the people who live there. Every month we ask someone, clearly in love with their city, to take us on a personal tour and tell us what makes it so special. You may feel inspired to visit one day or to rediscover the charms of a city closer to you, but for now just sit back, relax and enjoy some armchair travel. How long have you lived in Vancouver?

I’m a bit of a Vancouver boomerang as I’ve lived here twice. I’m originally from Edmonton, Alberta, a mid-sized city in the prairies. It was a wonderful place to grow up but I needed to get away from the long, cold winters. I’ve lived in Cape Town and Toronto and been back in Vancouver since 2011. I can’t stay away! 4

Tell us what makes your city unique.

It’s a great place to live because it’s laid-back while also being active. There’s a lot of culture but Vancouver is really about getting outdoors, whether it’s running, biking, swimming, skiing or sailing. All of these can be done all year round, even skiing. You might have to drive 90 minutes to Whistler and take a gondola up to the ski area, but it’s doable. What’s it like in summer?

The best weather in Vancouver is mid-July to midAugust when you get long, hot, sunny days. The city is almost surrounded with water and the beaches, parks and restaurant patios are all jammed with folk enjoying their free time with friends and family.

What time of day do you most enjoy and why?

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5

I’m a morning person so I love watching the sun come up. I go for a walk along the seawall and grab a coffee and maybe stop and write in my journal. What’s the nature like?

1 Vancouver’s marvellous, mountainous skyline. 2 Truly lovely False Creek harbour. 3 Sundae Sundays are best spent at Earnest Ice Cream. 4 Holding court: a volleyball session at Kits Beach. 5 Nothin’ but a hound dog… at Pacific Spirit Regional Park

The city is surrounded on two sides by water and mountains. To the west is the ocean and to the north are mountains. Whistler is well known for skiing but our secret is three local mountains that are only 30-45 minutes away: Mount Seymour, Cypress Mountain and Grouse Mountain. Each has skiing and snowboarding in winter and hiking in summer. The past few winters I’ve taken up snowshoeing. There’s nothing like a winter snowshoe with friends to a remote lodge with a hot chocolate for a reward. Where’s your favourite outdoor space?

Vancouver is known for Stanley Park, an urban oasis right next to downtown. However, my favourite »

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THE SIMPLE THINGS AUGUST 2019 S L O W B E A C H D AY S & F I L M S U N D E R T H E S TA R S

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PAU S E

Finding magic on your doorstep • The point of poetry A life unplugged • Campfire peaches • Appreciating weeds Minibreaks for the mind • Why we love a bakery

09/07/2019 10:57

www.thesimplethings.com

FABRIC: CRUZ PARAISO BY ANDREWMARTIN.CO.UK

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