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3/4 Charolais with a Club Calf look registered Chi and Charolais % — thf Phaf — works great on heat wave several high selling daughters this Past season - daughters Making treMendous feMales

Champion Chi, 2012 houston

Sired by Troubadour • Raised by Justin Homen Shown by the Womack Family, Sold by Copus Many other sons of Troubadour topped classes at Fort Worth, San Antonio, and Houston


Total Recall total reCall GCC

806T

Angus Reg. #15914543

Owned with Ratcliff Ranches and JE Ranch Foundation

Total Recall

represents calving ease, efficiency, and versatility. He is a cow changer, producing big bellied, broody made, feminine daughters that demand a premium. His sons carry the calving ease and power of this great sire. Limited flush semen available - but with powerful progeny, select a Recall son for your genetic future!

Griswold Bulls

total reCall sons

$30/unit

$25/unit

GCC

Legacy

Angus Reg. #16855217 BW 69 Total Recall x OCC Emblazon 854E x 4066 Owned with Bourquin Cattle and DW Cattle

GCC

Gold Standard

Angus Reg. #17001727 BW 78 Total Recall x OCC Nitro 703N (Legend) Owned with JE Ranch Foundation, Bourquin Cattle, and Boss Cattle Co.

$30/unit

ETR

Cowtown

1/4 Simmental Reg. #2626565 BW 68 Total Recall x Steel Force Owned with Duello Cattle and ETR Cattle. Ideal for heifers.

Uniquely bred Angus. High seller 2012 Grass to Grid Sale

Griswold Cattle To request a Griswold Sire Collection book or place a semen order call Tessa at 405-372-3300. Online ordering is also available. To be placed on our mailing list email gcccatalog@gmail.com

Griswold Cattle 5922 South Brush Creek Stillwater, Oklahoma 74074 John & Jeannie Griswold 405-780-3300

Greg Griswold 405-780-0100 Luke Doris 620-353-4114 www.griswoldcattle.com


June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

3


Dan Sullivan

2576 Old Brandon Rd. • Hillsboro, TX 76645 254-582-7096 • 254-582-0814 online at: sullivanranch.net • showsteers.com/dsullivan

Monarch DSUL FreckLeS 23c DSUL Freckles 23C is one of those rare females. She is the off spring of a old show heifer(Sim/Angus) I showed back in my day. I bred the heifer to a Limousin bull, and 23C was born. She is 20 years old with calf at side. 23C even at her age is still raising many outstanding progeny that have proven to go on and have much success. I then bred 23C to Broker(Limousin) for her first calf. DSUL Too Sweet 55E will turn 17 this spring. Too Sweet’s second calf was DSUL Sweetness 232H, who was the Champion Limousin Female in Denver 2000. DSUL takes pride in our cow families with longevity and predictability. All three females here produced a slew of Champions.

20 years & 3 generations of

DSUL Power In The BLooD

DSUL Sweetness, Daughter of Too Sweet. She was the Champion Limousin Female in Denver 2000.

DSUL Too Sweet, First Calf of 23C and dam to many champions.

Direct hit x 23c, many times champion for aI Promotional Bull, Meyer 734 x 23C the Elder Family.

4 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Direct hit x 23c Freckles, sold for $15,500 in April 2012..

Still going strong!


Best of Luck to all juniors for a successful Jr National and State Fair season

2012 Grand Champion Heifer Fort Worth (Open)

2012 Reserve Grand Bull Fort Worth (Open)

2012 Grand Champion Heifer Denver (Junior)

2012 Reserve Grand Heifer Denver (Junior & Open) Result of Embryo Purchase

2011 Louisville Grand Champion (Open) & Reserve Grand (Junior)

2011 Louisville Champion Yearling Bull

2011 Reserve Grand Heifer KC (Open)

2011 Grand Heifer KC (Junior)

2011 Reserve Grand Heifer KC (Junior)

2011 Junior National Reserve Grand Heifer

2011 Junior National Grand Steer

2011 Reserve Grand Champion Heifer FW (Open)

If your summer travels bring you through central Illinois, we hope you will take the time to stop and visit. Our 2012 calf crop is incredible! Cattle, embryos, and semen for sale at all times. Randy & Jamie mullinix 309-995-3013 • 309-853-6565 997 Township Rd 150 East, Toulon, IL 61483 purplereign76@gmail.com

www.purplereigncattle.com

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

5


r e d a e l e h T

in current Livestock Production, Show, and Sale Information.

Volume 15 • Issue 5 June/July 2012

Pages of Interest Advertising Deadlines................... 309 Editorial Table of Contents ............ 99

Index of Advertisers ...................... 322 Subscription Form ......................... 285

Phone/Fax 1-800-787-8690 www.theshowcircuit.com Owners Schumaker Publications, Inc. hi, 2012

wave ook great on heat Club Calf l is with a Phaf — works 3/4 Charola is % — thf hi and Charola feMales registered C treMendous rs Making season - daughte rs this Past selling daughte several high

houston

Champion C• Raised by Justin Homen our Sold by Copus Sired by Troubad Womack Family, at Shown by the topped classes of Troubadour , and Houston Many other sons Antonio Fort Worth, San

• Daughter Sold for $17,000 - 2012 Western Elite Sale • (Troubadour x Warpath-Nitro) Bred by Rob Miller. Sold to Nick Reiman. • Daughter Sold for $13,500 - 2012 Western Elite Sale • (Troubadour x Meyer-Nitro) Bred by Rob Miller. Sold to Nick Reiman. • Fall Born Steer Sold for $38,000 • (Troubadour x Heat Wave) Sold by Ryan Foreman in The Main Event Sale. • Champion Chi Steer 2012 Houston Livestock Show • (Troubadour x Friction) Raised by Justin Homen. Sold by Copus. • Many high sellers and show winners reported • Likely the most versatile club calf and maternal sire in the business! THF • PHAF • Young Producer of Champions Registered 3/4 Charolais and Chi KRIS BLACK • JOHN SULLIVAN • CHUCK BARTON BRANDON BIRD • RIDLING FARMS Managed by Christy Collins Inc.

6 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Editor-In-Chief Ad Sales, Subscriptions, Billing Roland Schumaker II direct: 309.365.7105 roland@theshowcircuit.com 21009 Clarksville Rd., Lexington, IL 61753 Production Director Camera-Ready Ad Submissions, Show Results, Ad Design Carrie Rhoades-Behlke carrie@theshowcircuit.com Black Diamond, Alberta, Canada Creative Director Ad Design, Special Projects Catherine Williams Neumayr catherine@theshowcircuit.com P.O. Box 505, Boling, TX 77420 Web Director Websites, Email Blasts Amber Martin amber@theshowcircuit.com Des Moines, Iowa Editorial Director Stories, Editorial Submissions Sharla Ishmael sharla@theshowcircuit.com Benbrook, Texas Field Representative Darla Aegerter darla@theshowcircuit.com direct: 402.643.8122 Advertising Rates Full Page/Color - $595 Full page/BW - $385 1/2 Page/Color - $460 1/2 Page/BW - $250 1/4 Page/Color - $385 1/4 Page/BW - $175

Contract rates available upon request. Cover & Position pages priced upon request.

Advertisers are allowed up to 4 pictures per page. All extras will be $7.50 each.

All partnerships billed to one person. 5% discount for pre-paid ads. TERMS: due upon receipt. Accounts 30 days past due are subject to a 24% APR on all overdue invoices.

Those submitting camera-ready ads should consult SC prior to submission to ensure proper set-up. Those who wish to use their SC ad in other publications should notify SC of this when their ad is approved. The Show Circuit (ISSN 152 10073) is published in January, March, April, May, June, August, November, and twice in September. For subscription price of $30 per year by The Show Circuit, 21009 Clarksville Rd. Lexington, IL, 61753. Periodical postage paid at Lexington, IL, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Show Circuit, 21009 Clarksville Rd., Lexington, IL 61753. The Show Circuit, hereby expressly limits its liability resulting from any and all misprints, errors and/or all inaccuracies whatsoever in the advertisement and editorial content published by The Show Circuit Magazine and its said liability is here by limited to the refund of the customer his/her or its payment for the said advertisement, the running of a corrected advertisement or editorial notice. Advertising copy received after deadline will not be returned for proofing. Changes to advertising copy made after deadline date will be allowed only if time permits, and will incur the appropriate charges according to time and materials involved in the changes. The opinions or views expressed in all editorials are those of the writer or persons interviewed and not The Show Circuit Magazine. The Show Circuit, does, however, reserve the right to edit or refuse all material which might be objectionable in content. Neither this publication nor any part of it may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without the prior permission of Schumaker Publications, Inc. Requests for reprints and permissions should be directed to The Show Circuit, 21009 Clarksville Rd, Lexington, IL 61753; o: 309.365.7105 or fax: 309.365.8879.


For ordering these products, visit our website, www.naturalsolutionsforlivestock.com, for a dealer locator

GLUCoat is a unique product that can be used to replace any oil or fat that you might be using. When a calf is behind in weight, not eating good, not fat enough, etc. the first thing a person does or thinks of is to “ADD FAT ” Studies show that feed intake and feed efficiency go down when a feed reaches 6% or more in fat content. So putting fat or oils into a show feed will normally sail over that 6% mark. In return, you are defeating the purpose of adding fat and may have a negative effect on weight gain, feed intake, and feed efficiency. When too much oil or fat is used, it will coat the rumen and the feed particles in the rumen which will slow down the digestion of the nutrients. GLUCoat is different ... • GLUCoat is not a fat product. • GLUCoat is a sugar product. The unique blend of sugars keeps the rumen working longer and faster than just a single source of glucose such as cane molasses. By speeding up rumen activity comes increased feed intake and palatability. It has been shown to dramatically enhance fat cover, increase feed efficiency and average daily gain. • GLUCoat also has the Cellarator technology as it contains the active ingredient Cell-rate, which aids in the process of cellular replication, supports the animal’s immune system, lowers stress levels, and aids in muscle and fat development. • GLUCoat has a refined flavored fish oil that contains the highest levels of Omega 3 Fatty Acids for joint health and naturally occurring Vitamin E which is great for skin and hair. • GLUCoat can also increase glucose levels which is stored in the body as fat, giving livestock that bloomier, fuller, softer look that is demanded in the show ring today. • GLUCoat is molasses based and sweet to the taste, cattle love it! GLUCoat is the most widely used feed additive on the market today. It’s the next level or generation to a fat source or supplement. You will never use a fat product again! Whether it’s market steers or breeding cattle your calf will feel better, act better and their eating habits will change. GLUCoat WILL KEEP YOU READY FOR THE RING!!

NATURAL STRIDE - Without question in the show ring today soundness is a necessity and with the advancements in genetics and performance we have stressed the structure of livestock to the limits. As we continue to push the show animal of today to its highest potential we will also see more and more movement problems. Whether it’s swelling, flexibility, joint pain or just wear and tear, Natural Stride is your answer. This revolutionary, one-of-a-kind, ALL NATURAL formula has led to dramatic results in todays show animal. Natural Stride benefits the joint in 4 ways ... • First, it helps modulate or “calm down” the body’s immune response to joint stress - enhancing joint recovery and minimizing damage from pain and activity. • Second, cetyl myristoleate may act as an anti-inflammatory, helping to reduce the symptoms of “inflammatory arthritis” and other conditions in which inflammation can lead to slow recovery, damaged tissues, increased pain and restricted motion. • Third, cetyl myristoleate can stimulate joint lubrication to help relieve stiffness, which may improve mobility and enhance the natural range of motion. • Finally, cetyl myristoleate has had an analgesic or “pain-killing” effect that may help to reduce joint pain, hence increasing your animal’s comfort.

HIDE AND HAIR is the revolutionary new hair growth product from Natural Solutions For Livestock. Not only has it been shown to grow hair but it encourages skin health which is essential for optimum hair growth. HIDE AND HAIR contains kelp and seaweed which has been shown to lower body temperature. Cattle will potentially take the higher or hotter temperature better when going to a show. This new product comes in granulated form, is extremely palatable, and best of all it contains no melatonin. HIDE AND HAIR is the first of its kind designed to be administered 60-90 days before show. A bucket of HIDE AND HAIR will last 45 days per head. Hair runs in 45 day cycles so you could start seeing results in as little as 45 days. This is a great tool to help with your success, but always remember daily hair care and management play an important roll as well. HIDE AND HAIR has no melatonin so you can not use it too long. With melatonin, there is a point where hair comes to a peak, then hair goes down hill and is hard to recover. With HIDE AND HAIR you are able to plan multiple peaks with a more consistent hair growth over a longer period of time without the valley. It is also great for skin and hair health, so you can administer it for a longer period of time and not be a negative.

618.546.5035

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

7


G od dard

Cattle

Next Generation

Peaches N Cream

Talk the Talk

Splash

Bad Company

Immortal

Unforgiven

Alias

Tin Man

Ace of Diamonds

Simple Man

Black Powder

The Hangover

Blindside

The Gift

Free N Easy

Jigsaw

Curtain Call

Guns N Roses

Ricky Bobby

Shake N Bake

Lector

Hillbilly Deluxe

Joe Blow

8 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Co.


Texhoma

Top Cat

Chisum

Ramblin Man

Paintball

Meltdown

Yuma

Shiver

Grizzly

Who’s Best

Blown Away

Deal Me In

IntroduCInG new addItIons for 2012

Limitless

Tremor

Limelight

The Creature

Fool Proof

Real Deal

Randy & denise GoddaRd

Stanton, Iowa • Semen Orders: Garrett Kalvig, Manager: 319-504-9020 or Emily Goddard-Doty: 800-654-7127 goddardcattle.com • Blog: goddardcattle.blogspot.com • Find us on Facebook! fb.com/goddardcattle


Sullivan’s BLACK HEAT Neck Sweat™

NEW Sullivan’s Show Stick Colors

Change your front end with BLACK HEAT!

Plus, special summer limited edition patterns: Fire, Tie-Die, Wood Grain, Barbed Wire, Skull and Cross Bones.

New, fun stylish patterns and colors: Mossy Oak, Diamond Tread Plate Aluminum, Carbon Fiber, Purple Zebra.

This NEW, double-stretch, closed cell SBR copolymer neoprene black sweating material has been scientifically proven after hours of research to be the best material to reach maximum sweating potential for cattle. The bonding of this advanced micro fiber neoprene with the velvet knitted fabric creates more sweating results than any material we have ever tested. The NoFray design features fabric binding sewn around the outer edges to prevent tearing and to add strength. Velcro is permanently sewn in place for your convenience. Dramatic results in just 3 to 5 days! Availabe in three different sizes.

All show sticks available with their regular grip or the putter grip, a more stable and controlled grip with a great feel.

All NEW Items!!

Sullivan’s Hair Shedding Comb™ Removing dead hair has never been so easy. The larger 4” wide head covers more area than previous shedding combs. The rounded stainless steel teeth gently penetrate deep into the hair coat removing the old dead hair and leaving the healthy hair unharmed. Simply pull the shedding comb through the hair coat in the direction you are training the hair before washing/rinsing. Repeat daily until shedding is complete. It’s simple, effective and saves hours. Always remember ... the faster the dead hair is shed out, the quicker new healthy hair will arrive.

Stock Show U Apparel Check out the many new apparel and speciality items available through Stock Show University. 100% of the proceeds go toward educating livestock youth.

Sullivan’s BODYGUARD™ The First Of Its Kind! Finally, a PREVENTER for ringworm that you can feed. This top-dress feed supplement nourishes the body with the proven natural anti-oxidants Dried Kelp, Garlic, Oregano leaf, Olive Leaf, and Grapefruit Seed which have been proven to support the animal’s immune system to ward off fungus infections. Contains strong levels of Vitamins A, E, & D to provide needed nourishment to the animal brought on by a lack of sunlight, a major cause of ringworm. Provides a full body of protection to the animal from the inside, out. Simply feed daily to cattle, sheep and swine. Don’t wait for the outbreak of ringworm, defend your animal with the BODYGUARD.

Now IMPROVED with teeth added in the flex area.

Sullivan’s FLEX Brush™ A flexible brush with a comfortable, adjustable nylon strap and the exact same pliable teeth as our popular massage brush used for training hair and washing livestock. Expect improved comfort and control as the Flex Brush naturally contours to the animal’s body shape.

SULLIVAN SUPPLY, INC.

1-800-475-5902 • Dunlap, Iowa • sales@sullivansupply.com

SULLIVAN SUPPLY SOUTH

1-800-588-7096 • Hillsboro, Texas • sullivan@hillsboro.net

SULLIVAN SUPPLY WEST

1-888-914-5972 • Lodi, California • lee@sullivansupply.com

10 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

www.sullivansupply.com Find us on ...


the SMART

Another livestock industry first from Sullivan’s ... the Innovative Leader.

SENSATION by Sullivan’s

Brush™

The Smart Sensation like no other. Healthy for hide and hair, the Smart Sensation gently massages the hide to stimulate blood flow that releases the natural oils from the skin to coat the hair and promote healthy hair growth. With the 129 precisely placed ball-tipped teeth, you can actually see the Smart Sensation brush create hair separation off the skin allowing air to flow deep into the hair base for added hair stimulation and hair growth. The advantage of the Smart Sensation is how it amplifies the volume of the hair as it lifts up from the hide without causing curls, kinks or matting that are often associated with rice root or massage brushes. The Smart Sensation is similar to human vent hair brushes but has been designed with the proper size for show cattle and a more comfortable handle application. Cattle love the feel of the stimulating Smart Sensation!

Patent pending.

Sullivan’s SMART Series

SMART Fork™ A slightly deeper basket with a reinforced back stop and raised sides. With a reinforced attachment point you will see no more breakage as seen in previous forks. Comfortable grip on a wood handle. Quality, unbreakable, impact resistant basket.

SMART Feed Pan™ This large, 22 quart capacity feed pan holds one gallon more feed than previous feed pan designs. Ideal for holding today’s high fiber feed rations. Large, open handle design provides a comfortable grip. The large diameter at the bottom of this feed pan prevents tipping and spills.

SMART Bucket™

Soft, comfortable grip. Convenient pour spout. Flat back, 20 quart capacity bucket. The most uniquely designed bucket you have ever seen.

SMART Comb™

SMART Sensation™ Described above

The Smart Comb™ is just that ... a multi-tasking, yet lightest weight comb on the market, with interchangeable blades that securely snap in and out of a plastic handle that allows you to pick the blade of choice. Available as a complete package or as an individual comb.

SMART Flex Brush™

Described on opposite page

SMART Comb

SMART Bucket

SMART Fork

SMART Sensation

SMART Feed Pan

June/July 2012SMART • theshowcircuit.com Flex

11


Believe in Me • Composite Heat Wave x 7587

nutter Butter • Composite Monopoly x Katarina (PB Charolais)

Make it rain • PB Simmental Foundation 721N x K-LER’s Beyonce

JawBreaker • Composite Eye Candy x Cornhusker

torrington • Composite Simple Man x Northern Improvement/ Ali/Total Solution/Direct Hit

two tone • Composite Walks Alone x Stray Kitty

Hollywood • Composite Heat Wave x Draft Pick

CHoppin wood • Composite troubadour x Heat Wave

walks alone • Composite Heat Wave x 7587

unstoppaBle • 1/2 Maine-Anjou Monopoly x Habanero/Witch Doctor

deadliest CatCH • Composite Outer Limits x Heat Wave

ali’s solution • Composite Total Solution x Ali

panda express • Composite Heat Wave x Donor Dam RD3L

walkie talkie • Composite Crowd Favorite 1 • Composite Walks Alone x Goose (Henney Donor) Heat Wave x Thone Y23 (PB Charolais)

silent knigHt • 1/2 Maine-Anjou inCrediBle Hulk • Composite lCJ sCooBy suH • 3/4 Maine-Anjou dF talladega • Shorthorn Big Foot • Composite Predator x Pale Face/Cheap Trick/Black Smilin’ Bob x Miss Meyer (Meyer 734 GVC Suh x Sabrina 1S HD Bloodstone 603 ET x WHR Poppin Monopoly x Kadabra/Charolais Jade’s dam x Hairietta) Girl 2R01

• Complete Embryo Facility • AI Schools and Supplies • bioPryn Testing (Pregnancy Test) • BVD Testing for P.I.’s • Semen volume discounts starting at $300 (Some bulls may not apply)

• No minimum straw orders • No packing and handling fees

SEK Genetics

9525 70th Road • Galesburg, Kansas 66740 fax: 620-763-2231 Call foR a CataloG!

1-800-443-6389 www.sekgenetics.com

12 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

spring speCial now tHru June 30, $20 oFF sHipping


June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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Semen available!

Contact Alan Miller for information at 217-840-6935. Please continue to visit us online at pvfangus.com for news and updates on these promising sires.

P V F Radiance 0126 BW WW YW 2.0 45 81 AAA Reg.: +16798330 • Birth Date: 04/09/2010 Sire: SAV Brilliance 8077 • Dam: PVF Missie 790 Owned with: Betzold Farms

MM 29

P V F ALL Payday 729 BW WW YW +4.7 63 115 AAA Reg.: 15779234 • Birth Date: 02/01/2007 Sire: SAV Payroll 5281 • Dam: PVF Blackbird 201 Owned with: TC Ranch, Adcock Land and Livestock

MM 32

P V F Insight 0129 BW WW YW I+1.9 I+42 I+80 AAA Reg.: +16805884 • Birth Date: 04/17/2010 Sire: SAV Brilliance 8077 • Dam: PVF Missie 790 Owned with: Express Ranches

MM I+27

P V F Windfall SCC 9005 BW WW YW MM 3.9 52 107 23 AAA Reg.: 16416682 • Birth Date: 01/03/2009 Sire: PVF ALL Payday 729 • Dam: Dameron PVF Proven Queen 010 Owned with: Four Corners Farms, Haas Angus, Stertzbach Cattle Co., York Farms, Hilmes Angus, Schafer Stock Farm

Gridley, Illinois AlAn & TheresA Miller: 217-840-6935 • pvfangus@gmail.com OrlAn & CArOl BrAndOn & CAThY JOnes: 309-370-1081

visit us online at:

pvfangus.com

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

15


54MA824 HiGH & MiGHtY THC/PHAF

54XB157 Ali’s solution Total Solution x Ali

ASA 2398913

THF/PHAC

54XB169 2 tone THC/PHAF

54XB172 Color Me up

54XB084 Believe in Me

41XB5111 AMen

THC/PHAF

THC/PHAF

THF/PHAF

Choose fr o m o ver 45 of t he mos t po p ula r Club C a lf bulls in the in dustry, all ava i la b le by ContaC t ing you r l oCa l a bs rep resen tative or by Ca llin g 1 .800.ABS.STUD. ©2012 ABS Global, Inc. • 1525 River Road, DeForest, WI 53532 • 608-846-3721 • www.absbeef.com

16 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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18 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


t e k c a J w o Yell Registered 50% Maine Sired by Lifeline out of Hoo Doo Ranch Phylli

His sons will sell in the October 2012 Cream of the Crop Fall Bull Sale!

THE CONTINUED SUCCESS OF YELLOW JACKET

Without question, Yellow Jacket has proven himself as one of the most consistent and versatile Charolais x Maine sires of this generation. His ability to sire champion females, champion steers and top selling replacement females, donors and herd bulls is unmatched. Few sires can claim the versatility and completeness of this bull. THF and PHAF, sound and consistent - thatʼs a hard combination to find today. Works great on Heat Wave daughters.

RECENT SUCCESSES INCLUDE...

uston Livestock

2012 Ho mental at the Champion Sim w Jacket Sired by Yello

• Many top selling steer, heifer and herd bull prospects from $10,000 to $50,000 reported. • His dam is the $100,000+ producer that is also in our cloning program. • His daughter, African Queen, owned with 5M Ranch, produced over $150,000 in sales this Spring - all out of one flush! • At least three Denver display sires in 2011. • Supreme Female 2011 Iowa Beef Expo. • Reserve Grand Steer 2011 Ft. Worth Stock Show. • Top seller 2011 Embryos on Snow.

Show

SEMEN AVAILABILITY

$30 / Unit - Through Most Major Companies or the Owners

OWNED BY

KRIS BLACK - 580-309-0711 JR STELZER - RICKY GREY - MARK STEEL

Iowa and the 2011 wa State Fair Io 11 20 e th ale at Wave Supreme Fem Dam by Heat Yellow Jacket; Expo - Sired by

Beef

IF YOU’RE STILL LOOKING FOR A FALL BORN SHOW STEER, WE HAVE A REAL NICE SELECTION AVAILABLE AT THE BLACK HEREFORD RANCH IN CRAWFORD, OKLAHOMA. June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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20 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


Congratulations Baylor Bonham & Bonham Show Cattle Grand Champion Steer

2012 National Western Stock Show

3 Steers. 3 Majors. 3 Prevailing Champions.

1 Program. Nationwide success with Showmaster® Feeds.

Grand Champion Steer 2011 North American

Reserve Grand Champion Steer 2011 Tulsa State Fair

We feel there is no other feed that gives you the bloom and finish your cattle need in order to compete at the highest level then SHOWMASTER®; it has been proven here at Bonham Show Cattle year after year. The quality of feed with SHOWMASTER® is always consistent. – Bonham Show Cattle, Newcastle, OK

Other SHOWMASTER® Champions ...

www.showmasterfeeds.com

- 2012 Reserve Light Weight Crossbred Steer, Fort Worth Stock Show Shown by Shelby Bevins, Stinnett, Texas - 2012 Reserve Champion Angus Steer, Fort Worth Stock Show Shown by Mackenzie Bevins, Stinnett, Texas - 2011 Reserve National Champion Shorthorn Female, (2012) National Western Stock Show Shown by Sheldon Tibbs, Rockin G Land & Cattle - 2012 Reserve Champion Maine-Anjou Female National Western Stock Show Junior Show Shown by Lucas Wisnefski © 2012 Cargill, Incorporated. All Rights Reserved.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

21


A few successes from past sales:

Chad Thompson 605-350-9567 • 605-539-9567 showsteers.com/thompson

• Champion Overall Steer, 2010 Oklahoma AGR • Grand Champion Steer, 2010 Ohio AGR • Reserve Grand Champion Steer, 2010 Heart of it All • Grand Champion Steer, 2010 North Dakota State Fair (also 13- time Champion steer) •

22 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

• Grand Champion Steer, 2010 Wyoming State Fair • Open Champion, Montana Fair • Reserve Chi Heifer, 2011 Heart of It All Ring A • Reserve Chi Heifer, 2011 Ohio AGR Ring A • Grand Champion Steer, 2011 VCCP • Reserve Chi Heifer, 2011 Illinois State Fair • Division Champion Shorthorn Plus Heifer, 2011 Illinois State Fair •

• Grand Champion Steer, College Station, Texas • Class Winner Middleweight Charolais, 2011 Fall Classic • Division 1 Champion Steer, Aksarben • Reserve Charolais, 2011 Nebraska AGR • Champion Maine, 2011 Kansas Beef Expo Ring A • 3rd Overall (A), 5th Overall (B), 2011 Oklahoma AGR • Champion Charolais, 4th Overall, 2012 York NE

Reserve Chi Heifer, 2012 DTS Feature • AlOnG WitH: Other Class or Division Champions at: • Iowa State Fair • Ohio State Fair • Missouri State Fair • Illinois State Fair • NAILE • South Dakota State Fair Countless other County Fair and Jackpot winners nationwide! 5 State Fair Grand or Reserves in recent years!


Modern Styling and Legendary Construction. Only EBY gives you both!

Shown with optional black and stainless nose panels

SHOW STOCK BOX Lightweight, strong, unique punch side look, 6’ model length shown

Since 1938, EBY has been the pioneering leader in advanced lightweight aluminum designs, proven construction and solid resale value. Today EBY leads the competition with the most sought after product features and convenient options.

It’s no wonder you find more Eby’s parked in the show lot than any other aluminum brand! Low Profile Bumper Hitch - a full range of low-pro options available!

M. H. EBY, Inc.

Blue Ball, PA 800-292-4752 / West Jefferson, OH 800-752-0507 / Story City, IA 866-894-3297 To find your local dealer, go to www.mheby.com or call 800-752-0507 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

23


Upcoming Sales Calendar

MAY 17........................................................................................................................Kopp Land & Livestock Online Pasture Club Calf Sale MAY 21 .....................................................................................................Man Among Boys Online Embryo, Bred Recip. & Semen Sale MAY 27-29................................................................................................................Shike Cattle Company Online Pasture Club Calf Sale JUNE 13 ................................................................................................M Lazy Heart Ranch Western Shootout VI Spring Pasture Sale SEPTEMBER 3................................................................................................................Campbell Cattle Company Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 5..................................................................................................................Goddard Cattle Company Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 6...............................................................................................................................Graves Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 7............................................................................................................................Dawson Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 9........................................................................................................................................Bush Angus Online Show Heifer Sale SEPTEMBER 9...................................................................................................................Hensley Cattle Company Top 10 Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 9........................................................................................................................................................Keller Club Calves Online Sale SEPTEMBER 9.............................................................................................................................................Lay Farm Show Calves Online Sale SEPTEMBER 10......................................................................................................................................Larrison Farms Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 11...................................................................................................................................McFarland Cattle Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 12........................................................................................................................................C-Cross Ranch Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 12.............................................................................................................................................Wagner Fall Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 12................................................................................................................Wolfe Farms Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 12..................................................................................................Elliott Cattle Company September’s Best Online Sale SEPTEMBER 13.....................................................................................................................Kopp Land & Livestock Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 13.........................................................................................................................Vickland Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 14...............................................................................................................Dykstra Show Cattle Online Steer & Heifer Sale SEPTEMBER 14.................................................................................................................................................Jeff Miller Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 15..............................................................................................................Capatske Cattle Company Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 15.........................................................................................................................Swanson Shorthorns Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 16.................................................................................................................................................Bonnell Club Calves Online Sale SEPTEMBER 16...............................................................................................................................Gateway Genetics Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 16....................................................................................................................Anderson-Muntefering Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 17....................................................................................................................................................................................All Star Alliance SEPTEMBER 17............................................................................................................................Landgren & Hoblyn Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 17............................................................................................Schrag’s Seriously Shorthorns & Club Calves Online Sale SEPTEMBER 18..............................................................................................................Bushy Park Farm Online Heifer & Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 18........................................................................................................................................................Larson Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 19..............................................................................................Burg Club Calves Private Treaty & Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 19................................................................................................................................................Kroupa Show Cattle Online Sale SEPTEMBER 19.........................................................................................................................................Luke Doris Show Cattle Online Sale SEPTEMBER 20............................................................................................................................Thompson Show Steers Online Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 21................................................................................................................................Dennert & Eichler Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 21.........................................................................................................................Hammer Club Calves Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 22 ...............................................................................................................Dicks Family Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 22 ..............................................................................................RMH Livestock & Hurlburt Cattle Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 23 ................................................................................................................................DeChristofaro Show Cattle Online Sale SEPTEMBER 23 ......................................................................................................................Ulmer, Koski, Schmitz Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 26 ..............................................................................................................Allen Show Steers Online Steer and Heifer Sale SEPTEMBER 27 .......................................................................................................................................Kerr Livestock Online Club Calf Sale SEPTEMBER 29........................................................................................................................Geppert Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 1 ...........................................................................................................Barnes Show Cattle and Friends Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 1 .....................................................................................................................................J/D Cattle Company Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 2 ..............................................................................................................................................Shaffer & Miller Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 3................................................................................................................................Blach Cattle Company Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 6 ............................................................................................................................View from the Top Online Steer & Heifer Sale OCTOBER 6 ...................................................................................................................................Fassett Hay & Cattle Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 6 ..............................................................................................................................................................Four Roses Cattle Online Sale OCTOBER 7..........................................Cardinal Cattle Company “Diamonds In The Mine” Show Heifer & Steer Online Sale OCTOBER 7.........................................................................................Backroads to Backdrops Mindemann Angus Farm Online Sale OCTOBER 7...........................................................................................................................................Kaercher/Pickard Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 7............................................................................................................................................................Volosin Club Calves Online Sale OCTOBER 9 ..........................................................................................................................Frenzen Cattle Company Online Club Calf Sale

OCTOBER 10 ..................................................................................Miller Cattle Company Source for Success Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 11.................................................................................................................Baker & Minges Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 13.............................................................................................................................Welshans Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 13...............................................................................................Capatske Cattle Company & Friends Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 14......................................................................................................Copeland & Griffiths Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 14..........................................................................................................................Runkel Cattle Company Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 14..................................................................................................................Harvey Cattle Company Online Show Heifer Sale OCTOBER 15................................................................................................................................................Goin’ for Gold Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 16...............................................................................................................................Habeger Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 17................................................................................................................................................Jeff Miller Online Show Heifer Sale OCTOBER 18......................................................................................DeRouchey Cattle Company Online Show Heifer & Steer Sale OCTOBER 20 ....................................................................................................................................Weaver Angus Online Show Heifer Sale OCTOBER 21............................................................................................................................................................Midwest Illinois Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 23.....................................................................................................................Ulmer, Koski and Schmitz Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 24.................................................................................................Daake & Dorn Sweeping The West Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 28...................................................................................................................................Ippensen Family Shorthorns Online Sale OCTOBER 28............................................................................................Schaeffer & Tice Elite Octoberfest Online Open Heifer Sale OCTOBER 29.................................................................................................................................Hueber Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale OCTOBER 30 ................................................................................................................................................Rom’n Limousin Fall Spooktacular OCTOBER 30 ..................................................................................................................................................Theobald Club Calves Online Sale OCTOBER 31..................................................................................................................Top Notch Cattle Company Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 3 .....................................................................................................................................................................J3 Cattle Company Sale NOVEMBER 3 ........................................................................................................................................................Pryor Show Cattle Online Sale NOVEMBER 3 ...................................................................Guyer Cattle Company & Bonham Show Steers Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 5 .................................................................................................................Gray Show Cattle Round 2 Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 5 ....................................................................................................DeLong Cattle Company Online Steer and Heifer Sale NOVEMBER 6...........................................................................................................................Windy City Fall Classic Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 12...................................................................................................................................................Weisinger Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 14 .................................................................................................................................Sieck Show Cattle Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 15........................................................................................................................................Easy to Look At Club Calf Sale Part 2 NOVEMBER 15...........................................................................OCHS Cattle Company Online Show Heifer and Bred Heifer Sale NOVEMBER 17.................................................................................................................Rock Creek Livestock Online Angus Heifer Sale NOVEMBER 18 .............................................Sand Hills Showcase Landren Hoblyn Online Show Heifer & Bred Female Sale NOVEMBER 18 ...................................................................................................................................Tebbe & Voegele Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 19 .............................................................................................................Ree Heights Fall Gathering Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 19 ....................................................................................................................................Goddard Cattle Company Online Sale NOVEMBER 19 ...................................................................................................................................JT Weber Family Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 20...............................................................................................................................Midwest Roundup Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 23......................................................................................................................Werning and RJ Cattle Online Club Calf Sale NOVEMBER 24.....................................................................................................................................................Ewing Club Calves Online Sale NOVEMBER 25......................................................................................................................................................Geffert & O’Leary Online Sale NOVEMBER 25...........................................................................................................Mayhew Show Cattle “Fully Loaded” Female Sale NOVEMBER 26...........................................................Grateful Harvest Open Heifer, Bred Heifer, Embryo, & Flush Online Sale NOVEMBER 26......................................................................................................................Vary & Sharon Online Elite Show Heifer Sale NOVEMBER 27...................................................................................................................................................Prairie View Angus Online Sale NOVEMBER 28...........................................................................................................................Bob Jon & Shane Ryan Online Heifer Sale NOVEMBER 29.....................................................................................................................................Hotz Farms Online Angus Heifer Sale DECEMBER 3.......................................Capatske Cattle Company Online Heifer, Steer, Bred Heifer, Embryo, & Semen Sale DECEMBER 4 ..............................................................................................................................Geffert & O’Leary Online Show Heifer Sale DECEMBER 5........................................................................................Geffert & O’Leary Online Bred Heifer, Cow, and Embryo Sale DECEMBER 11............................................................M Lazy Heart Ranch Western Shootout Fall Edition Online Club Calf Sale DECEMBER 12..................................................................................................................................Elliott Cattle Company Bred Heifer Sale DECEMBER 14................................................................................Sullivan Farms Shorthorn & Club Calf Open Heifer & Steer Sale DECEMBER 15................................................................................Sullivan Farms Shorthorn & Club Calf Open Heifer & Steer Sale DECEMBER 23 .............Schaeffer & Hensley Online Open Show Heifer, Bred Heifer & Cow, Elite Embryo & Flush Sale DECEMBER 28.............................................................................................................................Gray Show Cattle Online Bred Heifer Sale JANUARY 13.............................................................................................De Long Cattle Company Online Bred Heifer and Cow Sale

Interested In havIng an onlIne sale?

Go with the experienced and trusted source, Caldwell-Willoughby Sales (CW Cattle Sales.)

For More InForMatIon ContaCt

Todd Caldwell: 309.253.5729 todd@cwcattlesales.com | dan willoughby: 317.340.6392 dan_willoughby@msn.com

cwcattlesales.com

24 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

25


Keys to Reaching the Winner’s Circle Brought to You by Weaver Leather Livestock The Key to

The Right Look: Products with Style and Substance

Signature Series Products

❷ Glossy black hardware helps the halter virtually disappear on your cattle

❶ Carbon Fiber Show Stick

Known for its strength, lightweight properties and sleek appearance, carbon fiber makes this the luxury car of show sticks. Lighter and stronger than typical aluminum sticks that easily get scratched, dinged and dented, this top-ofthe-line design is a must-have in the ring.

❷ Black Magic Show Halter Distractions don’t win banners. With quality black bridle leather, matching glossy black hardware and low profile styling, this trend-setting halter practically disappears on your black steer or heifer so the judge gets a true, unhindered look at its features.

❸ Kirk Stierwalt Neck Sweat System A clean, attractive neckline makes a difference in the ring and achieving it is made easy with this neck sweat unlike any other on the market. The black Flex Foam liner retains heat for the perfect sweat while the easy-to-clean channels trap dirt and grime to eliminate buildup on your cattle’s skin.

26 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

The classy, refined look of carbon fiber will give any professional showman an edge in the show ring

With channels that trap dirt and grime, this never-before-seen-design eliminates buildup on skin, allowing for continuous hair growth

“There’s an advantage in the ring to having a clean, professional appearance. That’s why I’m so adamant about using only the highest quality products that not only look great and make cattle look great, but also function properly and stand up to the rigors of life in the show industry.” Kirk Stierwalt Professional Cattle Expert

www.thewinnersbrand.com

DAL042412AR-1


DON’T FORGET: Trade Ins Welcome! delivery and financing available!

PrOud dealer Of:

Then cOme see us!

Murphy Trailer Sales carries livestock trailers, flat beds, living quarter trailers and various trailer parts. We’re conveniently located just off I-74 in Crawfordsville, Indiana, less than 1 hour west of Indianapolis. Our friendly sales staff is ready to help you with any of your trailer needs.

Our Location: 3000 Industrial Boulevard, Crawfordsville, Indiana 47933 Phone: 800-939-7288 • Website: murphytrailer.com • Trades Welcome! Financing and Delivery Available June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

27


28 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


Build muscle dimension and shape with . . .

Mo orMan’s ® ShowTe c ® Natural Fit™ ( 8 1526A A A) Based on some of the same concepts behind ADM Alliance Nutrition’s very successful AminoGain® technology, it’s the natural choice to “beef-up” exhibition ruminant muscle mass especially over the top. Natural Fit is a high-protein, specific amino acid blended, mini-pellet supplement that also provides ADM proprietary ingredients like CitriStim® and RumeNext®-Beef, and numerous other beneficial ingredients!

Don’t get caught in the fire. Feed MoorMan’s ShowTec Fire Extinguisher™. When it’s hot, keep show animals cool with MoorMan’s ShowTec Fire Extinguisher

.

These unique, top-dress supplements in mini-pellet form bring relief to heat-stressed show livestock. They contain Thermal Care™, an ADM Alliance Nutrition® research-proven, patentpending technology which helps show livestock overcome the negative effects of heat stress. FIRE EXTINGUISHER S with Thermal Care S for show pigs 25-lb bag 12199AAAE6 Like MoorMan’s® ShowTec® on Facebook!

FIRE EXTINGUISHER R with Thermal Care R for show cattle, show goats, and show lambs 50-lb bag 81480AAAE4

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June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com ®

®

29


30 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


32 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


Contact us to order

fall club calf embryos

from these donors by your choice of sires!

2419

PZC Cruel Girl

Tygress 7060

TR PZC White Liar

Hoo Doo 1054

Reba

Fancy

Miley

Cita

www.polzincattle.com Marketing Representative

Chris, Leslie, Brooke, & Desirae Polzin Home: 320-693-2846 • Chris: 612-916-0105

Katie Johnson • Weatherford, Texas 515.450.6489 • 678.761.7009

Leslie Polzin, Owner: 320-282-2497 Derek Vergin, Herdsman: 651-303-8021

Contact us for donor flushing and boarding June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

33


Trump Solution

SATURDAY

September 1, 2012

Cloud 9

Star Search X Sale

Eldorado

www.catesfarms.com R.R. 1, Box 358 • Modoc, IN 47358 Brian: 765.853.5255 or cell: 765.969.0373 Randy: 765.853.5819 • Tyler: 765.576.0035 Herdsman, Jared Boyert: 330.416.4105

34 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Solution


Reserve Champion Shorthorn Heifer, Purdue AGR, Kentucky Beef Expo and Ohio AGR and a many time Top 5 Heifer

2012 National Champion Female, NWSS and Fifth Overall Female, Heart Of It All – Shown by Cole Wishman

Supreme Champion Heifer, Kentucky Beef Expo; Fourth Overall Female, Hoosier Beef Congress and Purdue AGR; and Div Champion, NWSS

Reserve Champion Heifer, NAILE and Division Champion, National Junior Shorthorn Show

Many time Champion Shorthorn Heifer and Second High Point Heifer, Ohio B.E.S.T. program

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Heifer, Hoosier Beef Congress & many time Champion and Reserve Female

Fourth Overall Heifer, National Junior Shorthorn Show – Shown by Brandon Hagie

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Heifer, Ohio Beef Expo

Div. Champion, FWSS and Reserve Div., NWSS

Two-time Reserve Champion Shorthorn Female Indiana Point Shows

Div Champion, KILE and Reserve Div, NAILE & FWSS

Reserve Champion Shorthorn, Cattle Battle

– Shown by the Shelby Stephenson

– Shown by John Reasor

– Shown by Miller Smith

– Shown by Taylor Justice

– Shown by Jake Boyert

– Shown by Simon Farms

– Shown by Autumn Robison

– Shown by the Xavier Ferris

– Shown by John Reasor

– Shown by Madison Saylor

Good Luck to all of our Juniors this summer. We look forward to your successes. June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

35


SOLD IN OUR 2010 SALE SUPREME CHAMPION FEMALE, 2011 NAILE SUPREME CHAMPION FEMALE , 2011 American Royal Grand Champion ShorthornPlus Female, 2011 NAILE Open Show Grand Champion ShorthornPlus Female, 2011 NAILE Junior Show Grand Champion ShorthornPlus Female, 2011 American Royal Open Show Grand Champion ShorthornPlus Female, 2011 American Royal Junior Show SUPREME CHAMPION FEMALE, 2010 Ohio AGR SUPREME CHAMPION FEMALE, 2010 Heart Of It All Grand Champion ShorthornPlus Female, 2010 KILE SHOWN BY : Nick Sullivan

SOLD IN OUR 2011 SALE 36 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

SUPREME CHAMPION FEMALE, 2011 KILE SUPREME CHAMPION FEMALE, 2011 Purdue AGR SHOWN BY : Kylie Blanding


Find your next opportunity to buy into your future champion with Schaeffer/Tice Show Cattle on SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 9th. Bids close at 6:00 pm. Monopoly x Doctor Who heifer

Ali x Northern Improvement heifer

Check www.schaeffersimmentals.com for updated pictures.

Tim, Emily & Breylan Schaeffer 765.541.0738

14622 Crull Road, Hagerstown, IN 47346 Paul & Tracy Schaeffer

Cloud 9 x Final Solution heifer

Nate Tice 717.926.0874 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

37


38 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

39


Sunday, June 24

On the ranch near Bradley, Oklahoma

Selling 115 Young Females Young Cows - The Productive Core of Our Program Angus & Composites Bred for Quick Profit

OCC Anchor x Who Made Who - Sells bred to Maine Man

OCC Anchor x Smokem x Midas - Sells bred to Maine Man

SAV Net Worth x EXT x 6807 - Sells bred to Maine Man

OCC Anchor x Hoo Doo - Sells bred to Monopoly Irish Whiskey x Angus - Sells bred to Monopoly

Also offering a select set of young females from

JE Ranch Foundation - Blanchard, OK www.jeranchfoundation.org

Our Largest-Ever Offering of Proven Females! Stop by anytime to preview the offering!

40 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


McLemore Farms MF Hog x OCC Anchor - Sells bred to Monopoly

Hoo Doo Charolais - Sells bred to Monopoly

Hollywood x Meyer 734 - Sells bred to Maine Man

MF Hog x EXAR Lutton x OCC Anchor - Sells bred to Maine Man

Since 1974. McLemore Farms

OCC Anchor x Hoo Doo - Sells bred to Maine Man

Bradley, Oklahoma - 405/574-4753 Kent's mobile: 405/574-2245

Between I-44 and I-35 - One hour south of OKC Request your FREE reference catalog at primetimeagrimarketing.com or by contacting the office of the marketing agents at 419.862.0117 or info@primetimeagrimarketing.com

Over Three Decades of Building and Improving.

Generations of Ranch-Proven Females - Hand-Selected and Developed Over Time - Will Sell in this Unique & Powerful Offering! Take a virtual tour of our best offering yet at www.mclemorestock.com June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

41


42 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


Calf Climate Severe Duty Window-Type Cooler Units The ULTIMATE Machine for your Cool Room! The only cooler unit specifically designed to withstand the unique, harsh conditions found in cool rooms.

FACT:

Regular Air Conditioners and refrigeration units are made for use in a clean environment. They were never meant to handle the dirt, hair, ammonia, acid, and continuous duty cycles that machines used in cool rooms must endure. In just a few years, the raw aluminum coils susceptible to ammonia and acid in the air start to look like this:

The continuous duty cycles necessitated by the heat load of the animals and fans burns up the compressors in a fraction of their normal life span. And let’s not even get started on how expensive and difficult it is to install a split unit refrigeration system. Even when it’s finally installed, your coil will be hanging from the ceiling, taking up precious room space.

Enter the Calf Climate TZ-WU Series--offering an unprecedented set of features that leave the competition feeling the heat: • Stops the dirt, hair, and debris from getting into the machine in the first place with large heavy duty triple layer aluminum filters that can be hosed out quickly and easily.

• High speed, high CFM fans to provide greater cool down power, and high air turnover rates. Optional nozzle kits can be added to direct cold air where you need it!

• On the inside, the critical components are coated with epoxy to prevent dirt from sticking, and to prevent corrosion from ammonia and acid in the air.

• Can be installed remotely in circumstances where it is impossible to go thru-the-wall by connecting optional ducting and piping the air where you need it.

Calf Climate TZ-WU Severe Duty Window Units come in 1-6 ton sizes with different options depending on your goals.

• A heavy duty scroll type compressor that offers the ultimate in long term reliability and energy efficiency.

• TZ-WU units offer the ultimate in peace-ofmind for those that can’t constantly babysit their cool rooms.

Please call or email Matt Rohrbach at 217.417.7784 or matt@calfclimate.com for a personalized quote!

• Easy to install so the owner can quickly and easily set the unit themselves in a convenient thru-the-wall fashion.

• These units have been engineered to be the best solution for your conditions. Nothing else even comes close!

• Capable of temperatures in the 30’s, without the hassle of traditional refrigeration equipment, which means any air conditioning tech can service them.

• Fully Programmable Digital Thermostat can turn the machine on and off so you won’t need to go start it up an hour before tie-in, etc.

• Uses heavy duty components proven to stand the test of time in severe conditions.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

43


Make 2012

your banner year

Congratulations Sarah Ayer

Winner

2011 Grand Champion Kentucky State Fair Junior Market Steer

Congratulations Sarah Ayer

“ Exhibiting a state fair Grand Champion Steer and a Reserve Grand Royal Steer Winner 2011 American Royal was something I never thought in my wildest dreams I would accomplish Junior Reserve Grand Champion in the same year. I owe a big thank you to Kirk Stierwalt and his team for Market Steer developing such an amazing product, because I wouldn’t be this successful Read more about without using SHAG.” Sarah Ayer, Sarah’s success at Share your success story! Calhoun, KY pbsanimalhealth.com Go to www.facebook.com/ pbsanimalhealthshowlivestock

60 -day supply less

210

$

than

per day!

Congratulations Macy Goretska

Congratulations Jim Breck Bean Winner

• Grows hair without the use of a cool room • Easy to feed! Just 3 oz per day

Winner

2010 American Royal Junior Grand Champion Market Steer

2011 Fort Worth Stock Show Grand Champion Market Lamb

The one & only original Often imitated, never duplicated

Also available in Heifer, Sheep and Goat formulas

Get your SHAG today! FREE CATALOG

Featuring 200 Livestock Show Supplies

Request yours today!

Serv ing livestock prod ucers since 1941

TSC12

Call 800-321-0235 or shop pbsanimalhealth.com TSC12


IllInoIs Beef Assn. PoInts show Bureau County Cattlemen’s assoCiation Presents

Heifer & Steer Jackpot Show

July 21, 2012 • BuReau County FaIRgRoundS, PRInCeton, IllInoIS

awards

Grand Champion Heifer ....................................$500 reserve Grand Heifer ........................................$250 Grand Champion steer......................................$500 reserve Grand steer ..........................................$250 Breed Champion ................................................... $50 reserve Breed Champion ....................................$25

Entry Fee: $25 per head Payouts will be prorated based upon number of entries and show sponsors.

46 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

showmanship classes Jr. (12 & under) • Int. (13-17) • Sr. (18-21)

schedule

July 20, 2012...... Cattle may arrive after 5 Pm . July 21, 2012 6 to 9 am........................Weigh-in and Registration 11:00 am ..............Heifer show followed by steers All cattle must be on fairgrounds by 9 am. Cattlemen’s Classic is an open show. Out of State animals must have health papers meeting the State of Illinois requirements.

more information:

look on website www.cattlemensclassic.com or email cattlemensclassic@gmail.com for additional information.

contact:

Brian Carlson: 815-878-8648 cell

cattlemensclassic.com


Comfort Solutions for your Environment! For over 60 years, Schaefer continues to serve the agricultural industry throughout the world with a complete line of quality ventilation equipment - for your next blue ribbon show, let us help you be your best! Proudly Made in the USA VK24CK-BWSC

24WH-BWSC

Call for your nearest dealer!

1.800.779.3267 www.schaeferfan.com

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

47


Smoke

the Competition Cellarator® provides nutrients that support an animal’s:

• musCle development • immune system • digestive system • stress response • stamina & performanCe

Heat up the ring this season with Cellarator®® ®

www.cellarator.com

877.788.4448


Pets Weddings Families Seniors Livestock 2340 W. County Road 1000 N Jamestown, IN 46147 (317) 994-6100

Making your memories last a lifetime.

Pictures at the backdroP are great, but would you like MORE than just the show ring?? Your team has worked hard all year to get to this moment, Let us “Capture the Memories” for you! First show, last show and everything in between, a lot of time is invested to not have these memories at your fingertips. PICTURES AND VIDEo of your show experience with commentary from your team, pre-show washing/fitting preparations, showing, contests . . . you tell us what you want your composition to include, and we will make it happen! Our experienced, talented artists will capture these moments for you to enjoy for a lifetime!

See you at theSe upcoming ShowS... Chianina Junior National Maine-Anjou Jr. National Ohio State Fair Iowa State Fair Order pics from: Ohio BEST Shows Kentucky Beef Expo Michigan Beef Expo Indiana’s Finest Shows and more at lindeslivestockphotos.com

Post your video montage to Facebook with a DVD or we can make a banner or print as a keepsake or gift. Your montage must be pre-ordered to ensure we don’t miss a moment of your experience.

Ask us about customized banners!

The first 5 reservations receive a 10% discount. Chi/Maine Jr National Pre-order by June 11 Ohio State Fair – Pre-order by July 23 Iowa State Fair – Pre-order by august 6

Check out our videos on lindeslivestockphotos.com. Videos for online sales!

www.lindeslivestockphotos.com EMILY EPURE

KAYLA CAMPBELL

LINDE SUTHERLY

for more information

LINDE SUTHERLY

3661 New Carlisle-St. Paris Rd. New Carlisle, OH 45344 (937) 875-0670 www.lindeslivestockphotos.com On Farm and Show Photography View and order photos online!!

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

49


•Grand Champion MaineTainer Heifer, 2012 NWSS Open •Reserve Champion MaineTainer Heifer, 2012 NWSS Jr

•Supreme Champion Female, 2011 NAILE •Supreme Champion Female, 2011 American Royal

Shown by Halley Becking

•Grand Champion Shorthorn Female, 2012 NWSS Jr

Shown by Nick Sullivan

•Supreme Champion Female, 2012 Illinios Beef Expo •National Champion ShorthornPlus Female, 2012 NWSS

Shown by Nick Sullivan

Shown by Patrick Foley

•Grand Champion ShorthornPlus Female, 2012 FWSS •Grand Champion ShorthornPlus Female, 2012 NWSS Jr •Supreme Champion Female, 2012 Nebraska State Fair •Grand Champion ShorthorPlus Female, 2012 National Junior Shorthorn Show

•Supreme Champion Female, 2011 Nebraska AGR

Shown by Luke Elder

Shown by Kane Aegerter

Dealer inquiries Welcome!!!

Please contact JDK Products, Inc. 815.264.8887 or David Kearns, 815.739.3578

50 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

SULLIVAN SUPPLY

1.800.475.5902, Dunlap, IA • 1.800.588.7096, Hillsboro, TX Dave Kearns, Jr., IL, 815.739.3575 Sinnamon Show Supply, IN, 765.566.2007 Way-Mar Semen Specialists, IL, 815.223.2534 White Show Supply, OH, 740.225.0698


Contents

1-800-787-8690 • www.theshowcircuit.com

Oklahoma Beef Expo .............................................................. 52-59 On & Off The Circuit............................................................... 88-89 Professor To Producer ............................................................ 68-69 SC Announcements ....................................................................113 SC Flashback .................................................................................95 SC Outdoors ........................................................................ 106-107 SC Scholarship Winners ......................................................... 94-95 Advertising Deadlines ................................................................130 American Chianina Association 40th Anniversary .................105 Blue & Gold Showdown................................................................87 Blue Valley Beef Review ......................................................... 70-71 Brad Hook B.S. ..............................................................................86 Business Minded...........................................................................78 Carroll County (IN) Beef Show .............................................. 82-83 Coming Events ............................................................................107 Entertainment ......................................................................... 84-85 Index of Advertisers....................................................................130

110-112

Intense Common Sense

• Ranch Management Program at Texas Christian University Junior National Schedules .................................................... 97-104 MCCA ...................................................................................... 72-73 Minnesota Junior Spring Classic............................................ 74-77 OCCA ....................................................................................... 60-63

94-95

SC Scholarships

• Meet the first-ever recipients of Show Circuit Scholarships! Subscription Form ......................................................................130 Tech Trends ...................................................................................96 The Big Picture .................................................................... 108-109 The Life of an Ag Girl....................................................................93 Top 10 List .....................................................................................69

69

Top 10 List

• Test your knowledge of Parliamentary Procedure What It’s Like.................................................................................79 Wild Bill Kick ‘Em Up Beef Shootout .................................... 64-67 WNC Spring Fling................................................................... 90-92

• • • Show CirCuit ServiCeS • • • Ad Prices...................................6 Email Blasts .......................... 119 August Marketing ....... 120-121 Websites ............................... 119 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

51


GRaND GRaND

• April 19-21, 2012 • Stillwater, Okla. • Judges: Matt Leo & Craig Talkington •

BREEDING

Heifers

GRaND GRaND

OklahOma Beef expO

• Grand ChampiOn (a), reserve Grand (B), & ChampiOn COmmerCial heifer • exhibited by Bailey Core, Pleasantville, Iowa.

• Grand ChampiOn (B), reserve Grand (a), & ChampiOn anGus heifer • exhibited by Madellyne Adams, Brownwood, Texas.

• 3rd Overall (a&B) & ChampiOn mainetainer heifer • exhibited by Maddy Udell, Sioux City, Iowa.

52 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

• 4th Overall (a&B) & reserve ChampiOn mainetainer heifer • exhibited by Allison Christian, Duncan, Okla.


5th (B) & ChampiOn COmpOsite CharOlais heifer (a&B) exhibited by Kiley Elder, Pella, Iowa.

Champion Angus Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Katie Green, Grove, Okla.

Champion Brahman Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Jordan Storey , Idabel, Okla.

Reserve Champion Brahman Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Jordan Storey , Idabel, Okla.

Champion Charolais Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Kade Bowen, Loco, Okla.

Reserve Composite Charolais Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Caitlin Stehr, Clinton, Okla.

Champion Chianina Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Anna Loftin, Elm Grove, Ark.

Reserve Champion Chianina Heifer (A&B), Champion Hereford Heifer (A&B), Reserve Champion Hereford Heifer (A), exhibited by Kyle Hiebert, Ringwood, Okla. exhibited by Sydney Dobbs, Sapulpa, Okla. exhibited by Victoria Chapman, Sulphur, Okla.

Reserve Champion Hereford Heifer (B), exhibited by Jace Prough, Altus, Okla.

Champion Limousin Heifer (A&B), exhibited Reserve Champion Limousin Heifer (A&B), by Audrey Christensen, Blanchard, Okla. exhibited by Brock Hutchinson, Canton, Okla.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

BANNERS&backdrops • Oklahoma Beef Expo •

5th Overall (a) & ChampiOn maine-anjOu heifer (a&B) exhibited by Lauren Prill, Wichita, Kan.

53


BANNERS&backdrops • Oklahoma Beef Expo •

Reserve Maine-Anjou Heifer (A), exhibited by Kash Champion Long, Wheeler, Texas.

Reserve Champion Maine-Anjou Heifer (B), exhibited by Sara Green, Grove, Okla.

Champion Red Angus Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Will Guthrie, Woodward, Okla.

Reserve Red Angus Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Brock Hutchinson, Canton, Okla.

Champion Shorthorn Heifer (A) & Reserve (B), exhibited by Caitlan Stehr, Clinton, Okla.

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Heifer (A), exhibited by Caitlin Stehr, Clinton, Okla.

Champion Shorthorn Heifer (B), exhibited Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer (A), by Jennifer Bedwell, Isabella, Okla. exhibited by Tommy Glover, Elgin, Okla.

Champion Simmental Heifer (B), exhibited by Cale Jahn, Cyril, Okla.

Reserve Perc.-Simmental Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Brock Courtney , Inola, Okla.

54 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Reserve Champion Simmental Heifer (A&B), exhibited by Stetson Kite, Pocasset, Okla.

Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer (B), exhibited by Katie Alexander, Weathford, Okla.

Champion Perc.-Simmental Heifer (A&B), exhibited by McKenzie Strickland, Shawnee, Okla.

Reserve Champion Commercial Heifer (A), Reserve Champion Commercial Heifer (B), exhibited by Abbey Chrz, Morrison, Okla. exhibited by Chaley Shepherd, Butter, Okla.


GRaND GRaND

• April 19-21, 2012 • Stillwater, Okla. • Judges: Matt Leo & Craig Talkington •

PROSPECT

Steers

GRaND GRaND

OklahOma Beef expO

• Grand ChampiOn (a), reserve Grand (B), & ChampiOn CrOssBred steer (a) • exhibited by Baylor Buck , Wray, Colo.

• Grand ChampiOn (B), reserve Grand (a), & ChampiOn CrOssBred steer (B) • exhibited by Jacy Duff, Hobart, Okla.

• 3rd Overall (a) & ChampiOn simmental steer (a&B) • exhibited by Braden Schovenec, Garber, Okla.

• 3rd Overall (B) & ChampiOn Chianina steer (a&B) • exhibited by Scout Thrasher, Texhoma, Okla.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

55


BANNERS&backdrops • Oklahoma Beef Expo •

4th Overall (a&B) & ChampiOn maine-anjOu steer (a&B) exhibited by Haven Davis, Cherokee, Okla.

5th Overall (a&B) & reserve \ maine-anjOu steer (a&B) exhibited by Gatlin Goodson, Shattuck, Okla.

Champion Angus Steer (A&B), exhibited by Ryan Sperle, Cordell, Okla.

Reserve Champion Angus Steer (B), exhibited by Kaylee Imke, Shattuck, Okla.

Champion Charolais Steer (A&B), exhibited by Gatlin Goodson, Shattuck, Okla.

Reserve Charolais Steer (A&B), exhibited by Tommy Glover, Elgin, Okla.

Reserve Champion Chianina Steer (A), exhibited by Logan Holt, Shattuck, Okla.

Reserve Champion Chianina Steer (A&B), exhibited by Jake Thorp, Helena, Okla.

Champion Hereford Steer (A&B), exhibited by Bailey Kite, Pocasset, Okla.

Reserve Champion Hereford Steer (B), exhibited by Taylor Branson, Tulsa, Okla.

Champion Limousin Steer (A&B), exhibited by Braden Schovenec, Garber, Okla.

PROSPECT Steers Reserve Limousin Steer (A), exhibited by Victoria Chapman, Sulphur, Okla.

56 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


Champion Salers Steer (A&B), exhibited by Kooper Branum, Lawton, Okla.

Champion Shorthorn Steer (A&B), exhibited by Raegan Bourquin, Follett, Texas.

Reserve Shorthorn Steer (A&B), exhibited by Reece Garcia, Coalgate, Okla.

Reserve Champion Simmental Steer (A), exhibited by Hadie Testerman, Hollis, Okla.

Reserve Champion Simmental Steer (B), exhibited by Kody Baker, Altus, Okla.

PROSPECT Steers

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

BANNERS&backdrops • Oklahoma Beef Expo •

Reserve Limousin Steer (B), exhibited by Bailey Kite, Pocasset, Okla.

57


GRaND GRaND

• April 19-21, 2012 • Stillwater, Okla. • Judges: Matt Leo & Craig Talkington •

PROGRESS

Steers

ReSeRVe ReSeRVe

OklahOma Beef expO

• Grand ChampiOn (a&B) & ChampiOn CrOssBred steer • exhibited by Baylor Bonham, Newcastle, Okla.

• reserve Grand ChampiOn (a&B) & reserve ChampiOn CrOssBred steer • exhibited by Bryton Voss, Dexter, Iowa.

• 3rd Overall (a&B) & 3rd plaCe CrOssBred steer • exhibited by Scout Thrasher, Texhoma, Okla.

58 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

• 4th Overall (a&B) & ChampiOn Chianina steer • exhibited by Bryton Voss, Dexter, Iowa.

• 5th Overall (a&B) & reserve ChampiOn Chianina steer • exhibited by Bailey Core, Pleasantville, Iowa.


Reserve Champion Angus Steer (A), exhibited by Kane Duff, Hobart, Okla.

Reserve Champion Angus Steer (B), exhibited by Colton Pratz, Stillwater, Okla.

Reserve Champion Charolais Steer (A&B), Champion Hereford Steer (A) & Reserve exhibited by Vivian Freeman, Hobart, Okla. (B), exhibited by Drew Duff, Hobart, Okla.

Reserve Champion Hereford Steer (A) & Champion (B), exhibited by Stetson Kite.

Champion Limousin Steer (A&B), Reserve Champion Limousin Steer (A&B), exhibited by Vivian Freeman, Hobart, Okla. exhibited by Levi Betchan, Guthrie, Okla.

Champion Maine-Anjou Steer (A) & Reserve (B), exhibited by Haven Davis, Cherokee, Okla.

Reserve Champion Maine-Anjou Steer (A) & Champion (B), exhibited by Raegan Klassen, Hydro, Okla.

Champion Shorthorn Steer (A&B), exhibited by Dillon Duff, Hobart, Okla.

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Steer (A), exhibited by Julie Cullum.

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Steer (B), exhibited by Jamie Thorp, Helena, Okla.

Champion Simmental Steer (A&B), exhibited by Gage Thrasher, Texhoma, Okla.

Reserve Simmental Steer (A&B), exhibited by Colton Pratz, Stillwater, Okla.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

BANNERS&backdrops • Oklahoma Beef Expo •

Champion Angus Steer (A&B), exhibited by Clint Barney, Watonga, Okla.

59


Showmanship Points by Division

Oklahoma Club Calf Association - May 2012

We just finished with another successful Oklahoma Beef Expo! Entry numbers were steady, even with the slow economy. On Saturday night, we had the year-end banquet, and it is so exciting to see all the young people all dressed up and carrying out truck loads of awards. Thanks to Rhonda Elizondo and Billie Chrz for all their hard work putting on the banquet. We want to give special congratulations to our All Around Trailer winners: Brock Courtney, Jessica Thorp and Abby Chrz. Job well done! This would not happen with out the help of our sponsors: CM Trailers, Purina Mills, Cinch/Cruel Girl, MultiMin, VitaFerm, Winning Edge Feed, Kent Feeds, Sullivan Show Supply, Blue Ribbon Show Supply and Supreme Show Supply. Thank you for all you do for the young people in Oklahoma. A BIG thank you also goes to all the members going to all the shows and keeping up with your grades in school make us parents very proud. Keep up the great work. You will go far!

Tim B Stidham, OCCA President

www.oklahomaclubcalfassociation.com

Note: According to OCCA Rules, winners of the “Overall Top 10 Exhibitors” are not eligible to compete for “District Awards”.

Div.

Last Name

First

Pts.

Div.

Top 15 Last Name First

Pts.

Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior Junior

Courtney Runner Hatter Hayes Courtney Armitage Thompson Bilderback Hoover Hutchison Griffith Rhodes Cash Krebs Melton Perryman Green

Brock Blake Bethany Blaklee Madison Sarah Raylyn Lauren Paige Brock Hadley Kye Dalton Brant Kendell Jake Paul Brock

381 248 175 152 81 75 25 19 17 16 12 10 8 6 2 2 2

Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm.

Gould Cantrell Cash Spears Hill Graven Klusmeyer Pratz Symes

51 48 24 23 22 17 16 12 11

Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm. Interm.

Blakley Green Cunningham Bowen Shepard Wynn

Reighly Katie Colt Kade Kolby Morgan

341 217 149 135 76 54

Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior Senior

Chrz Abbey Green Sara Grossnicklaus Jake Sheive Lauren Christensen Audrey Griswold Macy Woods Gabrielle Alexander Karly Prough Jace Armitage Hannah Alexander Katie Jahn Cale Newby Carli Earnhardt Sidney

384 161 149 142 137 64 42 35 35 28 27 16 4 3

Pts.

Overall Showmanship Points

Jacob Parker Darci Candace Matthew Hannah Jayden Colton Paden

Div.

Last Name

First

Pts.

Div.

Last Name

First

1 2 3 4 5

Chrz Courtney Blakley Runner Green

Abbey Brock Reighly Blake Katie

384 381 341 248 217

6 7 8 9 9

Hatter Bethany Green Sara Hayes Blaklee Cunningham Colt Grossnicklaus Jake

175 161 152 149 149

OCCA Membership Application

Name: ____________________________________________ Phone: ________________________ Email: ______________________________ Address: _____________________________________________ City: ___________________________ State: ______ Zip: ________________ Date of birth: ____________________ My School is: __________________________________where I am a member of (circle one) 4-H or FFA FFA District (circle one) Central SE SW NE NW

Have you shown beef cattle before April 1, 2007? (circle one) yes no

In case you are presented an award, we need your jacket/pull-over size (circle one) S M L XL Who told you about OCCA (if anyone)? ___________________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________ (signature) I wish to participate in the following divisions: (circle) 1st family member fee: $35 (includes on division); then add $30 each division thereafter Steers Heifers Showmanship The 1st member also receives a 1-year free subscription to The Show Circuit magazine. You may add additional family members at a cost of $30 per division - Use one enrollment form per individual. Send application and check (payable to OCCA) to Erica Boyer, 1701 College Park Road, Claremore, OK 74017; 918-344-0622; email: ericasg@hotmailcom

60 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


Heifer Points by Division

Top 15

Breed

Last Name First

Dist.

Pts.

Breed

Last Name First

Dist.

Pts.

AOB AOB AOB AOB AOB AOB

Chapman Strate Lingo Schenk Hoover Will

Victoria Jarred Jadyn Tyler Paige Jenna

C NW SW SW NE NW

143 55 30 19 18 5

American American American American American American American American American

Yocham Yocham Sharp Ozmet Griffith Sharp Sharp Griffith Tyra

Hank Dedrick Racheal Kane Hadley Chrissy Chrissy Hadley Jarret

NE NE SE C SE SE C SW

382 330 86 80 40 36 10 10 10

Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford

Courtney Gould Prough Northcutt Hayes Bilderback Chapman Shephard Courtney Blakley Jahn Shephard Shephard Andras Rhodes

Brock Jacob Jace Lucas Blaklee Lauren Victoria Brad Madison Reighly Spencer Laura Isac Whitney Kya

NE C SW C SE SW C SW NE NE SW SW SW NE SE

220 160 160 128 127 115 92 89 86 59 55 48 45 40 27

Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus

Green Shephard Courtney Wynn Alexander Strate Holder Green Krebs Runner Ivory Keeler Northcutt Barnes Pittman Blakey

Sara Kolby Brock Morgan Karly Jarred Harrison Katie Chace Blake Sarah Branna Lucas Jake Beth Adrienne

NE C NE SE NW NW SW NE SE NE SW NE C NE NW C

345 312 206 160 159 147 100 96 60 51 49 46 30 30 28 28

Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin

Christensen Audrey Cunningham Colt Vigil Tayla Hutchison Brock Jahn Spencer Gerard Aliese Evans Brooke

C NE C NW SW SE SE

503 212 90 40 35 24 3

Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais

Bowen Strate Fargo Evans Felkner Chrz Lingo Schenk Hoover Smith Will

Kade Jarred Raven Ashton Patricia Abbey Jadyn Tyler Paige Cody Jenna

C NW SE SE C NW SW SW NE C NW

261 75 58 46 40 32 30 19 18 12 5

Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine

Chrz Abbey Blakley Reighly Wood Avry Courtney Brock Runner Blake Fuss Austyn Coggins Macee Snodgrass Lauren Green Sara Melton Kendall Grossnicklas Jake Griswold Macy Cooper Baylie Pittman Beth Simon Dylan Armitage Sarah Wood Endy

NW NE SE NE NE NE NE SE NE NW SW C NE NW NW SE SE

218 189 168 126 124 100 76 71 66 52 50 46 36 24 20 20 20

Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina

Gregory Christian Alexander Bowen Wood Schovenec Cooper Wynn Hiebert Chrz Evans Thompson Courtney Bulling Klusmeyer Coggins

Cammi Allison Karly Kade Avry Braden Baylie Morgan Kyle Abbey Brooke Raylyn Madison Bryce Jayden Macee

NW C NW C SE NW NE SE NW NW SE NE NE NW NW NE

220 220 219 136 130 122 92 90 70 65 50 50 48 40 40 40

MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer MTainer

Runner Elam Chaney Armitage Blakley Jones Blakey Snodgrass Gregory Alexander Clark Alexander Geisler Kemp Hiebert

Blake Colt Madison Hannah Reighly Colby Adrienne Lauren Cammi Karly Ganden Katie Zachary Brooke Kyle

NE C C SE NE SE C SE NW NW SW SW NW SE NW

188 143 132 101 96 82 80 55 50 46 43 40 40 40 38

Gelbvieh Gelbvieh

Enyart Enyart

Lane Dylan

NE NE

56 52

Red Angus Red Angus Red Angus Red Angus Red Angus

Hutchison Guthrie Ivory McDuffee Clark

Brock Will Sam Wacey Garrett

NW NW SW C SW

196 187 30 6 6

Salers

Stewart

Jenna

NW

152

Breed

Last Name First

Dist.

Pts.

Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn

Woods Gregory Brady Cash Alexander Hill Ivory Raper Bulling

Gabrielle Kaylen Cale Darci Katie Matthew Ben Jacob Bryce

SE NW C NW SW SE SW C NW

284 240 122 108 76 45 31 12 10

ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus ShPlus

Thompson Alexander Sperle Williams Clark Sperle Schovenec Ivory Brady Lingo Hill Cato Evans

Raylyn Katie Mariah Brent Halie Ryan Braden Ben Cale Jorden Matthew Colby Ashton

NE SW SW NE SW SW NW SW C SW SE SE SE

205 151 109 109 96 40 38 37 24 20 20 20 5

Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental

Jahn Griswold Armitage Strickland Clark

Cale Macy Hannah McKenzie Garrett

SW C SE C SW

118 116 42 35 3

%Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental %Simmental

Strickland McKenzie Green Katie Woods Gabrielle Grossnicklas Jake Courtney Brock Armitage Hannah Alexander Katie Vigil Teirra Hill Matthew Northcutt Lucas Clark Garrett Klusmeyer Jayden Simon Dylan Enyart Lane Green Sara

C NE SE SW NE SE SW C SE C SW NW NW NE NE

474 161 161 157 138 51 50 48 30 30 29 24 22 22 21

Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial Commercial

Sheive Gregory Chrz Christian Courtney Griswold Hatter Wood Cash Symes Jones Cambell Fuss Sperle Strate

Lauren SW Cammi NW Abbey NW Allison C Madison NE Macy C Bethany NW Avry SE Dalton NW Anne Katherine C Colby SE Clancey NE Austyn NE Mariah SW Jarred NW

170 170 164 160 98 86 57 56 55 52 50 48 40 39 36

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

61


Steers Points by Division Breed

Last Name First

Dist.

Pts.

Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus Angus

Fuss Blakley Cato Hatter Weldon Symes Chrz Reuter Testerman Spears Creason Kennedy Tyra Batt Baker Searcey

Austyn Reighly Abby Bethany Brys Paden Abby Clay Mylah Candace Adam Kaden Jarret Tyler Kody Sawyer

NE NE SE NW NE SW NW SW SW NE NW SW SW SW SW SW

151 106 70 48 46 36 35 32 26 20 20 20 20 16 16 10

Braunvieh

Daley

Jacob

NE

40

Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais Charolais

Seelke Jones Pratz Batt Stults Weldon Smith Cullum Reuter Baker

Mason Colby Colton Tyler Ryan Brys Kydie Jo Julie Clark Kody

NW SE C SW C NE C SE SW SW

82 72 58 56 36 30 20 18 16 12

Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina Chianina

Perryman Thorp Arthur Strickland Spears Isbell Stults Baker Andras Thrasher Creason Hudgins Bowen Bonham Hudgins

Jake Jake Madyson McKenzie Candace Kylee Ryan Kody Whitney Scout Owen Garrett Kade Baylor Madison

NE NW SW C NE SW C SW NE NW NW NE C C NE

378 194 156 146 134 114 93 91 76 56 52 50 48 40 35

Gelbvieh Gelbvieh

Ray Reuter

William Clay

SW SW

40 22

Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford

Klaassen Alexander Cantrell Bowen Hale

Reagen Karly Parker Kade Chance

SW NW NE C SW

269 101 70 66 60

62 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Breed

Last Name First

Dist.

Pts.

Breed

Last Name First

Dist.

Pts.

Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford Hereford

Strate Jarred Evans Brooke Geisler Zachary Cunningham Colt Kennedy Kale

NW SE NW NE SW

36 36 36 20 6

Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin Limousin

Blakley Spears Sheive Clark Bowen Isbell Alexander Bulling Childs

Reighly Candace Lauren Halie Kade Kylee Karly Bryce Caylee

NE NE SW SW C SW NW NW SW

152 132 56 40 26 20 16 12 12

Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental

Talioferro Griswold Baker Arthur Thrasher Thorp Cato Evans Strickland Woods Wynn

Hunter Macy Kody Madyson Scout Jake Abby Ashton McKenzie Gabrielle Morgan

SW C SW SW NW NW SE SE C SE SE

60 45 36 30 30 28 25 18 16 12 10

Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine Maine

Klaassen Bulling Jones Wood Bonham Symes Griswold Fargo Testerman Knapp Isbell Searcey Hudgins Thrasher Chaney

Raegan Bryce Colby Avry Baylor Paden Macy Raven Mylah Jessalene Kylee Sawyer Garrett Scout Madison

SW NW SE SE C SW C SE SW SE SW SW NE NW C

111 111 88 88 86 61 50 40 40 39 31 24 21 20 10

Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred Crossbred

Thorp Baker Bonham Testerman Thrasher Hudgins Rolin Strickland Searcey Cullum Buss Hatter Runner Thorp Batt

Jessica Kody Baylor Mylah Scout Madison Brandon McKenzie Sawyer Daniel Cody Bethany Blake Jamie Tyler

NW SW C SW NW NE C C SW SE NW NW NE NW SW

312 101 86 74 60 60 50 46 44 40 40 38 30 28 26

Salers Salers

Reuter Symes

Clark Paden

SW SW

28 20

Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn Shorthorn

Thorp Stanley Chrz Runner Thorp Klaassen Creason Viles Krebs Earnheart Isbell Bonham Rolin Cullum Spears Cullum Wood Creason

Jessica Kylee Abby Blake Jamie Raegan Elese Breanna Brant Sidney Kylee Baylor Brandon Julie Candace Daniel Avry Owen

NW SW NW NE NW SW NW NE SE SW SW C C SE NE SE SE NW

221 151 128 96 80 73 50 46 45 30 20 20 18 13 10 10 10 10

Simmental Simmental Simmental Simmental

Earnheart Blakley Thorp Cato

Sidney Reighly Jessica Kolby

SW NE NW SE

200 144 96 72


Note: According to OCCA Rules, winners of the “Overall Top 10 Exhibitors” are not eligible to compete for “District Awards”.

Heifers

Overall Top Heifer Exhibitors

Place Last Name

First Name

District Pts.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Brock McKenzie Audrey Gabrielle Abbey Sara Cammi Karly Kade Allison

NE C C SE NW NE NW NW C C

Courtney Strickland Christensen Woods Chrz Green Gregory Alexander Bowen Christian

690 509 503 491 479 452 440 424 412 400

Top Novice Heifer Exhibitors

Place Last Name

First Name

1 2 3 4 5

Madison NE Adrienne C Tayla C Anne Katherine C Darrell NW

Courtney Blakey Vigil Symes Thomas

District Pts. 158 108 90 70 60

Steers

Overall Top Steer Exhibitors

Place Last Name

First Name

District Pts.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Jessica Reagen Reighly Jake Candess Kody Baylor Sidney Jake McKenzie

NW SW NE NE NE SW C SW NW C

Thorp Klaassen Blakley Perryman Spears Baker Bonham Earnheart Thorp Strickland

637 453 402 378 316 256 232 230 222 208

Top Novice Steer Exhibitors

Place Last Name

First Name

District Pts.

1 2 3 4 5

Kylee Kylee Abby Brandon Owen

SW SW SE C NW

Isbell Stanley Cato Rolin Creason

185 151 105 68 62

Overall Top Heifer Exhibitors by Region

Place Last Name

First Name

District Pts.

Place Last Name

First Name

District Pts.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Shepard Chapman Griswold Northcutt Elam Gould Chaney Brady Blakey Vigil

Kolby Victoria Macy Lucas Colt Jacob Madison Cale Adrienne Tayla

C C C C C C C C C C

312 265 248 188 164 160 158 146 108 90

6 7 8 9 10

Stewart Hiebert Cash Klusmeyer Cash

Jenna Kyle Darci Jayden Dalton

NW NW NW NW NW

152 134 130 79 78

1 2 3 3 5 6 7 8 9 10

Yocham Runner Blakley Yocham Thompson Green Courtney Cunningham Cooper Fuss

Hank Blake Reighly Dedrick Raylyn Katie Madison Colt Bailie Austyn

NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

382 363 344 330 271 269 232 212 154 140

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Wood Wynn Armitage Hill Jones Hayes Snodgrass Sharp Evans Evans

Avry Morgan Hannah Matthew Colby Blaklee Lauren Racheal Brooke Ashton

SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE

354 250 194 156 132 127 126 92 83 61

1 2 3 4 5

Strate Gregory Hutchison Guthrie Schovenec

Jarred Kaylen Brock Will Braden

NW NW NW NW NW

303 240 236 187 160

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Alexander Grossnicklas Sheive Prough Sperle Clark Jahn Bilderback Holder Jahn

Katie Jake Lauren Jace Mariah Halie Cale Lauren Harrison Spencer

SW SW SW SW SW SW SW SW SW SW

317 210 170 160 148 142 128 115 100 90

Overall Top Steer Exhibitors by Region

Place Last Name

First Name

District Pts.

Place Last Name

First Name

District Pts.

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Bowen Stults Griswold Rolin Pratz Newby Chaney Smith

Kade Ryan Macy Brandon Colton Carli Madison Kydie

C C C C C C C C

146 129 95 68 58 32 30 20

9 10

Creason Buss

Elese Cody

NW NW

50 40

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Fuss Runner Hudgins Hudgins Weldon Whitney Cantrell Viles Andras Daley

Austyn Blake Madison Garrett Brys Andras Parker Breanna Whitney Jacob

NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE NE

151 126 95 91 86 76 70 58 46 43

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10

Jones Cato Wood Cato Wynn Cullum Krebs Fargo Knapp Cullum

Colby Abby Avry Kolby Morgan Daniel Brant Raven Jessalene Julie

SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE SE

160 105 98 81 52 50 45 40 39 37

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

Thrasher Chrz Bulling Alexander Thorp Hatter Seelke Creason

Scout Abbey Bryce Karly Jamie Bethany Mason Owen

NW NW NW NW NW NW NW NW

166 163 123 117 108 86 82 62

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 8 10 10

Arthur Isbell Stanley Testerman Symes Batt Searcey Talioferro Hale Sheive Reuter

Madyson Kylee Kylee Mylah Paden Tyler Sawyer Hunter Chance Lauren Clark

SW SW SW SW SW SW SW SW SW SW SW

186 185 151 140 134 118 78 60 60 56 56

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

63


Wild Bill KicK ‘Em Up Shoot-oUt

• April 7, 2012 • Abilene, Kan. •

GRANd GRANd

BREEDING

Heifers

RESERVE RESERVE

• Grand Champion & Champion CommerCial heifer • exhibited by Ben Nikkel.

• reserve Grand & reserve Champion CommerCial heifer • exhibited by Raine Garten.

Champion Angus Heifer, exhibited by Luke Sankey.

64 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Reserve Champion Angus Heifer, exhibited by Taylor Nikkel.

Champion Composite Charolais Heifer, exhibited by Jake Nikkel.


Champion Chianina Heifer, exhibited by Mandy Michaelis.

Champion Maine-Anjou Heifer, exhibited by Lauren Prill.

Reserve Champion Maine-Anjou Heifer, exhibited by Cory Craver.

Champion MaineTainer Heifer, exhibited by Lauren Prill.

Reserve Champion MaineTainer Heifer, exhibited by Ben Nikkel.

Champion Shorthorn Heifer, exhibited by Jake Nikkel.

Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer, exhibited by Cole Hanna.

Reserve Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer, exhibited by Lexie Fager.

Champion Simmental Heifer, exhibited by Justin Loomis.

Reserve Champion Simmental Heifer, exhibited by Kobie Camerlinck.

Champion AOB Heifer, exhibited by Luke Prill.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

BANNERS&backdrops • Wild Bill Kick ‘Em Up Beef Shoot-Out •

Reserve Champion Composite Charolais Heifer, exhibited by Billy Seibert.

65


Wild Bill KicK ‘Em Up Shoot-oUt

• April 7, 2012 • Abilene, Kan. •

GRANd GRANd

MARKET

Animals

RESERVE RESERVE

• Grand Champion & Champion Crossbred steer • exhibited by Cody Seibert.

• reserve Grand & reserve Champion Crossbred steer • exhibited by Billy Seibert.

Reserve Champion Chianina Steer, exhibited by Reid Shipman.

66 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Champion MaineTainer Steer, exhibited by Charlie Peters.

Reserve Champion MaineTainer Steer, exhibited by Lexie Fager.


Champion Simmental Steer, exhibited by Trenton Goering.

Reserve Champion Simmental Steer, exhibited by Ben Puett.

Champion AOB Steer, exhibited by Taylor Goering.

Champion Market Heifer, exhibited by Raine Garten.

Reserve Champion Market Heifer, exhibited by Raine Garten.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

BANNERS&backdrops • Wild Bill Kick ‘Em Up •

Champion Shorthorn Steer, exhibited by Raine Garten.

67


by Dr. Paul Walker, Professor of Animal Science at Illinois State University

S

ummer Is Just Around The Corner Are You Prepared for Heat Stress?

Professor To Producer

Summer months can trigger heat stress in livestock. Generally, the expectations are for July and August to bring long hours of high ambient temperatures and the risk for heat stress. Heat stress in feedlot cattle lowers feed intake, resulting in decreased average daily gains. Heat stress in the brood cow can result in high body temperature that can lead to an early-term abortion. Many producers experienced more than the usual number of open cows last fall, in many cases due to the high environmental temperatures of late July and early August that caused several cows in each herd to “slip” fetuses. There are seven strategies animals have developed to cool in hot weather. Each of these methods is not common to all animals, but most animals use more than one of the methods. Method 1: Sweating Some animals sweat, but not all livestock. Horses sweat, some dogs sweat around their feet, but hogs, cattle and sheep do not. Method 2: Radiating Heat Almost all animals lose some body heat through radiation. Elephants and their large ears come to thought first. Among the cattle breeds, Brahman-influenced cattle use this method more than other breeds with their large ears and excessive hide in the dewlap, brisket, naval/sheath, etc. Method 3: Estivation This may be a new word to some, but it is similar to hibernation. Hibernation is when animals overwinter in a dormant state. Estivation is when animals go into a dormant state during hot weather such as drought, usually by burrowing into the ground to avoid drying and dehydration. Livestock do not utilize estivation. This method of reacting to heat stress is used by some fish and reptiles. Method 4: Hiding Out Most animals use this method of cooling to some degree. Livestock seek shade and cooler environmental areas. Methods 5: Panting Almost all animals increase their respiration rate to invoke evaporative cooling. Panting is the primary method for cooling for dogs, but cattle, hogs and sheep will increase their respiration rate when overheated. It is important to note that overheated animals that have excessive respiration rates will decrease respiration just prior to death to try to decrease body heat production. Method 6: Shedding Animals will shed their hair coat or fur as warmer weather approaches. Long hair is really not the insulation that warms animals; rather, the air that is trapped within the hair coat is the insulating factor. Long hair traps more air. During hot weather, less trapped air is required, therefore, animals shed. Within the show cattle industry, cattle are selected for long hair growth. These cattle often shed hair slower and can have more trouble cooling during summer

68 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

months. Body shaving high-hair growth cattle in the spring can improve conception rate during the summer breeding season. For sheep, long wool can be a double-edged sword. Long wool traps more air and increases the insulation capability. Consequently, most sheep producers shear sheep in the spring. However, longer wool, compared to shorn sheep, can provide protection against sunburn and does help prevent overheating of sheep exposed to excessive sunlight without shade. Method 7: Evaporative cooling Most animals, if provided the option, will seek water to cool and lower body temperature. Cattle will stand in water to cool, whether it is 6 inches deep or a pond. Hogs will create a mud wallow. Evaporative cooling fans are a great technology for cooling animals housed in buildings and are very effective. Conditions most conducive to heat stress in beef and dairy cattle are prolonged high temperatures, with above-average humidity, below-average winds and when cattle have had little time to adapt to the heat load. Heat stress is likely when these conditions exist and when temperatures overnight remain above 70 degrees, preventing a cool-down period. Losses in feedlot cattle often occur when there are consecutive days with temperature-humidity index values above 80 combined with nights of temperatures above 70. During a heat wave, the first calm, wind day can be lethal to cattle. Fat cattle, new arrivals, cattle with dark hides, recently fresh dairy cattle and cattle with illnesses are the most susceptible to heat stress. Short-term measures to manage heat stress include: • Have ample water available. Allow at least two gallons of water per 100 pounds bodyweight and make sure there is adequate linear tank space for cattle access – up to 3 inches per animal. • Avoid handling cattle. If cattle must be worked, do it early in the morning, after they have had a chance to cool overnight. Avoid having cattle confined for more than 30 minutes. • Change the feeding schedule. Feed 70 percent of the ration two to four hours after the peak heat of the day. • Feed cattle early in the morning at/or just prior to daylight and then again in the late evening. For show cattle, we feed at daylight before rinsing. For the evening feed, we begin rinsing at 4:00 p.m. and feed immediately after we complete working the hair. This procedure keeps the show cattle on feed for two reasons. One, rinsing cools the cattle and freshens them by lowering body temperature, thereby encouraging them to eat. Second, whenever cattle are worked (in this case, rinsed, blown, brushed and tied with their head up for a period of time) no matter how tame they are, they are put under a degree of stress (it may be minimal, but it is stress). Following every stress period, cattle will eat because eating increases propionate production and, therefore, blood glucose level, which makes cattle feel good. Therefore, rinsing cattle prior to feed-


ing increases their appetite. In hot weather, we will work the hair one more time just prior to dark when the cattle are turned out into grass paddocks for the night. Temperatures above 90 degrees are difficult for cattle on high-energy diets. Regarding feedlot cattle, as long as cattle have cool nights and can dissipate some of the heat, they are going to be okay. If they can’t, heat death is a potential problem. There are several management strategies that producers can use to keep cattle comfortable during periods of high temperatures. Water needs to be available. A cow’s water intake can double when the air temperature rises above 70 degrees. If the water line is below ground and the water fountain is shaded, the water will be kept cool. It might help to check the water temperature occasionally to make sure cattle are getting cool water. Sometimes thermostats malfunction and water tanks can heat up during the summer. • After cattle eat, they have the heat of fermentation and that heat has a greater chance to dissipate in the evening than it does during the day. Therefore, feed in the evening.

top 10

• Free-choice mineral should always be available to provide electrolyte balance. The more water cattle consume, the more mineral they should consume. • The bigger the cattle, the more susceptible it is to heat stress. Cattle that are nearly finished should be housed in a pen with good air movement. Younger, growing cattle have less problems with heat. • Spraying cattle with water can help, but it is important producers understand it’s evaporation that cools the cattle, not the water. For feedlot cattle, operators need to make sure that the feedlot does not turn to mud. Mud will coat the cattle and decrease body heat loss. • Feedlots need to provide some shade. Feedlot operators should pay attention to cattle behavior. If cattle aren’t lying down, they may have a heat issue. Standing may mean they are trying to maximize air movement. • Open-mouth breathing is another sign of heat stress. If you are uncomfortable outside, cattle are probably uncomfortable as well. Under today’s high-value marketing conditions, if you take care of the cattle, they will take care of you.

parliamentary puzzler

At Junior Nationals this summer where junior breed associations tend to make big decisions in membership meetings, a solid knowledge of parliamentary procedure can help a group have more effective and efficient meetings – more free time anyone? It can also give a savvy individual an advantage in promoting or defeating actions when dealing with other members who have less knowledge about how to conduct business. Perhaps it’s the chapter conducting experience of FFA members, but the truth is, young people tend to do a better job in conducting meetings than their grown-up counterparts. Think you know your parli-pro? Try this quiz by Rod G. Davidson, Professional Registered Parliamentarian. www.parlipro.org

1

no.

2

no.

no.

no.

no.

3

4

5

6

_______ is used to obtain information about meeting procedure. a) Parliamentary Inquiry b) Point of Information c) Point of Order

If the bylaws require an election to be by ballot, _______ . a) a voice vote can be used if there is no objection and there is only one nominee for each office b) this provision can be suspended by unanimous consent, and a rising vote used instead c) this provision cannot be suspended, even by a unanimous vote

no.

7

no.

8

Other than the Articles of Incorporation, the highest body of rules in an organization are _______. a) Robert’s Rules of Order b) bylaws no. c) standing rules

Division of the question means _______ . a) to separate a motion into two or more parts, each capable of standing as separate motions b) to retake a voice vote by a rising vote c) to have members who favor a motion and those who oppose it to move to opposites sides of the room

9

A quorum is _______ . a) the largest number that can be expected to attend a meeting, except in bad weather b) a majority of the members present c) the minimum number of members who must be present for business no. to be transacted

The motion to Lay on the Table can be used to _______ . a) kill a motion b) temporarily set aside a motion because something of immediate urgency has arisen, without a time to set to resume its consideration c) postpone consideration of a motion until the next meeting, in order to find out additional information

10

Previous Question means _______. a) call for the assembly to return to the agenda b) if adopted by a two-thirds vote, debate ends and a vote is immediately taken c) a request for the secretary to read the motion aloud

A main motion _______ . a) brings business before the assembly b) cannot be amended c) is the highest ranking motion If a member makes a motion that is not in order, _______ . a) he should be censured b) he should be ruled out of order by the chair c) the chair may suggest an alternate motion

A meeting at which the proceedings are secret is called _______ . a) a convention of delegates b) an executive session c) a mass meeting 1-A: Parliamentary Inquiry is used to obtain information about meeting procedure.2-B: Previous Question means if adopted by a two-thirds vote, debate ends and a vote is immediately taken. 3-B: Other than the Articles of Incorporation, the highest body of rules in an organization are bylaws. 4-C: A quorum is the minimum number of members who must be present for business to be transacted. 5-A: A main motion brings business before the assembly. 6-C: If a member makes a motion that is not in order the chair may suggest an alternate motion. 7-C: If the bylaws require an election to be by ballot, this provision cannot be suspended, even by a unanimous vote. 8-A: Division of the question means to separate a motion into two or more parts, each capable of standing as separate motions. 9-B: The motion to Lay on the Table can be used to temporarily set aside a motion because something of immediate urgency has arisen, without a time to set to resume its consideration. 10-B: A meeting at which the proceedings are secret is called an executive session.

answers

no.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

69


• April 20-21, 2012 • Fairbury, Neb. • Judges: Brady Jensen, Courtland, Kan. & Craig Steck, Bennington, Neb. •

GRaND GRaND

BREEDING

Heifers

Blue Valley Beef ReView

• Grand Champion heifer (rinGs a&B) • exhibited by Rylee Stoltz. • reserve Grand (a) & 3rd overall (B) • exhibited by Tejlor Strope.

• reserve Grand (B) & 5th overall (a) • exhibited by Cody Schultz.

• 3rd overall (a) • exhibited by Sydney Williams.

• 4th overall (a) & 5th overall (B) • exhibited by Katlyn Ahrens.

• 4th overall (B) • exhibited by Korynn Clason.

70 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


GRaND GRaND

• April 20-21, 2012 • Fairbury, Neb. • Judges: Brady Jensen, Courtland, Kan. & Craig Steck, Bennington, Neb. •

MARKET

Animals

ReSeRVe ReSeRVe

Blue Valley Beef ReView

• Grand Champion steer (a&B) • exhibited by Ashley Laffey.

• reserve Grand Champion steer (a&B) • exhibited by Sydney Williams.

• 3rd overall (a) & 5th overall (B) • exhibited by Jake Zahm.

• 3rd overall (B) & 4th overall (a) • exhibited by Haley Ehrke.

• 4th overall (B) & 5th overall (a) • exhibited by Drew Niewohner.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

71


www.missouriclubcalfassoc.com

AdviSorS

Missouri Club Calf Association • Samantha Graves 11795 Liv. 228, Chillicothe, MO 64601 H: 660-646-1242 • C: 660-973-2881 samantha.graves@transova.com • Michelle Koelling • 573-694-1622 12579 Audrain Road 757 Laddonia, MO 63352 koellingm@gmail.com

What a great show season we have had so far! As we get closer and closer to State Fair time, we are wrapping up the preview shows with just a few left! All of your effort and hard work will be recognized this year at the State Fair during the award ceremony. Anyone wanting to help out and support the youth, we are looking for sponsors for the awards this year. If you’re interested, contact a junior board member, Michelle Koelling or Samantha Graves. The Leadership Conference this year will be held the first weekend in October – hope to see you all there! I hope everyone has a great start to their summer keep up all of your hard work!

upcoming Shows

June 9: Troy June 8-12: MCA All Breeds - Sedalia July 22: Boone Co. - Columbia * Contact one of the Adult Advisors if you would like to have your show sanctioned in 2012!

MissouriClubCalfAssociation One exhibitor per form. One subscription to The Show Circuit magazine per MCCA household. First exhibitor in a family: $35. Each additional family member (brother/sister) may join for $30/each. Name: ______________________________ Parent/Guardian Name: _______________________________ Address: _______________________________________ City/State/Zip: ____________________________ Home Phone: _______________________________ Exhibitor Cell: _______________________________ Parent Cell: _______________________________ Email: _________________________________________ Age: _________ Date of Birth: _________________________ Today’s Date: _________________________ Please circle which division(s) in which you plan to participate: Steer Heifer Showmanship Is this your first year as an MCCA member? Circle one: Yes No Total Dues: $ _________ Circle one: Cash Check Make checks payable to MCCA. MAil to: MCCA - Attn. Samantha Graves 11795 Liv 228, Chillicothe, MO 64601 Or turn in at MCCA booth during MU-AGR in Columbia.

72 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

No poiNtS ACCuMulAte uNtil dueS Are pAid iN full.


Missouri Club Calf Association Heifer Points

ANGuS Ward Ward Richardson Daehn Connell Heath Moriondo Behlmann Barker Nieder Reeter Nieder Kahlenbeck Mayes Barker Barker Burns Gerke Gerke Kahlenbeck Behlmann Burns Colin

Cameron Carter Ashlyn Dustin Gregory Chase Mark Conrad Collin Colby Seth Colby Chris Nick Cassidy Collin Brooke Tyler Tyler Chris Conrad Brooke Reba

163 101 45 28 15 15 15 12 10 10 10 9 8 7 5 5 5 5 5 5 3 3 3

CHArolAiS Mawson

Mackenzie

10

CHArolAiS CoMpoSite Dilly Taten Connell Gregory

45 16

CHiANiNA Loges Riley Kempker Oerke Thomas Barker Buswell Buswell Buswell Buswell Adamson

Taylor Jaden Trent Lane Whitney Cassidy Brittni Brittni Blair Brittni Takoda

78 33 28 18 18 6 5 5 3 3 1

GelBvieH Lowe Lowe

Baxter Baxter

10 8

Hereford Murphy Abramovitz Early Vest Groose Oerke Gerke Marek Daehn

Cole Brianne Mallory David Eric Garrett Tyler Sidney Dustin

70 43 41 23 20 13 9 7 6

liMouSiN Schowe Schowe Wood

Natalie Natalie Drake

28 28 10

MAiNe-ANjou Daehn Dustin Schenkel John Fifer Kaitlin Alexander Trace Hudson Tanner Funk Danielle Fifer Kaitlin

58 31 21 18 18 11 5

MAiNetAiNer Riley Grace Ward Cameron Loges Olivia Bastian Chris Schenkel John Thomas Austin Wallace Sam Alexander Trace Barker Cassidy Fifer Kaitlin Wallace Sam Vest David Riley Noah Vest David Ward Carter Vest David Wear Sidney

73 65 38 36 36 33 25 15 10 8 8 6 5 5 5 3 3

red ANGuS Mayes

Diane

30

SHortHorN Decker Oerke Knipmeyer Decker Oerke Knipmeyer

Ethan Kale Austin Ethan Kale Austin

23 20 15 14 13 5

SHortHorNpluS Hudson Tanner Oerke Weston Harreld Clayton Burns Brooke

35 34 8 6

SiMSolutioN Moriondo Mark Webb Haley Loges Olivia Gerloff Dakota Robertson Brittany Robertson Haley Meyer Shiana

140 33 26 10 10 4 3

SiMMeNtAl Early McDonald Loges Early Early

Kennedy Blake Olivia Brittany Mallory

23 21 5 4 1

CroSSBred Ward Morrow Kempker Mawson Kempker Connell Wallace Gross Loges Riley Bastian Gerke Reeter Mawson Hudson Colin Gerke Thomas

Carter Kayla Trent Mackenzie Trent Gregory Sam Brittany Taylor Noah Jesse Adam Seth Mackenzie Caleb Reba Adam Whitney

71 68 60 58 40 25 20 15 10 10 8 8 8 5 4 3 3 3

Steer Points ANGuS Jenkins Mayes Colin

Tyler Diane Reba

28 21 8

CHArolAiS Gerke

Adam

23

CHiANiNA Heath Barker Riley Clark Buckner Jr. Schowe Marek Schenkel Moore

Chase Collin Jaden Emma Joe Clayton Kelsey Sidney Clayton

85 43 41 29 15 8 6 3 1

Hereford Marek Abramovitz Vest

Sidney Brianne David

44 20 5

MAiNe-ANjou Bremer Alexis Clark Mason Richardson Ashlyn Schenkel Sidney Manley Taylor Tallman Molly Mayes Nick Hudson Caleb Summers Evan Abramovitz Brianne

95 24 21 21 15 15 10 6 4 1

MAiNetAiNer Riley Grace Nieder Colby Mawson Mackenzie McCaulsin Jared Clark Emma Buswell Brittni Abramovitz Brianne

73 58 30 28 20 13 3

SHortHorNpluS Murphy Cole Bremer Alexis Britt-Rankin Katlyn Williams Cameron Thomas Austin

31 20 20 8 5

SiMMeNtAl Wooldridge Clark Gerloff Mawson Thomas

Harley Mason Olivia Mackenzie Austin

23 16 13 10 6

CroSSBred Morrow Laffey Mawson Barker Riley Murphy Thompson Early Riley Jennings

Kayla Ashlyn Mackenzie Cassidy Noah Cole Clint Mallory Grace Bill

200 156 103 60 33 30 28 20 20 18

Bremer McCaulsin Moore Robinson Schmidt Tallman Staples Harreld Hudson Manley Burns Plackemeier Thomas Gerke Heath Luther Behlmann Schenkel

Alexis Jared Clayton Layne Bryce Molly Josh Clayton Corey Taylor Brooke Lexi Austin Tyler Chase Carson Conrad Sidney

15 15 15 15 15 15 13 10 10 10 6 6 6 5 5 5 4 3

MArKet HeiferS Buswell Brittni Clark Emma Robinson Layne Abramovitz Brianne Wooldridge Clayton Fifer Kaitlin Riley Noah Barker Collin Loges Olivia

43 24 15 13 13 10 6 3 1

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

73


granD granD

• April 13-15, 2012 • Austin, Minn. • Judges: Bob May & Scott Bayer •

Minnesota Junior spring ClassiC

BREEDING

Heifers

reserVe reserVe

• Grand ChampiOn & ChampiOn anGuS heiFer • exhibited by Garret Weber.

• reServe Grand & ChampiOn maine-anjOu heiFer • exhibited by Ryleigh Beers.

• 3rd Overall & ChampiOn COmmerCial heiFer • exhibited by Sarah Carter.

74 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

• 4th Overall & ChampiOn ShOrthOrn heiFer • exhibited by William O’Sullivan.

• 5th Overall & ChampiOn FOundatiOn Simmental heiFer • exhibited by Brandi Raatz.


granD granD

• April 13-15, 2012 • Austin, Minn. • Judges: Bob May & Scott Bayer •

Animals

reserVe reserVe • Grand ChampiOn & ChampiOn CrOSSbred Steer • exhibited by Mariah Thate.

Minnesota Junior spring ClassiC

MARKET

• reServe Grand ChampiOn & ChampiOn aOb Steer • exhibited by Lacey Schmitz.

• 3rd Overall & ChampiOn market heiFer • exhibited by Joseph O’Sullivan.

• 4th Overall & reServe CrOSSbred Steer • exhibited by James Knudson.

• 5th Overall & reServe ChampiOn market heiFer • exhibited by MaryEllen Schiltz.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

75


BREEDING Heifers

BANNERS&backdrops • Minnesota Junior Spring Classic •

Champion Charolais Heifer, exhibited by Charlie Eklund.

Champion Hereford Heifer, exhibited by Tyler Krebs.

Champion Limousin Heifer, exhibited by John Weber.

Champion Red Angus Heifer, exhibited by Hannah Berg.

Champion ShorthornPlus Heifer, exhibited by Patrick O’Sullivan.

Champion Simmental Heifer, exhibited by Collin Grass.

Champion AOB Heifer, exhibited by Leah Hawkins.

MARKET Animals

Champion Angus Steer, exhibited by Cullen Walser.

76 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Champion Charolais Steer, exhibited by Jordyn Wellik.

Champion Hereford Steer, exhibited by Tyler Krebs.


Champion Maine-Anjou Steer, exhibited by Carlie Jackson.

Champion Shorthorn Steer, exhibited by Amy Beckstrand.

Champion ShorthornPlus Steer, exhibited by Dylan Miner.

Champion Simmental Steer, exhibited by Joe Grotsum.

Champion Foundation Simmental Steer, exhibited by Samuel Moenning.

ool Calf:Layout 1

3/31/08

10:28 PM

Page 1

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

BANNERS&backdrops • Minn. Spring Classic •

Champion Limousin Steer, exhibited by Courtney Dohrmann.

77


courtesy of Matthew E. O’Donnell, Vice President Morgan Stanley Smith Barney

D

ividend Strategies for 2012 & Beyond

Business Minded

The case for dividend investing is compelling, but cyclical rotation and the specter of tax hikes mean that dividend investors should be selective and take a longterm perspective. A dividend investing strategy is a smart way to generate income and total return, as history has shown. Dividendpaying stocks have outperformed non-dividend payers over time; since 1990, consistent dividend payers, as represented by the S&P 500 Dividend Aristocrats, earned an annualized 11.04% total return, while the broader S&P 500 index earned only 8.23%.1 In low-rate, low-growth environments, this outperformance is often even more pronounced. For the year ended December 31, 2011, dividend payers of the S&P 500 had an average total return of 1.4% vs. -7.6% for non-dividend payers.2 But dividend-paying stocks could come under pressure this year as a result of several factors. According to Standard & Poor’s, if the domestic economy continues to pick up steam, investors are likely to shift assets from defensive into more cyclical sectors in what is known as sector rotation. Defensive sectors, such as Telecom Services, Utilities and Consumer Staples, have offered the highest yields, while cyclical sectors, such as Consumer Durables and Technology, have offered lower yields. Another source of potential pressure is the concern that taxes on dividend income may rise. Under current law, the federal tax rate on qualified dividends will increase from 15% to 20% on January 1, 2013. What’s more, under the budget proposal submitted by the Obama administration, dividend income would be taxed at the much higher earned income rate for households making more than $250,000 annually ($200,000 for single filers). Such increases could reduce the appeal of dividend-paying stocks as investments for income-oriented investors. Even if Congress extends current rates and rejects the administration’s budget proposal, the uncertainty of dividend tax rates could put pressure on dividend-paying stocks. Given this environment, dividend investors should view dividend-paying stocks as a multiyear play. Dividend payout ratios, currently near historic lows, will likely rise over time as today’s cash-rich companies see increasing pressure to share the wealth. Long-term demand for dividend-paying stocks should also be boosted by the wave of baby-boomers entering retirement over the next two decades, many of whom will be seeking income-paying alternatives to low-yielding bonds.

78 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Other strategies to consider: Look for high-quality issues with an established history of dividend payment and annual increases. Such companies are represented by the S&P 500® Dividend Aristocrats index, which measures the performance of large-cap, blue-chip companies within the S&P 500 that have followed a policy of increasing dividends every year for at least 25 consecutive years. As noted above, this index has outperformed the broader S&P 500 Index since its inception in 1990. These long-term dividend payers have a proven track record and are more likely to continue paying dividends. Many are also sitting on record amounts of cash.1 Diversify Sectors Defensive sectors such as Telecom Services, Utilities and Consumer Staples are likely to still offer the highest average yields. But if the U.S. economy continues to improve, they may see erosion in prices. By diversifying, investors may be able to offset potential price losses with gains in sectors that are better positioned to benefit from an expanding economy. Consider Euro Zone stocks, which may offer higher yields in the current environment. While the U.S. economy has made strides in recent months, the Euro Zone remains mired in recession. A more defensive stance in Euro stocks is warranted, which favors dividendpaying sectors. Keep in mind, however, that higher yields, especially abnormally high yields, can be a warning flag that a company is not in good standing and has fallen out of favor with investors for any number of reasons. For More Information: Matthew E. O’Donnell is a Financial Advisor located in Chicago, IL and may be reached at (312) 917-7464 or http://fa.smithbarney.com/matthew_odonnell.

Source: Standard & Poor’s. For the 22 years ended December 31, 2011. Dividend Aristocrats consists of stocks within the S&P 500 that have increased their dividend payment in each of the past 25 years. 1

Source: Standard & Poor’s. Based on equal-weight indexes of all dividend-paying and non-dividend-paying stocks within the S&P 500. 2

Morgan Stanley Smith Barney and its Financial Advisors do not provide tax or legal advice, are not “fiduciaries”( under ERISA, the Internal Revenue Code or otherwise) with respect to the services or activities described herein, and this material was not intended or written to be used for the purpose of avoiding tax penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer. Individuals should consult their personal tax and legal advisors before making any tax or legal related decisions. The author(s) and/or publication are neither employees of nor affiliated with Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC (“MSSB”). By providing this third party publication, we are not implying an affiliation, sponsorship, endorsement, approval, investigation, verification or monitoring by MSSB of any information contained in the publication.


This column is the fourth in a series exploring careers that our young readers might be interested in pursuing, through the eyes and experiences of successful people in a variety of professions.

Joe Roybal, BEEF Magazine

An Editor

SC: What is your background – were you raised on a farm or ranch? No. I grew up in Rapid City, SD, but my dad’s side of the family had a small ranch in New Mexico, where we visited in the summer. My wife grew up on a stocker operation in South Dakota, which is still in the family, and we spend a lot of time there.

it to be more timely than just a monthly print publication. There’s a deadline at least every day in today’s publishing business, and technology continues to offer new and better ways to serve the reader. For instance, we produce a lot of videos now; that’s something totally new in the last few years. It’s hectic but it’s exciting, too.

SC: Would you describe for us what you really do (sometimes job titles aren’t reflective of the actual work): I’m in charge of the editorial product of BEEF magazine and its website, beef magazine.com. That means managing a staff of three full-time employees, two contract writers, and a half-dozen regular contributing editors. Over the course of the year, we’ll produce 12 monthly printed issues and close to 300 electronic newsletters. I’m the editor, but we utilize a team approach in planning our coverage, which gives everyone a voice and a stake in the final product.

SC: Do you need a college degree in your profession? As a rule, this business requires a four-year degree, because it serves as a basic requirement in hiring. A degree doesn’t mean you’re necessarily smarter or better prepared than someone who doesn’t have one, but I think employers regard a degree as proof that someone is goal-oriented and is perseverant.

SC: How did you get into this line of work? I started out as a daily newspaper reporter, where I did some agriculture coverage. Later, I worked as a feature writer. When I decided to move from South Dakota to Minnesota, I landed a job as managing editor with a monthly dairy magazine -- my boss said he was more interested in hiring someone who could write and learn the dairy business, than someone who knew the dairy business and didn’t have any writing experience. A couple of years later, I became editor of a small beef publication, which I found I enjoyed more. SC: What do you like about your job? I like journalism, and I really like the beef industry and its people. People in the beef business tend to be very self-reliant, probably because they operate in more of a free market than the other commodities. They are also hardworking, dedicated folks who love and respect the land, their animals, their families, and their country. Besides that, I’m convinced there is no more important job than feeding the world. Without a wellfed populace, civilization isn’t possible. Where people are hungry, there is no peace and stability. A big reason the U.S. has been so successful is because our agriculture is so productive. Today, only about 2 percent of the U.S. populace is directly involved in farming, and the average family only spends about 10 percent of their income on food. That frees up a lot of folks and a lot of resources for building a great country. SC: What are the toughest challenges for what you do? Trying to balance all the different roles of a publication today. Readers expect more information today, and in different forms, and they expect

SC: Where should somebody go to get started in your line of work? Most folks I’ve worked with have a background in journalism, English or technical writing. But some have animal science degrees. If you have a high school newspaper, get involved and see if you like it. Then build your writing skills and body of work. Offer to cover events for your local paper, or take on communications duties with the groups or associations you join. Internships are a huge tool for learning the ropes and getting your foot in the door with a potential employer. It’s all about getting experience. SC: What is a typical day on the job like for you? It varies on the time of the month. We typically are in production for the print issue the first two weeks of each month. But, we also have a weekly electronic newsletter to prepare, and a daily newsletter to edit. Mixed in with that is travel and managing a magazine budget. And then there are always the unexpected projects that pop up to take you away from your plans. SC: What would most surprise a student about your career? I’m kind of a rare one in my field because I decided I wanted to be a newspaper reporter when I was about 12. Most people anguish about what they want to do with their life, but I never really considered anything else. SC: Anything you wish someone would have told you in school? I earned a bachelor of arts, which is heavy on humanities and a foreign language. It was very interesting and I liked the classes, but I wish I had taken more science and math than the core classes required. I think every journalism student should be required to take business and science courses because it gives you a better base of knowledge for what you’ll probably encounter in life and write about in your career.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

79


Rachael Carlson - Plattsburg, MO Possesses the ambition and drive to become a leader. A first class young lady that is a model for the junior livestock industry. Good things happen to good people ... for a reason. Sponsored with Mid-Missouri Feed

Frederich ‘Cuatro’ Schauer IV Beeville, TX 2012 Fort Worth Grand Champion Steer, who is a leader in and out of the show ring. Deeply involved in FFA, 4-H, academics and church. Cuatro is proof you can achieve anything you set your mind to.

Sarah Ayer - Calhoun, KY

Jennie Johnson - Craig, NE

Responsibilities on her family farm have shaped Sarah’s work ethic and character. Her Kentucky State Fair Grand and American Royal Reserve Steer demonstrate her commitment and passion for this industry. Sponsored with Blue Grass Show Supply

Entrepreneur. Developing her own livestock photography business. Champion steer at AK-SAR-BEN, Nebraska State Fair. Jennie is a tremendous quality person with communication skills to succeed. Received the honor of Sullivan’s Best Presented Scholarship Application.

An Asset Worth Investing In!

20, $1,000 Scholarships - 1,087 applicants from 44 states! Sullivan Supply is committed to supporting the next generation of America’s agriculture through the distinguished Sullivan Supply/Stock Show U Youth Scholarship program. We have been honored to gift $70,000 in scholarships to deserving individuals over the past three years. Congratulations to all of this years 1,087 determined applicants representing 44 states. A special thank you to the scholarship selection committee of industry leaders (non-Sullivan Supply employees or family members) who volunteered their time for our mission.

With the quality of applications that we receive each year for this distinguished scholarship, it gives us great confidence and faith in the future of livestock production. Best wishes and congratulations to all 1,087 applicants. John and Dede Sullivan, Sullivan Supply, Inc.; Dan Sullivan, Sullivan Supply South, Inc.; And our entire staff and dealers

Check www.sullivansupply.com for a listing of our Gold and Silver Star honorees.

Kelli Retallick - Glen Haven, WI

Zach Bartenslager - Lewisburg, WV

Brittany Blum - Howe, TX

Lauren Grimes - Hillsboro, OH

Possibly the most qualified application submitted out of 1,087 from 44 states. The model for commitment and accomplishments. ‘Step up’ is Kelli’s middle name. Sponsored with Kegley Show Supply

Multiple State Fair Champion Steers, champion quiz bowl team, high livestock judging individual, yet with all of Zach’s success his best feats are his caring and giving spirit. Sponsored with Scottsdale Supply

A well rounded, accomplished champion who is a dedicated leader, judge and FFA representative. She is a humble winner in her community, school and the show ring.

Historic Angus family yet Lauren blazes her own trail. Louisville Percentage Simmental Champion, many Angus champions and 2012 National Junior Angus Show Committee chairman. Busy & bright. Sponsored with Highland Enterprises, Provico, Ohio Valley and White Show Supply

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Cameron Curry - McAlester, OK

Ty Webster - Runnells, IA

Brazos Williams - Clarendon, TX

Luke Bolin - Prairie Grove, AR

Officer and leader in 4-H, FFA and community service. A third generation Hereford breeder, Cameron is committed to beef production and presently operates his own fitting service.

Skilled cattleman beyond his years. Ty makes his own decisions with his cattle operation. Bar none, one of the most talented young fitters in the land.

A fourth generation cattleman dedicated not only in the show ring, but in his community as well. Has high goals for a career in beef E.T. production.

Extremely involved in his community and school, this champion strives to make a career in a breed association and to continually build his own herd. His involvement in and out of the ring shows his kind spirit to help others. Sponsored with Five Star Show Supply

Congratulations 2012 Winners

Bailey Core - Pleasantville, IA

Logan Davis - Newcastle, OK

Shelby Rogers - Hamilton, TX

Jonathan Heaton - Toulon, IL

National Champion competitor in every arena. Poised, involved leader, 4.0 GPA. Success happens here. Dedication and commitment is a way of life.

A natural born leader who has the dedication, passion and talent for showing. Repeat Grand Champions in Tulsa and Oklahoma State Fairs.

Positive attitude, dedication and love for Herefords make her a real champion in all aspects of life. A NJJHA director and heavily involved leader.

Family values and outstanding sportsmanship are the Heaton’s family rule that developed Jonathan’s success. National Champion Heifers and National Champion Judging awards followed.

Jake Bloomberg - Berwick, IL

Charles Boyd - Mayslick, KY

Emma Vickland - Longmont, CO

Autumn Robison - Markle, IN

High individual in the National 4H Livestock judging contest, three time Supreme Champion Female at the Illinois State Fair. 4.0 GPA. A national competitor in the ring and in livestock judging.

Multiple NJAS Champion Bred and Owned Bulls and Females. Fifth generation purebred breeder, Charles’ true grasp of beef production for his age is unmatched. Sponsored with Blue Grass Show Supply

This is the profile of a true champion in and out of the ring. National Champion cattle and National Champion Livestock 4-H Judging Teams yet a humble, respectful sportsman. Sponsored with Bauman Show Supply

Current president of the Indiana Junior Beef Cattlemen’s Assoc. Past AJSA board member. A natural born leader that excels in and out of the ring. Sponsored with Sinnamon Show Supply

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• April 14-15, 2012 • Delphi, Ind. • Judge: Jared Boyert •

GranD GranD

BREEDING

Carroll County (In) Beef Show

Heifers

reSerVe reSerVe

• Grand ChampiOn heifer • exhibited by Mitchell Smith.

• reserve Grand ChampiOn heifer • exhibited by Brooke Coffey.

• 3rd Overall heifer • exhibited by Ryen Kerr.

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• 4th Overall heifer • exhibited by Paige Longstreth.

• 5th Overall heifer • exhibited by Mitchell Smith.


GranD GranD

• April 14-15, 2012 • Delphi, Ind. • Judge: Jared Boyert •

MARKET reSerVe reSerVe • Grand ChampiOn steer • exhibited by Blake Reust.

Carroll County (In) Beef Show

Animals

• reserve Grand ChampiOn steer • exhibited by Bailey Rist.

• 3rd Overall steer • exhibited by Zayne Scott.

• 4th Overall steer • exhibited by Cole Mize.

• 5th Overall steer • exhibited by Cora Dale.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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the buzz outside the barn If you would like to contribute to our Entertainment Review section or have book/movie/tv/ music suggestions for us, please drop a note to Sharla at sharla@theshowcircuit.com

worth watching Seven DayS In UtopIa aboUt the MovIe… The storyline in Robert Duvall’s “Seven Days in Utopia” features an aspiring young golfer, his overly aggressive father/coach, a rancher with an interesting past and an assortment of smalltown characters that live in all rural communities. However, you don’t have to play golf or live in a small town to appreciate this family-friendly movie (now on DVD.) The movie offers a compelling “stop-and-think-about-it” theme for anyone who is a serious competitor in any sport – or is the parent of a serious competitor. The young golfer in this feelgood story, Luke Chisolm (played by Lucas Black), has been pushed his entire life by his father to make it on the pro golf tour. His high-flying success comes to a screeching halt after Luke has a televised meltdown, his dad walks away from him and then Luke gets stranded for a week in a little town that’s way off the beaten path. There Luke meets Duvall’s character, the eccentric rancher Johnny Crawford, who promises to teach him a thing or two about golf – but really teaches him about a healthy perspective on life and what he truly believes in. There’s a Christian message underlying this story without being preachy, too. Without giving away too much, suffice it to say that Luke has more than one “lightbulb” moment that will forever change the way he views himself, his place in the world and the game. What We thoUght... While “Seven Days in Utopia” won’t make it on my list of all-time greatest movies ever, it’s well worth the hour and a half of your time and a rental fee. For one thing, there is not a single cringe-worthy moment if you’re watching it with younger kids – a rarity these days. Even so, it’s entertaining and thought-provoking. Plus, Robert Duvall is in it! For show families, there are some moments in the film that could sure stimulate good discussion about why you are showing cattle in the first place, what your family thinks is truly important and what you as parents hope to accomplish (with steers and heifers being your tool of choice) in raising kids who pursue excellence but also know how to stay grounded. IntereStIng tIDbItS... • The script is based on Based on David L. Cook’s best-selling book Golf ’s Sacred Journey: Seven Days at the Links of Utopia. • There really is a tiny, beautiful town in Texas named Utopia – a unique section of the Texas Hill Country west of San Antonio – and parts of the film were set on location here and in Frederickburg, TX. • Robert Duvall and Lucas Black appeared together in two other films as well: “Sling Blade” and “Get Low.” • Alabama native Lucas Black turned down a role in “The Horse Whisperer” because he was asked to alter his accent.

FroM DoWnUnDer

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worth reading Larry McMurtry

My introduction to the prolific author Larry McMurty came as a high school senior when the “Lonesome Dove” miniseries was on television. It was a big hit in those days before everyone had 300 cable channels or the Internet; a good miniseries could get the whole family glued to the set night after night. Then as a college student, I took Southwest Literature as an elective, and the grad student who taught the course was writing his dissertation on Larry McMurty so we read a lot of McMurtry novels and analyzed his style and impact, etc. every which way from Sunday. Luckily, McMurty’s genius for authentic characters (especially strong, tough women) and all things western, old or contemporary, were fascinating and since then I’ve read almost everything the man ever wrote. It wouldn’t be fair to put just one of his works in our entertainment review, because there’s no way to choose a) the best one or b) one that appeals to everyone. McMurtry has had so many of his novels turned into films, it would be the same way trying to narrow the field down to just one film – “Terms of Endearment,” “The Last Picture Show,” and “Hud” are just a few. What follows are just a few of McMurtry novels you might enjoy reading on those long drives to yet another show or if you’re up at night waiting for a teenager to get home. One word of caution: most all of his books have adult themes – not graphic by any sense, but sex and how it fits into the lives of different characters is a major thematic element in most of his works.

The LasT PicTure show: Set in a small, dusty, Texas town, “The Last Picture Show” introduced the characters of Jacy, Duane and Sonny: teenagers stumbling toward adulthood, discovering the beguiling mysteries of sex and the even more baffling mysteries of love. Populated by a wonderful cast of eccentrics and animated by McMurtry’s wry and raucous humor, “The Last Picture Show” is wild, heartbreaking, and poignant -- a coming-ofage novel that resonates with the magical passion of youth. Lonesome Dove: The story focuses on the relationship of several retired Texas Rangers and their adventures driving a cattle herd from Texas to Montana. According to Biblio.com, McMurtry originally developed the tale in 1972 for a feature film entitled The Streets of Laredo (a title later used for the sequel), which would have been directed by Peter Bogdanovich and would have starred James Stewart as Augustus McCrae, John Wayne as W.F. Call and Henry Fonda as Jake Spoon. But plans fell through when Wayne turned it down, leading Stewart to back out, and the project was eventually shelved. Ten years later McMurtry resurrected the screenplay as a full-length novel, which became a bestseller and won the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. It was then made into the four-part TV miniseries, which won seven Emmy Awards and was nominated for twelve others. It spawned four follow-up miniseries, Return to Lonesome Dove, Streets of Laredo, Dead Man’s Walk, and Comanche Moon, and two television series, Lonesome Dove: The Series and Lonesome Dove: The Outlaw Years.

Terms of enDearmenT: In this acclaimed novel that inspired the Academy Award-winning motion picture, Larry McMurtry created two unforgettable characters who won the hearts of readers and moviegoers everywhere: Aurora Greenway (played in the movie by Shirley McClaine) and her daughter Emma (Debra Winger). Aurora is the kind of woman who makes the whole world orbit around her, including a string of devoted suitors. Widowed and overprotective of her daughter, Aurora adapts at her own pace until life sends two enormous challenges her way: Emma’s hasty marriage and subsequent battle with cancer. Terms of Endearment is the Oscar-winning story of a memorable mother and her feisty daughter and their struggle to find the courage and humor to live through life’s hazards -- and to love each other as never before. horseman, Pass By: When this classic novel of the post-World War II era was originally published in 1961, it created a sensation because never before had a writer portrayed the contemporary West in conflict with the Old West in such stark, realistic, unsentimental ways. “Horseman, Pass By, “ on which the film “Hud” is based, tells the story of Homer Bannon, an old-time cattleman who epitomizes the frontier values of honesty and decency, and Hud, his unscrupulous stepson. Caught in the middle is the narrator, Homer’s young grandson, Lonnie, who is as much drawn to his grandfather’s strength of character as he is to Hud’s hedonism and materialism. Memorable characters, powerful themes and illuminating detail make “Horseman, Pass By” vintage McMurtry.

aLL my frienDs are GoinG To Be sTranGers: All My Friends are Going to Be Strangers: Following a young writer’s journey in a car he calls El Chevy, “All My Friends Are Going to Be Strangers “is one of Larry McMurtry’s most vital and entertaining novels. Danny Deck is on the verge of success as an author when he flees Houston and hurtles unexpectedly into the hearts of three women: a girlfriend who makes him happy but who won’t stay, a neighbor as generous as she is lusty, and his pal Emma Horton. It’s a wild ride toward literary fame and an uncharted country...beyond everyone he deeply loves. The novel is a wonderful display of Larry McMurtry’s unique gift: his ability to re-create the subtle textures of feelings, the claims of passing time and familiar place, and the rich interlocking swirl of people’s lives. BuffaLo GirLs: It is the late 1800s, and the famous figures of the Wild West are aging and depressed. Calamity Jane lives in a bordello in Miles City, and is mostly content to remember the excitements of the past, until the arrival of her old friend Buffalo Bill Cody spurs her on one more grand adventure.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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by Brad Hook

F

avorite Quotes of the B.S. Month

Brad Hook B.S. (broadcasting system)

• Success isn’t measured by money or power or social rank. Success is measured by your discipline & inner peace. - Mike Ditka • One of the trademarks of a champion is that he can outlast you. - Lou Brock • When you win, say nothing, when you lose, say less. - Paul Brown • Following the path of least resistance is what makes rivers and men crooked. - Cowboy Wisdom of the Day • My responsibility is leadership, and the minute I get negative, that is going to have an influence on my team. - Don Shula • If you are patient in one moment of anger, you will escape a hundred days of sorrow. - Chinese proverb

Favorite Blog Posts from a month of the B.S.

• Prom Season Was gone a week straight to southern Ohio, filming for the Smackdown sales and got home just in time to prepare for prom and State FFA contests. We (meaning mostly Shawn) right at the end, were on the prom committee, since we were Junior student parents, and you all know how hectic these events can be. But it all came together wonderfully and went off pretty much without a hitch. On top of helping decorate the stage and getting games ready, we were one of the lucky parents that got to stay up all night at the after prom. I was really dreading it, but I never even got tired. It was much better than washing cattle in Denver at 1:00 am, I’ll guarantee you that!

• State FFA Convention... Congrats, Sage & Mandie Shawn and I spent all day at the State FFA Convention. I hadn’t been to one of those since about 1981. They seem much “cooler” now. Corydon has a new, young, ag instructor, and he’s ignited a fire back in our ag program again. Our FFA chapter didn’t have a website, and since there is a contest for this, it seemed like a good thing to do.....it turned into a great thing. Sage and a fellow FFA’er, Mandie, with the help of their instructor, designed what appeared to be a pretty nice site. Only one girl could present it in competition, so Mandie presented at District, receiving a Gold and advancing on to State competition. After even more tweaking and improving, Sage presented it at the State FFA Convention, receiving 1 of 5 Golds given and earning

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them a trip up on the awards stage that night for a final placing. Shawn and I watched all the chapters present and thought we were in the top three. Pretty well knew we couldn’t beat a returning bigger chapter’s site that had been up for a few years, but felt confident we were in the top 5......and that we were. Wayne FFA was announced as 3rd over-all winner in the Chapter Website competition ... a first in school history in any category at the state level I believe. The chapter, as well as the instructor, also received individual awards. So all in all, three trips were made across the big stage. Impressive for a young teacher’s first trip out. This is a prime example of all the motivational quotes I post on this blog about positive vs. negative. Congrats, everyone! • Can You Text Your Sympathy? So, in the spirit of Jerry Springer mixed with Larry the Cable Guy, Shawn and I got in a bit of a “discussion” in our local Dollar General Store, about buying a sympathy card for some friends of ours who lost an uncle. I must admit, I’m a little anti-greeting card. Not that I don’t think they’re nice, I really just think it could be done in a less expensive manner and accomplish the same thing or even better. I said to just text them and tell ’em we’re sorry for their loss...... to which she exclaimed horror with my idea, saying that was NOT very personal. I disagreed and said it was more personal than sending them a Dollar General greeting card, for Pete’s sake. Cast your vote on the poll (www.bradhookbs.com) and let’s see what you’re thinkin’.


• May 12, 2012 • Moundsville, W. Va. •

GRAnd GRAnd

BREEDING

Heifers

ReSeRVe ReSeRVe

• reServe Grand Champion heifer • exhibited by Lindsey Paugh, Louisville, Ohio.

GRAnd GRAnd

MARKET

Animals

ReSeRVe ReSeRVe

• Grand Champion Steer • exhibited by Jacque Knipe, Adamsville, Ohio.

• reServe Grand Champion Steer • exhibited by Clay Foor, Pataskala, Ohio.

Blue & Gold Showdown

• Grand Champion heifer • exhibited by Mandy Lacy, Dresden, Ohio.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

87


Jace Prough Sarah Ayer

Kendra Elder Kayla Morrow Activities outside the show ring

Dillon Elder

Breeds you show

Siblings

Sarah Ayer 20 Calhoun, KY

Crossbred steers

Kyle

Jace Prough 16 Altus, OK

Hereford

Spencer

Kayla Louise Morrow 18 Nevada, MO

Crossbreds

Heath, Seth, & Mercedes Barker

Cheerleading!

Movie/TV: Jersey Shore Music: Adele Book: The Hunger Games series; Twilight series; all Ellen Hopkins books

obese people

Big Papa!!!

Kendra Elder 13 Blum, TX

Charolais and Chianina heifers

Dillon

Volleyball and basketball

Movie/TV: American Idol Music: Jason Aldean Book: No Small Thing

People that brag about something they did and you didn’t.

Pearl, Black Velvet and Chesney

Dillon Elder 15 Blum, TX

Charolais and Chi heifers and steers

Kendra

BASKETBALL Movie/TV: Hoosiers and and being Stock Show Confidential. with friends Music: Zac Brown Band and family and LMFAO Book: Summer Ball by Mike Lupica

88 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Die-hard UK basketball fan

Favorites

Pet peeve

Movie/TV: 8 Seconds Fantasy Factory Music: George Strait/Gary Allan/Adele Book: Any book written by Nicholas Sparks.

Bad eating manners

Names of your current steers/heifers

Showman

Hanging with Movie/TV: Step Brothers, When people pop friends and staySwamp People their knuckles or ing active with Music: Jason Aldean, backs! sports Casey Donahew Band Book: “Their Eyes Were Watching God”

People who yell

Slim Shady and Jiggy

Maybaby, Andie, Paisley, Penny

Maverick, Miranda, Diamond, Taylor and Adele


Would you like to be in On & Off The Circuit or know someone else who would? E-mail sharla@theshowcircuit.com to get in on the action! What quality/ What do you Weird habit/ skill to you have Favorite subject want to be when skill/fact about that you’re most in school you grow up? you proud of?

Least Favorite Show Day Task

Marketing at The ability to Farm Credit never come across Services of Mid- a stranger. I think America I could talk to a brick wall and make it talk back.

History

As much as I am It’s a tie between trying to involved with keep my dad calm before showing steers the show or break down and the beef afterward. industry, I do not like steak.

Work somewhere My independence in forestry service area.

Biology

I am OCD about Breaking calves being down and loined!!! loading up.

When I grow up I feel like I’m a Modern warfare I want to be a pretty good showcosmetologist. man, I mean.. Bob May said I was, too.

I fall asleep as soon as I get in vehicles (exceot when I’m driving, of course!)

Attend Texas Being motivated A&M and work in and always trying the ag journalism my best. or communications field.

Language Arts (writing)

I’m pretty ticklish

Ag business Ability to get degree from Texas along and have Tech University, fun be a cattle judge with and own a club anyone. calf operation.

Math

I’m 15 years old and 6’4”.

Most embarrassing stock show moment

When I was 4, we were at my county fair showing lambs. My dad was talking and instead of interrupting him, I tried taking the halter off myself. The lamb took off running. When we stopped, the lamb was on top of me, all fours in the air, and making the most awful noise you ever heard because of the death grip I had around his stomach. People to this day still laugh about it. When my heifer leaped up into the air onto me in showmanship.

Blow drying. It takes forever.

Most embarrassing moment I have ever had was at the Missouri State Fair 2010. I was in the ring with my goat, Peter, when the judge went to feel him, I went to shake his hand!

Blowing When my heifer Pearl was acting up at last year’s Chi Jr Nationals. It was embarrassing to me, because I can usually handle my animals extremely well.

Breaking down

In 2008 at the Heart O’ Texas fair, my heifer and I went into the champion drive in the rodeo. With so many people and “jumping” cowboys, she got spooked and took me for a ride -- while the big screen showed the ride.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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• April 21, 2012 • Fletcher, NC •

Western north Carolina spring Fling

granD granD

BREEDING

Heifers

reserVe reserVe

• Grand ChampiOn & ChampiOn anGus heifer • exhibited by Bill Jones.

• reserve Grand ChampiOn & ChampiOn herefOrd heifer • exhibited by Courtney Eudy.

• 3rd Overall & ChampiOn aOb heifer • exhibited by Carrie Elmore.

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• 4th Overall & ChampiOn CharOlais heifer • exhibited by Caroline Davis.

• 5th Overall & ChampiOn Gelbvieh heifer • exhibited by Connor Durham.


Reserve Champion Angus Heifer, exhibited by Ty Reeves.

Reserve Champion Charolais Heifer, exhibited by Chas Rowlett.

Champion Dexter Heifer, exhibited by Raina Townson.

Reserve Champion Dexter Heifer, exhibited by Raina Townson.

Reserve Champion Gelbvieh Heifer, exhibited by Carson Hall.

Reserve Champion Hereford Heifer, exhibited by Alexis Eudy.

Champion Red Angus Heifer, exhibited by Mason Blinson.

Reserve Champion Red Angus Heifer, exhibited by Joseph Groce.

Champion Shorthorn Heifer, exhibited by Shane Kendall.

Reserve Champion Shorthorn Heifer, exhibited by Rossie Blinson.

Champion Simmental Heifer, exhibited by Jordan Carter.

Reserve Champion Simmental Heifer, exhibited by Allie Yokley.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

BANNERS&backdrops • Western North Carolina Spring Fling •

BREEDING Heifers

91


Western north Carolina spring Fling

Champion Commercial Heifer, exhibited by Jordan Carter.

Reserve Champion Commercial Heifer, exhibited by Wyatt Kendall.

Reserve Champion AOB Heifer, exhibited by Hailee Bissett.

granD granD

MARKET

Animals

reserVe reserVe

• Grand ChampiOn steer • exhibited by Bill Jones.

92 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

• reserve Grand ChampiOn steer • exhibited by Bill Jones.


Courtesy of Crystal Blin, Author of crystalcattle.blogspot.com

The life of

An Ag Girl

The MosT IMporTanT pIece of advIce I ever receIved Summer is here. I am sure a few of you are saying finally! It is time to get cattle in the cooler, start thinking about state fairs and hit the summer junior national circuit. For others, it means the beginning of internships, finalizing college choices and aiming for a position on your national junior board of directors. Summer is time to network, make positive impressions on people and chase your dreams. In my first job, I was given a very valuable piece of advice. My No. 1 goal needed to be, “make our boss look good.” If our boss looked good, that meant the entire team looked good. And when the team looks good, that means additional opportunities for everyone. As you start that summer internship or gain that leadership position, how can this piece of advice apply to you? Summertime is your opportunity to prove that you can work as a team, take instruction from others and show people that you are not above any task that needs to be completed – no matter how long it make take, how dirty you may get or how out of your comfort zone it may be. This is the time to show that you don’t care about getting credit for the completed project, instead you care about giving it your all and creating something the company or association can be proud of. When you walk through the door on the first day, remember that you are low man on the totem pole, and although your opinion will be valued, there is much to be learned from the people that surround you. It is also time to make the best impression possible on those around you. That could mean showing up to the office 10 minutes before everyone else arrives and staying an hour later to make sure all your work is completed. It could mean making sure you leave the four-inch heels at home, and wearing a nice pair of black pumps or clean cowboy boots to the office. It could mean leaving your cell phone in your desk and giving the people around you your undivided attention. And it means remembering at all times, whether you are in the office, at a trade show booth or hanging out with friends at the hotel, your actions reflect the company that is investing time and energy in you. Your coworkers, the company’s customer or the association’s members will have an eye on you all summer. If you make it your goal to make sure they look good, you’ll certainly be rewarded. Those rewards could come in the form of reference letters, getting to sit in on meetings between higherups in the company, having the opportunity to expand your network or the

ultimate reward – a full-time position. Remember the people that you meet and work with this summer will be a part of your network for years to come. Don’t forget to write those thank you cards communicating you appreciation. And it certainly doesn’t hurt to drop your boss, advisor or coworkers a note, or email every so often to let them know what you are up to and what your future plans are. If you don’t plan on pursuing an internship or leadership role this summer, still keep in mind now is a great time for you to network, and think about future goals. Start to feel out who might have an internship that you would be interested in for next summer, or how much time it really takes to devote to a junior board position. Sure Champ will have three interns this summer, and one of them we met at a junior national event last summer. You never know when a conversation will turn into an opportunity. If you are on the show road this summer, be sure to stop by the Sure Champ booth and say hello. It’s going to be a great summer traveling up and down the show road; plenty of memories to be made and doors to be opened.

the M r o f e g n e l l a Ch

onth

Other ways to get com bsite InternQueen. we e th t ou the most out of your k ec Ch 1. landing the perfect on ce vi summer internship: ad of ns to r fo the ing the most out of ak m d an ip sh rn te in d. have already lande or internship you may de show vendors tra , rs so on sp th wi sit vi ring the 2. Take time to s they may have du tie ni rtu po op t ou other breeders ab . t to have a fall or next summer e is no reason no er th t bu ly, sil d k with. 3. It may soun people you networ e th to t ou nd ha and email business card to e, phone number m na ur yo s de clu a more Make sure it in n computer or, for ow ur yo on off em mpany. address. Print th d by a marketing co ne sig de e on ve ha , professional look

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

93


$500 Career Division Winners: Bailey Core • Paige WallaCe • JessiCa HarsH • Kinzie selKe

Ag Business BAiley Core, 18, a se-

nior at Pleasantville High School in iowa, has maintained a perfect 4.0 GPA while serving as president of the iowa Junior Beef Breeds Board, Vice President of the National Junior Maine Anjou Board and she’s served as her FFA chapter’s president for two consecutive years. She’s been a winner at local, state and national levels in every organization she’s been involved with, including her show career. Bailey’s been awarded the All Around Sweepstakes Award four times and is especially honored to have won three different breeds’ National Junior Heifer Show Showmanship awards. Bailey says: “To me, junior heifer shows were much more than just show day; they were about taking every opportunity given.”

Ag Communications As a 20-year-old sopho-

more at Butler Community College, PAiGe WAllACe, has made a successful transition from high school (in Missouri), where she was an Area FFA president and highly competitive in public speaking contests on a state level as well as national 4-H livestock judging, to college where she keeps a 4.0 GPA while serving as the 2011 Miss American Angus, co-hosting a weekly television show for rFD-TV, The Angus report and being active in a variety of student organizations. Paige says: “My career goals reflect this passion and i have no doubt that the rest of my life will continue to be surrounded by livestock. Whether that’s working for an agricultural company in Washington D.C. or writing for a livestock magazine or maybe just working self employed from home on my family farm. i’m always striving to make a difference in agriculture, hoping to make a daily impact on this industry i’ve grown so fond of.”

Animal Science if you’re attending the Chi-

anina/Maine Anjou Junior National event in ohio this summer, chances are you’ll get to meet 17-yearold JeSSiCA HArSH from radnor, oH. As a representative on the American Junior Chianina Association Board, Jessica is helping to plan and work the event. She’s also serving a two-year term with the ohio Cattleman’s Association BeST program, where she represents 300plus exhibitors. Before graduating this year, she was president of both her 4-H club and her FFA chapter, and works for an insurance agency and a show cattle operation while keeping a 3.99 GPA. Jessica says: “i had the privilege to speak at an ‘Ag Weekend’ seminar sponsored by TurnKey. People from the city, who have no farm background, were in attendance. i spoke about the benefits of agriculture from a ‘kids’ perspective. My opening line to them was, ‘When you think of agriculture you most likely think of the food you see on your plate three times a day. But when i think of agriculture i think of the infinite number of possibilities that are in front of me from a leadership and future career perspective to serve the A sophomore at Butler Community College, KiNzie SelKe, 19, of Frankfort, world.’” iN, has worked on the family farm from a very young age. The work ethic learned by that work experience has led to a highly successful livestock judging career, the opportunity to serve in multiple leadership roles through 4-H, FFA, the indiana Junior Beef Association executive Board and the Butler Community College Agriculture Ambassador program. That’s not to mention volunteering with a range of groups, both in high school and college, and maintaining a 3.92 GPA. Kinzie says: “Due to the passionate educators and the priceless opportunities i have received due to 4-H, FFA and junior shows, it is my goal to become an agriculture teacher or extension agent. i hope to give my students the same opportunities. The idea of watching my students become passionate leaders in the agriculture industry is the driving force for my degree path.”

Other

First SC Scholarship Winners Set the Bar High A deep and very talented field of young people with big plans in the agricultural world made selecting the winners a really tough endeavor in the first Show Circuit Scholarship Contest. While there were many deserving youth that applied, our six winners rose to the top with a combination of excellent grades, an amazing degree of involvement in 4-H, FFA, junior breed associations and dedicated volunteer time with other community programs. They’ve already invested a lot of time in jobs, internships or on the family farm gaining valuable work experience. They also have in common a sincere desire and targeted plan to be part of a bright future in agriculture as they go through college and start on career paths. Join us in congratulating these future industry leaders!

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$250 Partner organization Winners: Brianne aBramovitz • gaBrielle Woods

Missouri Club Calf Association

BriANNe ABrAMoViTz, 20, is an animal science/ pre-vet major at the University of Missouri-Columbia, where she maintains a 3.8 GPA while working with AbraKadabra Cattle Co., a 100-head Hereford herd that she co-owns. She’s also active in student organizations and, as a pre-vet student, has spent more than 200 hours shadowing large animal and equine veterinarians to learn as much as she can. Her track record includes the usual officer positions in 4-H and FFA, the Missouri Junior Hereford Association, the Missouri Club Calf Association and more. But she also shined as a livestock judging team member – representing the U.S. at the Scottish royal Highlands livestock judging contest in 2010. Brianne says: “i would like to open my own reproductive clinic focusing on embryo transfer and/or other new technologies that are prevalent in the beef industry. i plan to continue raising Hereford Cattle and would like to continue showing at open shows such as the Missouri State Fair, American royal and National Western if time allows.”

Oklahoma Club Calf Association

After graduating from Tupelo High School as Salutatorian with a 3.63 GPA, GABrielle WooDS, will attend oklahoma State University, majoring in animal science/pre-vet. Her high school resume is chock full of leadership and volunteer experiences, including founding a charity focused on providing quality of life for pediatric oncology patients. She’s served as a district representative for oCCA, vice president of the oklahoma Shorthorn Association and president of her FFA chapter. Her trophy shelf has not only cattle trophies, but also awards from her participation in Miss Teen oklahoma and Miss Jr. Teen pageants and Presidential Call to Service Awards from Presidents Bush and obama. Gabrielle says: “i am always inspired by young women who want to shatter glass ceilings, but equally impressed by those who strive to continue tradition, even if they bring exciting innovation to the sustainability of agricultural pursuits.”

sCholarshiPs Do you remember where you were back then?

the sc flashback 5 years ago June-July 2007 SC Cover: The Punisher Price of gas: $2.98 Billboard #1 on June 9 Rihanna/Jay-Z: Umbrella Country #1 on June 2

Billy Currington: Good Directions

Box Office Hit on July 13 Harry Potter & The Order of the Phoenix

theshowcircuit.com

Volume 10 Issue 5 June/July 2007

10 years ago May-June-July 2002 SC Cover: All About You, Who Made Who Price of gas: $1.35 Billboard #1 on June 29 Nelly: Hot in Herre Country #1 on June 1 Alan Jackson: Drive Box Office Hit on June 14 Scooby Doo

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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courtesy of Trans Ova Genetics

M

inimizing The Effects of Heat Stress

Summer is a great time for county fairs, cattle shows and family picnics, just to name a few. But summer heat and humidity can wreak havoc on cattle reproduction, making this season a challenging time for optimal reproductive performance in cattle. While most females are already pregnant with next year’s calves, or “on vacation” from an embryo transfer program, breeders may have a few special cows to breed – an elite donor on a permanent flush program, or embryos to transfer in the summer months. The technical services team from Trans Ova Genetics offers insight into this hot-weather challenge so that breeders can take the necessary precautions in their summer breeding plans. “Conception rates in cattle typically decrease 10 percent to 20 percent in summer due to heat stress,” says Dr. Jose Molina, technical service veterinarian for Trans Ova Genetics. “Heat stress can be directly related to the increase in body temperature of the cattle.”

Tech Trends

Affect on donors Heat stress can have a significant impact on embryo production, as follicular development and superovulation is often reduced during times of heat stress. It is the result of follicular dominance established by a diminished luteinizing hormone (LH) “pulse and peak,” leading to a reduced number of ovulatory follicles and subsequent super ovulatory suppression. “Oocyte development during heat stress also reduces the number of competent oocytes that can be fertilized, and leads to more infertile embryos,” says Dr. Molina. “This can have a prolonged effect on subsequent flushes as oocyte development in the ovaries occurs over a longer period of time. These effects can last into the fall, particularly if the autumn weather also is unseasonably warm. This is why we often see a decrease of fertility 60 to 90 days after a prolonged exposure to heat stress.” Early development of fertilized embryos is also hindered by heat stress, leading to more low grade and degenerate embryos. Recipients feel the heat, too The uterine environment can be affected during periods of heat stress resulting in decreased ability to support embryo health and growth, and failure to implant. The development of the corpus luteum (CL) and secretion of progesterone, which helps maintain the pregnancy, is also reduced during heat stress. Recipients may benefit from the administration of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone (GnRH) or ECG at the time of transfer to improve accessory CL development and progesterone levels during periods of stress. There is an advantage to transferring embryos into recipients, as compared to breeding artificially or naturally during heat stress, because transferred embryos are already 7 to 8 days old, and obviously have been fertilized successfully. Dr. Molina points out that

96 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

the greatest vulnerability to the developing embryo occurs before this one week period. Heat stress may also cause cattle to show fewer signs of heat. “Periods of standing heat may be much less obvious in hot, humid weather,” explains Dr. Paul Van Roekel, technical services veterinarian for Trans Ova Genetics. “Motor activities such as mounting are decreased, which means increased incidence of silent heat or anestrus. Cows can have approximately one-half the number of mounts in the summer compared to in the winter.” Don’t forget about the bulls The effects of heat stress can also damage bulls’ semen quality, including alterations in the shape of the sperm cells. Continual exposure to temperatures above 86 degrees for two weeks is enough to cause heat stress problems in cows and bulls. “Decrease in semen quality is evident one to two weeks after the heat stress has occurred, and it may continue for another two months before the quality improves to normal, pre-stress quality,” says. Dr. Van Roekel. Breeders should keep this in mind whether purchasing semen for AI use, or if using their own bulls on an elite donor or a breeding herd. Keep it cool Breeders who are planning any summer breeding should take steps to reduce heat stress to their donors and recipients, as well as any of their own bulls used in the breeding program. Of course, plenty of cool, clean water is mandatory for all animals. Providing adequate space and plenty of shade is also highly recommended, and is especially important for donors once they start shots. Either big trees in a pasture, or a man-made roof or shade for cattle to gather under will work. Breeders should ensure that there is enough shade for all animals, and that cattle are not forced to bunch up too close together to take advantage of that shade. Dr. Van Roekel suggests the use of water misters or sprinklers, which help to increase heat loss by evaporation. “Breeders should maintain cattle in good, but not excessive, body condition. Obese animals, especially bulls, are more susceptible to heat stress.” Small changes in breeding management also may help reduce heat stress. “If summer breeding is a must, try to schedule shots in the cooler parts of the day, such as early morning or late evening,” Dr. Molina advises. “The same goes for heat detection because cattle are more likely to show signs of heat at these times.” Heat stress can be inevitable in some climates each summer, and it can create reproductive – and thus economic – losses to a breeding program. But, knowing how heat stress can affect cattle is a big step toward reducing losses associated with heat stress. Breeders who do as much as possible to keep their cattle cool and comfortable in the summer months will see fewer reproductive effects from heat stress.


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National Junior Angus Show LouisviLLe, KentucKy Sunday, July 15 All day Cattle may begin arriving, set up stalls and move-in

Monday, July 16 8:00am Exhibitors Meeting – Broadbent 9am – 12pm Cattle Check-In - DEADLINE: 12:00 p.m. – Pavilion 9am – 12pm Contest sign up – West Hall Turn in: Posters, Scrapbooks, Auction Items 10am – 4pm Hospitality Open – West Hall 11:00 a.m. Queens Luncheon – Kentucky Derby Museum 12:00 Noon Cattle Check-In Deadline & Contest Sign-up Deadline 12:15 p.m. Advisors Meeting – West Hall (Room W3) 12:15 p.m. Check-In and Weigh Carcass Steers – Pavilion 1:00 p.m. Cook-off Information Meeting – West Hall 2:00 p.m. Candidate/Delegate Meeting – West Hall 2:15 p.m. Coloring Session (Age 9 and under) – West Hall 2:15 p.m. Mentoring Mixer – West Hall 3:15 p.m. State Line-up and Picture – Broadbent 4:00 p.m. Opening Ceremonies – Broadbent TBA Banana Splits- TBA Tuesday, July 17 7:00 a.m. Angus Foundation Golf Tournament – Quail Chase Golf Club 7:30 a.m. Prepared Speaking Contest – West Hall 7:30 a.m. Career Development Contest – West Hall 8:00 a.m. Judge Scrapbooks & Posters – West Hall 10am – 4pm Hospitality Open – West Hall 10am – 6pm Trade Show Open – West Hall and Cattle Barn 10:30 a.m. Cattle Judging Contest – Broadbent 1:00 p.m. Cook-Off Contest – West Hall 6:00 p.m. Annual Meeting of the NJAA – Crowne Plaza Hotel Wednesday, July 18 8am – 6pm Trade Show & Silent Auction – West Hall & Cattle Barn 8:00 a.m. Begin Show – Broadbent Bred & Owned Heifers 10am – 4pm Hospitality Open – West Hall 12:00 noon Extemporaneous Speaking Contest - Begin Prep Time 12:30 p.m. Extemporaneous Speaking Contest - Begin Speeches 2:30 p.m. Team Sales Competition – Broadbent 3:30 p.m. Amer. Angus Auxiliary Social & Meeting– West Hall 4:30 p.m. Angus Auxiliary ‘Rounding up Scholarship Money’ 5:00 p.m. Angus Auxiliary ‘Wearing the Crown’– West Hall 6:00 p.m. Quiz Bowl Written Test – West Hall

Thursday, July 19 8am – 6pm Trade Show & Silent Auction – West Hall & Cattle Barn 8:00 a.m. Resume Show –Broadbent Steers, Bred-and-Owned Cow-Calf Pairs, Owned Cow-Calf Pairs, Bred-and-Owned Bulls, Bred & Owned Best 5 Head 9:00 a.m. Post Quiz Bowl Final Round Qualifiers – Show Office 9 – 11 am Showmanship Check-in – Show Office 10 am – 4 pm Hospitality Open – West Hall 1:30 p.m. Showmanship Orientation & Photo Session – Broadbent Showmanship Preliminaries immediately following photos – Broadbent 4:00 p.m. Team Fitting Contest – Broadbent 5:00 p.m. Quiz Bowl Finals – West Hall Friday, July 20 8:00 a.m. Trade Show & Silent Auction –West Hall & Cattle Barn 8:00 a.m. Resume Show – Broadbent Owned Heifers (Number of divisions shown will be decided upon check-in) 10am – 4pm Hospitality Open – West Hall 11:00 a.m. Presentation of Advisor of the Year Award & Honorary Angus Foundation Awards – Broadbent 12:00 p.m. NJAS Mentoring Autograph Books Due – Show Office 1:30 p.m. Foundation Scholarship Presentations - Broadbent 4:30 p.m. NJAA Elections – West Hall 6:30 – 8:00 p.m. NJAA Awards Program – Broadbent Presentation of the Following Awards: All NJAA Contests; Gold Awards; Crystal Award; Auxiliary, CAB/NJAA, Angus Foundation Scholarships; Introduction of New NJAA Officers and Directors 9pm – 12am Junior social/dance – Crowne Plaza Hotel 9pm – 12am Adult Social – Crowne Plaza Hotel Saturday, July 21 7:00 a.m. NJAA Board Meeting – Show Office 8:00 a.m. Trade Show & Silent Auction – West Hall & Cattle Barn 8:00 a.m. Showmanship Finals & Awards – Broadbent 9am – 12pm Hospitality Open – West Hall 9:30 a.m. Resume Show – Broadbent Remainder of Owned Heifers Owned Best 5 Head, Announce Premier Breeders, Sweepstakes Winners and Auxiliary Silver Pitcher 10:00 a.m. Close Silent Auction –West Hall 12:00 noon Close Trade Show –West Hall

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National Junior Beefmaster Show Bryan/coLLege station, texas

Monday, July 23 12:00pm (firm) Cattle may begin arriving – Brazos Co. Expo. Complex Tuesday, July 24 9am – 5pm Registration Open 8:30am – 11am Leadership Conference (mandatory Board Candidates) 2:00 pm Interviews, Board of Director Candidates 3pm – 5pm Cattle Check-in located in the main arena 5:00 pm JBBA Board Meeting (mandatory Board Candidates) Wednesday, July 25 8am – 12pm Registration Open 8am – 12pm Beef Industry Seminar 12:00 noon Kick-off Luncheon and sign up for contests 2:00 pm Ultrasound steers 2pm – 5pm Cattle Check-in located in the show ring 3:00 pm Herdsman Quiz Dutch Treat Supper 7:30 pm Family Fun Night Thursday, July 26 8am – 9am Cattle Check-in (must be checked in by 9:00 AM) 8:00 am Senior Public Speaking – Brazos Co. Expo. Complex 9:00 am Junior Public Speaking – Brazos Co. Expo. Complex Intermed. Public Speaking – Brazos Co. Expo. Complex 9:00 am Cattle must be in place and checked in by show officials 12:30 pm Lunch 1:30 pm Judging Contest 3:30 pm General Meeting, Director Elections & Coloring Contest 6:30 pm Supper followed by auction of Calcutta Showmen Friday, July 27 8:00 am Showmanship Contest followed by PeeWee Showmanship (5 & under) and Calcutta Showmanship 11:00 am Steer Show 12:00 noon Lunch 2:00 pm National Bred & Owned Heifer Show; Immediately followed by the Haltered Bull Show 6:00 pm Supper – followed by Live Fun Auction Saturday, July 28 8:00 am 2012 National Heifer Show Lunch – Dutch treat (snack bar will be open) 7:00 pm Awards Banquet & Dance – Brazos Co. Expo. Complex Sunday, July 29 11:00 am Cattle must be off grounds

98 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

National Junior Brahman Show shawnee, oKLahoma

Monday, July 23 - Facilities available for cattle. 4:00 p.m. AJBA Jr. Board Meeting - Conference Center, Room 3 Tuesday, July 24 7:00 a.m. AJBA Jr. Board Meeting - Conference Center, Room 3 8:00 a.m. Queen & Princess Contest Meeting - Conf. Center 8 - 10am Exhibitor Registration - Conference Center Lobby Autograph Contest Begins 10:00 a.m. All Cattle Must Be In Place 1:00 p.m Weighing & Measuring of Show Cattle - Arena C 1:30 p.m. Photography/Poster Contest Judging 2:00 p.m. Public Speaking Contest - Conference Center 6:30 - 8pm Opening Ceremonies, Welcome Supper, Semen Auction & Fun Auction - Conference Center Wednesday, July 25 8:00 a.m. Showmanship Contest - Judge: Gerald Young Thursday, July 26 8:00 a.m. Bred & Owned Judging - Judge: Paul Maulsby 2:30 p.m. Queen & Princess Tea/Interview - Conference Center 4:00 p.m. Shawnee Bailey Interviews - Conference Center Friday, July 27 8:00 a.m. Female Judging - Judge: Brett Barber 11:30am - 12:30pm Hot Dog Lunch - Concession Area G 3:00 p.m. AJBA Annual Membership Meeting - Arena C Autograph Contest Due Herdsman Quiz - Conference Center Banquet Hall Saturday, July 28 8:00 a.m. Bull Judging 6:30 p.m. Awards Banquet - Conference Center Banquet Hall 9pm -12am Dance


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Charolais Jr. Nat’l grand isLand, neB. National Junior Braunvieh Show hope, arKansas

Sunday, June 3, 2012 All day Barns available for stalling 7 pm Pizza Social & Swimming at hotel Monday, June 4, 2012 9 am Cattle must be in place, stalled in barn 10 am Exhibitor Meeting Poster, Writing & Photo Entries Due, Cattlemen’s Quiz Processing of Cattle (Jr Committee to verify tattoos and papers) Deadline for Banquet Tickets - $20/person NOON Lunch (Burgers & etc) 1 pm Livestock Judging Contest 4 pm Salesmanship Contest 5 pm Barnyard Olympics – Jessica Johnston 6 pm Supper – Cattle Released to Tie Outs Tuesday, June 5, 2012 9 am Cattle must be in place, stalled in barn 10 am Showmanship Contest (no fitting) Bred & Owned Show (Bulls, Percentage Heifers, Purebred Heifers) Costume Contest (immediately following, 15 min break to prepare) 2 pm Fitting Contest 5 pm Cattle Released to Tie Outs 6pm Banquet –Fairgrounds - $20 Tickets in Advance (Junior Awards, State Basket Auction) Wednesday, June 6, 2012 10 am Cattle must be in place, stalled in barn. Junior Steer and Heifer Show (no fitting) Steers - Prospect (up to 900 lbs) Market (901 lbs and over) Females (youngest to oldest Beefbuilder/Percentage Pairs Beefbuilder/Percentage Heifers Percentage State Group Class (best 4 head, per state) Fullblood/Purebred Pairs Fullblood/Purebred Heifers Drawing of Raffle Ticket Female Fullblood/Purebred State Group Class (best 4 head) Following Show All Cattle Released – have a safe trip home!

Sunday, June 17 8 a.m. Barn stallings posted; Earliest admittance to the barn 11 – 4 p.m. Leadership Conf. & Contest Check-In - Swine Arena 1 – 4 p.m. Cattle Check-In – Cattle Barn 4 p.m. All cattle must be on the grounds 4 p.m. Peer Mentor/Mentee Introductions — Swine Arena 5 – 6 p.m. Opening Ceremonies — Livestock Arena 6 p.m. Conference Dinner — Swine Arena Conference Hall 7 p.m. Barnyard Olympics

Monday, June 18 7 – 9 a.m. Grand Chute-Out Breakfast – Swine Arena 8 a.m. Weigh Steers — West of Livestock Arena 9 a.m. Adult, chaperone and advisor meeting – Swine Arena 9:30 – 11 a.m. Conference Session — Livestock Arena & VIP Lounge 11 a.m. Caucus Meeting/Area Meetings — Swine Arena 11:30 a.m. Grand Chute-Out Lunch – Swine Arena 1 p.m. Cook-off Contest – Swine Arena Conference Hall 4 – 5:30 p.m. Conference Session — Livestock Arena & VIP Lounge 5:30 p.m. Grand Chute-Out Dinner — Swine Arena Tuesday, June 19 7 – 9 a.m. Grand Chute-Out Breakfast 8 a.m. Speech & Interview Contests – Holiday Inn Midtown 11:30 a.m Grand Chute-Out Lunch – Swine Arena 12:30 p.m. Area Meetings & Director Elections — Livestock Arena 2 p.m. Team Fitting Contest – Sheep Barn & Livestock Arena Team Sales Contest — Livestock Arena 7 p.m. Grand Chute-Out Dinner and Activity off Grounds Wednesday, June 20 7 – 9 a.m. Grand Chute-Out Breakfast — Swine Arena 8 a.m. Bull, Steer, % Heifer, Bred & Owned Heifer Shows 11:30 a.m. Grand Chute-Out Lunch — Swine Arena 2 p.m. Quiz Bowl Contest – VIP Lounge & Swine Arena 5:30 p.m. Grand Chute-Out Dinner — Swine Arena 7 pm. Talent & Skit Night – Swine Arena Conference Hall Thursday, June 21 7 – 9 a.m. Grand Chute-Out Breakfast – Swine Arena 7:30 a.m. Showmanship Contest – Livestock Arena 11:30 a.m Conference Lunch & Awards Program – Swine Arena 2:00 p.m. Conference Session — Swine Arena Conference Hall 2:30 p.m. Adult Golf Scramble — Indianhead Golf Club 3 – 5 p.m. AIJCA Annual Membership Meeting – Swine Arena 3:30 p.m. Adult Conference Session — VIP Lounge 5:30 p.m. Officer Elections — VIP Lounge Friday, June 22 7 – 9 a.m. 8 a.m. 11:30 a.m. 7 p.m.

Grand Chute-Out Breakfast — Swine Arena Heifer Show — Livestock Arena Grand Chute-Out Lunch — Swine Arena Conference Hall AIJCA Annual Awards Banquet — Swine Arena Cattle released at the conclusion of the banquet

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Gelbvieh Jr. Classic chiLLicothe, missouri Sunday, July 1 8:00 am 11:00 am 1:00 pm 1:00 pm 5:00 pm 8:00 pm

Set up in barn allowed AGJA Board Meeting Cattle must be in place Come and go check-in Opening Ceremonies, Mentor/Protege orientation Board Candidate Orientation

Monday, July 2 8:00 am 9:30 am Noon 1:00 pm 2:30 pm 5:00 pm 6:00 pm

AGJA Carcass Evaluation Contest AGJA Impromptu Contest Lunch AGJA Sales Talk Contest AGJA Ambassador interviews Steer weigh-in Dinner, sponsored; Board Candidate Interviews

Tuesday, July 3 8:00 am Noon 1:00 pm 2:30 pm 3:00 pm 4:30 pm 6:00 pm

AGJA Judging Contest Lunch, sponsored Stock Show University Team Fitting Set Up Senior Team Fitting Contest Junior/Intermediate Team Fitting Contest Dinner, sponsored

Wednesday, July 4 8:00 am AGJA Quiz Bowl Preliminary Rounds 9:00 am Scott Gemar Memorial Adult Golf Tournament 11:30 am AGJA Quiz Bowl Finals 12:30 pm Lunch, sponsored 1:30 pm Fun Day Thursday, July 5 8:00 am AGJA National Showmanship Contest Steer Show, Bred & Owned Balancer Bull Show, then Balancer Female Show 6:00 pm Dinner 7:00 pm AGJA Annual Meeting and Board Election Friday, July 6 8:00 am 6:00 pm 9:00 pm

Bred & Owned Gelbvieh Bull Show, Gelbvieh Female Show Awards Banquet, held at Good Time Charlie’s AGJA Dance, held at headquarters hotel

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National Junior Limousin Show des moines, iowa

Saturday, July 7 8 a.m. Cattle may begin arriving 4 p.m. NALJA Board of Directors interviews, Board meeting to follow Sunday, July 8 7:30 a.m. 8 a.m. 11 a.m. 12 p.m. 5 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Church service Cattle check-in State officers and advisors meeting Showmanship Stock Show University Tenderfoot Social

Monday, July 9 8 a.m. 12:30 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

Cow Camp Beef cook-off Membership meeting Opening ceremonies with meal and entertainment

Tuesday, July 10 8 a.m. Lim-Flex® females, Bred & Owned females, and Steers *Carcass contest to follow immediately after show is over Wednesday, July 11 8 a.m. Bred and Owned Lim-Flex bulls, Bred and Owned Purebred bulls, Owned heifer show Thursday, July 12 7:30 a.m. Judging registration 8 a.m. Judging contest 10:00 a.m. Public speaking 12 p.m. Bus Departs for Ames and Carcass Education Event 5 p.m. Cow Camp finals Presidential election immediately follows Friday, July 13 8 a.m. All-American Limousin Futurity 7 p.m. Awards banquet, with dance to follow


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Junior National Hereford Expo grand isLand, neB. Sunday, July 1 Noon Outdoor tie spaces available for early arriving cattle Barn available for setting up stalls 1 p.m. NJHA, AHA staff, host state and candidates meeting 2 p.m. National Junior Merit, Ed Bible, NOP Founders, Golden Bull Achievement, John Wayne, Future Cattleman and Hereford Herdsman interviews 6 p.m. NJHA director candidate interviews Monday, July 2 Cattle may enter the barns 7:30 a.m. Begin cattle processing 7:30am–5pm People registration in show office 9 a.m. Case IH Plant Tour A 1 p.m. Case IH Plant Tour B 2 p.m. State advisors meeting, hand out contest sign-up packets, turn in posters and scrapbooks 3 p.m. Process steers (weigh and ultrasound) 3 p.m. Illustrated speech contest 4 p.m. Hereford Idol – trade show stage 5 p.m. All cattle must be in the barn and processed 7 p.m. Contest sign-up deadline — all advisors must turn in contest sign-up packets at show office 7:30 p.m. State delegate meeting followed by candidate round table and meet-the-candidates dinner Tuesday, July 3 8 a.m. 9 a.m.-Noon 9 a.m. 9 a.m. 11 a.m. Noon 1 p.m. 1 p.m. 3 p.m. 4 p.m.

Hereford bowl written test People registration – show office Case IH Plant Tour C Great American CHB Grill-off 3-on-3 basketball State silent auction baskets must be in place Case IH Plant Tour D Queen’s tea and queen orientation Mentoring mixer State group pictures

5 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Opening ceremonies Whiskey Creek hamburger fry followed by junior dance – Swine Arena and Adult Social – Barn Bar

Wednesday, July 4 Sure Champ T-Shirt Day 8 a.m. Cattle judging contest 10 a.m. Team marketing: senior and junior 11 a.m. Extemporaneous speech contest (First preparation starts at 10:30 a.m.) Noon Hereford bowl—final “buzzer” round 2 p.m. Stock Show University fitting demonstration 4 p.m. Stock Show University team fitting contest 7 p.m. NJHA membership meeting – election of NJHA directors Thursday, July 5 7-9 a.m. Omelet Breakfast in the Trade Show 8 a.m. Stock Show University national showmanship contest Ring 1: senior, intermediate, and senior final Ring 2: junior and peewee divisions Friday, July 6 8 a.m. 6 p.m.

Cow-calf pairs, bred-and-owned bulls, junior AI bulls, bred-and-owned heifers, junior AI heifers Steer show and BBQ dinner

Saturday, July 7 8 a.m. Begin owned heifer show 6 p.m. Awards steak dinner and ceremony Sunday, July 8 7 a.m. Cowboy Church with Susie McEntire 8 a.m. Resume owned heifer show, followed by the announcement of premier breeder and exhibitor, Walter and Joe Lewis Memorial, golden pitchfork and herdsman of the year award winners, and then all group classes.

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Chi-Maine Jr. Nat’l Lima, ohio

Saturday, June 16 3 – 6 p.m. Cattle and Contest Check-in 7 p.m. Chi and Maine-Anjou Junior Board Meeting Sunday, June 17 *Vita Ferm T-Shirt Day* Lunch 9 a.m. Maine-Anjou Advisor/Delegate Meeting 9:30 a.m. Chi Exhibitor Meeting 10:30 a.m. Stockman’s Challenge (Chi & Maine) 12 p.m. Chi and Maine Queen and Princess Interviews 1 p.m. Maine Cook-Off 4 p.m. Maine Poster Contest 6 p.m. Lineup for Opening Ceremonies 6:30 p.m. Opening Ceremonies & Dinner Monday, June 18 * Breakfast & Lunch 8 a.m. Stock Show U Maine and Chi Showmanship 1 p.m. Speech contest (Chi & Maine) 3:30 p.m. She’s A Lady 5 p.m. Chi Quiz Bowl Tuesday, June 19 * Breakfast & Dinner 8 a.m. Salesmanship (Chi & Maine) 12:30 p.m. Maine Sullivan Supply/Stock Show U Team Fitting 4:30 p.m. Livestock Judging (Chi & Maine) 6 p.m. Maine-Anjou & Chi Fun night Wednesday, June 20 * Breakfast & Lunch 8 a.m. Maine-Anjou Steers, Bulls and Fullbloods 12 p.m. Chi Team Fitting 4 p.m. Maine Annual Meeting 5 p.m. Chi Annual Meeting 5:30 p.m. Kirk Stierwalt Fitting Clinic 6:30 p.m. ACA Foundation Kick Off & AJCA Fundraiser Thursday, June 21 * Breakfast 8 a.m. B&O MaineTainer, Owned MaineTainers shows 8 a.m. Chi Steers, Bulls and ChiAngus shows 5:30 p.m. Chi and Maine Annual Banquet Friday, June 22 * Breakfast 8 a.m. B&O Maine-Anjou then Owned Maine-Anjou shows 8 a.m. ChiMaine and Chianina shows

102 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

North Amer. Junior Red Angus Event hutchinson, Kansas

Wednesdsay, June 20 8 a.m. Ambassador and Advisor meeting 9 a.m. New Ambassador Interviews 10 a.m. Hospitality Booth all day 11 a.m. All cattle must be in place. Ambassadors will have an informal meeting with the exhibitors. Scavenger Hunt Rules explained. Ice breaker 12 p.m. Lunch and Check - in 3 p.m. Team Fitting 6 p.m. Opening Ceremonies Thursday, June 21 7 a.m. Ambassador and Advisor meeting 9 a.m. Photos in Place 9 - 12 p.m. Public Speaking Contest 10 Hospitality Booth All day 1 – 2 p.m. Sales Contest 3 p.m. Herdsman Quiz Friday, June 22 7 a.m. 8 a.m. 10 a.m. 11 a.m. 1 p.m. 6:30 p.m.

Ambassador and Advisor meeting Livestock Judging Hospitality Booth all day Showmanship Contest Futurity Show Awards Banquet & Auction for 2012 Show.

Saturday, June 23 Breakfast and Lunch will be on the grounds 9 a.m. All exhibitors to the show ring for a group photograph, in your show shirt. 9:30 a.m. Show Steers, Bred & Owned Bulls, Bred & Owned Heifers, & Owned Heifers


Jr SchNati ed oNa ul l eS

Salers Junior Nationals

duQuoin, iLLinois

Red Poll Summer Preview aLexandria, indiana

Friday, June 15 9:00 am Fairgrounds open for cattle to begin arriving 6:30 pm Pool Party – location TBD 9:00 pm Animals must be on grounds unless other arrangements are made in advance. Saturday, June 16 9:00 am Weigh steers and check heifer papers 10:00 am ARPA Board of Directors Meeting 11:30 am AJRPA Meeting 11:30 am Indiana Red Poll Association Summer Meeting 2:00 pm Junior Activities Workshop/Presentation Old Timers Showmanship contest 6:00 pm Open House/Meal at Shuter Sunset Farms Junior Endowment Silent Auction Sunday, June 17 9:00 am Showtime Steers Bulls: youngest to oldest Cow/Calf Heifers: youngest to oldest Group classes: pair of females; get-of-sire Showmanship : Sr/Jr/Beginner/PeeWee

Tuesday, July 10

Cattle may start arriving (tie-outs)

Wednesday, July 11 8:00 a.m. Cattle may start arriving at the arena 1:00-3:00 p.m. Cattle Check-in and Registration 3:00-3:45 p.m. Ice Breakers- ASJA Members attendance required 6:30 p.m. Pizza, Ice Cream Party, & Barnyard Olympics Thursday, July 12 8:00-8:15 a.m. Morning Round-Up 9:00-10:30 a.m. Team Fitting 12:00 p.m. 2012 ASJA Board of Director Applications Due 1:30-3:30 p.m. Quiz Bowl 3:45-4:15 p.m. Junior Art Activity 4:15-5:15 p.m. Advertising Contest 6:00 p.m. Tailgate Cook-off 7:30 p.m. Board of Director Interviews 8:00 p.m. Swimming at the Hotel Friday, July 13 8:00-8:15 a.m. Morning Round-Up 8:15-8:45 a.m. Steer Weigh-In 8:45-10:30 a.m. No Fit Showmanship, Alumni Showmanship, and Bucket Calf Show 12:30-1:30 p.m. Lunch 2:00 p.m. ASJA Annual Meeting- ASJA Members required to attend 2:30 - 3:30 p.m. ASJA Queen and Princess Contest 4:00 - 5:30 p.m. Team Marketing Contest 7:00 p.m. Dinner Saturday, July 14 9:15 a.m. ASJA Junior National Show Showmanship Showdown to follow 5:00 p.m. Awards Banquet

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al N tiouleS a N Jr ched S

National Junior Shorthorn Show grand isLand, neB.

Monday, June 25 8:00 a.m. Stall Set up and cattle allowed in the barns 5:30 p.m. Barnyard Olympics Tuesday, June 26 8:00 a.m. ALL CATTLE MUST BE STALLED 8:00 a.m. State Advisors and Exhibitor meeting 9:00 am-noon Process cattle & registration for all contests 11:30 a.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. Judging of arts etc., poster, graphic design, photography and state projects 1:15 p.m. Youth Conference I, Mentor-Apprentice Sign-up 1:15 p.m. Shorthorn Sidekicks – Session I 2:30 p.m. Speech Contest 6:00 p.m. Start taking state group photos 7:00 p.m. Opening Ceremonies, followed by Brisket dinner Wednesday, June 27 8:00 a.m. Showmanship 11:30 a.m. Lunch 1:00 p.m. Youth Conference II 1:00 p.m. Shorthorn Sidekicks – Session II 2:30 p.m. Quiz Bowl Contest 3:30 p.m. Team Salesmanship Contest 5:30 p.m. Show Stock University TBA Annual Lassie Meeting Evening Exhibitor Street Dance and Adult Social Thursday, June 28 7:00 a.m. Donuts, Juice and Coffee 8:00 a.m. Interviews for AJSA Board Candidates 8:00 a.m. Livestock Judging Contest 9:00 a.m. Golf Outing 11:00 a.m. Youth Conference III – Elections: State Delegates 11:00 a.m. Shorthorn Sidekicks – Session III 12:00 p.m. Lunch 12:30 p.m. Beef Cook-Off Contest 3:00 p.m. Team Fitting Contest 6:30 p.m. Funding the Future Sale and Dinner Friday, June 29 8:00 a.m. Show Bred & Owned Heifers, Bred & Owned Bulls, Cow/Calf Pairs, Prospect Steers, Market Steers, ShorthornPlus Steers, ShorthornPlus Heifers 12:00 p.m. Lunch 6:00 p.m. Dinner and Awards Banquet Saturday, June 30 8:00 a.m. National Junior Shorthorn Show/Junior PACE Show

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Simmental Nat. Classic Lima, ohio

Saturday, July 7 7:00 am AJSA Trustee orientation and Jr. Board meeting 8 am – 1:00 pm Cattle & contestant check-in 12:00 pm All cattle must be in place on the fairgrounds 2:30 pm Novice Program Kick Off (Rabbit Barn) 3:00 pm Mentoring Mixer (Youth Building) 4:00 pm Regional Meetings 6:00 pm Opening Ceremonies (Grandstand) 7:00 pm Cook Out 8:00 pm Street Festival Sunday, July 8 8:00 am Breakfast (Hospitality) - Devotional Service 9:00 am Interview Contest (Show Office) 10:00 am Stock Show U Fitting Clinic 12:00 pm State silent auction baskets must be in place 12:00 pm Lunch (Youth Activities Building) 1:00 pm Judging Contest 5:00 pm Dinner (Youth Activities Building) 8:30 pm Minute to Win It Contest Monday, July 9 8:00 am Sales Talk (Schmidhorst Pavilion) 11:00 am Traveling Taco Lunch (Youth Activities Building) 11:30 am Public Speaking (Howard Johnson) 6:00 pm Dinner (Youth Activities Building) 7:00 pm Cook Off Contest (Grandstand Plaza Stage) Tuesday, July 10 7:00 am Breakfast (Hospitality) 8:00 am Showmanship 12:00 pm Lunch (Youth Activities Building) 2:30 pm Simmental’s Got Talent! (Grandstand Plaza Stage) 4:30 pm Cattlemen’s Quiz (Youth and Fine Arts Building) 6:00 pm Dinner (Youth Activities Building) Wednesday, July 11 7:00 am Breakfast (Hospitality) 8:00 am Simbrah, Fullblood, and Steer Shows 10:00 am Percentage Female Show 12:00 pm Lunch (Wildcat Den) 5:00 pm Skill-a-thon (Youth Activities and Fine Arts Buildings) 6:00 pm Dinner (Youth Activities Building) 8:00 pm Fun Night (Howard Johnson Grand Ball Room) Thursday, July 12 7:00 am Breakfast (Hospitality) 8:00 am Purebred Show 9 am – 2:00 pm Election Polls Open for Voting (Show Office) 5:00 pm Dinner (Youth Activities Building) 8:00 pm Dance (Howard Johnson Grand Ball Room) Friday, July 13 7:00 am Breakfast (Hospitality) 9:00 am Fitting Contest (Schmidthorst Pavilion) 11:00 am Town Hall Meeting with Dr. Jerry Lipsey 12:30 pm Lunch (Youth Activities Building) 5:00 pm Dinner (Lima Convention Center Banquet Hall) 7:00 pm AJSA Pinnacle Auction & Awards Banquet


American Chianina Association Celebrates 40th Anniversary By Stan Comer, ACA Chief Executive Officer

The American Chianina Association was formed in 1972, after the first half-blood calves were born in the United States. As many of you know, U.S. military members serving in Italy saw Fullblood Chianina for the first time during World War II. There was a need in the cattle industry in this country to increase the size, growth efficiency and muscle of American (British) breeds of cattle. Chianina were the most majestic, large-framed and structurally correct cattle that U.S. cattlemen had ever seen. Several pioneer cattle producers made the investment to bring Chianina semen to the U.S. in 1971 and began importing live cattle in 1972. The introduction of Continental breeds of cattle to the U.S. sparked the single most significant change the U.S. cattle business had ever seen. The events that took place over the course of the first 40 years have been a roller coaster ride to say the least. After the first Chianina crossbred steer was named Grand Champion at the Chicago International Livestock Show, cattlemen across the U.S. couldn’t get Chianina bulls fast enough. Demand was high and supply was short, so culling was very limited. No breed is strong enough on its own to withstand no culling. Subsequently, traits traditionally culled for in beef cattle started showing up in the crossbreeding with other breeds. The American Chianina Association spent the better part of the next 25 years trying to correct and improve the selection issues of the early phenomenal growth of the association and registration numbers. Many breeds of cattle in the U.S., however, took note of the superior growth and unique phenotype and incorporated the Chianina gene into their herds for improvement. The ACA was among the first breed associations to incorporate a composite registry. Chiangus, Chiford, Red Chiangus and ChiMaine were added to the Chianina registrations in the 1980s. The addition of these composites opened up a new avenue of versatility in breeding Chianina genetics. The ACA Board of Directors, along with the Long Range Planning Committee, have worked very diligently to create and adopt programs and policies that will help grow and improve the brand awareness of the Chianina breed throughout the cattle industry. In 2012, the American Chianina Association Foundation was approved by the Board of Directors and formed. This should be one of the single most influential programs to sustain and help grow both the ACA and AJCA.

Highlights in Chianina History 1983 1993

1978

1988

1973

The first ACJ (called the American Chianina Journal at that The ACA office building in time) was published in April. In the inaugural cover story, the Platte City was officially dedicated on July 8, 1983. The dedicastaff emphasized that the association’s philosophy was to never tion was held during the Sixth Annual National Junior Heifer attempt to portray to breeders “the ideal Chianina bull or cow,” Show. Charles Burk served as the master of ceremonies. and to “hopefully never stereotype or standardize our breeders’ thinking as to the type, structure or color pattern of this magnifi• Chianina Lite Beef, Inc. opened its first retail store in the cent breed. Always mindful that in nature, differences are more Dallas-Fort Worth area. precious for survival than likenesses”. • Chianina cattle won every interbreed competition in which they entered at the 1988 National Western Stock Show in Denver. The Houston Livestock Show Grand Champion Market Steer, a Chianina crosses won three of the four division championship in Chianina quarter-blood, brought $47,500 at the sale. The steer the Fed Beef Contest, winning grand and reserve grand champion was exhibited by Paul Ray, Big Springs, Texas. heifer and reserve champion steer. The Grand Champion steer, • A three-quarter Chianina bull shattered all the average daily exhibited by Doug Washam, was also the best carcass. gain records at the Noble Foundation Performance Test Center • Walco KY Colonel, the only Chianina bull (as of 1988) to have in Ardmore, Okla. The Idalgo son, owned by Clyde Miller, Lone won two ACA National Champion titles and also to have been Grove, Okla., gained an average of 4.79 lbs/day over 140 days. named Show Sire of the Year twice, died. His passing and the sale • The national board unanimously approved the establishment of of the Walco herd marked the end of a chapter in Chianina breed a Junior Membership program. history. At maturity, Colonel stood 74 inches at his withers and his • The first National Junior Heifer Show was held in Louisville, Ky., top weight was 3,880 lbs. in conjunction with the ACA National Show. • Dr. Jack Phillips, the first ACA CEO, passed away Nov. 6, 1988. • Lombard became the second Chianina bull to qualify as a Golden Certified Meat Sire. The program’s objective is to identify Eagle Scout 2CA made history at the 1998 National Show superior sires in all breeds of beef cattle which produce offspring when he was named Grand Champion Chiangus Bull for the that excel in the most economically important growth and carcass third year in a row. Eagle Scout claimed the same honor in traits. 1996 and 1997. This success has not been matched since. June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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Do you have a photo celebrating the great outdoors? Due to the popular response we received, we’ll be sharing bits and bites of SC Outdoors throughout the year. Submit your stories or photos to sharla@theshowciruit.com.

Diseases

People Can Get From Wildlife

Whether you’re a hunter, fisherman, hiker or trail rider, people who spend time in the great outdoors are susceptible to more wildlife-related diseases than any of us would care to think. Some diseases can be contracted by handling the animals or carcasses; others can be contracted simply from inhaling. Here’s the lowdown on a few diseases more likely to affect you when playing outside. Disease: Hantavirus Animals Affected: Wild Hod do you get it? You may contract it by breathing virus carried on dust particles from mouse feces, dried urine or nesting materials. How To Protect Yourself: Rodent-proof your home / cabin/barn. Avoid contact with rodents and their feces. Wear a protective mask when you work in enclosed spaces where rodents live. Symptoms in People: The early symptoms of hantavirus disease are similar to the flu and include: Chills, fever, muscle aches. People with hantavirus may begin to feel better for a very short amount of time, but within 1-2 days, it becomes hard to breathe. The disease gets worse quickly. Symptoms include: Dry cough, general ill feeling (malaise), headache, nausea and vomiting, shortness of breath . Safe for Pets? Yes, although pet rodents should be kept away from wild rodents and their habitats.

in people. Small, painless sore, blister, or ulcer with a black centre. Identify early. Treat with antibiotics • Inhalation (lungs) anthrax: Fever, sore throat, general ill-feeling, cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, breathing difficulties, death. • Gastrointestinal (digestive) anthrax: Fever, loss of appetite, vomiting,diarrhea, stomach pain. Safe for Pets? No. Carcasses should not be opened or cut into.

Disease: DipHyllobotHriasis Animals Affected: Many species of freshwater fish and salmon. Hod do you get it? By consuming raw or undercooked fish. People can develop mature tapeworms in their intestines. There aremedications that can kill and remove the worms. How To Protect Yourself: Kill the worms through cooking (63 degrees C or 145 degrees F) or freezing( -18 degrees C or -39 degrees F). Symptoms in People: Most people have no or mild symptoms. Massive infection may cause Disease: antHrax numbness of extremities. Additional symptoms Animals Affected: Bison, Cervids may include: Loss of appetite, Paleness, ShortHod do you get it? Through cuts, open sores and scratches. Inhal- ness of breath, Weakness, Confusion. ing spores from contaminated materials, such Safe for Pets? Not raw! Cook or freeze it first. as dust and grass. Eating undercooked meat. These worms can survive and grow in dog intestines. Inhaled anthrax is fatal. How To Protect Yourself: Do not touch or eat animals suspected of having anthrax. Wear Disease: leptospirosis a proper filter mask. Contact the local public Animals Affected: Rodents, beaver, deer, raccoon. health authorities. Symptoms in People: Cutaneous (skin) anthrax Hod do you get it? is the most common type of anthrax infection Contact with urine or tissues of infected ani-

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mals; or contact with water, soil or vegetation contaminated by infected urine. Or by consumption of food or drinking water contaminated by infected urine. How To Protect Yourself: When handling rodents (including beavers) and raccoons: wear disposable gloves, wash your hands afterwards, clean cuts or wounds with soap and water, wear boots when wading in water. Symptoms in People: Most people will not have symptoms. If symptoms do occur, they can include: high fever, severe headache, chills, muscle aches, and vomiting. Other symptoms can include: Jaundice (yellow skin and eyes), red eyes, abdominal pain, diarrhea, rash. If untreated, symptoms can include: kidney damage, liver failure, breathing problems, headache, stiff neck. Fatalities are rare. Safe for Pets? In severe cases, pets can die from leptospirosis. Pets can also transfer the bacteria to you. Talk to your veterinarian about vaccines. Disease: plague Animals Affected: Flea, rodents, squirrels, mink, marten, bobcat and lynx. Hod do you get it? Being bitten by an infected rodent or flea. Contact with abscesses on infected animals. And through bites and scratches. Also inhaling infectious airborne droplets (rare). How To Protect Yourself: Avoid rodents. Prevent flea bites by wearing: long sleeved clothing and disposable gloves. Do not consume infected animals. Wear a proper filter mask. Wash puncture wounds and scratches with soap and water. Symptoms in People: Bubonic form (flea bite):


June 2, 2012 ............. Black Hereford Ranch’s Cream of the Crop Sale September 5, 2012 ....................Eckloff/Strolberg Private Treaty Sale June 2, 2012 .................. Southwest Minnesota Spring Training Sales September 9, 2012 .....................Schaeffer & Tice Private Treaty Sale June 5, 2012 ..................Burch Livestock Spring Pasture Bid-Off Sale September 10, 2012 .........................American Royal Entry Deadline June 10, 2012 .............................WJHA Open Hereford Jackpot Show September 10, 2012 .... American Royal Heifer Ownership Deadline June 10, 2012 .......................................... WLBA Junior Preview Show September 15, 2012 ...... Scheetz Cattle Company Second Sale Event June 12, 2012 .................................. Cabaniss Online Production Sale September 16, 2012 .......................... Tremendous 12 Sale Bids Close June 13, 2012 ..................................M Lazy Hearts Western Shootout September 17, 2012 .............NWSS Steer DNA/Ownership Deadline June 15-22, 2012 ............. Chi & Maine-Anjou Junior National Show September 20, 2012 ...............Thompson Show Steers Club Calf Sale June 25-30, 2012 ............................ Midwest Classic Wether Sire Sale September 22, 2012 .............................. Reimann Ranch Pasture Sale June 25-30, 2012 .............................National Junior Shorthorn Show September 27-30, 2012 .......AK-SAR-BEN 4-H Stock Show & Rodeo July 21, 2012 .....................Bureau County Cattlemens’s Classic Show September 30, 2012 ..... Streitmatter Show Cattle Private Treaty Sale

Coming EvEnts

June 2-3, 2012 ...................... Bennett Shorthorns Private Treaty Sale September 3, 2012 ............... Sullivan Farms Genetics That Win Sale

August 1, 2012....Am. Royal Mkt Hog, Goat & Lamb DNA Deadline October 7, 2012 ..................... Sullivan Farms Maternal Legends Sale August 1, 2012. Am. Royal Hog, Goat & Sheep Ownership Deadline November 1, 2012 ............... NWSS Jr. Market Swine Entry Deadline August 1, 2012......................NWSS Jr. Market Swine Draw Deadline November 1, 2012 .................. NWSS Jr. Market Beef Entry Deadline Aug. 18-Sept. 6, 2012 ............Lueking/Rockfalls Private Pasture Sale November 1, 2012 ...NWSS Mkt Lamb & Goat DNA/Entry Deadline Aug. 31-Sept. 16, 2012 .................................. West Central Iowa Sales This list is provided as a courtesy. While we do our best to keep a complete and

accurate Coming Events list, occasionally errors or omissions may occur. We are

September 1, 2012 .............................Cates Farms Star Search X Sale not liable and make no guarantees regarding the accuracy of its content.

Fever and general illness, swollen/painful/ hot lymph nodes, tissue swelling around the flea bite. Septicemic (in blood) or pneumonic (in lungs) form: Fever and signs of shock, breathing problems, including cough, excessive bleeding and even death. Safe for Pets? No. Carnivores may be infected when they eat infected tissues. Once infected, pets can potentially cause illness to you or your family.

unusual behavior should not be approached. Do not touch! Contact local health authorities. Symptoms in People: RABIES IS SERIOUS - IT CAN BE FATAL. Symptoms may not be detected for weeks, months or years. Symptoms may start with: Pain, tingling or itching near exposure site, fever, chills, fatigue, muscle aches, irritability. Additional symptoms can include: high fever, confusion, agitation, seizures, coma, headache, paralysis and incoordination. If bitten or scratched by a suspect animal: Clean and flush Disease: rabies wound with soap and water. Seek medical attenAnimals Affected: Bat and any mammal tion immediately! Hod do you get it? Safe for Pets? No! Talk to your vet about vacFrom the bite or scratch of an infected animal. cines. And from saliva of infected animals that touches your eyes, nose, mouth, or skin wounds. Disease: tuberculosis How To Protect Yourself: Any animal that shows Animals Affected: Bison, cervids, birds

Hod do you get it? Inhaling bacteria from open wounds, fluids from the mouth and nose, or feces of an infected animal. Also directly through breaks in the skin (rare). How To Protect Yourself: If you see multiple pale (tan or yellow) rounded lumps on lungs, rib cage or internal organs in bison or cervids: STOP HANDLING THE ANIMAL. Wash your hands and wear a proper filter mask. Symptoms in People: Dependent on where lesions are located: Lungs - Prolonged illness with fever, cough, night sweats, weight loss, occasionally coughing up blood. Intestines - Stomach pain, diarrhea. Symptoms get worse with time, if left untreated, disease can be FATAL. Immunosuppressed people are at a higher risk. Safe for Pets? No.

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Bringing you news and views from throughout the agriculture industry. If you have something to share, email sharla@theshowcircuit.com.

New BQA Videos AVAilABle for CAttle ProduCers, eduCAtors

The beef checkoff ’s Beef Quality Assurance (BQA) program recently released two educational videos geared toward cattle producers and quality assurance educators. The first of the two videos titled “BQA Cattle Handling Tips for Cow/Calf Producers”, was created to demonstrate how to handle different types of cattle (bulls, cows, heifers, calves, and pairs) on cow/calf, stocker and seedstock operations. Experts Dr. Ron Gill, Curt Pate, Dr. John Maas, and others take producers though different production settings and the changing cycle of a cattle operation to understand how the handler and the cattle react to these differing situations. The second of the video series titled “BQA Facilities Design”, was created to help farmers, ranchers and cattle feeders of any size operation better understand how to properly design facilities to best suit their needs. “The BQA program continually strives to help producers better their operations, whether it be with animal care, cattle handling or record-keeping,” says Andy Salinas, cow/calf producer from Marion, Mich., and vice-chair of the industry’s producer education committee. “These instructional videos are just another way to teach producers about best management practices to ensure beef quality and keep consumers putting beef on their dinner tables.” Both videos can be viewed at www.bqa.org or on the National BQA YouTube channel.

CAttle MArkets Clouded By uNCertAiNty

Cattle markets have displayed a noticeable lack of direction lately, marked by a weak or stagnant undertone despite generally strong fundamentals, according to Dr. Derrell S. Peel, Oklahoma State University Extension Livestock Marketing Specialist. “Much of this tone is due to external factors and seems more the result of uncertainty about possible negative outcomes or uncertainty about the impact of negative outcomes than to the direct impact of decidedly negative situations,” Peel writes in the May 7th edition of OSU’s Cow-Calf Corner. “Not all the factors are external. The beef industry has had plenty of negative news in the past month with concerns over lean finely textured beef (LFTB) and the fourth case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE). “The worst of the direct impacts of LFTB is past but lingering effects will likely impact markets for several more weeks. The beef trimmings market, where prices briefly dropped by half, has recovered much of the lost value. On the other hand, the BSE case

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had almost no impact on cash markets with the negative impacts confined largely to rumor-based futures trading ahead of the official USDA announcement of the case. Most of the drop in Live and Feeder futures was recovered within a few days. Though U.S. beef exports have been largely unaffected, the situation created a breath-holding situation that has hampered markets the past two weeks. “The U.S. and global macroeconomic situation presents a bigger and growing cloud of uncertainty over cattle and beef markets,” Peel states. “Though little overtly negative news has emerged regarding the U.S. macroeconomic situation, lackluster performance such as the recent jobs data perpetuate uncertainty about the pace of growth in the economy. The persistent threat of widespread fallout due to financial collapse in several European countries was increased by recent elections in France and Greece. Concern about economic problems in Europe leads to jitters in the U.S. stock market and financial industries that not only cloud overall economic performance but lead to more direct impacts, such as additional volatility in agricultural futures markets. “Significantly higher prices have increased the capital requirements for all participants in the cattle industry. That fact, combined with rising and volatile input prices, has many producers hesitant to act aggressively despite strong cattle market fundamentals. Lenders, with close oversight by bank regulators, are likewise moving cautiously, either hesitant or limited in their ability to provide capital for livestock producers. The resulting equity requirements limit the ability of many producers, especially young producers, to participate in the current market. In the Southern Plains, this financial environment is contributing to a slow recovery from the drought forced reductions in cattle numbers so far in 2012.” “On another front, beef exports so far in 2012 have weakened from the sterling performance of the past two years. While a slowdown in exports was not a surprise, lower exports so far this year creates uncertainty about the strength of beef exports for the remainder of the year,” says Peel. However, he also points out that not all the news is bad, including a drop in gas prices and Wal-Mart’s new Choice beef promotion, both of which should help beef demand this summer. “Though cattle and beef markets have stalled a bit recently, it is important to remember that prices remain close to the record levels of the spring and it should not be surprising that it takes a bit of time for markets to regroup before moving higher,” Peel states. “Seasonal tendencies, though perhaps muted or altered in the current market, will still affect markets through the summer


period. The market fundamentals of decreasing beef production and continued tightening of animal inventories provides plenty of fuel for higher prices, but the many clouds of uncertainty limit how fast and when those fundamentals will prevail.”

No surPrises Here: foreCAst is Hot ANd dry

The Climate Prediction Center says La Niña conditions no longer play a direct role in temperature and precipitation outlooks through July. However, there may be a delayed effect in terms of soil moisture from the long, La Niña-influenced drought in many parts of the country. Models are apparently mixed in whether or not El Niño conditions are likely return later in the year. The CPC issues long-term outlooks and what it says about this summer is no surprise. The latest outlook, issued (in April), for the Long-Lead Seasonal Outlook for May, June and July indicates: “The seasonal temperature outlook…indicates below normal mean temperature for Montana and Western North Dakota; probabilities of above normal mean temperatures are enhanced from the Southwest across Texas and the South, including the Gulf Coast States, the Mississippi Valley and to the Atlantic Coast states. “The seasonal precipitation outlook … indicates probabilities of below median total precipitation for the Pacific Northwest, inland as far as Montana and Wyoming.” So where does that leave us in terms of drought? Depends on where you live – see map below.

feedBACk HelPed kill ProPosed lABor regulAtioNs

Agricultural families can breathe a sigh of relief – for now. Following a tremendous outcry, the U.S. Department of Labor withdrew updates to labor laws that would have severely restricted how and where young people could work in ag operations. From the April 26 news DOL news release: “The Obama administration is firmly committed to promoting family farmers and respecting the rural way of life, especially the role that parents and other family members play in passing those traditions down through the generations. The Obama administration is also deeply committed to listening and responding to what Americans across the country have to say about proposed rules and regulations. “As a result, the Department of Labor is announcing today the withdrawal of the proposed rule dealing with children under the age of 16 who work in agricultural vocations. “The decision to withdraw this rule – including provisions to define the ‘parental exemption’ – was made in response to thousands of comments expressing concerns about the effect of the proposed rules on small family-owned farms. To be clear, this regulation will not be pursued for the duration of the Obama administration. “Instead, the Departments of Labor and Agriculture will work with rural stakeholders – such as the American Farm Bureau Federation, the National Farmers Union, the Future Farmers of America, and 4-H – to develop an educational program to reduce accidents to young workers and promote safer agricultural working practices.” While we can probably thank our campaign-year lucky stars for the backpedal, this incident shows just how vital it is for the agricultural community to proactively address issues that affect us by engaging with the government and public about our special way of life. Congratulations to everyone who wrote, emailed or called their elected representative!

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by Sharla Ishmael

Students at TCU Ranch Management Program Get a Healthy Dose Of…..

Intense Common Sense

So you want to be a ranch manager? This longtime, respected program at Texas Christian University teaches students how to think through the complexities of managing agricultural resources with a sharp eye on both economic and ecological practicality.

In the shadows of the football stadium where Texas Christian University (TCU) football players took the private school in Fort Worth to national prominence as the Rose Bowl champs two years ago, there is a pretty little red-roofed, white building with a bronze cowboy in front of it, framed by oak trees. Inside that building, many of the students look a little different than the other 8,200 undergraduates. Most of these folks wear boots and cowboy hats, they tend to be just a little older (average age is 25), and they have the poise of someone who has the extra maturity and determination required to be successful in such a rigorous program. Over the years, these students have come from 40 different states and 22 countries to study here. “It’s not for everybody,” explains Kerry Cornelius, director of TCU Ranch Management. “We’re more interested in quality than quantity. We want to take less than 30 students at a time. This year we have 23. When we’re interviewing

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applicants, we want more maturity than your average college student to handle the work load. “When you come to interview, we’ll tell you that until you go through it, you can’t understand the intensity,” he adds. “Experience is one of the most defining requirements for successful completion of the program. When we interview, we focus on their work life. It’s not for the faint of heart. You have to be committed. We spend six hours in the classroom, five days a week, although we’re out on day trips at least one day a week. Students also go on five week-long field trips across the country as well, traveling over 9,000 miles to visit ranches, stocker operations, feedlots and farms and meet some of the most successful people in the business. “But if you ask the alumni what the best year of their life was they’re probably going to say it was the year they spent in our program. They’re learning about exactly what they want to learn about,” Cornelius says. “You don’t just learn about ranch management, you learn about time management and people skills. It’s like taking a drink out of a fire hydrant.”

In addition to classroom instruction from professors that have been handpicked for their prior (and ongoing) success in ranching and resource management, ranch management students have major projects like designing a detailed corral plan, an extensive range plan, a five-year forage plan as well as preparing for daily quizzes, tests and traveling. Then there is the one project they must successfully complete to graduate no matter what their GPA is: the Management Plan. Students have to put together a comprehensive plan for a real-life operation that will support four people. They have four months to pull together everything they’ve learned that goes into formulating enterprise budgets, cash flow analysis, depreciation schedules, inventory, carrying capacity, checkbook records, cash disbursements, breakevens, return on investment – basically anything and everything that affects the economics and outcome of the operation down to the last penny. “The biggest thing they learn is how to put a dollar figure on everything,” Cornelius explains.


“We focus on beef cattle production – purebred cow-calf, commercial cow-calf, stocker and feedlot. But the big deal is the business side. One of the neat things is if you have good, sound, business principals, you can apply that to any business.” As a matter of fact, not all TCU Ranch Management alumni end up on ranches. Cornelius says they have doctors, lawyers, bankers, restaurant managers and other business leaders that have been through the program and applied what they learned beyond their agricultural roots. Wade Perks is one of those. Although he grew up in the family’s Hereford business in Rockford, Illinois, Perks now works for his family’s 103-year-old industrial burner manufacturing business in addition to maintaining his ties to the Hereford business. “You can take a lot of the fundamentals that you learn at TCU and apply them to any business,” he says. “You learn how to think and make decisions. You learn how to be disciplined at your paperwork and stay organized. It’s intense. It’s a load of fun. More rewarding than you expect. I liked the practical application of the teaching method. “You’re among people with common interests,” he adds. “We talk about beef per acre instead of widgets. You’re not just discussing theory; they teach you practical things that you’ll use everyday. The beauty of the program is you can go through at any stage. I liked going the year after I earned my undergraduate degree at Oklahoma State University. “OSU gave me a great foundation. TCU really drove home ‘aha’ moments. My roommate and I both went to OSU. It was easier for us to study because we’d already learned how. But even if you don’t go beyond a high school education, you’ll find it interesting because of the practical application. They’re not really teaching anything that you don’t want to know. “You tend to do things off the cuff and by your gut,” Perks explains. “This program teaches you to question why. What makes that right? It builds your confidence. To some degree, they teach asset management and strategic planning. Probably half to a third of students are part of a family operation. Someday they may be in a position to hire somebody to run a ranch for them and they need to understand what to expect.” Clay Neel is a TCU Ranch Management alum who was hired to do just that. Neel now manages a large family business in South Texas that includes commercial cattle as well as oil and gas interests. As manager of the J. F. Welder Heirs Ranch Management Company, Neel oversees three ranches scattered over 45 miles located

about 20 miles from the Gulf of Mexico. “It’s fairly hot and the biggest thing is the humidity,” Neel explains. “We have parasites galore. Where in Oklahoma we could reasonably expect a 95-percent calf crop and 700-lb. steers, that is not even possible here. We fluctuate between drought and being flooded out. We have a Brahman-Hereford cow base, and we’re going to add more Red Angus. We’re trying to raise more of our own bulls because they are better adapted. We do a little ET work and maintain a small purebred herd with some AI work. “We also have an ongoing fence program; we build X number of miles of fence a year,” he adds. “I spend three days a week at the Victoria office where I also oversee some oil and gas business.” Neel grew up in Central Oklahoma around Purcell, where his dad was in the horse industry. He judged livestock at Murray State College in Tishomingo, and then graduated from Oklahoma State University with a major in animal science. He worked for the purebred beef unit while at OSU and went straight to TCU after graduation. “After I graduated from TCU Ranch Management in 1995, my first job was when corn was high and cattle were dirt cheap,” he recalls. “My wife was a school teacher. We looked for the best deal we could find, salary-wise and to get experience. So, we packed up and moved to Florida to work for Deseret Ranch. “I had never been there; I had made the deal over the phone. I was there for two years in a foreman training program. Then an opportunity to manage a commercial Brangus operation in Texas came up. For the last 11 years, we’ve been here in South Texas where I do a little bit of everything. “I always wanted ranching as a career,” Neel explains. “I knew the TCU program was a better place to go and build on the basics – economics, practicality and a common sense approach.

It has an impeccable reputation. In order to further my career, I knew I needed that extra practical experience.” There are two options for TCU Ranch Management students – a certification option and a degree option. Both Neel and Perks were in the nine-month certification option. The degree option is a recent addition to the program; the certification option is what the founders of the school established back in 1955 when they wanted their managers to get in, learn what they need, and get back to the ranch quickly. Students in the certification program attend classes for one academic year (nine months) and the classes are not part of any other academic program at TCU. Upon completion of the course of study, a graduate receives 34 credit hours, transferable to most colleges and universities, and a Ranch Management Certificate. Students apply directly to the Ranch Management Program. Students who wish to earn a Bachelors of Science in Ranch Management must enroll in TCU as a ranch management major and complete the university’s core requirements prior to making formal application to the Ranch Management Program before their junior year. Qualified students are given “conditional” acceptance into the Ranch Management Program. They must then successfully complete the requirements for a general business minor for non-business majors. “At TCU they do such a fine job, above and beyond, in giving you real world experience and common sense,” Neel says. “There is a lot of computer work. There is so much emphasis on real-world economics. I found the field trips to be invaluable. For me, our West Texas trip was very beneficial because we saw a lot of yearling programs on small grains – high risk cattle. They talked to us about how they manage them from the time they come in, how they figure breakevens, cost of gain, marketing, everything.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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“It’s funny because on the South Texas field trip, the ranchers seemed to talk so much about brush. I was a 22-year-old from Oklahoma; I wondered why they talked about it so much! Funny how things happen … now I wish I had paid more attention. The Oklahoma-Kansas field trip was closest to the area where I grew up. You meet some very sharp operators that have been doing this a very long time. Meeting these ranchers who open up their books and know-how to the students also helps them with their communications skills.” Perks explains, “You get to visit so many facets of the industry, and you learn to communicate on a professional level with these real-world experts. You learn to adapt to their style and how to talk about what is important to them on their level.” Perks has applied what he learned at TCU to help make some profit-changing decisions in the family’s Hereford business. “For instance, we took a hard look at how we utilized open land where we’d been growing all our own hay. We asked ourselves: ‘Is the cost of production more economical compared to the alternatives of custom hiring, or purchasing hay and utilizing the ground a different way?’ “An opportunity cost created from land rent, tractor upkeep and overhead was assigned to help us understand our inputs. Based off of those numbers, annual average production and our cows annual hay consumption, our breakeven showed we can take care of our own needs and afford to sell a certain tonnage each year. Weather permitting, this puts the ranch in a position to secure a majority of our own feed as well as creates another source for revenue.”

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“Another decision we had to make was whether we should still raise and sell all our bulls off the ranch,” Perks explains. “The other option was to work with a cooperator to raise, sell and develop them for us. We realized our gross development input costs were $2,500 on a yearling bull. If a cooperator further south developed them for us, it would cost us half as much because we have to feed harder through the winter months. Plus, most of our customers are in the South, so the bulls would be better acclimated.” Having learned at TCU how to put a dollar figure on everything and how to consider various alternatives gives the students more confidence when they are out in the world making these tough decisions. “TCU taught me to be flexible,” Neel explains. “Some things you do by the book, some not. Some programs work over and over again. On the other hand, we might find a slight modification in vaccines that works better for us or mineral changes. As new chemicals become available, we’re aware of that and are constantly evaluating the options. Then you have weather patterns or market swings that change everything even if you had a good plan to start with. “The beef industry is evolving all the time,” Neel emphasizes. “It costs $100,000 more now to operate than it did in 2005. Feed and the prices of other inputs have risen dramatically. You also look at depreciation on trucks, fences, you have to look at everything. This business is so capital intensive that you just don’t need to make too many mistakes. “There are some mistakes like using the

wrong bulls or vaccination program, where you’ll end up paying for it for a long time,” he adds. “If you keep heifers, three or four years down the line you may still be having problems. There are long-term consequences. We used to spend a lot of money on developing heifers. With high feed costs, we’ve changed the way we develop them and our expectations for them. But heifers are worth so much more than they were 10 years ago. You put all that information into one big formula. “Last year in the drought, we spent so much more money on supplemental feed. During the drought before we liquidated one quarter of the herd instead of spending money on feed. Now we couldn’t afford to replace 600 cows at $1,500 to $2,000 a piece,” he explains. Neel (whose kids, H.C., Kody and Cassidy, show steers on the weekends and are very competitive) has some solid advice for aspiring ranch managers. “When you graduate from a four-year university, you’ll have a good foundation. You have to have that education. But there is much more that you need to know,” he says. “You really need that work experience. You also need patience. Take the first job that gives you great experience, not necessarily just the best salary. “Really, your first job is meant to build toward your future,” Neel explains. “You also want to be sure that you work for good people, whether it’s a large feedlot or a ranch or whatever. TCU Ranch Management can teach you so much real world experience you’ll need.”


announcements La Prix SchoLarShiP reciPientS

Students involved in the agricultural industry that possess ambition, knowledge and ability received $14,000 scholarships from the La Prix Scholarship program during the spring 2012 semester. Morgan Meisenheimer, a junior at Oklahoma State University from Frederick, Md., was named the winner of the 2012 La Prix Scholarship and received a $10,000 cash award and framed print. Mark Sims, also a junior at OSU from Elgin, Okla., and Marita Palacio, a sophomore at Redlands Community College from Bend, Ore., tied for second place. Sims and Palacio each received a $2,000 cash award. Travis Begley of Lubbock, Texas, and Mackenzi Dorsey of Strasburg, Colo., also interviewed for the awards. The scholarship award was made possible by the commissionable proceeds from the 2011 Embryos on Snow sale and an initial sponsorship from TransOva Genetics. “The primary goal of La Prix is to let this sale give back to an outstanding youth who has a dream and a goal of building a business or starting a project at the front of their young professional life,” said Christy Collins, La Prix Scholarship Program founder. The La Prix Scholarship Program extends sincere appreciation to everyone involved in making this prestigious award happen and congratulates all applicants for your outstanding talents. Major

sponsors for 2012 currently include Embryos on Snow, Trans Ova, Donor Solutions and Purina; other sponsors include Prairie View Farms and Roslyn Earle. These sponsorships help fund the 2013 La Prix Scholarships. Applications for the 2013 La Prix Scholarship will be available this coming fall.

iLLinoiS State Fair Market heiFer Show

Junior heifer exhibitors at the Illinois State Fair (ISF) will have a new opportunity to show their cattle during the first ever Illinois State Fair Market Heifer Show. This inaugural show will take place in the Junior Livestock Center on Saturday, August 11th, following the conclusion of the ISF Junior Steer Show. Dan Hoge of Cambridge, IL and Black Hawk College will evaluate this year’s event. The ISF Market Heifer Show is a jackpot show and will pay out the following to the Top 5 heifers: $500 for the ISF Grand Champion Market Heifer; $400 to the Reserve Grand Champion Market Heifer; third overall will receive $300; fourth overall heifer will receive $200 and $100 to the fifth overall heifer. Money and additional prizes will also be awarded to junior exhibitors for class placing. Current sponsors for the ISF Market Heifer Show include Sullivan Supply, Umbarger Show Feeds, Dwyer Cattle Services and Elliott Cattle Company. This show will also be broadcast LIVE on Livestock World TV with Anchorman Chris Terembes. Anyone interested in sponsoring the 2012 ISF Market Heifer show can contact Bill Elliott at 217-741-6894; Eric Johnson at 217361-4567; or Bill Graff at 217-741-9003.

These calves and more will sell in our annual FaLL Private treaty PaSture SaLe. Jack & Lori SieverS • Layne & Jackie SieverS

55980 860th Road • Randolph, NE 68771 • 402.337.1506 Visit us online at showsteers.com! 402.329.4464

one & only Heifer

tyson x Monopoly

Sale date will be announced in the August issue of The Show Circuit.

Other Sires: Man Among Boys Unstoppable One & Only Tyson Walks Alone Eye Candy

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

113


Private Treaty Pasture Bid-Off Sale August 18th to September 6th

Bids close at 6 p.m. CDT on September 6

Sale Information: Champion Prospect Steer, 2012 National Western Stock Show Res. Champion Steer, Both Rings, 2011 OK State AGR Shown by Jake Wagner, Erie, CO • Sold by Kevin Bremer

Raised by RockfallsRanch!

Cattle available to view beginning August 18th. Call ahead to view cattle or to view earlier. Show steer and heifer prospects available.

Lueking Club Calves Oxford, Nebraska John: 308-991-0277 • Taylor: 308-991-0695

SiresRepresented:

Rockfalls Ranch Bertrand, Nebraska Mark Williams: 308-991-5628 Tyler Williams: 308-991-6177

Monopoly, Heat Wave, Walks Alone, Blindside, Immortal, Tiger Woods, and Headliner Directions: Off of I-80 at the Odessa exit, go south 1/4 mile. Pasture is on the west side of the road. Follow the signs.

Champion Steer, 2011 NE AGR, 2012 IL Beef Expo, 2012 KY Beef Expo Shown by AJ Line, Seaton, IL • Sold by Bonham, Guyer, & Caldwell

Raised by RockfallsRanch!

114 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

View calf photos online at rockfallsranch.com luekingclubcalves.com


116 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


9.15.12 SATURDAY

Featuring an incredible set of powerful steer & heifer prospects! Many embryo progeny from our great donor program will sell.

Supreme Champion Steer (Rings A & B), 2012 Western Bonanza. Congratulations, Stormy Aue! This steer is out of our Donor 600, owned with Blaine Rodgers.

Champion Chi Heifer & Fifth Overall, 2011 Nebraska AGR. Selected by the Vickland Family in our fall 2011 bid-off.

CATTLE COMPANY

Sale videos and photos will be online at

scheetzcattleco.com

Farm located in southeast Iowa near Fort Madison off of Chalk Ridge Road on 210th Street. From the west, turn off X23 (county highway that runs from Hwy. 2 and Hwy. 103) onto Chalk Ridge Road and follow to 210th street; turn west and go 1.5 miles. From Fort Madison, turn off of Ave. A/Bluff Road onto Chalk Ridge Road and follow to 210th Street; turn west and go 1.5 miles. Visitors Welcome!

scheetz CATTLE COMPANY

Des Moines

a

Fort Madison

2714 210th Street Fort Madison, Iowa 52627 Jason Scheetz (319) 470-6488 jasonscheetz@gmail.com

“Special thanks to all who supported our April 12th Online Offering of Proven Genetics & Rare Semen!”

Unmatched… Service.Support.Guidance.

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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Private Treaty Sale

Bids close at Dark on September 16

Congratulations!

Sale Location:

Streitmatter Family! Sold in last year’s sale!

3349 Rustic Trail Truro, Iowa 50257

New:

Offering a handful of load & go cattle

Sires:

Salty dog, Monopoly, Yellow Jacket, Walks Alone, Troubadour, Boardwalk, Tonic

Look For Our Showstring At The Iowa State Fair! ROd BeeleR: 727-741-8158

MitcH BeeleR: 515-490-0372

ANTHONY MONROE: 515-689-5275

Guest consignors: Ben Yetter, Jerry Bedwell, Moore Show cattle

118 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


DOES YOUR ONLINE PRESENCE NEED SOME WORK? Let The Show Circuit work for you! From websites to email blasts, The Show Circuit is here to give you a professional online image and get your message out to your potential clients. We want to work for you! WEBSITES 1 Page site

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Call Roland at 1-800-787-8690 to get started.

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June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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It’s comIng.

august ‘12

120 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


AnnuAl StAte FAir edition deAdline july 1 cAll 1-800-787-8690

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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Semen Orders: Garrett Kalvig: 319-504-9020 Emily Goddard-Doty: 800-654-7127

Blog: goddardcattle.blogspot.com

122 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Facebook: fb.com/goddardcattle


blindside

sire: Monopoly dam: Rapids Creek Miss 208N (3/4 Maine Canadian outcross) bw: 88 • dob: 4-4-2009 THC, PHAF • $25/unit

curtain call

sire: Heat Wave dam: Cunia 602 bw: 94 • THC, PHAF • $25/unit owned with: McKay Cattle Co.

To order semen on these sires, contact: Garrett Kalvig: 319-504-9020 • Emily Goddard-Doty: 800-654-7127

Randy & denise GoddaRd Stanton, Iowa Garrett Kalvig, Manager: 319-504-9020 goddardcattle.com

Blog: goddardcattle.blogspot.com

Facebook: fb.com/goddardcattle June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

123


contratulationS nick Sullivan & Family! grand champion heifer, 2011 Iowa Beef Expo and 2011 Iowa State Fair

congratulationS olivia lapke and Family! Supreme Breeding heifer, Kent Habeger Memorial Classic, Bob Williams Memorial Classic, Washington Spring Preview, Indianola Extravaganza

Congrats...

...to all exhibitors! Thank

you to everyone for their past business! We look forward to working with you in the future. Good luck to all families at your state fairs!

124 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

congratulationS mckenzie Strickland Family! champion Simmental, 2011 Wichita Mountains Classic

congratulationS rylee Stoltz & Family! Supreme champion, A&B Fairbury Preview Show; reserve Supreme, Sneak A Peek A; 4th overall, Sneak A Peek B, Northern Exposure; 3rd overall, York Country Preview, Block & Bridle; 7th overall, NCC

cattle John Sachau

1731 255th • Denison, Iowa 712-267-2200 • e-mail: johnsachau@gmail.com


Sullivan’s

TURBO

Livestock Fan

• Nothing matches the Turbo for RPMs, CFMs and Air Velocity. The Turbo pushes the air at 5560 feet per minute. This is 22% faster and harder than other fans. To achieve this, the custom engineered Turbo motor rotates at 1740 RPMs, faster than any other competitive livestock fan.

• The Dominant Motor Quality ... How? The sealed ball bearing Nidec - Emerson 1/2 HP rated motor features a 10% longer stator and rotor than standard 1/2 HP motors. This interior assembly is called ‘stack.’ The more length creates more horse power. It borders the edge of what would be considered a 5/8 HP motor, if there was such a category (which there is not). This longer ‘stack’ enables the motor to run faster and handle the load put on this motor from the high pitched blade. In turn, it keeps the motor running 11% cooler as compared to competitors 1/2 HP motors. Hence, the reason for the Turbo’s very few warranties. All while only drawing 4 AMPs of electricity, equaling a super efficient fan!

• The Problem-Free Guard! Constructed of 7 guage and 11 guage steel wire that is formed into a continuous one-piece loop formation. This one-piece loop creates added crush proof strength because of the elimination of welded butt joints that can break. No other fan guard withstands the rigors of the show road like the Turbo. Guard complies with OSHA regulations. Front of guard opens so you can easily clean the blades to keep your More Air ... Less Trouble. fan running at its peak performance. Specially coated in black color for a cleaner appearance. SULLIVAN SUPPLY, INC. 1-800-475-5902 • Dunlap, Iowa • sales@sullivansupply.com

Stock Show Family Owned and Operated since 1989.

SULLIVAN SUPPLY SOUTH

1-800-588-7096 • Hillsboro, Texas • sullivan@hillsboro.net

SULLIVAN SUPPLY WEST

1-888-914-5972 • Lodi, California • lee@sullivansupply.com June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

125


�e only place you need to shop! raised by gruhn

raised by staley

winninGest steeR in Canada

raised by Chester lee ReseRve GRand steeR, 2012 National Western shown by Gracie Russell

raised by Muller & sons GRand Champion steeR, 2012 NAILE shown by Baylor Bonham

raised by roeCker GRand Champion steeR, 2011 Kentucky Beef Expo shown by DJ Martin

126 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

supReme heifeR, AJCA Thanksgiving Expo; Reserve Supreme Heifer, AGR Winter Bonanza (A); 3rd Overall, Okema Winter Classic shown by Jeremy Clark Family


raised by staley

8

ReseRve BReedinG heifeR, Kansas Beef Expo (A) shown by Kassidy Bremer

raised by healy

ReseRve mainetaineR, 2011 Hoosier Beef Congress shown by Lesing Family

sold at Club Calf Paradise GRand Champion steeR, Montana State Fair shown by Avery Bates

raised by sornson

GRand Champion steeR, IJBBA Harlan, Iowa; Division Champion ShorthornPlus, Iowa State Fair shown by Tyler Mitchell

The sale will kick off on Friday, august 31 and bid oFF on sunday, september 16th at 6:00 PM.

We hope you'll join us this fall for the famous West Central Iowa Sales! We're the center of the club calf universe!

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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Silveiras Style (Angus)

Limestone Darkhorse (Angus)

PVF Windfall (Angus)

Rodman (Angus)

MCATL By Product (Angus)

Bush’s Unbelievable (Angus) NBAR Hamley (Red Angus)

Fat Tony (Red Angus)

Card Shark (Red Angus)

Fire Water (Charolais)

Purple Milsap (Hereford)

H Excel (Hereford)

Cash Flow (Hereford)

Cyrus (Hereford)

True Grit (Hereford)

Exile (Shorthorn)

Ace of Diamonds (SH)

Captain Obvious (Shorthorn)

Swagger (Shorthorn)

MAV Bellringer (Shorthorn)

I-80 (Maine)

GVC Maverick (Maine)

GVC Fortune & Glory (Maine)

GVC Suh (Maine)

Boomer (Maine)

THF

I-67 (%Maine)

THF

Predator (%Maine)

THF

The Ringer (%Maine)

THF

TCTC Patton (%Maine)

Mercedez Benz (%Maine)

THF

Believe In Me (Club Calf)

Not Afraid (Club Calf)

128 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

Pretty Snazzy (Club Calf)

THF

Monopoly 2 (Club Calf)

Mojito (Club Calf)


Fast Freddy (Club Calf)

Smilin Bob (ClubCalf)

2 Tone (ClubCalf)

The Gambler (Club Calf)

Walks Alone (ClubCalf)

Big Iron (Club Calf)

Monopoly Money (Club Calf)

THF

THF

Bulletproof (ClubCalf)

One & Only (ClubCalf)

THF

THF

Blindside (Club Calf)

THF

Thriller (ClubCalf)

THF

Eye Candy (ClubCalf)

Troubadour (ClubCalf)

Amen (ClubCalf)

Simple Math (ClubCalf)

Point Taken (ClubCalf)

Bodacious (ClubCalf)

Hollywood (ClubCalf)

Unforgiven (ClubCalf)

Texas Twister (ClubCalf)

Carpe Diem (ClubCalf)

THF

Yellow Jacket (ClubCalf)

THF

Master of Puppets (ClubCalf) Unstoppable (ClubCalf)

Tiger Woods (ClubCalf)

1-866-356-4565 www.cattlevisions.com THF

THF

Copyright (Angus+)

Choppin Wood (Club Calf)

Walk This Way (Club Calf)

Salty Dog (Club Calf)

True Grit (Club Calf)

Young Money (Club Calf)

June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com

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Upcoming Ad deAdlines August Issue: July 1 • Sept/Oct Issue: Issue: August 10

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on the action! Send completed form along with payment to: The Show CirCuiT 21009 Clarksville Rd., Lexington, IL 61753 1-800-787-8690 • roland@theshowcircuit.com www.theshowcircuit.com

Browse the latest Top SireS

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Steer, Star of Texas

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130 June/July 2012 • theshowcircuit.com


PrivatE trEaty Bid SalE

Wednesday, September 5 • Bids close at 6 p.m.

Your I-80 One Stop Club Calf Shop!

Spring & Fall Born Steers, Heifers, Bulls

With over 600 head of calves to view (mostly embryo and AI calves) in all price ranges, we invite you to visit these two locations (within 15 miles of each other and I-80) and make this your I-80 “one stop” club calf shop!

Call for directions to the Eckloff viewing site and the Strolberg viewing site.

Kearney

Grand Champion Steer, 2011 Missouri State Fair Congratulations Bailey dent! Raised by us!

Spring calf photos will be available for viewing at eckloffstrolberg.com or strolbergeckloff.com or showsteers.com approximately mid-August. We would like to express our sincere appreciation to our buyers in the past year, and we look forward to seeing you again in the fall!

Grand Champion Steer, 2010 Ohio AGR, 2011 National Western Prospect Show, and 2011 Purdue AGR. Congratulations Emma vickland! Raised by us!

reserve Grand Champion Steer, 2011 San Angelo Stock Show Congratulations Cuatro Schauer! Raised by us & Mid Continent Farms!

Grand Champion Steer, 2011 Maine-Anjou Jr. Grand Champion Steer, 2010 Ak-Sar-Ben National; reserve Champion Steer, 2011 Chi Congratulations Cody Burke! Raised by us! Jr. National; Congratulations hunter Weber! Raised by us & Rick Frye!

Grand Champion Steer, 2009 Nebraska AGR Champion Charolais Composite, 2012 IA Beef Expo, 2012 Tipton, 2012 and Kansas Beef Expo; reserve Champion, Cyclone Classic, 2012 AGR Spring Show, 2012 Habeger Memorial, Grinnell, 2010 NWSS Prospect Show and Purdue AGR. 2012 OK Beef Expo; Grand Champion, 2012 Grinnell; reserve Champion, Congratulations Emma vickland! Raised by us! 2012 Habeger Memorial; 5th overall, 2012 Tipton, 2012 OK Beef Expo; Congratulations Kiley Elder! Purchased from Mid Continent Farms • Sold by us!

Ward & Christyne Eckloff PhonE: 308-832-0517 • CEll: 308-830-0834 Chad Marsh, Herdsman: 308-440-8851

Grand Champion heifer, 2011 Purple Ribbon Run; Grand Champion heifer, 2011 Tipton, Iowa; Grand Champion heifer, 2011 Centerville, Iowa; reserve Champion heifer, 2011 Grinnel, Iowa. Congratulations Kiley Elder! Sold by us!

Dave & Cheryl Strolberg PhonE: 308-263-3531 • CEll: 308-991-1589 Jeff Livingston, Herdsman: 308-999-0036

Visitors Always Welcome!

The Show Circuit - June/July 2012  

June/July 2012 Issue