Page 1

DECEMBER 06, 2018

4

I SS UE 1 4 , VO L . 1 1 0

6

YOUR UNI VE R S I T Y O F SAS K ATC H E WA N ST UDE NT NE WS PA P E R S I N C E 1 9 1 2

12

The University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis.

14

ht e sheaf Critiquing charity

is h

THE HOLIDAY ISSUE

y

USAY tackles tough topics

ciet

Digesting keto

p ubl

U of S prof given Governor General’s Award

ing so


NEWS

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

ciet

p ubl

is h

y

the sheaf

ing so

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | TBD editor@thesheaf.com NEWS EDITOR

CULTURE EDITOR

Tanner Bayne

Cole Chretien

news@thesheaf.com

culture@thesheaf.com

SPORTS & HEALTH EDITOR

OPINIONS EDITOR

Jack Thompson sportshealth@thesheaf.com

Erin Matthews opinions@thesheaf.com

STAFF WRITER

Ana Cristina Camacho staffwriter@thesheaf.com COPY EDITOR | TBD copy@thesheaf.com LAYOUT MANAGER | Kaitlin Wong layout@thesheaf.com PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR | Riley Deacon photo@thesheaf.com GRAPHICS EDITOR | Jaymie Stachyruk graphics@thesheaf.com WEB EDITOR | Nykole King web@thesheaf.com OUTREACH DIRECTOR | J.C. Balicanta Narag outreach@thesheaf.com AD & BUSINESS MANAGER | Shantelle Hrytsak ads@thesheaf.com COVER IMAGE

Riley Deacon BOARD OF DIRECTORS Matthew Taylor Mikaila Ortynsky Lyndsay Afseth Kayle Neis Emily Klatt

ADVERTISING (306) 966 8688 EDITORIAL (306) 966 8689

Mission // The mission of the Sheaf is to inform and entertain students by addressing those issues that are relevant to life on campus, in the city or in the province. The newspaper serves as a forum for discussion on a wide range of issues that concern students. Written for students, by students, it provides unique insight into university issues through a student perspective. The staff of editors, photographers and artists collaborate with volunteers as student journalists to create a product relevant to students on the University of Saskatchewan campus. Legal // The Sheaf, published weekly during the academic year and periodically from May through August, is an incorporated non-profit that is, in part, student-body funded by way of a direct levy paid by all partand full-time undergraduate students at the U of S. The remainder of the revenue is generated through advertising. The financial affairs are governed by a Board of Directors, most of whom are students. Membership in the Sheaf Publishing Society is open to all undergraduate students at the U of S, who are encouraged to contribute to the newspaper. Absolutely no experience is required! The opinions expressed in the Sheaf do not necessarily reflect those of the Sheaf Publishing Society Inc. The Sheaf reserves the right to refuse to accept or print any material deemed unfit for publication, as determined by the Editor-in-Chief. The Editor-in-Chief has the right to veto any submission deemed unfit for the Society newspaper. In determining this, the Editor-in-Chief will decide if the article or artwork would be of interest to a significant portion of the Society and benefit the welfare of Sheaf readers. The Sheaf will not publish any racist, sexist, homophobic or libellous material. Land Acknowledgement // The Sheaf acknowledges that our office is built on Treaty Six Territory and the traditional homeland of the Métis. We pay our respects to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and affirm both the importance of our relationship with Indigenous peoples and students at the U of S and our commitment to recognize and remain accountable for our collective history.

corrections

There were no errors brought to our attention in our last issue. If you spot any errors in this issue, please email them to copy@thesheaf.com for correction.

2 / NEWS

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 1 0

NEWS

Usask’s Global Water Futures partners with federal government for freshwater research The U of S-based organization Global Water Futures has signed a five-year MOU with the Canadian federal government. AQSA HUSSAIN

The University of Saskatchewan furthered its role in global freshwater research last month after the U of S-based organization Global Water Futures signed a five-year memorandum of understanding with Natural Resources Canada. The partnership will see an increased commitment to collaboration in both organizations’ research. While GWF and NRCan — the federal ministry responsible for the development of Canada’s natural resources — have worked together to study glaciers in the Canadian Rockies and the Northwest Territories, the MOU is expected to bring universities, government sectors and other organizations together for a multisectoral approach to water research. Founded in 2016, GWF is the world’s largest university-led project for freshwater research. The project is slated to last for seven years and is funded by a $77.8 million endowment from the Canada First Research Excellence Fund. John Pomeroy, director of GWF and Canada research chair in water resources and climate change, says that the MOU formalizes the research relationship between the GWF and NRCan and may produce new opportunities for U of S researchers. “We’ve mutually supported research for a number of years, so in some cases, it was formalized in something that already existed, and in other cases, it’s developing things that could be quite new,” Pomeroy said. “We would like to see an NRCan scientist who would engage with the U of S graduate students and provide opportunities, in the end, for our students with the federal government.” The project’s goal is to provide solutions to global water threats, with three desired outcomes: to forecast water-based natural disasters, to accurately predict water quality and quantity, and to provide risk-management data to government.

Jaymie Stachyruk / Graphics Editor

Pomeroy says that the MOU with NRCan provides GWF with a greater scope of geological data and more specific information about freshwater through data collected on river basins, groundwater collections and glaciers. Such data, Pomeroy says, is derived from NRCan’s use of satellites for remote sensing. The GWF program has over 350 partners from countries across the globe and engages with them through interdisciplinary approaches. Pomeroy says that an example of this is the work GWF has done with Indigenous communities in Canada. “We get away from the [university], [we] talk to the users about the sorts of problems that they have, … and we engage with them throughout the whole research project,” Pomeroy said. “We met with Indigenous groups several times, talked about areas of joint interest and found out some of the water problems they had and then jointly developed the call for proposals to address some of those problems.” Ultimately, Pomeroy says that freshwater research, as seen

through the MOU between the GWF and NRCan, is some of the most pressing research being done today. “With the increasing development, growing populations around the world and the biggest challenge humanity has ever faced in its existence — global climate change — the impacts are mostly on water, and that has made the study of water more important than ever,” Pomeroy said. “It’s the time to join in with us to develop solutions to the problems that we have.” For Pomeroy, the seriousness of these issues has contributed to the overall interest in and strength of the GWF project. “[Climate change] encourages students who are interested in the natural environment or communities to really get involved in the study of water and help with some of these solutions,” Pomeroy said. “We’ve been able to take on hundreds of students at the graduate level and post-graduate level in GWF. We have the largest concentration of water scientists in the world at the U of S and the strongest water research program in Canada.”


NEWS

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

The U of S sees increase in student mental-health concerns around finals season STAFF WRITER

With finals fast approaching, university mental-health resources are expected to see an increase in student use. This trend is consistent around examination periods at the University of Saskatchewan, and it’s an issue that the Student Wellness Centre aims to address. This exam season is expected to be no different — academic and holiday-related pressures make it a stressful time of the year for most students. Jocelyn Orb, student health services manager, says that the university is prepared for this seasonal trend as it’s not a dramatic change from past years’ numbers. “We always see a higher volume of students seeking support, primarily mental-health support, around evaluation periods — during midterms and finals. It’s a predictable pattern,” Orb said. “We are used to it — there’s nothing different this year or last year. There’s a steadily increasing trend over the last number of years.” In light of this trend, the university organizes their programming accordingly. The Stress Less events, where students get free mini massages,

snacks and study tips in Upper Place Riel, are always scheduled to happen during or leading up to exam time. This year, Peer Health hosted the event on Dec. 4. Student Affairs and Outreach Services put on their first Hope for the Holidays seminar on Nov. 29 to help students who are grieving during the holiday season. Orb says that the university also aims to address factors outside academics that can have a negative impact on students’ health at this time of year. Despite the increased demand, Orb says the Student Wellness Centre is ready to attend to anyone going through a crisis. “We try to be mindful about how not only is it a heavy exam time but it’s a time of year that can be stressful for people regardless,” Orb said. “We expect it, and our wait times do get longer this time of year, but we are still able to help people manage if they are in crisis.” The Student Wellness Centre has same-day appointments set aside every day for students with urgent mental-health concerns — all they have to do is go to the third or fourth floor of the Place Riel Student Centre. Additionally, students can turn to the drop-in peer-support group that runs year-round in Marquis 104. Orb says that it is crucial to

Looking for term 2 classes? Consider the following International Studies and Political Studies options! For more information and other IS & POLS courses see the Course Catalogue. IS 110 (01) Global Issues with Dr. Ranjan Datta TR 10:00-11:20 am IS 110 (W02) Global Issues with Dr. Martin Gaal Online IS 212 (02) Introduction to International Studies Cooperation and Conflict with David York MWF 12:30-1:20 pm

ra ph ics

ANA CRISTINA CAMACHO

Ed ito r

The Sheaf talks to the Student Wellness Centre about resources for student burnout.

J ay

take advantage of these resources before health concerns get to a critical point to avoid going through a health crisis at a stressful time of the year. “We can support people when they are in crisis, but we want to encourage people to access services early and not let it get to that point,” Orb said. “You can self-care, get enough sleep and rest, spend time with friends and family, and take advantage of our service providers — part of that is covered through Studentcare.”

The U of S is interested in helping students take care of their mental health — Orb says they are putting resources towards the prevention of health issues through initiatives like Peer Health. “The university continues to invest in health-education and illness-prevention programming — they are investing a lot in the Peer Health mentors and their health campaigns,” Orb said. “[We know] that the more we invest in health promotion the less we’ll eventually have to

POLS 111 (04) Democratic Citizenship in Canada with David York TR 1:00-2:20 pm POLS 111 (W02) Democratic Citizenship in Canada with Dr. Loleen Berdahl Online POLS 112 (01) Justice and Injustice in Politics and Law with William Buschert TR 2:30-3:50 pm

mi

ru hy tac S e

k

/G

invest in intervention and providing care.” With these initiatives, Orb says that students can learn to better take care of themselves. “We want to help increase students’ capacity and their resiliency as well, but that’s longterm work,” Orb said. “We want to get people to access resources when appropriate on their own — reading and accessing support from friends and family — and then, when that’s not enough, we are happy to see them.”

POLS 256 (02) Understanding Political Science Research with Brennan Field TR 11:30 am-12:50 pm POLS 442 (W02) First Nations Governance with Danette Starblanket Online POLS 446 (01) Development Challenges and Prospects with Dr. Matthew Mitchell T 1:00-3:50 pm

POLS 222 (W02) Indigenous Governance and Politics with Dr. Ranjan Datta Online

IS 401 (02) International Cooperation and Conflict

with Dr. Colleen Bell

W 1:30-4:20 pm

POLS 237 (02) Modern Political Theory with Dr. Kiran Banerjee TR 10:00-11:20 am

NEWS / 3


NEWS

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 1 0

Usask professor emeritus bestowed with Governor General’s Award for history This retired academic has educated people on Saskatchewan’s history through a number of talks, books and even radio and TV programs. JONAH EGAN-PIMBLETT

One of Saskatchewan’s most distinguished historians is being awarded a Governor General’s Award for his contributions to the field of history and heritage on Jan. 28, wherein Canada’s Governor General will present him the nation’s top honour in Ottawa’s Rideau Hall. Dr. Bill Waiser is, perhaps, one of Saskatchewan’s most prominent figures in terms of celebrity historians. The University of Saskatchewan professor emeritus of history has shared his wealth of knowledge on Western Canada through his CBC Radio segment, Mining the Past, his bi-weekly column in the Saskatoon StarPhoenix, called History Matters, and his CBC Saskatchewan TV production, Looking Back. It is for contributions like these that Waiser has been named the recipient of the 2018 Governor General’s History

Award for Popular Media, the Pierre Berton Award. The accolade aims to acknowledge an individual or organization that has helped popularize Canadian history and heritage through various media forms. For Waiser, engaging the public has been a rewarding task and also one that Saskatchewanians actively want to participate in. “The matter of reaching out and connecting with the general public, it can be very rewarding and gratifying,” Waiser said. “Everyday people want to talk history and figure things out on where they fit in and why things have happened in a particular way, and I think by having an understanding of history, you’re better armed to deal with some of the challenges we face today.” Waiser’s forthcoming award is not the first time that his work has been recognized by the Governor General. Waiser was the recipient of the 2016 Governor General’s Literary Award for Non-Fiction for his book, A

World We Have Lost: Saskatchewan Before 1905. Although both accolades have been a important to Waiser, the Pierre Berton Award is a special one as it recognizes his entire of body of work rather than just one contribution. Waiser says that his work as a public educator has been as important to him as his academic work within the U of S. “I see my job as bringing history to the Saskatchewan public and not simply to the university,” Waiser said. ”I find that people in this province want to know about their history — they want to talk and debate about their history… [Knowing history] can help in terms of their own identity, where they fit in… History also provides a sense of place — it provides perspective — and history helps explain why things happen in particular ways.” In fact, Waiser says that history should not be separated into popular and academic realms.

Bill Waiser / Supplied Bill Waiser poses for a photograph at the U of S.

“I don’t believe there should be a dividing line between popular and academic history. As a writer, it’s my job to make it interesting and engaging… As a writer, you need to use creativity to make people care, and I try and do that through my writing. “I write for the general public or everyday people so that anyone and everybody can read it, understand it and appreciate it. I wouldn’t want to do the research that I do and then write

it in such a way that only a few people can understand it. I don’t think that’s the way it should be.” While he is thankful for the recognition of his previous work, Waiser is already working on new projects. Waiser says that he is currently working on a book that he hopes to release in fall 2019. The book will be about Almighty Voice, a man who was born in the late 1800s in One Arrow First Nation near Batoche, Sask.

Season’s greetings With the holiday season fast approaching, I want to take a moment to acknowledge some of the special moments we have celebrated in 2018 and to thank you all for your contributions to the University of Saskatchewan. This year has been an exciting one for our campus community, highlighted in October by the unveiling of our new university plan to guide our institution through to 2025. Titled The University the World Needs, and gifted the Indigenous names nīkānītān manācihitowinihk (Cree) and ni manachīhitoonaan (Michif), the plan is a bold new vision to position the university as a leader locally, nationally and internationally with research and programming that provide global impact. Global connections are also a key to our new International Blueprint for Action 2025, which coordinates USask international activities in research,

4 / NEWS

teaching and the student experience. We are now enrolling more international students than ever before, from more than 100 countries. Our rising enrolment also includes a record number of Indigenous students as we continue the process of Reconciliation and Indigenization. The skyline of campus has changed this year with the opening of the Merlis Belsher Place multi-sport complex and the Collaborative Science Research Building along with the new hotel. It has also been a year of milestones at USask: Edwards School of Business celebrated its centennial in September, while the College of Dentistry celebrated its 50th anniversary, as did the College of Arts and Science departments of computer science, archaeology and anthropology, regional and urban planning, and international studies. Four of our faculty were inducted into the Royal Society of Canada, and two into its College of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists—a total we have not seen before. Medicine, Pharmacy, Veterinary Medicine

and the Edwards School of Business all received accreditation; our Tri-Council success rates climbed; and we rose in the Academic Rankings of World Universities. We are proud to be a member of Canada’s prestigious U-15 group of the top medical-doctoral universities in the country and we now have more than 150,000 alumni world-wide. As we look back at the accomplishments of 2018, we are also excited about what 2019 has in store, including bringing back our convocation ceremonies to campus to be celebrated in Merlis Belsher Place. As we approach the holiday season, I hope you enjoy time with family and friends, and I wish you all the best in the new year.

President Peter Stoicheff


DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

SPORTS&HEALTH

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

Recipe:

SPORTS&HEALTH

Volleyball teams rally after Candy cane kissdipped Oreos a slow start to the season Back-to-back wins against the UBCO Heat puts the Huskies in a good place heading into the second half of the season.

SARAH BAINS

Recipe from www.slickhousewives.com Serves: 12

ANA CRISTINA CAMACHO STAFF WRITER

Both Huskies volleyball teams ended their final games of 2018 on a high — both teams played and won against the University of British Columbia Okanagan Heat on Nov. 30 and Dec. 1. These wins came as an excellent capstone to a season that began roughly. The wins came at a critical midpoint in the season and will hopefully help to propel the Huskies forward when they return to the court in January 2019. Both teams have had a slow first half of the season, but things are looking up. Coming into the weekend, the women’s team hadn’t won a match since their two victories in the season opener against the Brandon University Bobcats. The women’s teams seemed wellmatched — they both had 2-8 season scores, and the Heat had been victorious in their last ten matches against the Huskies. Their offence put up a good fight — the Heat’s hitting average was higher than the Huskies’ in both matches — but the home team stood their ground. They won 3-2 in both five-set matches of the weekend, bringing their record to 4-8. Mark Dodds, head coach for the women’s team, says that the group will look to build on their success in the last few games. “We are always continuing to improve on all aspects, but our block and defence stepped up this weekend,” Dodds said, in an email to the Sheaf. “We need to continue to be better on serve, receive and attack — if we can pass and score points, we are a tough team to play against.” The recent victories over the Heat were also significant for the men’s team as it brought up their season score to 6-6. The team went up against the Heat in four

Cook time: 60 minutes Ingredients: 12 Oreos 8 oz. Hershey’s Kisses Candy Cane Mint Candies 2 tsp. powdered sugar Holiday candy decorations of choice Line a cookie sheet or cutting board with parchment paper. Place 12 Oreos on the sheet, and then place the sheet in the freezer for at least 25 minutes. Unwrap the kisses, and place them in a microwave-safe bowl. Microwave for 30 seconds to melt, stir, then repeat until melted and smooth. Add powdered sugar, and stir until well mixed. Using a fork, dip Oreos in melted candy and flip to ensure they are completely coated. Shake off the excess, and return cookies to the prepared sheet. Decorate the top with a decoration, if desired. Return to the refrigerator for 30 minutes to set.

Aqsa Hussain U of S Huskies volleyball team jumps to block a spike at the PAC on Dec. 1.

sets on Friday, which they finished off with a score of 3-1, and in three sets on Saturday, when they bested the Heat 3-0. Their successes this weekend, coupled with a victory against the University of British Columbia Thunderbirds on Nov. 24, puts them on a three-game winning streak. The men’s team came into the games knowing that it was their chance to get their scores up. The Huskies are sitting in sixth place in the Canada West standings, while the Heat is last — but the Heat’s win in Friday’s third set proved they were not to be taken lightly. That day, their hitting average was higher — however, the Huskies did get their sweep victory on Saturday, sending them into the holiday break on a positive note. After the break, the teams will face the University of Winnipeg Wesmen on Jan. 4 and 5, looking to carry their winning streaks into the second half of the season. Dodds says that the wins are good for team morale and

that they will help the group do their best as the season continues. “This will put us in a good frame of mind to train hard through December and be ready to keep rolling,” Dodds said. “We will be working hard … so that we continue to progress and be ready for a difficult Canada West second half — I absolutely think we have what it takes, but we have to show it on the court.” Men’s head coach Nathan Bennet says the team will return from the break ready to win. Two exhibition games against Japanese team Budo, scheduled for Dec 29 and 30, will give them a chance to practice their game. “I think we will have a great opportunity to take care of our bodies, ensure that we are in good academic standing, and to just take a break,” said Bennet in an email to the Sheaf. “With Budo University coming in … we will get some solid training as well as a couple of good matches — we will be ready for Winnipeg.”

Jaymie Stachyruk / Graphics Editor

SPORTS & HEALTH / 5


SPORTS&HEALTH

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 1 0

Weighing in:

Is the keto diet king? The safety and efficacy of following popular diet trends. ERIN MATTHEWS OPINIONS EDITOR

Fad diets constantly rotate through the public opinion, often as reiterations of the same old promises for weight loss and health optimization. It was Atkins decades ago, then the paleo diet took hold, and now the ketogenic diet is common among the health conscious. Keto promises weight loss and performance perks with

its high-fat, low-carb breakdown. Followers of the diet attest that it will increase mental clarity, paradoxically protect against heart disease and possibly even protect against cancer — claims that appear to fall into the toogood-to-be-true category. Keto may be new to the mainstream in the last several years, but the diet has an old history. The keto diet has been in use since the early 20th century — created by physicians in the 1920s in an attempt to

control epileptic seizures. It was used as a successful treatment, especially for epileptic children, for decades until the advent of anti-seizure medication. Once pharmacological measures proved more effective and well tolerated, the keto diet dropped from view. But in recent years, keto has exploded as the diet du jour with meal plans and recipes that are only a click away. Traditionally, your carbohydrate intake should be

WANT TO SELL YOUR TEXTS?

BOOKS UNLIMITED 1402 College Drive • 652-0244 (across from campus under the Royal Bank)

See our website bookunlimited.ca Used University Textbooks Taken For Sale on Consignment

B u y yo u r t e x t s a t r e d u c e d p r i c e s ! L a r g e s e l e c t i o n o f u s e d p a p e r ba c k s !

Regular Hours: Monday to Friday, 11am to 5pm Open until December 21st

Extended Hours: Open again on January 2nd January 2nd to 4th , 9 am to 5pm Saturday, January 5th, 11am to 5pm Serving Students for over 40 years!

6 / SPORTS & HEALTH

Cree Longjohn

anywhere from 50 to 60 per cent of your total diet, with fats being around 30 per cent. Keto, on the other hand, shifts this balance dramatically, recommending that up to 75 per cent of your dietary intake be fat-based with less than 10 per cent being made up of carbs. Fat makes you full: a meal high in fat puts the breaks on your gut mobility — slowing down your digestion and making you feel satisfied for longer periods. This, obviously, is the biggest contributor to the weight loss experienced on high-fat diets. As expected, a dramatic change like this will have huge repercussions on your body’s normal functioning. The whole point of the keto diet is to change the way your body uses molecules for fuel. Generally, our bodies run on glucose — the sugar we get from all those delicious carb-loaded meals — but on a keto diet, your body is forced to use its fat stores for fuel. By breaking down fat into its smaller parts, known as fatty acids, molecules called ketone bodies are extracted and used for the body’s energy needs. Keto diet practitioners want to achieve ketosis, and users will purchase test strips to test for the presence of ketone bodies in their urine. These are preventative monitoring tools used by diabetics to avoid ketosis and a serious illness called ketoacidosis, that occurs because people with type 1 diabetes are unable to utilize glucose. Just to put things into perspective, keto diet followers are trying their very hardest to reach a state that diabetics try their very hardest to avoid. While the chance of individuals without diabetes reaching these dangerous levels of ketones is small, it is

not unheard of. A case study from 2006 reported the hospitalization of a non-diabetic woman for ketoacidosis after an extremely low-carb diet. But luckily, for the majority of healthy adults, achieving and maintaining ketosis is very difficult. Even if you are following the diet closely and your test strip reads a nice lavender colour, you are likely to drop in and out of ketosis because your body just doesn’t want to be there. One of the most troubling messages to come out of this diet is that of cancer prevention and treatment. Insulin has a complex role in cancer — it can cause cells to keep growing and dividing, which can be problematic. Studies have found that suppressing insulin, something keto does, is beneficial for cancer treatments. Cancer researcher and author Siddhartha Mukherjee found that the insulin suppression of keto diets can also enhance the positive effects of a cancer-fighting drug called a PI3K inhibitor. However, there was a catch. Mukherjee warned users on Twitter that people should not switch to a keto diet without a PI3K inhibitor or medical supervision, emphasizing that his investigations had discovered that the progress of leukemia was actually accelerated by a keto diet alone. Diets — especially those with extreme restrictions — can be dangerous. They can lead to disordered eating and dietary deficiencies. They are also the hardest diets to maintain. Eating healthy is complex, and it’s easy to fall into diet traps that promise incredible results. Make sure you know what you are getting into before you jump on the fad-diet bandwagon.


CULTURE

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

CULTURE

Holiday selections for scrooges: A look at alternative holiday entertainment Tired of the usual onslaught of holiday films? Check out some of these nontraditional recommendations.

EVENTS T H U R S

06

HOLIDAY NIGHT MARKET @ ONE YOGA SASKATOON, 6:00 P.M.

VOID HOLIDAY PARTY 2018 @ VOID GALLERY, 6:00 P.M.

THREE DAYS GRACE @ SASKTEL CENTRE, 7:30 P.M.

KARAOKE THURSDAY @ AMIGOS CANTINA, 9:00 P.M.

RILEY DEACON PHOTO EDITOR

F R I

With another holiday season quickly approaching, we are in for an endless loop of Christmas cable classics. Everyone has their yearly traditions, but we often forget about the movies that capture the spirit of the holidays yet aren’t explicitly festive. Traditional Christmas movies make audiences feel warm and fuzzy over the holiday season. They are joyful and silly — pictures like Home Alone, Elf and National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation. These films each have their lead characters mixed up in a series of comedic hijinks, and in return, audiences are gifted with jolly laughs and happy endings. Though these films are wonderful, Christmas isn’t always a pleasant time. Stresses associated with gift giving, family events and feverishly busy malls can take a toll on an individual, rendering them cold to the Christmas season. For these dark times amidst the holiday cheer, certain alternative Christmas films can help one wallow in these estranged moods and bring to light endlessly interesting topics such as Freemason orgies, surreal dual personalities and cold-blooded murders. The first film on this list is Eyes Wide Shut — released in 1999, it is the final film by Stanley Kubrick. It stars Nicole Kidman and Tom Cruise, two megacelebrities at the time. The story is set during Christmastime in New York City and follows the struggles of Bill (Cruise), an attractive but aloof doctor, and Alice (Kidman), his wife. The film is based on Arthur Schnitzler’s 1926 novella Traumnovelle, which translates to “dream story.” This take on the brooding anxiety wrought from the thought of your partner becoming intimate with another person will surely cool your warm heart during the holiday season.

07

CBC SASKATOON: COMFORT & JOY CHARITY DRIVE @ CITIZEN CAFE & BAKERY, 6:00 A.M.

SILENCE AUCTION BY VASU @ GORDON SNELGROVE GALLERY, 7:00 P.M.

SWEETIE @ REMAI MODERN, 7:00 P.M.

ECILA WITH THE RADIANT AND TAURUS STORY @ AMIGOS CANTINA, 9:00 P.M.

S A T

Yashica Bither

At the beginning of the film, Alice reveals to Bill that she has contemplated having an affair and would have had one had the other man been interested. Bill proceeds to go on a nightlong journey in which he infiltrates a masked orgy of a Freemason-type society. If there is any soundtrack that can replace the Christmas songs we all know and love, it’s probably the reversed chanting of a masked secret order. Eyes Wide Shut is long, slow and gives no direct answers, although it asks some of the most difficult questions that people are challenged with when engaged in long-term relationships. The second alternative Christmas film that ought to be on your list is The Double Life of Veronique, a film released in 1991 by the famous Polish director Krzysztof Kieślowski. Starring Polish actress Irène Jacob, this film is quieter and less grand than Eyes Wide Shut, instead offering a more contemplative and poetic look into two women who share a mysterious bond deeper than language and geography. The two main characters are both played by Jacob — one character is a Polish choir soprano, and the other is a French music teacher. They have no knowledge of one another but are connected throughout the film in a deeply surreal way. The film is much like a fantasy — the cinematography is cross-processed and duo-

toned, creating an ethereal feeling that you won’t find in your average Christmas film. This film is not so much a work of art that you watch and understand but more something that you feel. Analysis does not do this film much justice. The final and least depressing alternative Christmas movie on the list is the Coen brothers’ classic Fargo. Set in the cold, bitter winter of the American Midwest, the setting is reminiscent of the frosty weather of our own City of Saskatoon. The story is centred around Jerry Lundegaard, a man in desperate need of money, who makes the erroneous choice to have his wife kidnapped and held for ransom. The plan goes completely awry, wherein helpless bystanders are murdered, lives are ruined and Marge Gunderson, a pregnant detective, works to find an answer to these murders. This film sits somewhat parallel to the happygo-lucky Christmas films mentioned at the beginning of this article — wherein the audience follows a lead character that gets into some comical hijinks, but in this black-comedy masterpiece, it does not end happily. As warm Starbucks drinks flow throughout our holiday veins and the voice of Michael Bublé haunts the halls of retail environments, the overly saccharine holiday atmosphere may just lead you to seek out something a bit stranger for your holiday entertainment.

08

VEGAN COMFORT — POP UP RESTAURANT @ SASKATOON FARMERS’ MARKET, 9:30 A.M.

12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS: SASKATOON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA VARIETY SHOW @ TCU PLACE, 7:30 P.M.

THE DYLAN COOPER BAND WITH TAYLOR JADE AND SHARP TAIL @ AMIGOS CANTINA, 10:00 P.M.

S U N

09

SUNDAY NIGHT JAM @ BUDS ON BROADWAY, 8:00 P.M.

BLACK CAT OPEN MIC: BEST PERFORMANCE FINALS @ BLACK CAT TAVERN, 9:00 P.M.

KARAOKE NIGHT @ FLINT SALOON, 9:00 P.M.

M O N

10

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL SASKATOON: WRITE FOR RIGHTS @ AUGUSTANA LUTHERAN CHURCH, 4:30 P.M. CITY CENTRE FOOD COOPERATIVE PRESENTS BROC & ROLL (& BURGERS!) @ THE ROOK AND RAVEN PUB, 6:00 P.M. GAMES NIGHT @ LOUIS’ PUB, 7:00 P.M. THE OFFICE CHRISTMAS TRIVIA @ HUDSONS SASKATOON, 7:30 P.M.

T U E S

11

COMEDY WRITING WORKSHOP FOR WOMEN @ AMIGOS CANTINA, 6:30 P.M.

SUPER JAM TUESDAY! @ SOMEWHERE ELSE PUB & GRILL, 7:00 P.M

100% TUESDAYS @ LOUIS’ PUB, 8:00 P.M.

OPEN STAGE @ CAPITOL MUSIC CLUB, 8:00 P.M.

W E D

12

WRITER/ARTIST JAM @ AMAZING STORIES, 6:30 P.M.

ANNA KARENINA: THE MUSICAL @ THE ROXY THEATRE, 7:00 P.M.

DRAMA QUEEN MARTYR ALBUM RELEASE WITH TWIN VOICES @ PAVED ARTS, 7:30 P.M.

MICHAEL KAESHAMMER @ THE BASSMENT, 8:00 P.M.

DEC. 1-23

FIDDLER ON THE ROOF

DEC. 4-8

ALONE AT HOME: A REZ CHRISTMAS STORY

@ PERSEPHONE THEATRE

@ THE BROADWAY THEATRE

CULTURE / 7


PHOTO FEATURE

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 1 0

Riley Deacon / Photo Editor

frosty campus Yashica Bither

F

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM THE SHEA

Rile y Deacon / Photo

Editor

Ril e y De

acon / P

Yashica

hoto Ed

itor

Bither

Ril ey Deacon /

Rile y Dea

con / Pho to Editor

8 / PHOTO FEATURE

Photo Editor


DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

COLOURING PAGE

Jaymie Stachyruk / Graphics Editor

COLOURING PAGE / 9


CULTURE

10 / CULTURE

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 1 0


CULTURE

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

Fighting In the Age of Loneliness hits hard in an era defined by uncertainty

956-7777 FOR RESERVATIONS

"Straight Up Saskatchewan Goodness FROM SCRATCH"

A brilliant documentary series by two internet cult heroes looks at the intersection between fighting and politics.

Lettuce Wraps, Vietnamese Rolls, Potstickers, Wings, Nachos, Hot Spinach & Artichoke Dip, Beef Dip, Sandwhiches, Wraps, Fish & Chips, Burgers, Stir Frys, Pastas, Jambalaya, Thai Chicken & Ginger Beef Noodle Bowls, Meatloaf, Poulet du Chef, Maple-Glazed Salmon, Steaks, Gourmet Pizzas, Milkshakes, Cappuccinos, Wines by the Glass

Our Famous Made in-house Desserts and so much more!

Daily food, draft and drink specials! Full slab weekend back rib special $18.99 Weekly pizza Special $9.99 Cumberland & College across from campus

Mon - Thurs 11am-1am

Fri & Sat 11am-2am

Jaymie Stachyruk / Graphics Editor

Sun 11am-11pm

COLE CHRETIEN CULTURE EDITOR

fill a gap in your program Athabasca University has over 850 courses to choose from to meet your needs and courses start every month. AU has over 6,600 transfer agreements around the world (including with this institution).

It’s rare that high-quality documentary content is just given away for free on the internet, and for this reason, Fighting in the Age of Loneliness — a nearly two-hour history of mixed martial arts — feels like a gift. Created by Jon Bois and Felix Biederman, FITAOL serves as a genealogy of modern combat sports that follows MMA from the invention of Jiu-Jitsu in feudal Japan up to the disastrous bout between Conor McGregor and Khabib Nurmagomedov at the Ultimate Fighting Championship 229 in Oct. 6, 2018. It serves as a history of athletic exceptionalism, rivalry and triumph in MMA, but it also looks at the economic and social conditions that led to the strange success of the sport. For those in the know, FITAOL signals a crossover between two unconventional writers who are both extremely good at what they do. Bois has built a cult following at SB Nation through his unconventional documentaries that combine sports, maps and statistics to create compelling stories through graphical representations of data. Biederman was an insightful sports and culture reporter long before he accidentally became one of the pre-eminent voices of the new American left through his work on the Chapo Trap House podcast. With this documentary, Biederman gets back to his MMA roots and Bois comes out of a year-long filmmaking hiatus to handle the visuals and editing. The political analysis in the film is sharp, and Biederman has some takes on the UFC that will most likely anger anyone who has no memory of the league before nepotism cases like McGregor came in and turned it into an unending reality show that thrives on exploited talent. For those that take their cultural criticism as seriously as they take their bloodsports, FITAOL is going to resonate in a way that few other pieces of media will. Every aspect of the sport is explored from the early competitive hegemony of the Gracie family to the rise and fall of the Yakuza-backed Pride Fighting Championships, but the current state of the UFC is the main focus. Biederman and Bois look at how greed and the quest for mass acceptance will eventually erode not just the sport of MMA but everything else we love as well. MMA is a sport that thrives because athletes who don’t fit in anywhere else continue to make the sport great in the face of bureaucracy and mismanagement. FITAOL shows us that, no matter how isolated we feel or how atomized society becomes, the spectacle of combat sports can help us transcend our collective political imagination. Biederman makes a compelling argument that we need the battles of the octagon to remind us of the hope that we wish was reflected in our own everyday struggles. All five episodes of Fighting in the Age of Loneliness are available for free on SB Nation’s Youtube channel.

CULTURE / 11


CULTURE

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 1 0

Students talk contentious topics in new campus group Students create space outside of classroom for informal debate on important issues. J.C. BALICANTA NARAG OUTREACH DIRECTOR

The ratification of the University of Saskatchewan Areopagus Youth in September brings discussion groups to a different level using confrontations to discuss controversial topics. The group is planning an event in February 2019 that will engage participants in a critical discussion on university education. The structure of USAY is inspired by the earliest known aristocratic council from Athens, Greece, called Areopagus, which was a discussion group with the goal of bringing understanding to the varying opinions that students have. In addition to weekly meetings, the group is planning an event in

February 2019 that will engage participants in a critical discussion on university education and varying issues surrounding it, including tuition prices and the operation of the administration. Although the students held discussions throughout last year, they ratified as a group in September. The idea for the February event came to Akinwande Akingbehin, a second-year arts and science student and co-founder of USAY, after watching a documentary about post-secondary education institutions in the summer. This prompted him to initiate bigger campus discussions and encourage critical thought on these institutions. “One of the documentaries I watched the most this summer was about university education…

HAPPY HOLIDAYS from cfcr 90.5fm we’re making our playlist and checking it twice.

All the best in the coming year! from

CFCR

cfcr hoodies in stock at cfcr.ca! beCOME A COMMUNITY RADIO vOLUNTEER HOST TODAY AT

CFCR CFCR.CA

DOWNLOAD THE APPLICATION AT

12 / CULTURE

OR VISIT

CALL

664 267 3RD AVE S 6678 ( 3RD FLOOR )

[I thought] How is it valuable? Why is tuition high? Do university administrators have to be paid so much? Why do we have the kind of grading system we have?” Akingbehin said. Although the subject of the event questions the structure of universities, it is not a protest against post-secondary education, but instead, it aims to create a space for students to critically analyze their opinions on the topic. “It’s not intended to be antiestablishment, because all of us in USAY, we are very passionate students… But there are some problems with the institution, obviously, and I think that it’s very, very important to address them,” Akingbehin said. Frances Stoneham, a first-year law student and co-founder of USAY, says that it has been beneficial for her, especially when it comes to speaking up in class discussions. “For me, it’s a space where you can bounce ideas off each other and hone your arguments. That’s really beneficial for me as a law student — to be able to argue things convincingly or realize where the flaws in my argument are,” Stoneham said. The club delves into in-depth discussions on topics and world events where people have varying perspectives. Salma Kazmi, a second-year arts and science student and co-founder of the club,

Riley Deacon / Photo Editor Members of the U of S Aeropagus Youth club discuss topics at their meeting held in the ISAAC Training Room on Dec. 3, 2018.

says that the table is open for ideas from many different viewpoints. “We have talked about different subjects. We have talked about abortion [and] euthanasia. We were just talking about science and spirituality and feminism,” Kazmi said. Other topics that they have discussed include artificial intelligence, gun control, sexual assault and American politics. Kazmi says that she likes their current theme, science and spirituality, because it is an important subject as it combines personal beliefs with university education. “I personally have been enjoying this last topic… It’s really important because we are engaged

[in] science research and studying science, and I think it’s pretty important to have a holistic view of [the university] where we are studying every day,” Kazmi said. The purpose of the club is to create a free space for students to speak, and Akingbehin says that they have been lucky to have respectful members considering how controversial the subjects are. “We never put any form of system in place to keep people down,” Akingbehin said. “We’ve just been lucky enough to have reasonable people, because if someone really provocative and vindictive comes, there’s nothing we can do because it is a free space.”


OPINIONS

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

OPINIONS

Holiday humbug

Sometimes stress can weigh down on the holiday season like a heavy snowfall. HOPE N.S. JEFFERY

Don’t get me wrong, the holidays can usher in a variety of great things, like bringing families together or coaxing out the spirit of giving in people. Unfortunately, there are a lot of bad things that can occur at this time of year. Christmas can place a large amount of stress on many families. For some, this season may bring up negative emotions any number of reasons, from missing family members due to a recent passing or being separated by a great distance to stress from financial burdens. A heavier workload can lead to increased stress — as university students, we all know this. During the holiday season, people with retail or sales jobs are often given more shifts so that businesses can

manage consumer demand and the influx of shoppers in malls. Others may pick up extra hours at work, so they can make more money to afford gifts for family and friends. With children being off from school during the holiday break, parents may need to take time off work to be home to look after their kids, forcing one parent to work extra to make up for lost income. Even the weather at this time of year can have an impact on people’s mental and physical well-being. Although holiday songs and decorations are meant to bring cheer, the gloomy weather and decreased amount of daylight are doing the opposite. With shorter and colder days, people tend to spend most of their time indoors. Students who live in campus residences might be able to stay indoors and wander the warm tunnels as long as

their class locations allow for it. However, some people might feel down in the cold winter months from a lack of sunlight, which travels through the optic nerve and releases “happy” chemicals like serotonin. All of this stress can push people towards unhealthy coping mechanisms such as heavy drinking or overeating. Unfortunately, drinking and driving is a prevalent issue at this time of year despite our attempts as a society to try to put an end to it. According to research in the United States, the number of alcohol-related accidents seems to spike twice a year: in the summer months and again in December. Yet, Canadian researchers report that the spike occurs in the fall, with rates dropping to the lowest levels of the year in winter months. But this doesn’t mean that

Jaymie Stachyruk / Graphics Editor

there isn’t any risk on the roads this season. In 2010, Statistics Canada reported 1,200 incidents of impaired driving over each weekend approaching Christmas and New Year’s. Drinking rates also spike this time of year. The Ontario Public Health Association noted that LCBO saw significant sales peaks between Dec. 6 and Jan. 2 and the lowest dip in sales immediately afterwards. One can assume that, if people are aware their drinking habits

are being tracked, they may alter their alcohol intake or their self disclosure of such. It’s not hard to imagine the increased number of accidents caused by impaired driving with trends like these. This season isn’t all cheer, and it’s clear that the holidays can be really hard for everyone. Some of us may relate to all of these humbug holiday feelings, while some may love being jolly during the season. We can all try to take care of ourselves and others over the break.

A very Sasky Christmas: Ask an Agro’s holiday favourites Show your Saskatchewan pride this holiday season with local gifts, even on a student budget. ASHLY DYCK

When I first moved to Saskatchewan, I thought only wheat and canola were produced locally, but was I wrong! For years, I’ve been wowing folks back in British Columbia with the variety of Saskatchewan-made gifts that I bring home for the holidays. Whether you’re spending the holidays out of province or in the next county over, Ask an Agro has compiled a list of locally sourced gift ideas perfect for those on a student budget. Booze: Is it a cliché to mention alcohol first? Who cares. The amount of microbreweries and distilleries in Saskatchewan has grown exponentially in the last 20 years, and the changes made to the liquor laws in 2016 have made it even easier to find these local libations at a store near you. Last Mountain Distillery, Lucky Bastard Distillers and Black Fox Farm & Distillery produce a wide variety of locally made spirits that are available at both private and provincial liquor board stores. You can also buy straight from the distillery, which even lets you sample the goods.

Our favourite is Black Fox. This company grows 90 per cent of the ingredients that go into its gins, vodkas and liqueurs. Paddock Wood Brewing Co., Saskatchewan’s first microbrewery, even allows customers to create their own six pack, so they can take home whatever combination of beers wets their whistle! If you can’t manage a trip to the brewery itself, you can find most craft beers at liquor board stores for a much smaller markup than what’s placed on spirits. Black Bridge Brewery’s IPA, Rebellion Brewing Co.’s Lentil Cream Ale and High Key Brewing Co.’s Jolly Roger Ale are our top three picks. Even if someone on your Christmas list has a gluten allergy, they can still enjoy locally made products from Crossmount Cider Company. Their cider is gluten free, available at any local liquor store and made using 100 per cent Canadian apples. Honey: Crops need pollination, and as one of the country’s main producers of cereal crops, Saskatchewan also has a blooming honey industry. Though it may harden over time, honey never goes bad, making it an excellent gift.

Also, honey produced in different places will have a distinct flavour unique to that locality, known as its terroir. This means you can truly take the taste of Saskatchewan home with you for the holidays. Local honey and beeswax candles can be purchased at SaskMade Marketplace, Black Fox and The Better Good. Hemp: Commercial hemp production was legalized in Canada in 1998, and Saskatchewan currently holds the country’s highest number of Industrial Hemp Licenses and Registrations. Hemp is the nonTHC version of marijuana — it contains only 0.03 per cent THC compared to an average of 8.5 per cent in marijuana — and it can be used to make cooking oil, protein supplements and clothing. Hemp fibre has quite the history. In the past, it was even used to make American military uniforms during WWII, when traditional fibre sources weren’t available. Today, the locally owned Tentree Clothing Co. makes some of its items with hemp fibres. Skincare: Who doesn’t like to

Riley Deacon / Photo Editor The Better Good on Broadway Avenue in Saskatoon on Dec. 4, 2018.

be pampered? Soaps and lotions make a great gift for almost anyone, whether you know them well or not. The Whole Buffalo Soap Co. adds a refreshing prairie twist to the making of homemade soap by using bison tallow instead of the usual coconut oil, palm oil or beef tallow and colouring their soap with clay instead of artificial dyes. Their products can currently be found online, but the owners say they hope to stock store shelves soon. Homeware: If you know the person well, a locally made houseware item like a paint-

ing, photograph, cutting board or a pair of slippers makes for a beautiful and thoughtful gift. The Better Good and the Wanuskewin Gift Shop, both located on Broadway Avenue, offer a beautiful selection of local and Indigenous-made pieces at a range of student-friendly prices. Buying local reduces emissions, keeps tax dollars and profits within Saskatchewan, and provides you with unique and memorable gifts to take home. And it doesn’t have to break the bank if you know where to look. Happy hunting!

OPINIONS / 13


OPINIONS

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 1 0

Charity season: The critical fault in relying upon grace Charity work is great, but will it solve the problem or just alleviate the symptoms? JACK THOMPSON

SPORTS & HEALTH EDITOR

December is often looked at as a charitable season, and many organizations look to bolster their donations at this time of year. As with most things, however, it is best to know all the details surrounding who you are supporting. The Salvation Army is an international Christian church that started working as a charitable organization in 1882 as a way to give “hope and support to vulnerable people” in 400 communities across Canada and more than 125 countries around the world, according to their website. These efforts include a variety of services, such as mental-health and addictions services, meals and overnight shelter. The Salvation Army achieves these supports through donations and revenue generated through thrift stores. These thrift stores, alongside the donation collectors posted in the entrances to Walmart stores, make up the majority of the public’s interactions with the organization. These services are largely ob-

COMING EVENTS follow us

jectively positive for those who receive them, and many would have trouble with providing services to vulnerable peoples. However, the Salvation Army has had more than its share of controversies during the course of its history. Accusations of prejudice on the part of the Salvation Army are something that has been taken up in the past, with allegations of anti-LGBT discrimination — including fighting non-discriminatory hiring laws for LGBT persons in the United States. After these messages were brought under scrutiny, the Salvation Army altered their statements surrounding these issues in order to maintain relevance in a modern climate. In fact, there is a page on their website stating that they act in compliance with Canadian anti-discrimination law and that their efforts are put towards helping members of any marginalized community. Whether this shift to increase inclusion is the result of an actual paradigm shift within the organization or simply the result of avoiding legal disputes, an attempt to fit in as opinions change is irrelevant to the bigger issue at play here. The decision to support a cause will most often be informed by a person’s own views, but the real question is whether any opinion should have a place in helping vulner-

©

clariSSa Harwood Launching

Bear No Malice

Thursday, January 3, 7 pm

•••

L ive M usic in P rairie i nk Friday & Saturday Nights, 8-10 pm

Friday, december 7

Uklectic Fred

Saturday, december 8

Gopher Broke

Friday, december 14

ian Martens

Saturday, december 15

the lost keys

Friday, december 21

Jack Walton

Saturday, december 22

dan JUlien trio

14 / OPINIONS11/27/2018

sheaf dec 6 to jan 2, 2018.indd 1

2:42:43 PM

Riley Deacon / Photo Editor A Salvation Army volunteer rings the bell at a donation stand in Midtown Plaza on Dec. 1, 2018.

able communities and persons. Organizations such as the Salvation Army exist to supplement public assistance programs — essentially filling the gaps left by capitalism and government support programs. This allows individuals to choose who they support or whether to support any causes at all. When you break it down, charitable organizations allow people to opt in to provide people with the basic needs of survival. The fact that whether or not someone gets the crucial sup-

port they need depends on another person’s willingness and ability to help is an imperfect system at best. If charitable organizations are needed, there is room for prejudice to form — such as the Salvation Army attempting to exert political pressure — and for some causes to go without support because they are not in the public consciousness. Whether or not a person survives should not fall upon the grace of others, and it should be seen not as an op-

portunity for charity but rather as a failure in the world around us. Charitable organizations are, of course, largely a positive force despite a few exceptions, but they cannot be viewed as a permanent solution to most problems because of their dependency on the public. Pointing out problems is one thing, but solutions are another thing entirely. A solution to all poverty and injustice in world may seem impossible, and while charity is a good Band-Aid for the time being, it is not a concrete solution.


DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

DISTRACTIONS

xkcd.com

#albumoftheweek:

eviction sessions By Jean-Michel Blais Tanner Bayne

Jean-Michel Blais, a Montreal-bornand-based pianist, knows first-hand the truth of the overused axiom “all good things must come to an end.� This spring, Blais was evicted from his Mile End apartment, as gentrification made the Bohemian neighbourhood too expensive for area artists to afford. However, instead of ending his time there on a sour note, Blais decided to make it bittersweet by recording a live record in his bedroom. Called eviction sessions, the fivesong EP is a unique live album. In the place of uproarious applause and frantic screaming, this live album picks up on creaking chairs, breathing bodies and the precise pattering of fingers on piano keys. Combining these elements with his compositions, Blais reminds listeners that there is always a little good in things ending.

http://www.harkavagrant.com

DISTRACTIONS / 15


BACKPAGE

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 0 6 , 2 0 1 8

From the USSU Executive and Staff.

16 / BACKPAGE

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 1 0

December 6, 2018  
December 6, 2018  
Advertisement