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Classes not required for USSU

Saying goodbye to a Huskie great

YOUR UNI VE R S I T Y O F SAS K ATC H E WA N ST UDE NT NE WS PA P E R S I N C E 1 9 1 2

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Buying presents on a budget

The University of Saskatchewan’s main campus is situated on Treaty 6 Territory and the Homeland of the Métis.

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Sheaf debates: Holiday greetings

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NEWS

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF | Jessica Klaassen-Wright

editor@thesheaf.com NEWS EDITOR

CULTURE EDITOR

Nykole King

Tanner Bayne

news@thesheaf.com

culture@thesheaf.com

SPORTS & HEALTH EDITOR

OPINIONS EDITOR

Emily Migchels

Jack Thompson

opinions@thesheaf.com

sportshealth@thesheaf.com

STAFF WRITER

Lyndsay Afseth staffwriter@thesheaf.com COPY EDITOR

| Amanda Slinger

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Mission // The mission of the Sheaf is to inform and entertain students by addressing those issues that are relevant to life on campus, in the city or in the province. The newspaper serves as a forum for discussion on a wide range of issues that concern students. Written for students, by students, it provides unique insight into university issues through a student perspective. The staff of editors, photographers and artists collaborate with volunteers as student journalists to create a product relevant to students on the University of Saskatchewan campus. Legal // The Sheaf, published weekly during the academic year and periodically from May through August, is an incorporated non-profit that is, in part, student-body funded by way of a direct levy paid by all partand full-time undergraduate students at the U of S. The remainder of the revenue is generated through advertising. The financial affairs are governed by a Board of Directors, most of whom are students. Membership in the Sheaf Publishing Society is open to all undergraduate students at the U of S, who are encouraged to contribute to the newspaper. Absolutely no experience is required! The opinions expressed in the Sheaf do not necessarily reflect those of the Sheaf Publishing Society Inc. The Sheaf reserves the right to refuse to accept or print any material deemed unfit for publication, as determined by the Editor-in-Chief. The Editor-in-Chief has the right to veto any submission deemed unfit for the Society newspaper. In determining this, the Editor-in-Chief will decide if the article or artwork would be of interest to a significant portion of the Society and benefit the welfare of Sheaf readers. The Sheaf will not publish any racist, sexist, homophobic or libellous material. Land Acknowledgement // The Sheaf acknowledges that our office is built on Treaty Six Territory and the traditional homeland of the Métis. We pay our respects to the First Nations and Métis ancestors of this place and affirm both the importance of our relationship with Indigenous peoples and students at the U of S and our commitment to recognize and remain accountable for our collective history.

corrections

There were no errors brought to our attention in our last issue. We apologize for this error. If you spot any errors in this issue, please email them to: copy@thesheaf.com

2 / NEWS

USaskStorytelling’s debut show embraces firsts The newly-established campus group empowered students to share their narratives on the theme of beginnings at their first event. NYKOLE KING NEWS EDITOR

While only in her first year of university, Toby Ewert is already making an impression at the University of Saskatchewan by creating a space for students to share personal stories with their peers. Ewert, who is going into social work, is passionate about storytelling and noticed that there was no outlet for storytellers on campus, so she took the initiative to create a group called USaskStorytelling. On Dec. 1, the group’s debut show featured five students presenting genuine narratives about meaningful beginnings in their lives. Ewert is an avid listener of storytelling podcasts, which she says inspired her to bring this performance-based group to campus. She explains that, even without knowing someone, listening to their narrative can still evoke emotions. “I find that [storytelling] seemed to be something that people can connect over really easily, without having a lot of [knowledge of their] personal background,” Ewert said. “I’ve had people’s stories — [people] I don’t know and will never know — affect my life, and I thought that was really important.” Ewert approached USask Improv, an improvisational-

theatre student group on campus, in October with the idea for students to share their narratives, and with USask Improv’s support, USaskStorytelling came to fruition. At the first event, the stories varied from lighthearted topics, like flying in an airplane for the first time, to more serious topics, such as living with schizophrenia. Bjorn Haave, a third-year computer science student and the president of USask Improv, says the improv group supports its members in pursuing new performance-art activities. Although storytelling and improvisational theatre may seem unrelated, Haave notes the similarities between the art forms. “USask Improv has been around a few years now, and it is our third year, officially, as a group on campus. We’ve always been talking about [doing a] sketch or a podcast. We thought about open arts for everyone at the university,” Haave said. “It seems like the perfect intersection of being artistic [and] also being personal and vulnerable.” Lachlan Logue, a first-year drama student and one of the five storytellers at the event, chose to share his story of beginning a life without his father, whom he has not seen for 10 months. Logue discusses his appreciation of the other storytellers at the event, noting that

there is more than one way to share a story. While he focused specifically on the audience’s experience during his performance, Logue says that he was surprised at the cathartic experience of sharing his narrative. “It was a lot of thinking about ‘If I were a person in the audience — which I was for the rest of the show — what stories I would want to hear?’” Logue said. “Everyone [had] really cool, diverse, different ways of storytelling. I feel like that was [the] coolest thing about it. Everyone had a unique take on storytelling.” No plans are set for the next storytelling show, but Ewert encourages any interested students to reach out to USaskStorytelling by Facebook or email. Just as the style of storytelling changed from performer to performer, so too did the mood of each story. Ewert explains that she let each individual student choose the direction of their story, with the only guideline being that the overall theme should focus on beginnings. “Some of the stories that I have are pretty serious, but some of them are just pure happy, [and] it will be a contrast, and that’s kind of a thing that’s cool about storytelling,” Ewert said. “You can kind of control the emotions of a room that way, and when people are really mesmerized, you can often just feel it in a room.”


DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

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NEWS

Proposed amendment at USSU Annual General Meeting causes dispute At the AGM, U of S Campus Conservatives lobbied students to vote against a proposed amendment to remove the USSU executives’ minimum course requirements. NAFISA ISLAM

On Nov. 23 at the University of Saskatchewan Students’ Union Annual General Meeting, a proposed amendment to the USSU bylaws led to an objection from a group of students from the U of S Campus Conservatives. The AGM agenda consisted of eight proposed amendments to the USSU bylaws, but the amendment that garnered the most debate called for a removal of the requirement that USSU executives enroll in courses while they are in office. At the AGM, members from the Campus Conservatives, a politically-­focused student group, questioned whether or not the amendment is necessary and beneficial. David D’Eon, president of the USSU, put forward the proposed amendment at the AGM. He explains that it is necessary to change the restrictive courseload requirements due to the demands of the executive positions. “When I stepped into the job, I was very aware of a history of mental-health breakdowns amongst executive members, and that was something that I wanted to try [to] find a couple of ways of addressing. So, that was my first motivation,” D’Eon said. Before the amendment passed, section 15 and 16 of the USSU bylaws required the executives of the union to enroll in a minimum of three credit units in both the fall session and the winter session. Failing to enroll in courses while working full time on the executive might have resulted in removal from office. At the AGM, a group of about eight students objected to the proposed amendment and handed out small information sheets to convince students to

vote against the amendment with them. The handouts stated that the purpose of the bylaw was “to ensure the executive remains under the control of U of S students” and that the amendment would give the executives an “easy ride while they get paid a massive salary.” Erik Carey, a second-year political science student and a member of Campus Conservatives, notes that, while the students who objected to the amendment at the AGM were from a political student group, the amendment is not specifically a conservative issue. Carey explains that this amendment may allow some individuals to take advantage of the union positions. “We are concerned that some people might see this as an opportunity to take a year off of studying while maintaining their student status, and at the same time, generate an income,” Carey said. “This opens up the possibility that people who don’t really care about the interests of the students [run] for the positions because of the benefits it offers.” D’Eon explains there may be a misunderstanding amongst students that this amendment might allow people who are not U of S students to hold executive positions, but he says this is not the case. “We have an agreement now, with the registrar’s office, where executives are coded as ‘placeholders,’ which is the same status given to students who take time off to partake in co-op programs. It is still in the bylaws that you are required to be a student to run for an executive position,” D’Eon said. D’Eon explains that the U of S is not the only university to consider removing the requirement that student-union staff take classes during their work year. He says he discovered, while attending a student conference at the University

Emily Migchels / Opinions Editor The numbers reflected in the Ubyssey article were collected from the 2015-16 USSU budget.

of British Columbia, that the required course load is in review at other unions. “This was a conversation that I carried with me to the Student Union Development Summit that I went to in August. It really became apparent when we spoke with other student-union members that this was one way that was being explored, by many unions, of reducing the burden on executive members,” D’Eon said. Despite the opposition to the pro-

posed amendment, the USSU passed all eight amendments during the AGM. Carey notes, however, that he and other students still have concerns about whether or not the amendment will encourage inept students to run for executive positions on the students’ union. “Our point was that, if they cannot handle the workload of the classes and their responsibilities, they should not have taken the responsibility in the first place.”

Anxious in Social Situations? Participate in Self-Help Treatment Researchers at the University of Regina are investigating self-compassion training, a new treatment approach for social anxiety. Participation in this research includes working through a self-help program for 6 weeks and completing questionnaires online. Participation is done from the comfort of your home and will teach you skills to help manage your social anxiety. http://bit.do/socialanxietyselfhelp self.compassion@uregina.ca ⦁ 306-337-2473

Approved by the Research Ethics Board, University of Regina, file # 2017-017.

NEWS / 3


NEWS

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Colleges take time to consult students before setting tuition A new university policy brought forward by the USSU will make tuition transparency mandatory in all colleges.

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said. “We are getting the credits to graduate from the College of Education with that internship, so we do need to get the credits.” Johnson says that the administration of the College of Education offered to supply the tuition-consultation information and speak with students at any point in the year. Johnson also notes that she is looking forward to the followup consultation meeting in term two. D’Eon explains that student feedback on setting tuition has the most impact while the colleges are still determining the tuition internally, which is why the policy has focused on getting student unions involved early in the process. “The reason we’ve been focusing so intensely on the colleges is because that’s where you can make the largest impact,” D’Eon said. “We don’t know the particularities of every college, so empowering these groups has been a much more effective way of going about it.”

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NYKOLE KING NEWS EDITOR

Since March 2017, when the Government of Saskatchewan announced that it would reduce funding to post-secondary tuitions, the University of Saskatchewan has been exploring its budget to meet basic operating costs while avoiding a hike in tuition. Each year, tuition prices are determined by individual colleges and sent to the Board of Governors for approval. Typically, the prices are determined in December, but the BOG has extended the renewal deadline to March, so that colleges can have “more meaningful consultation with students.” Vanessa Johnson, a third-year education student specializing in social studies, attended the consultation session held on Oct. 19 with Michelle Prytula, dean of the College of Education. Johnson explains that the consultation consisted of a presentation that forecasted tuition increases and compared the tuition costs to other universities. “I found that it was quite transparent for the information they were giving us, because she was giving us numbers from

4 / NEWS

other universities based on their education tuition,” Johnson said. “[Dean Prytula] just kept reiterating that she wanted to create the best College of Education that she possibly can, and she wanted us to know where our money [is] going.” Tuition prices are set according to three guiding principles. The first principle is that tuition prices should be comparable between the U of S and other U15 medical-doctoral institutions, as well as other universities in the region. The second principle is to monitor the affordability of tuition, based on the availability of financial aid, estimated cost of being a student, program demand and potential lifetime earning of graduates. The third principle is to maintain the quality of the programs and education for students. While most colleges have been in consultation with students using these three principles to set tuition rates, the U of S Students’ Union is seeking to made the process mandatory. David D’Eon, president of the USSU, discusses how he and Jessica Quan, vice-president academic affairs, have been working toward a policy since May, in order to specify and standardize

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the requirements for tuition consultation. “Tuition consultations — they … have been happening [with] the colleges for some time, so I think they are fairly standard across the university. What we aim to do this year is to create some consistency, in terms of how they’re run and in terms of what information the colleges are providing, … ensuring they are more robust than they were before,” D’Eon said. D’Eon says that he will present the policy at the BOG meeting on Dec. 7 and 8, where they will determine whether or not to implement it into official U of S policy. This September, the policy was brought before the Deans’ Council, and D’Eon notes that, since then, the U of S has been acting as if the policy is already in place to guide the tuition process. The draft policy focuses on the accessibility of tuition information for students and the transparency of the colleges to outline the costs and reasons for increases. It also mandates that the colleges remain accountable for seeking out student feedback early in the tuition­-setting process. The policy dictates that colleges must host a followup consultation meeting in term

two if the student societies request one. Tuition revenue makes up approximately 26 per cent of the university’s operating budget, and with the consultation meetings, students have the opportunity to share their input on how their tuition will be used, as D’Eon discusses. “If a college is bringing in a service that is not necessary, students can say so. That will help with the bottom line to reduce tuition. Or, if there’s a certain service that is really needed, students can bring that up, … and hopefully, have better relations with their college moving forward,” D’Eon said. Johnson explains that the consultation meeting was beneficial, because the administration answered the questions that students brought forward about issues related to their tuition. One question that students brought to the meeting was why they pay tuition while taking an internship. “You need 15 credits in order to get your teaching internship done, … and you have to pay for those credits. So, if you’re only going to want to pay for three or six of those credits, you’re not going get all your credits to get your internship,” Johnson

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Saturday, December 9, 1 pm

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Feeding My Mother and A Jann Arden Christmas Tuesday, December 12, 7 pm

sheaf dec 7 to jan 3, 2017.indd 1

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SPORTS&HEALTH

SPORTS&HEALTH A farewell to Mitch Hillis, the greatest receiver in Huskies football history Hillis leaves behind a legacy as he departs from the Huskies football team. MATTHEW JOHNSON

With accolades such as threetime Canada West All-Star, twotime U Sports All-Canadian, Huskies all-time leader in career receptions, receiving yards and touchdowns, and record holder for career receiving yards in Canada West, Mitch Hillis is one of the program’s all-time greats. When Mitch first stepped into the Huskies clubhouse as a member of the program in 2013, there was at least one familiar face in the room. His brother and fellow receiver Kit Hillis was already a star for the Huskies. Kit, who spent four years with the program, will forever cherish his time spent playing with his brother. “It was incredibly special, being able to not only play with Mitch but for both of us be lined up beside each other as receivers. Football is already a brotherhood, but to be able to celebrate with your brother in the endzone is something I’ll never forget,” Kit said. Playing alongside Kit was a

career-changing experience for Mitch, and receiving mentorship from a player of that caliber was extremely beneficial for the long-term success of his career. “Playing with your brother, who is five years older than you, is something not many people get to experience,” Mitch said. “I am grateful for the experience, because it brought us closer than we had ever been and allowed me to learn from him in his element. He showed me the ropes on how to be a good leader, teammate, and more importantly, a good role model.” Mitch showed glimpses of his potential during his first two seasons with the program, amassing 551 receiving yards and four touchdowns. In his third year with the Huskies, Mitch made his name known on the national stage, setting the program’s singleseason record in receptions, with 66, and receiving yards, with 1052. After his fourth year was plagued by injury, Mitch bounced back in a big way in 2017. He racked up 935 yards on 52 receptions while finding the end zone on 10 occasions. Mitch played his final game

with the program on Oct. 28, against the Manitoba Bisons at Griffiths Stadium, and he went out with a bang. He recorded 13 receptions for 219 yards, gaining the yards he needed to break the Canada West record for career receiving yards. Despite this success, the Huskies failed to qualify for the post-season this year for the first time since 2000, making for a disappointing end to a spectacular individual career. Nevertheless, Kit enjoyed watching Mitch from the broadcast booth this season, where he served as a radio analyst for CJWW. “When we were playing together, we became best friends and we celebrated our accomplishments together, but these last few years, I’ve been able to watch as a fan and a proud brother and not worry about my own football career,” Kit said. Looking back on his years with the program, the relationships that Mitch has developed with people along the way will always emerge for him as life-changing experiences. “The thing that stands out to me is when I take a step back

Jessa Robb Mitch Hillis departs from the Huskies with many acheivements to show for it.

and look at all the people and friends I have met through playing football for five years with the Huskies. All of my teammates obviously, alumni who played, athletes from other sports — it is just amazing how many networks and connections you make playing a sport,” Mitch said. Huskies quarterback Kyle Siemens has developed an amazing on-field connection with Mitch over the course of his career. Thanks to Mitch and Siemens, this Huskies offence has been arguably one of the most explosive in the country over the past three seasons, and Siemens has appreciated the opportunity to

Josh Schaefer / Supplied Mitch Hillis, pictured here in his 2015-16 season, leaves behind a long history of excellence with the Huskies.

toss the rock to Mitch. “[Throwing to Mitch] has been unbelievable. To have a receiver who you can rely on as a quarterback is a major confidence boost. Whenever we needed a play, or a spark to get our team going, he was always there to do it,” Siemens said. Siemens also speaks about Mitch’s spectacular on-field vision. “The game comes so naturally to him. He’s able to see the field and react to what’s going on around him, which is something a lot of athletes cannot do,” Siemens said. Mitch has accomplished almost everything on an individual basis at the U Sports level. He was drafted by the British Columbia Lions in the eighth round of last year’s draft and will turn his focus back to the pro level once he finishes up his kinesiology degree in April. “My life will be primarily the same until the end of the school year. I will be training in the off-season like every other year. The difference will come in the spring once I go to a CFL camp, and from there, your guess is as good as mine as to what to expect,” Mitch said. Mitch Hillis’s career will go down as one of the best in program history by an individual player. His numerous contributions to the program are substantial and shouldn’t go unnoticed, something his brother Kit is proud of. “Mitch had an incredible career, and I’m glad the records can showcase his tremendous accomplishments.”

SPORTS & HEALTH / 5


SPORTS&HEALTH

Recipe:

Glazed eggnog bread

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

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Fitness class review:

Recipes from www.fortheloveofcooking.net

Fitness yoga

Makes 1 loaf Time: 1 hour 15 minutes

Taking the fitness class series back to its roots, I review an alternate version of the yoga class.

SARAH BAINS

1½ cups flour 1 cup white sugar 1 tsp. baking powder ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. ground cinnamon ¼ tsp. ground nutmeg ⅛ tsp. ground cloves ¾ cup eggnog ½ cup vegetable oil 2 large eggs, beaten 1½ tsp. vanilla extract

JACK THOMPSON SPORTS & HEALTH EDITOR

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Coat an 8½ by 4½ inch loaf pan with cooking spray. Combine the flour with the sugar, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, nutmeg and cloves; mix well. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggnog, vegetable oil, eggs and vanilla until well combined. Slowly add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients; stir until just combined. Pour the batter into the prepared loaf pan. Tap the pan on the counter to be sure the batter is evenly set in the pan. Bake for about 65-75 minutes. Remove from the oven, let cool on a wire rack for a 10-15 minutes, then loosen the bread from the pan with a butter knife. Let the bread cool directly on the wire rack. Once completely cooled, make the glaze by combining the powdered sugar with the eggnog, vanilla and nutmeg; mix well.

Way back in September, the first Fit Centre class I attended for this series was the standard yoga class, and therefore, I found it fitting to come full circle and close out a term’s worth of reviews with a variant of the first class: fitness yoga. Since that first yoga session, I have been to the same class a number of times, so this review won’t be based on my usual level of inexperience with the exercise. However, I am not quite wellversed enough in the nuances of yoga to give an in-depth explanation of the differences between the two classes — so I will be focusing on how they felt. Going into fitness yoga, I assumed incorrectly that the class would be a more advanced yoga class because of its name. This was not the case — in fact, the opposite was true. Strangely, this class does not have a description on the Fit Centre web page, so there was no way for me — or anyone —

to know what I was getting into by signing up. The class is also only offered once a week on Wednesdays at 5:45 p.m., making it all the more mysterious. Having taken the class, however, I can say for certain there is nothing tricky or exceptionally difficult about it. It turns out that this yoga class is focused on taking care of the body rather than challenging it. While I certainly worked some muscles, the class was much less strenuous than the standard yoga class, in my experience. Instead, it focused on stretching and relaxing a worn-down body. In my opinion, the name of this class is misleading, as the session was almost better for beginners rather than advanced practitioners of yoga. The beginning of the class consisted of a pretty average warm-up, but this was followed by positions that emphasized stretching. The class then ended with what felt like an extended meditative period. In addition, there were many breaks in between sets of poses that gave the class a relaxing feel, overall. In closing, I would say not to let the name of this class scare you, since it is very relaxing, and I left the class feeling de-stressed and loose.

Place some parchment paper underneath the wire cooling rack holding the bread. Drizzle the glaze back and forth over the bread. Slice and serve with a glass of eggnog.

Eggnog glaze 1 cup powdered sugar 3 tbsp. eggnog ½ tsp. vanilla extract ⅛ teaspoon ground nutmeg Shamille Sarcauga

HOLIDAY STORE HOURS

Starting Dec. 6 we will be open at our Preston Crossing location: MONDAY-SATURDAY

9:30 am - 9 pm SUNDAY

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DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

SPORTS&HEALTH

Five quick tips for staying healthy this holiday season Indulgence and holiday celebrations seem to go hand in hand, so here are some tips to keep your holidays healthy no matter what you celebrate. KIMIA BAYATTORK

The holidays are just around the corner — and soon, there will be wine, turkey and treats to enjoy with loved ones — so this is a great opportunity to read up on some ways to stay healthy and fit this holiday season. Start the day healthy: Whether you have the whole day off or need to prepare for a holiday gathering in the evening, the best way to start your day is with a nutritious breakfast. Skipping this essential meal could hinder you as the day goes on — leaving you with less energy, and potentially, making you more likely to overeat at meals. Breakfast starts your day, and therefore, it is the best opportunity to boost your energy and get your brain going. But, remember to choose wisely so you get all the necessary proteins, carbohydrates and fats in your meal. Stay hydrated: Whether you are staying in for the holidays or hitting Mexico’s beaches, do not forget the most precious molecule on Earth — water. If you are flying, low humidity in high altitudes will make the cabin air dry, which can make you more vulnerable

Lauren Klassen Making healthy choices can leave you with a holiday season to feel good about.

to viruses and bacteria. Therefore, drink lots of water to protect yourself from these germs if you are travelling over the holidays. Even if you are staying at home just watching the snow fall by the fireplace, make sure to drink plenty of water each day to stay fresh and energetic and avoid headaches and fatigue. Eat sensible snacks: Wherever you go or whatever your plans are for the holidays, try to have small snacks in between your big meals to fight off temptation. Small amounts of fruit, yogurt and nuts are all great choices for a healthy snack. Before any party, try to have a small bite to eat to avoid overeating at the event and feeling guilty the next morning. Some

healthy examples include plain yogurt with bananas, toast with peanut butter and vegetable soup. Choose wisely at parties: Socializing is one of the most exciting things happening throughout the holidays — from hanging out with friends and family and mingling at parties to enjoying a great meal of turkey and gravy with a glass of wine. Here are some tips to help you to both enjoy that big holiday party and eat an amount of food that you feel good about. Avoid buffets, limit your drinks to one or two glasses, and try to fill half of your plate with fruits and vegetables. You are here to see your loved ones and mingle with them, not to hang out by the serving table

Lauren Klassen Moderation and smart snacking can keep you from overindulging.

and eat until you want to explode. And as always, drink water in between alcoholic beverages to avoid hangovers and to stay hydrated. Stay active: It is the holiday season, and we do need some relaxation, but exercise is still important. Exercising at least two times a week is enough to counteract all those turkey dinners. You will feel happy and healthy while still having plen-

ty of time to enjoy the holiday and mingle with your family. If you are leaving the snow for some warmth in other places, make sure to walk down the aisle whether you are travelling by train or plane, so as to keep the blood from clotting in your legs from long periods of sitting. By following these tips, you can stay healthy and active this holiday season and still enjoy the moment.

#Sheafgram

usask andrew_forsberg

usask

andrew_forsberg coming this spring to CBC: Little Castle on the Prairie. #usask #finalsarecoming #sendhelp #YXE #LivingYXE

SPORTS & HEALTH / 7


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HOLIDAY

EVENTS T H U R S

07

BROADWAY DISTRICT’S SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS @BROADWAY DISTRICT, 6:00 P.M.

HOLIDAY NIGHT MARKET @ ONE YOGA SASKATOON, 6:00 P.M.

CULTURE

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

F R I

15

A LOUISIANA HAYRIDE CHRISTMAS @ THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 7:30 P.M.

MESSIAH WITH SASKATOON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA & CHORUS @ KNOX UNITED CHURCH, 7:30 P.M.

THE ROOM @ THE ROXY THEATRE, 9:30 P.M.

S A T

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QUEER NIGHT @ USSU PRIDE CENTRE, 6:30 P.M.

ETSY SK’S WINTER MARKET @ STATION 20 WEST, 10:00 A.M.

@ WANUSKEWIN HERITAGE PARK, 10:00 A.M.

SING-ALONG MESSIAH WITH SASKATOON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA & CHORUS ONE BAD SON WITH WHALE AND THE WOLF AND LEAGUE OF WOLVES

FARM PARK & ZOO (UNTIL JAN. 6)

24 25

CHRISTMAS EVE “THE LIGHT OF CHRISTMAS” @ SASKATOON CHRISTIAN CENTRE, 10:00 A.M.

CHRISTMAS EVE CANDLELIGHT SERVICE @ PLEASANT HILL MENNONITE CHURCH, 7:00 P.M.

M O N

CHRISTMAS DAY — STATUTORY HOLIDAY

T U E S

BOXING DAY — STATUTORY HOLIDAY

WANUSKEWIN WORKSHOP: MITT MAKING

@ KNOX UNITED CHURCH, 2:00 P.M.

BHP BILLITON ENCHANTED FOREST HOLIDAY LIGHT TOUR @ SASKATOON FORESTRY

S U N

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HOME ALONE DOUBLE FEATURE @ THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 2:00 P.M.

@ O’BRIANS EVENT CENTRE, 7:00 P.M.

F R I

08

BELLE DE JOUR @ REMAI MODERN, 7:00 P.M.

COLTER WALL @ LOUIS’ PUB, 7:00 P.M.

LGBT2QS SPIRITUALITY: MOVING ON FROM A PAINFUL PAST — SEEKING THE WAY FORWARD

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COLTER WALL @ LOUIS’ PUB, 7:00 P.M. THE GOOD LOVELIES CHRISTMAS CONCERT @ THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 7:30 P.M. WILLIAM PRINCE

@ EMMANUEL ANGLICAN CHURCH, 8:00 P.M.

@ WESTERN DEVELOPMENT MUSEUM, 1:00 P.M.

LIGHTEN UP! FUN RUN 2017 @ D’LISH BY TISH CAFÉ, 6:30 P.M.

CHRISTMAS WITH ECLIPSE: CANADA… ONE…FIVE…OH...HO…HO

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PAINT NITE: CHICKADEE IN THE TREES @ FINN’S IRISH PUB, 7:00 P.M.

SASKATOON BLADES VS. PRINCE ALBERT RAIDERS @ SASKTEL CENTRE, 7:05 P.M. MELODY BAR ONE-YEAR ANNIVERSARY @ MELODY BAR, 9:00 P.M.

@ THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 7:30 P.M.

@ OUTSASKATOON, 7:00 P.M.

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CAROLLING SUNDAY

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LAST DAY OF VEGAS VACATION: A REZ CHRISTMAS STORY @ THE BROADWAY THEATRE

ALL THAT REMAINS WITH THROW THE FIGHT AND IN RUIN @ LOUIS’ PUB, 7:00 P.M.

VIDEO GAME MONDAY @ LOUIS’ PUB, 7:00 P.M.

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PAINT NITE: SEA TURTLE @ HERITAGE LOUNGE, 7:00 P.M.

KARAOKE THURSDAY THE 28TH: NYPREGAME @ AMIGOS CANTINA, 9:00 P.M.

LADYBITS IMPROV COMEDY COLLECTIVE! @ AMIGOS CANTINA, 7:30 P.M.

INTERSECTIONS EXHIBITION

@ SASKATCHEWAN CRAFT COUNCIL (UNTIL JAN. 20)

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LOW COST FILMMAKING WORKSHOP WITH AISHA JAMAL @ PAVED ARTS, 1:00 P.M. NESS 2018 DECEMBER AUDITIONS @ CAPITOL MUSIC CLUB, 1:00 P.M.

HAWKSLEY WORKMAN

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HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE WITH SHERI BENSON AND DAVID FORBES @ 904 22ND STREET WEST, 3:00 P.M.

FESTIVUS! TWO TWENTY HOLIDAY PARTY @ VILLAGE GUITAR & AMP CO., 7:00 P.M.

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DR. STRANGELOVE @ REMAI MODERN, 7:00 P.M. THE TIPPING POINT PREMIERE @ THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 7:00 P.M.

KENNY MARCO @ THE BASSMENT, 9:00 P.M.

@ EMMANUEL ANGLICAN CHURCH, 7:30 P.M.

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IN THE NAME OF ALL CANADIANS: A HOT DOCS SCREENING @ THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 7:00 P.M.

VIDEO GAME MONDAY @ LOUIS’ PUB, 7:00 P.M.

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HAWKSLEY WORKMAN

CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE

@ WESTERN DEVELOPMENT MUSEUM, 2:00 P.M.

SECOND SISTER — UNPLUGGED @ D’LISH BY TISH CAFÉ, 7:00 P.M.

GANGS OF NEW YORK 15TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING @ THE ROXY THEATRE, 7:30 P.M.

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SALUTE TO VIENNA NEW YEAR’S CONCERT @ TCU PLACE, 7:30 P.M.

VESTI & THE VEXATIONS @ THE BASSMENT, 8:00 P.M.

SULTANS OF STRING’S CHRISTMAS CARAVAN @ THE BASSMENT, 8:00 P.M.

@ EMMANUEL ANGLICAN CHURCH, 7:30 P.M.

PAINT NITE: SEASON OF GIVING AND LOVING @ FOX & HOUNDS, 2:00 P.M.

ADEN BOWMAN COLLEGIATE ART STUDENTS @ GORDON SNELGROVE GALLERY (UNTIL JAN.22)

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AND THAT’S U.P. SCREENING @ SCYAP ART CENTRE, 7:00 P.M.

TOONIE TUESDAY @ LOUIS’ PUB, 7:00 P.M.

CAPITOL OPEN STAGE

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@ CAPITOL MUSIC CLUB, 9:00 P.M.

WINTER SOLSTICE @ STATION 20 WEST, 7:00 P.M. FIRESIDE SINGERS CHRISTMAS MEMORIES @ TCU PLACE, 7:30 P.M. FAITH HEALER WITH CECIL FRENA, SLOW DOWN MOLASSES AND SPATIONAUTS

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A VILLAGE NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH BIG STUFF @ VILLAGE GUITAR & AMP CO., 7:30 P.M. ROSIE & THE RIVETERS PRESENT: A VERY VINTAGE NEW YEAR’S EVE @ THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 8:00 P.M.

@ VANGELIS TAVERN, 9:00 P.M.

NYE HOUSE PARTY @ PRAIRIELAND PARK, 9:00 P.M.

KARAOKE THURSDAY THE 21ST: YULE-OFF!

AMIGOS NEW YEAR’S EVE: CASTLE RIVER, AFTER 2AM, KAYE & CO. AND VBND

@ AMIGOS CANTINA, 9:00 P.M.

@ AMIGOS CANTINA, 10:00 P.M.

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WING WEDNESDAY @ LOUIS’ PUB, 5:00 P.M.

CANADA COUNCIL FOR THE ARTS GRANT WRITING WORKSHOP @ PAVED ARTS, 7:30 P.M. MUSIC IN THE GALLERY FEATURING 3 NINJASKS @ SASKATOON PUBLIC LIBRARY, 7:30 P.M.

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IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE @ REMAI MODERN, 7:00 P.M.

FIRESIDE SINGERS CHRISTMAS MEMORIES @ TCU PLACE, 7:30 P.M. 6TH ANNUAL UGLY CARDI PARTY

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@ CAPITOL MUSIC CLUB, 8:30 P.M.

NEW YEAR’S DAY — STATUTORY HOLIDAY 33RD ANNUAL RESOLUTION RUN @ SASKATOON, 10:00 A.M.

SASKATOON BLADES VS. SWIFT CURRENT BRONCOS @ SASKTEL CENTRE, 2:05 P.M. REALMS II EXHIBIT @ GORDON SNELGROVE GALLERY (UNTIL JAN. 12)

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CHRISTMAS EVENING MARKET @ SASKATOON FARMERS’ MARKET, 4:00 P.M.

JACKIE BROWN 20TH ANNIVERSARY SCREENING @ THE BROADWAY THEATRE, 8:00 P.M.

KARAOKE THURSDAY @ AMIGOS CANTINA, 9:00 P.M.

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SASKATCHEWAN RUSH VS. NEW ENGLAND BLACK WOLVES @ SASKTEL CENTRE, 7:30 P.M.

IAN SINCLAIR QUARTET WITH JUSTICE DER & UNDERLINE @ THE BASSMENT, 8:00 P.M.

CAVES ALBUM RELEASE WITH THE GARRYS AND KATHRINA BAND @ AMIGOS CANTINA, 10:00 P.M.

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PAINT NITE: WINTER CABIN SUNRISE @ BIRMINGHAM’S VODKA & ALE HOUSE, 7:00 P.M.

PAINT NITE: SNOWY MOONLIGHT @ FINN’S IRISH PUB, 7:00 P.M.

CULTURE / 9


FEATURE

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

Seasons eatings

from the Sheaf to you: A mini Sheafworthy recipe book

The Sheaf presents an exclusive staff recipe list for the holiday season.

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othing represents the holidays quite like the unbridled consumption of food. After months of subsisting on instant noodles, Kraft Dinner and the occasional multivitamin, students deserve to overindulge on some quality fare. However — whether because of a lack of cooking experience, time or funds — we students often leave the task of contributing to holiday meals for others, but we don’t have to be hedonistic holiday hosers. Since the holidays are all about sharing, here are some holiday recipe favourites from the Sheaf staff that you can bring to the table this season.

TANNER BAYNE CULTURE EDITOR

Tanner Bayne Culture Editor

Nykole King News Editor

K T

his recipe is a seasonal staple from my Dear Ol’ Mom, Susan. Though my mom is an expert cook, baker and confectioner who can create more holiday dishes than I can name, nothing compares to her Old-Fashioned Toffee — it’s the shining star of her Christmas creations. Don’t tell her that I shared this recipe, though — I would probably lose my inheritance if she found out.

utia, pronounced koot-YA, is a sweet wheat-pudding dish served at the beginning of the Christmas meal in many Ukrainian families. It is usually mandatory for everyone to eat at least one spoonful. The key ingredients are wheat and poppy seeds, but otherwise, the rest of the ingredients vary, and every family has a different recipe.

I’m going to be real with you — this shit is not fun to make. You have to stir incessantly for 20 goddamn minutes or more, or else it will quickly burn. Nevertheless, the gooey, sweet and slightly salty treat at the end always makes the prospect of permanently injuring your wrist worth it. Thanks, Mom.

M

y partner’s mother taught me this recipe. It’s warm and filling and easy to make. If it’s cold outside and you need to feed an a lot of people in a hurry, this is a good option. Also, it keeps surprisingly well in the fridge.

Laura Underwood Layout Manager

10 / FEATURE


FEATURE

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

Emily Migchels Opinions Editor

M

aybe 30 years ago, my mum scribbled this gem into the back of her Joy of Cooking recipe book. For the last few years, my family has been making a double batch in a giant punch bowl and drinking it together while we put up the Christmas tree and decorations. If you want to add the recipe to your list of holiday traditions, be wary — this stuff has a boozy bite.

Jessica Klaassen-Wright Editor-in-Chief

T

hese cookies are simple, but really goddamn good and — sometimes in spite of everything — shockingly consistent. You can mess up a lot, but you can’t mess up these cookies.

M J.C. Balicanta Narag Photo Editor

y mom always makes this during Christmas. It’s not a tradition at all, but we always have it on special occasions. On Christmas Eve in the Philippines, when I was young, this dessert was paired with spaghetti and hotdogs, Filipino-style pork-and-beef barbecue and lechon baboy — or roasted pig. My family would invite our neighbours and family friends, and we would all eat together. This dessert sticks out for me because it reminds me how full of stories and joy my house always was on Christmas Day.

Jack Thompson

Sports & Health Editor

T

Jeremy Britz

his recipe makes simple — but tasty — mimosas that can be made on a budget, depending on your choice of wine. This recipe came into my family at Easter, but it became a holiday tradition when we decided to stay inside, relax and drink mimosas all day rather than bother with any Boxing Day deals — my family now calls Boxing Day “Mimosa Day.” This recipe is a great way to unwind from holiday stress.

Web Editor

M

y grandma used to make the best gingersnap cookies, and while this isn’t exactly the same recipe, it’s fairly close to hers. The unique flavour of these cookies pairs well with coffee or hot chocolate, making them an excellent choice for the holidays.

All graphics by Jeremy Britz / Web Editor

FEATURE / 11


CULTURE

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

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How to give the perfect gift without that bank account hangover The Sheaf simplifies shopping for presents over the holidays by gifting you a plan. LARISSA BELINSKY

Finals are right around the corner, and that means the happiest time of year is almost here! However, for us poor university students, the holidays can impose a great deal of stress on our financial situations. Many students are already scraping the bottom of the barrel to buy another cup of ramen for dinner, and now, they are also expected to somehow find extra cash to buy gifts for their loved ones. It can be difficult to buy such meaningful gifts while staying on a budget. First things first, it’s a good idea to draw out a game plan. You can start by figuring out how many people you need to buy for, and then, assigning a budget for each person. A minimum price isn’t necessary, but it may be a good idea to set a maximum amount for each person, so you don’t wipe your bank account clean. Finding the perfect gift for

12 / CULTURE

someone special doesn’t mean spending the most amount of money on them. Truth be told, some of the best gifts are no more expensive than that fast-food hangover meal you bought yourself last Sunday. No matter what you purchase for that special individual, their face is sure to light up like a Christmas tree. Once you have the basics organized, you’re ready to shop. Finding a memorable gift is an intimidating task, but it’s not as hard as you might think. Bookstores like McNally Robinson and Indigo carry write-in books that allow their owners to record important events and thoughts. These books are the perfect sentimental gift for almost every member of your family and for your significant other. If you want a more meaningful gift, nothing says sentimental like something homemade. If you know how to sew or knit, you’ve pretty much got the DIY gifting in the bag. For the rest of us, pinterest.com has count-

Shamille Sarcauga

less ideas for DIY gifts. Some of the cuter ideas on Pinterest include homemade beeswax, essential-oil candles and a “52 Reasons Why I Love You” book made out of playing cards. When shopping for the right gift, don’t forget that the retail price is not always the

final price. Retailmenot.com informs you about a number of sales going on in stores across the city, and groupon.com features coupons on many goods, beauty and spa treatments, and restaurant and travel vouchers. The best part about Groupon is that you can even buy some items in bulk. Remember that you don’t always have to leave your house to buy gifts, either. Nowadays, you can do most of your shopping right from home on any device with internet access, and some online retailers feature exclusive discounts and sales that are only available online.

Another way to cut down the cost of gifting is to group people together. If you have multiple siblings who are around the same age, buy them a singular present that they can share and enjoy together. Board games, video games, movies and puzzles are great group gifts. You can also buy one joint gift for your parents, like a spice rack or a new bedspread. Holiday gift giving is only as stressful as you make it. Following these tips can help ease some of your wintertime financial struggles and put the “happy” back into your Happy Holidays!


DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

Winter blast from the past: Find your inner child with five Christmas movies Join me in this frivolous, but nostalgic, holiday look at the standout Christmas movies from my childhood. JESSICA KLAASSEN-WRIGHT

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

When I was a kid, my parents had a Rubbermaid container just for Christmas movies, but we weren’t allowed to watch them unless it was the Christmas season — something that my brothers and I found particularly irksome. As a supposed adult, I’ve definitely argued with my dad about the reasoning behind this secreted-away movie box. While I understand my dad better now — keeping bratty children entertained over the holidays is hard — my inner child still wants to watch those Christmas movies whenever it wants. So, in the spirit of the holidays, let’s dive into the Rubbermaid and take a look at the movies that I remember most vividly. And no, Home Alone does not make my list — I’ve always felt uncomfort-

CULTURE

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

able about Kevin McCallister’s self-protective pranks.

A Christmas Story: As a kid, I felt like this 1983 classic was forced upon me — my parents loved it, and my child mind has likely exaggerated the number of times we were made to watch it — but I’ve grown to appreciate it as I’ve gotten older. Set in the 1940s, the film focuses on Ralphie, who — more than anything — wants a Red Ryder BB gun for Christmas. With plenty of scenes that children can relate to — as well as jokes and semi-dysfunctional marriage situations that only adults will understand — this

is, I admit, a good family movie experience.

Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas!: If you’re thinking of the Jim Carrey version — don’t. That movie is vile and it will ruin any child’s Christmas. I’m talking the 1966 television special. The British Boris Karloff — known for his parts in horror films — lends his euphonious voice to the production as both narrator and Grinch, bringing a homey, fire-side-story feel to this animated classic. Even better, the film features a few catchy musical numbers, from the comical and acer-

bic “You’re a Mean One, Mr. Grinch” to the heart-melting “Welcome Christmas.” Various Rankin/Bass Productions holiday specials: When I say various, I mean it. This company’s heyday in the 1960s and ’70s generated loads of stop-motion-animated Christmas films, including Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, The Year Without a Santa Claus, Rudolph’s Shiny New Year and Rudolph and Frosty’s Christmas in July. Featuring a recurring cast of characters — with the voices of actors like Billie Mae Richards and Burl Ives — and a host of holiday tunes, these films will keep your inner child busy for days.

The Snowman: If you don’t have time for a full-length film at the end of a busy day prepping holiday fare, this 27-minute animated short is for you. Nominated for a 1982 Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film, The

Snowman tells the story of a boy and his snowman in a quiet, snow-swept landscape — literally, as the film features a score by Howard Blake without any dialogue.

The Muppet Christmas Carol: A musical adaptation of Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol, this film is by far my favourite childhood Christmas movie. While Michael Caine as Ebenezer Scrooge doesn’t quite match Alastair Sim’s brilliance in the 1951 film Scrooge, A Muppet Christmas Carol makes up for it with a swath of your favourite, lovable Muppet characters and heartwarming holiday tunes. In all seriousness, parts of this movie still make me want to cry. And thankfully, you too can experience the magic of these Rubbermaid treasures, because, like my most cherished Muppet movie song says, soon there will only be “One More Sleep ’til Christmas.”

$5 all you can eat wings

FINALS PARTY! Saturday, December 9th

PRIZES & THE ULTIMATE KEGGER 10PM TO 11PM

810 Central Ave

306.374.8873 CULTURE / 13


CULTURE

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

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Winter wardrobes: A look at on-campus fashion The Sheaf returns with a fashion update, this time focusing on winter clothes. JENNA LEUNG

The winter season means bundling up, but you don’t have to resort to wearing sweatpants and ugly Christmas sweaters for months on end. Meet three students here at the University of Saskatchewan who dress warmly but still stay stylish.

Shea Fidyk,

third-year education, age 20 In terms of clothing, what do you love to shop for during the holiday season? “I’m a sucker for big cozy sweaters with a high turtleneck. Anything cashmere is my go-to for the holiday season.” What is your favourite trend this winter? “I’m a really big fan of the earmuffs, which are coming back in — they’re so cute.” How many pairs of shoes do you own? “Upwards of 30.” What is a holiday piece that you must have in your closet and why? “Turtlenecks — I’m terribly cold all the time. So, turtlenecks are my thing.”

Coat: Ever New Shirt: Zara Bag: Kate Spade New York Pants: Zara

Dannielle Brewster,

first-year engineering, age 18

Denim button-up: Garage Scarf: Ardene Watch: Caravelle Leggings: American Eagle Outfitters Shoes: Le Château

As a student, how do you shop on a budget? “I try not to go shopping as often, and I’ll shop maybe once a season — just to get what I actually need.” Describe your campus style. “I don’t go for designer brands. If I like it, I will buy it. I’ll wear a lot of basic stuff, and I’ll mix and match. It’s mostly comfy. Nowadays, I know that students have to be comfy, especially while studying.” What is the coziest piece you own? “I have this cropped wool sweater — it keeps me warm and has a cool frayed design.” What is your favourite season to dress for and why? “Summer, just because I think it’s really easy to dress for. Or fall, because you can wear just about anything. It’s not too hot, and it’s not too cold.”

Brycen Persad,

first-year arts and science, age 18 How would you describe your style on campus? “I like to switch it up between comfy and business casual.” What is your favourite item in your closet? “It has definitely got to be my grey Jack & Jones [turtleneck] sweater.” What piece would you love to have that you don’t own yet? “A gold Rolex watch.”

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Sweater: Guess Watch: Fossil Pants: Zanerobe

All photos by J.C. Balicanta Narag / Photo Editor


OPINIONS

WWW.T H E S H E A F.COM // @ U SAS KS H E A F

DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

HOT TAKES

OPINIONS

EMILY MIGCHELS OPINIONS EDITOR

The University of Saskatchewan offers round-the-clock, monitored study spaces for students during finals season — 24 Hour Safe Study is a collaboration between the Murray Library and the U of S Students’ Union that aims to provide a safe space for late-night labours. Operating on the ground floor of the Murray Library, 24 Hour Safe Study began on Nov. 28 and runs until 8:00 a.m. on Dec. 22. That’s right — free rent for nearly a month, if you’re thrifty.

Gabbie Torres We can’t all go home for the holidays.

They’ll have a blue Christmas without you: How to combat holiday loneliness The reason for the season is togetherness, and thankfully, you can choose your own crowd — whether it be your family or a group of soup-kitchen volunteers. MARIANNE HOLT

Christmas cheer has unfortunately been overshadowed by consumerism and consumption. However, I believe the holiday really can be the most wonderful time of the year when it brings people together. The conventional way to celebrate Christmas in 2017 is to live excessively. Society sustains the narrative that to be Christmassy, one must spend a fortune. Whether you’re throwing cash toward an obscene amount of food or lavish gifts, which you know you can’t afford, participating in Christmas can break the bank to such an extreme extent that you might just find yourself doomed to spend the next month subsisting entirely on noodles. From an environmentally concerned perspective, Christmas is nightmarish. According to Zero Waste Canada, every year, Canadians will purchase around 4.3 million turkeys, 3,000 tonnes of foil, 2.6 billion greeting cards and 6 million rolls of tape. But, creating an abundance of joy does not need to be synonymous with creating an abundance of stuff. I love going home for the holidays — being the youngest

of four siblings means that it is a rarity that all of us are all in one place at one time. Thus, I love the festive period, because I know that it is the one time of the year when we will all be together. My experience with the holidays is the same every year. Tears are guaranteed from my mom when she decorates the tree, as she mourns the baubles that have been lost and broken over the years. Then, we’ll argue in the supermarket as she buys four different kinds of meat, despite the fact that she and my dad are the only ones who’ll eat it in our family. On Christmas Day, I’ll inevitably get a lecture for being hungover during church, and then, my dad will get too drunk and burn dinner. Later, I’ll have to pretend to love the terrible gifts that my extended family has picked out for me. Yes, Uncle Billy, I’ve always wanted a One Direction calendar. Most festive celebrations are inevitably disappointing. Awful jokes and arguments are not the makings of an enjoyable occasion, but I still treasure the time that I get to spend with my family and friends over Christmas. Not everyone is lucky enough to have such sentimental and warm feelings about

Christmas. There is too much pressure to be happy on this arguably arbitrary day, and what is supposed to be the most joyful time of the year can be one of the most isolating and lonely periods of the year for many people. According to a 2016 study by clinical psychologist Ami Rokach, loneliness amongst the elderly population is an epidemic. Statistics Canada reports that as many as 1.4 million elderly Canadians report feeling lonely. The epidemic is exacerbated during the festive period because of the societal pressures to be surrounded by loved ones. The reality for many is that Christmas is just like any other day of the year, but I believe it is imperative to love and value those in your life and in your community who may feel isolated, especially during the consumerist Christmas holidays. There are some amazing Saskatoon organizations that you could get involved with this holiday season to make a difference in the community if you feel the season is lacking. Saskatoon’s Friendship Inn provides hot meals 365 days of the year, and Christmas is one of their busiest days. Visit friendshipinn.ca to get involved with this fantastic organization.

The space is monitored by USSU Student Crew employees, and students utilizing 24 Hour Safe Study are technically required to present their student card — an item that I lost three months ago and have not since replaced — upon entering the space after regular library operating hours. Thankfully, no one has ever asked to see mine. Take a look beyond the bookshelves at 3 a.m., and you’ll see that, despite its best intentions, the program is endorsing and facilitating fundamentally unhealthy behaviours in students. We know that looking at our computer screens for hours on end, sleep deprivation and poor eating habits are bad for us, but it’s hard to reconcile making healthy lifestyle changes with the obligation to utilize every minute of every day because the library enables you to. On the other hand, 24 Hour Safe Study does provide students with a unique opportunity for collaborative learning. Additionally, I’ve found that reserving a space specifically for one activity — me getting my school work done — has been beneficial to my learning and productivity throughout the term. I’m glad to have the opportunity to use the space whenever I want, but I wish I didn’t have to. What do students need most during peak times of stress? Is a non-stop, collective learning space more valuable than mental supports? Is it the role of the university to structure student lives in a healthier way, or is that the individual’s responsibility? What do you think? Drop a line at thesheaf.com or tweet with the hashtag #sheafhottakes, and let’s talk.

Kate Locsin Are you sacrificing too much for your studies?

OPINIONS / 15


OPINIONS

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My journey from Christmas fanatic to full-on Scrooge From religious reasons to consumerism, here is the story of why I no longer celebrate Christmas. LYNDSAY AFSETH STAFF WRITER

When I was a child, I was full of Christmas spirit. I loved baking, buying presents, opening presents and everything in between — I even put my cat in Christmas outfits for photos and built a Christmas tree out of sugar cookies. I no longer have that Christmas spirit. My disdain for the season began after a string of bad Christmas experiences that caused me to turn my back on the holiday altogether. It all started when my sister left home — after that, our family

Christmas traditions no longer felt the same. I decorated the tree by myself that year and ended up crying in the corner listening to A Christmas Album by Bright Eyes. The next year, my boyfriend brought me to his family holiday party and I immediately sought out an empty room to have a nap in. Then, I realized that I was stuck in a strange house with people I didn’t know for the rest of the day, and that thought left me in tears in the bathroom. After these bad Christmases, I began to feel suspicious of the whole holiday season for a number of reasons.

First, it’s been hijacked by consumerism. If Christmas is the day to celebrate Jesus’s birth, why is it that most people’s main concern is being able to afford presents for everyone they know? As a student, buying presents is an added stress that I feel is completely unnecessary — and I think this applies to adults everywhere who live on a budget. I don’t understand why people will go into debt just because it’s the holidays. Secondly, I am an atheist. I do not go to church, nor have I ever gone, and I perceive Christmas as a fundamentally Christian holiday. As I’m get-

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ting older, I’m trying to reconcile my beliefs with my lifestyle — Christmas just doesn’t fit into my routine anymore. According to Time Magazine, many scholars agree that the Christian figure Jesus Christ was likely not even born on Dec. 25, so I don’t really understand why the date is celebrated in the first place. And third — I just don’t understand Christmas. I don’t understand Santa Claus or his flying reindeer or why we make gingerbread houses or put up pine trees inside the house. The whole thing doesn’t make any sense, if you think about it. I’ve read that some of our Christmas traditions began after a group of ancient shamans collected magic mushrooms from under pine trees, gave some as presents to their village, then ate them and saw flying reindeer. While I don’t think this is a factual story, it makes about as much sense as anything else during this holiday.

My point is that I’m a big Grinch, and I’m really okay with that. I don’t like tinsel because it is too shiny, I don’t like presents because they encourage consumerism, and I don’t decorate because I think it is a waste of time. But, there are still parts of Christmas that I do enjoy. I love spending time with my family, especially family that I don’t get to see very often, and I love watching Jingle All the Way with Arnold Schwarzenegger. I also have a four-month old nephew this holiday season, and I look forward to seeing in him the same Christmas spirit that I once wholly embodied as a child. However, at the end of the day, even though I love the more organic and emotional parts of the holiday season, I am no longer a Christmas fanatic because of the holiday’s religious roots, its penchant to endorse consumerism and the fact that it is truly nonsensical.

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DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

OPINIONS

SHEAF DEBATES “Merry Christmas” is the respectful season’s greeting Religion isn’t the point — extending Christmas greetings is a Canadian commitment. WYATT BERNIER

Despite the fact that the vast majority of Canadians across all religious and cultural backgrounds celebrate Christmas every year, there is still a push to take out the religious aspects of the holiday — first and foremost, the word Christmas itself. Let’s be realistic — Christmas is already a secular occasion. Due

to commercialism, a large portion of the population buys gifts, decorates a tree and has family over for dinner without ever brushing up on the religious parts of Christmas. The inclusivity of Christmas is what makes it so great. It doesn’t matter whether people know or care about the holiday’s religious importance. As long as you have some Christmas spirit, and the

Jina Bae

decency to wish people “Merry Christmas,” anyone can participate in the largest national celebration of the year. It’s very important to remember that Christmas is a national holiday. As Canadians, we have recognized that the majority of this country’s citizens, as well as its founders, celebrate Christmas, which is why it is celebrated nationally by Canada. Taking Christ out of Christmas would destroy not only its religious aspects but also the national unity that the holiday creates. I would argue that Christmas has now transcended its religious roots and evolved into a national celebration, which warrants our participation simply by virtue of being Canadian. To say that Christmas is primarily a religious ceremony is a complete misunderstanding of what Christmas really means. It is not an exclusive event that

is only open to Christians, but instead, simply a season of festivity for everyone in the community — and it always has been. More importantly, if we remove the word Christmas, what are we even celebrating? Are we seriously going to decorate a “holiday” tree, have a “winter” dinner and then exchange gifts — all the while pretending that this is a completely secular event, with no religious affiliations whatsoever? No — whether we like it or not — Christmas started out as a religious holiday, and I don’t think that’s a bad thing. We can all enjoy chocolate at Easter, candy at Halloween and drinks on St. Patrick’s Day without being bombarded by reminders about their religious importance. Christmas should be no different. Try to think of Christmas as if it were a university class. While people treat the religious aspects like unnecessary assignments that interfere with their enjoyment of the holidays, these aspects are really more like suggested readings — completely

optional, but available if we ever want additional information. However, many people still refuse to say “Merry Christmas,” arguing that to adopt the greeting is to participate in a celebration of something unimportant to them or that is contrary to their beliefs. To them, I politely say, suck it up. Maybe you’re bitter, because you’ve sat through too many boring family dinners, school Christmas concerts and hockey games played by your distant cousin. Consider, however, that although hockey and turkey stuffing might not hold as much value to you, it is likely important to some of your friends and family. We should value our relationships with those around us, and that alone should be enough to make you say “Merry Christmas.” At the bare minimum, let’s keep saying “Merry Christmas” simply out of respect. We might not all put out a nativity scene, go to church or even say grace before supper — but at the very least, we can pay our respects to the rest of our fellow citizens, to Canada’s religious founders and to this great country of ours. It’s the least we can do.

The non-existent war on Christmas: A case for neutral December greetings This city, this province, this country is not your place but the place of many. JOSHUA BRAND

In December, we think of beautiful snow and fatty foods that facilitate hibernation. The month also includes many celebrations that bring people together — like Hanukkah, Kwanza and end-of-finals karaoke at Flint. Christmas, however, is currently getting special attention because of the supposed war the holiday is facing. Let me be clear — there is no war on Christmas. In 2016, Statistics Canada reported that the Christmas-tree industry is valued at $78.4 million, a 26.1 per cent increase from the year before. The business of Christmas is alive and well in Canada — and there is no end in sight. The assumed war on Christmas stems from the fear that other religions will take over one’s own or that the dominant culture will have to make room for others. Consider Trump’s

presidency, with claims that he will ensure “that we [will] be saying ‘Merry Christmas’ again.” But, did people ever stop saying “Merry Christmas”? Here is the reality — Canada is not a Christian country. There may be Christians here, but it is not Christian by default. Today’s Canada is young and still trying to find an identity. It’s full of different backgrounds, religious prescriptions and cultures. Even if one does not adhere to the notion that diversity is our strength, the fact that holidays based on Christian beliefs are not celebrated by all cannot be disputed. Religion, and whatever stems from it, is part of the private realm of one’s life. In this pluralistic society, we all live together, and in our public settings, we conduct our social business in an irreligious manner. Eating out at a restaurant, shopping

for a sweater and taking public transit are not inherently religious activities. During leisure time, you can choose to pray or meet with fellow people of similar faith. Choosing to greet others with a more neutral greeting like “Happy Holidays” in December is not a malicious act against Christmas or any other religious event in this month, but rather, it is an understanding of the difference between the public and private realms in which we live. I am not asserting that “Merry Christmas” should never be uttered — it would be absurd to have such a restriction on language. If you know the person is celebrating Christmas, say it. If your friend is celebrating Hanukkah, wish them a “Happy Hanukkah” — you can even say “Happy Winter Solstice” to neo-pagans. When you’re in the public realm — with people whose

private lives are unknown to you — a greeting that encompasses all of the possible holidays and acknowledges and respects everyone in our society seems to be the most appropriate. Celebrating Christmas

should involve you, your family and your loved ones — not societal dominance. Not everyone’s lives revolve around Christmas, and it is time to stop expecting everybody to bend over backwards for one specific faith.

Jina Bae

OPINIONS / 17


CAMPUS LENS

T H E S H E A F P U B L I S HI NG S OC I E T Y // DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

I SS UE 1 4 // VO L . 1 0 9 Sidney Ray Shacter

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Happy Holidays from The Sheaf! Gabbie Torres

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DISTRACTIONS

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DE C E M B E R 07, 2 0 1 7

SALAD BAR FORNICATORS ARGUE INTERRUPTION WASN’T VERY SEX-POSITIVE MARQUIS HALL — A couple of young lovers, who were forcibly removed from the salad bar in Marquis Hall after getting raunchy in the romaine, are now arguing that U of S Protective Services acted without cause. Two students are facing academic penalties and criminal charges for committing an indecent act in public following an incident that took place on Dec. 1. Eye-witness reports say that the two students entered the facility around 1 p.m., quickly got handsy and began to debate the effectiveness of Kraft italian salad dressing as a lubricant, before actually engaging in intercourse. Sergeant John Broyle was first on scene to respond after Protective Services received complaints of covert copulation near the curried cauliflower. “They were doin’ it, alright,” Broyle said.

#albumoftheweek:

A Very BROS Christmas Vol. 1 by BROS Emily Migchels

Though Broyle attempted to diffuse the situation verbally, he claims that any effort other than physically removing the individuals would have proven futile, as the students in question were “too in the zone” to hear his initial pleas. This incident has divided the student body. Though many agree that getting busy in a salad bar is wrong and should warrant punishment, a group has come together in support of the criminal couple. “Even if those two people were having sex on the salad bar, why do people have call it gross? I don’t think that’s very nice, especially since the U of S puts so many resources into cultivating sex-positivity,” one student said. The culpable students in question will find out next week whether or not they will be allowed to continue their meal plans.

It’s only got two tracks — but who really wants to sit down and listen to a full-length holiday album, anyway? A Very BROS Christmas is Ewan and Shamus Currie’s latest release — it’s cute, lighthearted and the album art looks eerily similar to their previous work. Best of all, you can tell that the BROS don’t take themselves too seriously. You might not need to seek this album out for yourself, however — “It’s Christmas Day” is poised to play at every holiday party you’ll attend this season. harkavagrant.com

AHREN KLAASSEN-WRIGHT xkcd.com

Come on down to the police station! We’ve got all things good. Our signature spicy deodorant will keep you fresh — it smells so great you’ll be tearing up from joy! If you need some quiet time to yourself, we have plenty of rooms in which you can be alone. And, our fun friendship bracelets will make you so happy you’ll say, “My arms have been behind my back so long that it feels like they’re going to fall off!” This meme is very similar to starter-pack memes and is equally dank and analytical. I give this meme 15 inmates in a eight-person holding cell.

DISTRACTIONS / 19


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From the USSU Executive and Staff.

December 7, 2017  
December 7, 2017  
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