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Tuesday • April 3, 2012 — D1

The Sentinel at www.cumberlink.com

Kids World When kids speak out, The Sentinel listens

Kids Speak Out

Tell Me A Story

The best April Fool’s prank I pulled was ....

A folktale from Southern Africa

The best April Fool’s prank I pulled was pretending to break my arm. I pranked it on Claude and he said, Oh no! Angel you broke your arm. Hey! Your tricked me! Angel Hoyt-Pagan, 7 (winner) Hillside Elementary School Second grade The best April Fool’s joke I pulled was on my sister. I put clear wire across the bottom of the doorway. When I was finished with that, I hid a camera and taped it. I heard a fall and I went downstairs and she was on the floor laughing. It was the best April Fool’s joke ever. Everest Robinson, 9 (winner) Fishing Creek Elementary School Fourth grade The best April Fool’s prank I pulled was when I put a hairband on the sprayer on the sink and asked my mom to wash my water bottle. She got all wet because when she turned on the water it squirted her in the face. She let out a yelp and my whole family laughed. It was the funniest prank ever. John Alexander Bertsch, 7 1/2 (winner) Lynch-Bustin Elementary School Second grade The best April Fool’s Day prank I pulled was I squirted whipped cream on my dad’s hand. Then tickled his face with a feather. Then he smashed the whipped cream in his face! Coleman, 8 Bellaire Elementary School Second grade The best April Fool’s prank I pulled was when I told my kindergarten teacher I was moving to New York and she believed me. That was awesome. Rylee Hall Newville Elementary School Second grade

Adapted by Amy Friedman Illustrated by Jillian Gilliland

The best April Fool’s prank I pulled was a very good prank. I got red nail polish and put some on my skin. Then I got my sister and said, I have a cut and it’s bleeding really bad. Then my sister said, “Ahh.” Then I said, “April Fool’s.” Devon Zerbe, 7 Hillside Elementary School Second grade The best April Fool’s prank I pulled was when I did it on my brother. My brother was walking in the living room. I was hiding behind the couch. When he was walking in the room, I pulled on a rope. Then he was upside down. That was the best April Fool’s prank ever. Owen Karn, 9 Fishing Creek Elementary School Fourth Grade

Happy Birthday to ... April 1 Megan Rose Talley (13) Rylie Salisbury (12)

April 2 Hanna Wllacy (14) Nancy Soccio (7)

April 3 Amber Shughart (14) A.J. Sharp (11)

April 5 Trevor Perry (12) Hannah Diziki (11) Conley Dunn (7)

April 6 Luke Swank (11) Jordan Bitner (14) Maggie Sheffer (12) Jordan Bitner (14)

April 7 Jonthan Shields Cole Miller (13) Collin Lindsay

April 9 Keera Hurley (2)

April 11 Peyton Weekley (6)

April 13 Kacey Shughart (11)

Malcolm and the ostrich egg’s daughter

Bryce Curlen (8)

April 14 Mason Wickard (8)

April 15 Matthew Geiler (7) Kam Zangle (7)

April 17 Zachary Zeigler (11) Coleman Bastien (10) Maeve Hurley (6) Zachery Zeigler (11)

April 18 Dever Culhane Adon Deitch (9)

April 19 Alisha Stump (11) Abbi Shover (10) Joey Serafin (7) Abbi Shover (10)

April 21 Aja-Nai Jumper (6) Jacob Haschak Casey Barrick (13) Kayla Kennedy (13) Skylar Diehl (11)

April 23 Allison Goodhart (6) Odessa Cruz (6) Jaxxen Lloyd (7)

April 24 Nevina Marie Frese (11)

April 25 Benjamin Cole (13) Emma Rampulla (13) Marci Thorson (13) Julie Marie Papaj (11) Kylee Dale (13)

April 26 Shannon Hurley (14) Benjamin Shughart (9) Zoe Beal Benjamin Shughart (9) Alana McWilliams (10)

April 27 Hannah Shindel (8)

April 28 Jackson Swartz Averiel Hempstead (8) Emily Schrade (11) Mikaela A. Ward (7) Caleb Black (2) Emily Schrade (11)

April 29 Brady Grimes (7) Auraleigh Bliss Orner (11)

April 30 Anthony Jacob Bartels (13)

Adon Deitch has won a free birthday cake from Weis Markets in Carlisle! To enter the KidsWorld Birthday Club, e-mail your name, address, phone number and birth date to frontdoor@ cumberlink.com with “Birthday Club” in the subject line, or mail the information to The Sentinel’s Birthday Club, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013. To guarantee inclusion into the June birthday club, entries must be received by May 26. Cake winners can pick up the free cake certificate from The Sentinel office during normal business hours.

How you can get involved with Kids Speak Out Want To See Your Name Here?

Hey, kids! How would you like to get your story published in Kids Speak Out? Just write a short story on one of our prompts and send it to The Sentinel. You can also draw a picture to go with your story. Each week, The Sentinel will publish some of the stories we receive in KidsWorld and on www.cumberlink.com. Only the top three essay writers, published on this page, will receive KidsWorld T-shirts. To claim T-shirts, visit The Sentinel during normal business hours. You must be 5 to 13 years old to enter. Stories must be 150 words or less. Be sure to include your full name, age, address, school and grade. Mail your entry to “Kids Speak Out,” The Sentinel, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013, drop it off at either Sentinel office or mail it to frontdoor@cumberlink.com with the subject “KidsWorld.”

Upcoming Topics Due April 6 I woke up and saw a dinosaur in my back yard... Due April 13 My favorite pet is... Due April 20 I was visiting the moon when.... Due April 27 I was cooking dinner for my family when... Due May 4 I was held prisoner on a pirate ship and ...

Once upon a time there lived a poor man named Malcolm who hunted for his food. Indeed, his hunting skills were so poor that he sometimes felt as if the whole world laughed at him. Even the animals seemed to make fun of him. The baboons laughed and the hyena did too, for even they were better hunters. However, he was a kind man — decent and soft-spoken, and he was forever doing nice deeds to help others. When he had good luck, he shared it with the villagers. But mostly Malcolm lived on water and the meat of rats and mice, and he dressed in the skins of the rats and mice. One warm spring day Malcolm had been hunting for many hours, and he was hot and tired and hungry. He hadn’t caught even a mouse, and when he came upon a sausage tree, he sat down beneath its shade to rest. Before long he fell fast asleep, and he began to dream. In his dream there was a beautiful woman, and she became his wife. In his dream there was a large tribe, and he became their chief. In his dream he lived in great comfort, never hungry, never tired, never alone. Suddenly the wind blew through the tree, and one of the fruits of the sausage tree crashed to the ground and woke Malcolm. To his amazement he found an enormous ostrich egg beside the fruit. “The ostrich ought to be guarding her egg,” he said aloud. He looked to his right and to his left, but he saw no ostrich anywhere. He could not resist, so he picked up the egg and carried it back to his hut. “This egg would taste delicious,” he said to no one, for there was no one near him to talk to. He was just about to crack the egg open when he stopped himself. It was so white and round, pure and beautiful, he couldn’t imagine harming it. And so he left the egg alone and went to sleep. The next morning when he saw the egg, he once again thought how good it would taste. But, once again, he was awed by its purity and loveliness, and so he left it alone and went out to hunt. That evening when he came home, he was amazed to find a loaf of fresh brown bread. “What’s this?” he said aloud, but of course nobody answered. When he reached to touch the bread, he found it was still warm and its scent was so delightful that he could not resist. He tore off a piece and ate it. “I’ve never tasted anything so delicious,” he said aloud, though he knew there was no one to hear him. He ate another piece, and another, and soon the whole loaf was gone. He fell asleep happy and full. When he woke, he thought he must have dreamed just as he had dreamed beneath the sausage tree. But, to his amazement, he found another loaf of bread, and this time a bowl of steaming soup was beside it. “What’s this?” he asked aloud, and this time, even more surprising, he heard a voice answer. “It’s bread and soup I’ve made for you,” the voice said. He turned to find a beautiful woman standing beside the ostrich egg, which was cracked wide open. “Malcolm, you are a kind and generous man, and I will make you happy for the rest of your life. Marry me and I will always make your favorite food and cook you soup.” Malcolm could not believe his eyes and ears. “How can this be? An ostrich egg’s daughter cannot speak or cook or marry me,” he said. “I will make you happy, Malcolm,” she said. “You must promise only this: You will never call me the daughter of an ostrich egg.” The gorgeous woman leaned in and kissed him, and Malcolm was the happiest man in the whole world. “I promise,” he said. And so they married. From that day on, Malcolm was never hungry. Whenever he wished for anything, his wife made it for him. For many years they lived in great happiness, and then one day Malcolm remembered his dream. “I once wished to be a chief,” he said to his wife. “Your wish will be granted,” she said. To Malcolm’s astonishment, his wife walked outside, beat the dirt with a stick, and moments later they were surrounded by people building huts, herds of cattle and flocks of goats and sheep. And Malcolm was their chief. They lived this way for many more years, and Malcolm became a wealthy man, and he enjoyed the fine life, but as time passed, he longed to have more. “If one herd of cows is good,” he said to his wife, “two is better.” For the first time his wife shook her head. “That may not be true,” she said. Malcolm had become accustomed to his wife’s sweetness, generosity and kind words, so this shocked him. “Why do you disagree with me?” he asked. “Because you might be wrong,” she said. Suddenly Malcolm could not contain himself. After all, he thought, he was the chief. “How would you know?” he asked, growing angry. “Because I know,” she said. Malcolm could not stop himself. He burst out laughing and without thinking, he said, “But you’re only the daughter of an ostrich egg!” And in a flash he was alone again, living in his hut, wearing his old tattered rat skins. There were no people around anywhere — no cattle, no goats and no wife. He understood that he had, indeed, been mistaken to let greed and anger get the better of him and to break his promise to his wife.


D2 — The Sentinel at www.cumberlink.com

Tuesday • April 3, 2012

Kids World When kids speak out, The Sentinel listens 13-1 (12)

release dates: March 31-April 6

Mini Spy . . .

Mini Spy just launched her box kite! See if you can find: sQUESTIONMARKsWORD-).)sFUNNYFACEsDOUGHNUT sBAT sSOCK sHEART sPENCIL sBIRD sDRAGON sNUMBER sUMBRELLA sNUMBER sLETTER! sFISH sTOOTH sTEAPOT sKITE sCHERRY sTEACUP

Š 2012 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

Go Fly a Kite! photo courtesy of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum Archives

March winds and April showers Bring forth May flowers!

This Chinese kite was one of the first aeronautical objects to join the Smithsonian collection. It is a festival kite made of silk with a bamboo frame. It was shown at the Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia in 1876.

Every kind of kite for any kind of flier Have you ever flown a kite? There are hundreds of different types and sizes of kites. A kite expert told The Mini Page: “What are kites made of? You name it! That’s the beauty of kite-flying — they make so many different types. I know of a kite that’s only 4 by 4 inches, with rods made from the whiskers of tigers!�

Kites come in many sizes and shapes. Some common ones are:

Delta

Diamond

Box

Parafoil

photo courtesy Phil Broder/American Kitefliers Association

Meet Debby Ryan

Early people used kites more as tools than for fun. Kites were probably first flown in China, and then spread through Asia to Europe and finally to the Americas. In 200 B.C., as a Chinese general prepared to attack a city, he flew a kite over the walls of the city. He marked the string and later measured how far his soldiers would have to tunnel to get inside the walls. In England in the early 1800s, some roads required carriage drivers to pay a toll, or fee, based on how many horses were pulling the carriage. One man avoided the toll by attaching a kite to his carriage and letting the wind pull him along! Benjamin Franklin famously used a kite to prove that lightning is an electrical event. Wars brought many opportunities for using kites. Strong kites could carry a spy high in the air for a better look at the enemy. Sailors lost at sea could signal for help by lifting up a kite. And kites were used for target practice.

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

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Rookie Cookie’s Recipe

Green Beans With Tarragon You’ll need:

s14 cup chopped onion sCUPSFRESHGREENBEANS TRIMMED sTEASPOONSOLIVEOIL s12 teaspoon salt s12 teaspoon tarragon s12 cup water s12 teaspoon lemon pepper sSTALKCELERY CHOPPED 1 s 2 cup chopped red bell pepper What to do: 1. Boil green beans and salt in 12 cup water in a saucepan until crisptender, about 5 minutes. 2UNGREENBEANSUNDERCOLDWATERTOSTOPTHECOOKINGPROCESS$RAIN 3. Meanwhile, combine remaining vegetables in separate pan with olive oil. 4. Sprinkle spices on top and cook on medium heat until tender, about 5 minutes. 5. Add vegetable mixture to green beans and stir to combine. You will need an adult’s help with this recipe.

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

photo by Katie Yu, courtesy Mar Vista Entertainment

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

$EBBY2YANSTARSAS4ARAINTHE$ISNEY Channel movie “Radio Rebel.� She is best known FORPLAYING*ESSIEINTHE$ISNEY#HANNELSERIES h*ESSIEv3HEALSOPLAYS"AILEYINTHE$ISNEY #HANNELSERIESh4HE3UITE,IFEON$ECKv )NTHE$ISNEY#HANNELMOVIEh7ISHES v she acted and sang. She and her brother, Chase, co-wrote some of the music for that movie. She has also appeared in several commercials, TV shows and other movies. $EBBY  GREWUPIN!LABAMA 4EXASAND Germany. Because her father was in the military, the family moved to several places. When she was in Germany, she acted in musicals and plays at the local theater. She can speak German. She enjoys vintage clothing, writing, cooking and blogging. She SUPPORTSSEVERALCHARITIES INCLUDING$ISNEYS&RIENDSFOR#HANGE WHICH works to save the environment. from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

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Supersport: Curtis Granderson Birthdate: 3-16-81 Hometown: Blue Island, Ill.

In the grand old game of baseball, the New York Yankees have another grand man — Curtis Granderson. The All-Star center fielder, who joined the Yanks in 2010 AFTERSIXSEASONSWITH$ETROIT ISONEOFTHEGAMESTOPALL around players. He demonstrated that last year with his glove, his speed and his bat — belting 41 homers and leading the American League in RBIs (119) and runs scored (136). Granderson, with degrees in business and marketing from the University of Illinois-Chicago, can do more than play ball. He has worked as a TV analyst and produced a motivational children’s book, “All You Can Be.� Overall, he uses baseball as a platform to help needy youth and countless others through various charities.

Soaring to a New Height How it works

A different kind of flying

Indoor kites are extremely light. “They weigh about the same as half a turkey sandwich,� Connor says. The flier moves around to create “wind.� Fliers don’t want any other drafts or wind in the room where they’re flying. Connor practices at school gyms or other rooms with high ceilings.

In 2010, a young kite-flier NAMED#ONNOR$ORANAPPEAREDON “America’s Got Talent.� He performed with his indoor kites and earned the praise of the judges. Connor, now 19, didn’t win the competition, but he did make it to the semifinals.

Flying to feel better When Connor was 4 years old, he was diagnosed with epilepsy (EH-pul-ep-see). This condition can make people have seizures (SEEConnor Doran zyoors), or times when the brain doesn’t send signals correctly. Connor takes medicine to control his seizures. But flying helps him a lot, too. He said: “Flying makes me forget about my epilepsy.� Kite-flying has given him confidence.

Flying with music

Connor’s flights are accompanied by music. He said he chooses slower music because he likes it better, but some fliers choose fast music and do lots of tricks while they’re flying.

photo by Scott Weider, courtesy Amy Doran

This well-known nursery rhyme reminds us that spring is a windy time of year. For kite-fliers, that means it’s the perfect weather for their favorite pastime. This week, The Mini Page learns more about kites as we celebrate National Kite Month in April.

Kite stories

photo courtesy Amy Doran

National Kite Month

Height: 6-1 Weight: 185

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A high-flying message Today Connor is a keynote speaker for the National Epilepsy Foundation ANDRAISESMONEYTHROUGHTHE$ARE TO$REAM4EAM(ETRAVELSALL over the country. He also speaks at schools about achieving something that might seem impossible. “You can do anything you set your mind to,� he tells kids.

Connor Doran flies a stack kite during a demonstration at the National Food Convention in Portland, Ore. The stack kite is two kites positioned 7 feet apart from each other and controlled with four kite lines. Connor says this kind of kite takes a lot more energy to fly.

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

Up in the Air With Kites

This camera is attached to a kite line. The flier can lift the camera high above the ground and use a remote control to make photographs of the subject.

The busy kite Today kites are still used as tools for many projects. For example, lightweight cameras can be attached to a kite for aerial photography. In the Pacific Islands, fishermen use kites to carry a fishing line hundreds of feet out into the ocean. Kites are used with instruments that measure the time and height of the flight paths of bats. Meteorologists, or scientists who study weather, still use kites to carry instruments up into the atmosphere.

New ideas How would you use a kite? In 1999, kites were used to pull sleds to the North Pole. Scientists are developing ways to capture wind energy using special kite-like devices. The Mini Page thanks Mel Hickman, executive director of the American Kitefliers Association, for help with this issue.

For anything heavier than air to fly, it must have a shape that creates lift. This is true for a bird, a lightweight kite and for an airplane weighing many tons. A bird flies because it flaps its wings, pushing air downward and creating lift. An airplane flies because its engines move it forward through the air. The air going over the wings is moving faster than the air going under the wings, so the air pressure on the top of the wings decreases and the plane is lifted. A kite needs wind to fly because it is attached to the person holding the string.

All the following jokes have something in common. Can you guess the common theme or category?

Lift happens when the wind pushing up on the under surface of the kite has more pressure than the air moving over the top surface of the kite. Drag is the force that’s created by resistance to the wind from the kite’s material. Gravity is the force from the weight of the kite, pulling it toward Earth. For a kite to fly, its lift must be greater than its drag and gravity.

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Ferris: What time is it when a hippo sits on a fence? Frieda: Time to fix the fence!

As airplanes became more common, kites were used less as military and science tools and more for fun. About 40 years ago, a twoline kite was invented. The flier could make the kite do stunts by moving the lines in different directions. New designs allowed kites to do complicated tricks. People began to gather for competitions.

Almost lighter than air Kites have to be very lightweight to fly. Early kites were made of thin animal skins or handmade paper. Today, kites may be made of high-tech cloth that resists water, which would make it heavier. The rods might be made of carbon fiber, which is very strong and weighs very little.

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The Mini Page’s popular series of issues about each state is collected here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state, along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come.

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

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try ’n find

Kites

Words that remind us of kites are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally, and some letters are used twice. See if you can find: BOX, CAMERA, DELTA, DIAMOND, DRAG, ENERGY, FISH, FLY, FRANKLIN, FUN, GRAVITY, INDOOR, KITE, LIFT, LIGHTWEIGHT, PARAFOIL, SIGNAL, SPORT, SPY, TARGET, TOOL, WAR, WEATHER, WINDS.

Let’s go fLy a kite!

Kite-fliers meet each year in Huntington Beach, Calif., to compete with stunt kites. This flier uses a two-line kite to do maneuvers.

People also make kites out of found objects, such as plastic garbage bags. This is a fun way to recycle. Next week in The Mini Page, meet the 2012 Newbery and Caldecott Medal winners.

The Mini Page Staff

!

Fiona: What has 400 teeth but can’t bite? Forrest: A picket fence!

Kites as sport

Betty Debnam - Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry - Managing Editor Lucy Lien - Associate Editor Wendy Daley - Artist

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Frank: What can go around a backyard but doesn’t move? Francie: A fence!

photo by John Chilese

photo courtesy Phil Broder/American Kitefliers Association

How do objects fly?

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S P Y J H O S X T

K M G T S H I D L

E T I K J X O B A R E M N F E T I F L H B V N Y G N A L E N E R O O T H

F U A P A T U G G

S R C D K R A Y I

D D A R R N G E E

N E N N O A U E W

O S L I K O G F T

M W I T W L D M H

A Z F R A W I N G

I V T R O P S N I

D P A R A F O I L

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

ready resources The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this week’s topics. On the Web: sNATIONALKITEMONTHORGKIDSGAMESPHP sHOWTHINGSFLYSIEDU sBOEINGCOMCOMPANYOFFICESABOUTUSWONDER?OF?FLIGHT HOW?THINGSHTML sYOUTUBECOMWATCHV(UA%:SS sAKAKITEORGRESOURCESEDUCATIONAL RESOURCES At the library: sh-AKING+ITESvBY$AVID-ICHAEL

To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call tollfree 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________

Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini PageÂŽ.


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