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C6 — The Sentinel at www.cumberlink.com

Kids World

Tuesday • April 17, 2012

When kids speak out, The Sentinel listens

Kids Speak Out

My favorite pet is.... Tell Me A Story

Hodja’s turban

A Turkish tale Adapted by Amy Friedman Illustrated by Jillian Gilliland

My favorite pet is a panda. Well, the only thing is every time it is hungry, my parents have to drive me to China. Abby Spahr, 8 (Winner) St. Patrick School Second Grade My favorite pet is my crazy dumb dog Steve. He runs around like a maniac, and my dog Steve is very scared of everything. I mean it. Steve will crash down if he sees a piece of paper, and he is a pit bull. Don’t be scared! Because Steve won’t hurt a fly. I love my crazy dog Steve. Faith Malley, 10 (Winner) Fishing Creek Elementary School Fourth Grade My favorite pet is a pig. I love pigs because they are funny, and I love bacon. Not that I would eat my pig for bacon. Faith, 10 (Winner) Fishing Creek Elementary School Fourth Grade My favorite pet is my dog Tristan. She died a bit ago. She was a good dog. My family and I love her. She was black and she was a Lab. She was 14. We miss her. She is my favorite pet. Marisa Colondrillo, 7 St. Patrick School Second Grade My favorite pet is an alpaca because it spits at you and your sister. My dog does not like my alpaca because it spits at her, and my dog spits back. Then it turns into a spitting fight that goes on for an hour. My mom and my dad do not like it either. James Ulsh, 8 (Winner) St. Patrick School Second Grade

My favorite pet is a cat because cats are nice. Sometimes cats are mean. One time I went to my cousin’s house. I went into my cousin’s bedroom to go to sleep, but my cousin’s cat was in there. He was so scared, and I was so scared. So the cat scratched me on my arm. My cousin came in and saw me crying, so I slept on the couch that night. Besides that, I still like cats. I had a cat once, but he died on Dec. 29. Jacob Munoz, 8 St. Patrick School Second Grade

My favorite pets are dogs, but I never want to hurt a pet’s feelings so I always say that all animals are my favorite. So that’s my favorite animal. Mia Christensen, 10 Fishing Creek Elementary School Fourth Grade My favorite pet is my dog Rocky. We play catch all the time and we play tug-of-war and he always shakes his head and it makes me laugh and I let go. That is why my favorite pet is Rocky. Everest Robinson, 9 Fishing Creek Elementary School Fourth Grade My favorite pet is a bunny. A bunny is fluffy and cute. I’ll hold it and give it a carrot. I would give it a five star bunnytell. It would have a carrot room, bedroom, bathroom, and playhouse too. Abbie, 8 Bellaire Elementary School Second Grade My favorite pet is a fish because they are beautiful. They are also fun to watch. But they are hard to take care of. Some are even very expensive. Some need special food. That is my favorite pet. Ricky Dumais, 9 Fishing Creek Elementary School Fourth Grade

My favorite pet is my hamster because she bit my brother. After she bit him we became best friends. The hamster watches TV with me and she plays with me. She is the best hamster in the whole world. James Clark, 8 Hillside Elementary School Second Grade My favorite pet is a Lapizzion horse six or seven hands tall. I would board it at my favorite barn. I would take him to all my lessons. I would try to break it in by myself but if I needed help I would ask my teacher Andraya. I would name him Jack. It would be so fun. That is my favorite pet. Anna Arensdorf, 8 Hillside Elementary School Second Grade

How you can get involved with Kids Speak Out Want To See Your Name Here?

Hey, kids! How would you like to get your story published in Kids Speak Out? Just write a short story on one of our prompts and send it to The Sentinel. You can also draw a picture to go with your story. Each week, The Sentinel will publish some of the stories we receive in KidsWorld and on www.cumberlink.com. Only the top three essay writers, published on this page, will receive KidsWorld T-shirts. To claim T-shirts, visit The Sentinel during normal business hours. You must be 5 to 13 years old to enter. Stories must be 150 words or less. Be sure to include your full name, age, address, school and grade. Mail your entry to “Kids Speak Out,” The Sentinel, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013, drop it off at either Sentinel office or mail it to frontdoor@cumberlink.com with the subject “KidsWorld.”

Upcoming Topics Due April 20 I was visiting the moon when.... Due April 27 I was cooking dinner for my family when... Due May 4 I was held prisoner on a pirate ship and ... Due May 11 I was spending the day at grandma’s house when ... Due May 18 My favorite food is...

Once upon a time Nasreddin Hodja walked to the house of the mayor of Aksehir. As usual, his many followers walked behind him and they imitated Hodja’s every move. On this particular day, Hodja wore his new turban, a beautiful turban indeed. Naturally, all his followers wore turbans too. When Hodja arrived at the mayor’s house, the mayor’s servant invited him inside, but he told the followers to wait outside the gate. This they did. The mayor warmly welcomed Hodja to his home, and Hodja was pleased to see the mayor’s eyes light up at the sight of his turban. “What an exquisite turban,” the mayor said. “I must say I have never seen one quite so beautiful.” “Thank you, mayor,” Hodja said. “I’ve just bought it.” The mayor carefully eyed the turban. He loved beautiful things, and Hodja knew he did. “Hodja,” the mayor said after a moment, “I’d like to buy your turban. How much will you sell it to me for?” Hodja was silent as he pretended to think about this. At last he said, “I’ll sell it to you for 1,000 gold coins.” The mayor’s assistant was standing nearby and overheard this conversation. The assistant had been a very successful merchant, and he prided himself on knowing the value of things. “Excuse me for interrupting,” the assistant said, “but I’m afraid 1,000 gold coins is far higher than the market value for this turban. Lovely as it is, Hodja, you’re asking far too much.” The mayor trusted his assistant. Besides, 1,000 gold coins was a great deal of money, and the mayor did not like to spend money. Still, he wanted that turban. “I must agree with my assistant,” the mayor said, “that sounds too expensive to me.” Hodja sighed deeply. “Ah, but sir, you must understand. I paid a great deal for this turban. Of course I know there is just one man in the entire universe who has the taste to appreciate something so exquisite. Very few people in this world truly know the value of things. As I tell everyone I meet, if anyone knows the value of the things of this world, it is our mayor, the mayor of Aksehir.” The mayor was extremely flattered, and without another moment’s hesitation, he called to his banker to bring 1,000 gold coins. He paid Hodja, and Hodja handed over the turban. As Hodja was leaving, he stopped to whisper to the mayor’s assistant. “Sir, you may know a great deal about merchandise, but there is something you do not know. You do not understand the value of a compliment.” With that, he hurried outside and began to walk toward the bazaar. When his followers saw him, they removed their turbans, and once again they walked behind, imitating every gesture and footstep. As Hodja walked, he stopped every few steps, and his followers stopped too. Then Hodja shook his hands in the air, and his followers did the same thing. Then he leaped up in the air and touched his feet. So did his followers. And now, as he landed on the ground, Hodja cried, “Hu, hu, hu!” His followers cried, “Hu, hu, hu!” Then Hodja walked on, but every few feet he stopped again, shook his hands in the air, leaped up, touched his feet, and as he landed he cried, “Hu, hu, hu!” So did his followers. And so a long line of men entered the bazaar. The shopkeepers looked up in confusion as every few steps the men all stopped, shook their arms in the air, leaped up, touched their feet and cried, “Hu, hu, hu!” But nobody said anything. There was a stranger in the bazaar that day, and he had never met Nasreddin Hodja. For a long time he simply watched this strange procession, but at last he could not contain his curiosity, and he approached Hodja. “Excuse me, sir,” he said, “may I ask you a question?” “Of course you may!” Hodja said happily. Hodja was a friendly fellow, and he always welcomed everyone’s questions. “Ask away.” “What are you doing?” the stranger asked. “And why are all these people imitating you?” Hodja smiled. “Ah, my friend, you see, I am a wise man. These are my followers who are seeking spiritual guidance. Each one hopes to reach enlightenment.” This seemed most peculiar to the stranger. He studied the faces of the men, and then he asked, “But sir, how do you know when they have reached enlightenment?” Hodja laughed heartily. “That is the easy part, my friend. Each morning I count them, and I know that those who have departed have reached enlightenment.” And so it was that one more man understood the power and wisdom of Nasreddin Hodja.


Tuesday • April 17, 2012 — C7

The Sentinel at www.cumberlink.com

Kids World When kids speak out, The Sentinel listens 15-1 (12)

release dates: April 14-20

Mini Spy . . .

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Power in the Earth

Using Geothermal Energy photo by J.D. Griggs, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, USGS

It can get hot beneath the surface of the Earth! The deeper under the ground, the hotter it gets. We can tap into this buried heat for warmth and energy. This is called geothermal (jee-ohTHUR-muhl) energy, from two Greek words — “geo,� meaning “earth,� and “therme,� which means “heat.� The Mini Page talked with an expert on geothermal energy to learn more about this form of power.

Inside the Earth

Hot water and steam can be trapped in underground rocks. We can use that trapped heat for our energy needs.

Meet Taylor Swift photo courtesy Universal Pictures

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

Supersport: Tyler Zeller Height: 7-0 Weight: 250 Hometown: Washington, Ind.

Most everybody looks up to Tyler Zeller, and not just because he’s 7 feet tall. .ORTH#AROLINASLIKABLESENIORCENTERISAMODELSTUDENT athlete, excelling in the classroom and on the court. Both an academic and basketball All-American, Zeller led the highly ranked Tar Heels to another ACC regular-season title. :ELLER AMEMBEROF5.#SNATIONALCHAMPIONSHIPTEAM AVERAGEDPOINTSANDGRABBEDREBOUNDSDURINGTHEREGULAR season. That’s not surprising for a kid who grew tall in a basketball FAMILY/LDERBROTHER,UKEPLAYEDAT.OTRE$AME ANDYOUNGERBROTHER Cody is a standout at Indiana. Zeller has served in the community with Habitat for Humanity, the United Way and Read Across America.

In some parts of the world, hot springs are used to heat buildings directly. The hot water is not only used to create electricity, but can also be piped directly into homes or businesses. For example, in Iceland, hot water and steam are used to create electricity. .ATURALLYHOTWATERISALSOPIPEDINTO almost every building to heat the buildings and provide hot tap water. The Mini Page thanks Fred Mayes, U.S. Energy Information Administration, for help with this issue.

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The easiest and most common way to use geothermal energy is to collect the hot water and steam stored underground. People have been using hot springs for heat for thousands of years. In modern geothermal power plants, steam is used to drive turbines. A turbine (TUR-bine) is an engine with spinning blades on a wheel. It is used in the creation of electricity. There are three ways power plants use this steam. They might: sCapture steam already coming from the ground. This is the easiest way to create geothermal power. sTurn hot water into steam. sUse the hot water to heat another liquid until that turns into steam. The advantage of this is that the second liquid might be easier to turn to steam.

Only a small percent of the land area has hot water near the surface. Geothermal energy can be an inexpensive source of power in those areas. Areas where there is, or has been, volcanic activity are top spots for hot springs. This includes the volcanic area around the edges of the Pacific Ocean, an area known as the Ring of Fire.

photo by Peter W. Lipman, courtesy USGS

Mount St. Helens in Washington erupts with a plume of smoke and ash in 1980. In areas where there is volcanic activity, hot springs and steam are usually easy to get at. Geothermal energy can be an efficient source of power in those areas.

Geothermal energy is a renewable resource. There will always be heat inside the Earth. However, the equipment costs a lot of money to build. If you live near hot springs or geysers, it could be worth it. The costs would be low. Also, most of the water can be put back underground once it has been used to create power. With heat pumps, people need to dig underground to lay the pipes. Unless you are building a home in a new development, this may not be practical. However, in buildings with a lot of land, such as schools, digging around the building might work well. Geothermal plants do not burn fuel, so they produce little pollution. Experts say they give off only about 1 percent as many carbon dioxide emissions as fossil fuel plants. They GIVEOFFONLYABOUTPERCENTASMANY acid rain pollutants.

The Mini Page Staff

The Mini Page’s popular series of issues about each state is collected here in a 156-page softcover book. Conveniently spiral-bound for ease of use, this invaluable resource contains A-to-Z facts about each state, along with the District of Columbia. Illustrated with colorful photographs and art, and complete with updated information, The Mini Page Book of States will be a favorite in classrooms and homes for years to come.

All the following jokes have something in common. #ANYOUGUESSTHECOMMONTHEMEORCATEGORY Felix: What happened to the tactless man WHENHEPUTHISFOOTINHISMOUTH Fatima: He got a sock in the jaw! Fiona: How many feet are there in the 5NITED3TATES Forrest: Twice as many as the number of people! Frances:7HATTYPEOFSHOEISGOODFORLAZYFEET Frankie: Loafers! from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

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*USTAFEWFEETUNDERTHEGROUND the temperature stays at about 55 degrees. People use heat pumps to take advantage of these natural underground temperatures. For example, if it is 95 degrees outside, a normal air conditioner would have to work hard to get it down to a comfortable 70 degrees. With a heat pump, a liquid such as water or antifreeze is naturally cooled underground to 55 degrees. The liquid then cools the air. The air conditioner just has to finish the job. If it is cold outside, the heat pump does just the opposite. It warms the liquid to 55 degrees and makes it easier to heat the air.

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from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

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Betty Debnam - Founding Editor and Editor at Large Lisa Tarry - Managing Editor Lucy Lien - Associate Editor Wendy Daley - Artist

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The Ring of Fire

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

Advantages and disadvantages

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The Geysers near Santa Rosa, Calif., is the site of the oldest geothermal power plant in the United States. Built in 1962, It creates power for about 1 million people in northern and central California. It is the largest producer of geothermal power in the world. “The Geysers� does not actually have geysers. The plant uses steam to produce its energy. It does not tap into real geysers, or fountains of hot water.

Power near the surface

Heat pumps

Next week, The Mini Page is about coin collecting.

! W E

Blackberry Parfait

You’ll need: s OUNCEPACKAGESUGAR FREEINSTANTVANILLAPUDDING sCUPSLOW FATMILK sCUPSBLACKBERRIES WASHEDANDRINSED sTABLESPOONSSEEDLESSBLACKBERRYPRESERVES sWHIPPEDDAIRYTOPPING What to do: 1. Make pudding with milk according to package directions. Chill for 5 minutes until soft set. 2. Combine blackberries and preserves in a small pan; cook on medium heat for 5 minutes. 3POONHALFOFPUDDINGEVENLYINTOPARFAITDISHES 4. Spoon 14 cup blackberry sauce on top of pudding in each dish. 5. Layer with remaining pudding, then with remaining blackberry sauce. 6. Spoon desired amount of whipped dairy topping as final layer. Serves 4. You will need an adult’s help with this recipe. from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

Using hot water

Power places

Hot water

Rookie Cookie’s Recipe

Capturing Geothermal Energy

Paths to Power The first geothermal power plant in the world was built in Italy in 1904. It used steam to create energy. Some countries are able to easily use hot springs and geysers to provide power for their citizens. For example, Iceland, El Salvador and the Philippines produce at least one-quarter of their electricity with geothermal plants. The United States has more capacity for geothermal energy than anyplace in the world. Most of America’s capacity is in California.

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from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

Taylor Swift is the voice of Audrey in the movie “The Lorax.� She is best known as a country music singer and composer. She has won six Grammy Awards and many top country music awards. She writes all of her own songs. Taylor, 22, was born in Reading, Pa., and grew up on a Christmas tree farm. She won a national poetry-writing contest when she was in the fourth grade. She learned to play the guitar when she was 12. She was a member of a kids comedy group, and the manager urged her to work toward a musical career. She soon started performing at malls and fairs. Her first album came out when she was 16. 4AYLORSFAMILYMOVEDTOA.ASHVILLESUBURBWHENSHEWASATEENAGER SOSHECOULDHAVEBETTERCAREERCHANCES3HESTILLLIVESIN.ASHVILLE She has supported several charities and has performed at benefit concerts to help tornado victims and kids in need. from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick TM

Steamboat is one of the most famous geysers in Yellowstone National Park. When it erupts, it can send superhot water and steam up to 300 feet high.

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

art courtesy USGS

INNER CORE OUTER CORE MANTLE CRUST

Storing heat

Magma flows under the Earth’s crust like a super-hot, slow-moving river. Some of it can burst through the surface in erupting volcanoes. But most magma stays underground, heating rocks beneath the crust. It also heats water that has sunk below the ground. The heat and weight of the planet create pressure. This pressure builds up, as in a teakettle. If there are no openings for the heat to escape, it may burst out as steam and hot water. Hot springs and geysers (GUY-zers), or hot fountains, are formed. The easiest places to use geothermal energy are in areas with geysers and hot springs.

photo by Julie Donnelly-Nolan, courtesy USGS

art courtesy NASA

layers inside the Earth. At the core, temperatures can be hotter than the surface of the sun.

Heat builds up

photo by Tom Cawley, NPS

The Earth is made up of layers of rocks and metals. These layers are: s4HEcore, in the center of the Earth. It has two parts. The very middle is made of solid iron. Rock that is so hot it has melted surrounds the iron center. This hot, melted rock is called magma. s4HEmantle, made of magma and solid rock. s4HEcrust, or top layer. The land we walk on and at the bottom of the sea is the crust. This art shows the

The Puu Oo volcano cone erupts in Hawaii. Magma, or hot, melted rock, can flow between pieces of broken crust to reach the surface. It can also burst through thin areas of the crust. Lava erupting from volcanoes is made partly of magma.

Geothermal Energy

try ’n find

Words that remind us of geothermal energy are hidden in the block below. Some words are hidden backward or diagonally. See if you can find: AIR, CORE, CRUST, EARTH, ELECTRICITY, ENERGY, FIRE, FUELS, GEOTHERMAL, GEYSERS, HEAT, HOT, ICELAND, MAGMA, MANTLE, MOLTEN, POWER, PUMPS, SPRINGS, STEAM, TEMPERATURE, WATER. The earTh’s core is smokin’ hoT!

C E A R T H S T R

M O A H O T R A E

S A R I V R E E W

F T G E R E S H O

E U E M N T Y Y P

R M E A A A E T L

U K S L M W G I A

T D G N S N Y C M

A N N N S E G I R

R A I E P T R R E

E L R R M L E T H

P E P I U O N C T

M C S F P M E E O

E I C R U S T L E

T M A N T L E E G

from The Mini Page Š 2012 Universal Uclick

ready resources The Mini Page provides ideas for websites, books or other resources that will help you learn more about this week’s topics. On the Web: sEPAGOVCLIMATECHANGEKIDSSOLUTIONSTECHNOLOGIES geothermal.html sEIAGOVKIDSENERGYCFMPAGEGEOTHERMAL?HOME BASICS sENVIRONMENTNATIONALGEOGRAPHICCOMENVIRONMENT GLOBAL WARMINGGEOTHERMAL PROFILE sYOUTUBECOMWATCHV.PKZT7R'(! At the library: sh'EOTHERMAL%NERGY(OT3TUFFvBY!MY3(ANSEN sh'EOTHERMAL0OWERvBY*OSEPHA3HERMAN

To order, send $15.99 ($19.99 Canada) plus $5 postage and handling for each copy. Make check or money order (U.S. funds only) payable to Universal Uclick. Send to The Mini Page Book of States, Universal Uclick, P.O. Box 6814, Leawood, KS 66206. Or call tollfree 800-591-2097 or go to www.smartwarehousing.com. Please send ______ copies of The Mini Page Book of States (Item #0-7407-8549-4) at $20.99 each, total cost. (Bulk discount information available upon request.) Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Address: _______________________________________________________________________ City: _________________________________________ State: _________ Zip: ________________

Please include all of the appropriate registered trademark symbols and copyright lines in any publication of The Mini PageÂŽ.

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