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Movies D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Movie Review

‘Cabin’ is frightfully clever By CHRISTY LEMIRE AP Movie Critic

Stop reading this review right now. Go see “The Cabin in the Woods,” then come back and we can have a conversation about it. Just trust me on this. The less you know going into it, the better. We can say this much: The hype is justified. And that’s saying something when we’re talking about geek god Joss Whedon, who produced and co-wrote the script with director Drew Goddard, a veteran of such revered TV shows as “Lost” and Whedon’s own “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” Goddard makes his directing debut with this long-awaited film (he also previously wrote “Cloverfield”) but he keeps all the moving parts humming along with thrilling fluidity and ease. So yes, “The Cabin in the Woods” is as good as you’ve heard, or at least as good as you’ve hoped it would be, because it walks a very difficult line and manages to find the right tone pretty much the entire time. Anyone can try to be subversive. Anyone can spoof and parody and wink at the camera in making fun of a specific genre, especially one like horror in which the conventions are so deeply ingrained and staying a couple steps ahead of the characters is part of the fun. But the trick is to avoid going overboard and to play it somewhat straight. The “Scream” movies in the 1990s were super-meta and cutesy and knowing, with characters who were all-too aware of the rules of a horror movie and their roles within that structure. “The Cabin in the Woods” affectionately toys with the

Allenberry Playhouse presents the

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Section D April 12, 2012

Entertainment in the heart of the midstate

This heavenly show is filled with nostolgic hits of the 50’s and 60’s rock & roll, show tunes and dance music. You will love the songs, such as; Three Coins in the Fountain, Sixteen Tons, Rags to Riches, Love is a Many Splendored Thing, No Not Much, plus many many more! You will be glad you didn’t miss this sweet show.

Associated Press/Lionsgate

Kristen Connolly is shown in a scene from “The Cabin in the Woods.” familiarity of certain types and plot points but it also dares to take a step back and examine why we need to return to these sorts of films, why we love to laugh and jump, why we hunger for carnage and thirst for blood. This probably makes “Cabin” sound like some sort of analytical, eggheady thesis, and while it is extremely clever and intelligent, it also could not be more fun. It pays homage to the kinds of frights horror fans know and love while managing to provide surprises and twists, layers upon layers, over and over again. It’s humorously selfaware without being smugly sarcastic; again, a tough balance to strike. Let’s quickly touch upon plot and then get out: Five friends go away for the weekend to a remote cabin by a lake. There’s party-girl Jules (Anna Hutchison), her jock boyfriend Curt (Chris Hemsworth, who made this film before “Thor” made

him a star), the bookishbut-sexy Holden (Jesse Williams), wisecracking stoner Marty (Fran Kranz, who gets the best lines of the group) and the wholesome Dana (Kristen Connolly). Because they are good-looking college archetypes, they must drink beer, smoke weed, undress and cavort; it heightens their vulnerability. Stop me if you think you’ve heard this one before. From the character descriptions alone, you can probably determine who’s going to get it and in what order. But wait, there’s also a parallel story line involving Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford as midlevel managers at some sort of sterile research lab who kill time one-upping each other with deadpan gallows humor. As Goddard and Whedon jump back and forth, the pieces snap into place; then just when you think you’ve got it all figured out, they throw something else at you.

“Cabin” may not win over any new converts to the horror genre, but it’ll certainly make the faithful feel fervent all over again. “The Cabin in the Woods,” a Lionsgate release, is rated R for strong bloody horror violence and gore, language, drug use and some sexuality/nudity. Running time: 95 minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.

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Comic duo

‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ stars to appear at Luhrs Center


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Special Events

Theater

Music

• “Writers, Illustrators, and Publishing Group of South Central Pennsylvania” will hold a meeting at 6:30 p.m. April 12 at the Shippensburg Public Library Annex, 73 W. King St. For more information contact John Graham at john@nosweetsforsanta.com.

• Wilson College Drama Club to present “Gallathea” at 7:30 p.m. April 13 and 14 in Laird Hall. Admission is free, donations appreciated. For more information contact Richard Shoap at 264-4011 or richard.shoap@wilson.edu.

• Newville Common Ground coffee house will be hosting open mic/stage night from 6 to 9 p.m. on Fridays. The coffee house is located at 2 W. Big Spring Ave., Newville. For more information visit www.newvilleground. com or call 776-1156.

• Dickinson College’s improvisation group, Run With It!, will perform its final show of the year at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 14 in the Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium. For more information email, lidardc@dickinson.edu.

• Adams County School of Musical Theatre will present “Godspell” at 7 p.m. April 13 and 14 and at 2 p.m. April 14 and 15 at the school, 49 York St., Gettysburg. Reserved seating tickets are $11. For more information visit www.acsmt.org or call 334-2692.

• Cumberland County Historical Society will present a Civil War walking tour at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 14. Cost is $8 for members and $12 for nonmembers. The tour will meet at the historical society building, 21 N. Pitt St., Carlisle. For reservations or more information call Lynda Mann at 249-7610 or email, program@historicalsociety.com. • Dickinson College will present “Astrofest” from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 14 in Tome Hall. The event includes several planetarium shows, astronomy demonstrations and roof-top observing. The event is free and open to the public. For more information email astro@dickinson.edu. • The Shippensburg University Asian American Organization will host “The Asian Extravaganza: Celebrating the Year of the Dragon” from 4 to 6 p.m. April 14 in the Ceddia Union Building. • The York County Heritage Trust will present “homebrew workshops” April 14 and May 2. Cost is $70. Call 848-1587 for more information. • Susquehanna Mysteries Alliance will present “Titanic: What Lies Beneath” event at 2 p.m. April 15 at the Mechanicsburg Mystery Bookshop in Mechanicsburg, 6 Clouser Road. For more information call 795-7470 or email mysterybooks@comcast.net. • Pat’s Singles Club will hold a dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 15, at the Valencia Ballroom, York. The Headliners will provide the dance music. Cost is $10.

• Dickinson College will host an opening reception for its new exhibit, “The Titanic and Cultural Memory: A Centennial Exhibit” at 6 p.m. Monday, April 16 in the Archives and Special Collections of the WaidnerSpahr Library. The event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will run through June 15. For more information call 245-1399. • Dickinson College will host internationally-acclaimed Mexican-American poet Tino Villanueva who will present a poetry reading at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 16 in the great room of the Stern Center. The event is free and open to the public. Select copies of Villaneuva’s books will be available for purchase at the event. For more information call 245-1277.

• Gamut Theatre will present an improv show featuring ShawnMikael(s) and Harrisburg natives T.M.I. at 7:30 p.m. on April 15 at the Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor of Strawberry Square in Harrisburg. • The Hershey Theatre presents “Memphis” from Tuesday, April 10 through Sunday, April 15. Tickets are $25 to $80. For more information visit hersheytheatre.com or ticketmaster. com. • Encore! Home School Productions will present Agatha Christie’s “Appointment with Death” at 7 p.m. April 19 to 21 and at 3 p.m. April 22 at Trinity High School. For tickets visit www.showtix4u.com or call (866)967-8167. • Messiah College to perform “The Miracle Worker,” at 8 p.m. April 19 to 21 and at 3 p.m. April 22. For more information or to order tickets call 691-6036 or email tickets@messiah. edu. • The Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet presents “Giselle” at 1 and 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 21 and at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 22 at the Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts. For tickets or more information call 214-ARTS or whitakercenter.org. • Gamut Theatre Group will hold its “9th Annual Shakespeare’s Birthday Celebration,” from 4 to 7 p.m. April 22. Tickets are $100 and $150. For more information, www.gamutplays.org. • Oyster Mill Playhouse will hold auditions for an upcoming comedy, “Play On!” at 7 p.m. on April 22 and 23. For more information visit www.oystermill.com. • The Popcorn Hat Players presents “Emperor’s New Clothes,” Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10:15 a.m. and Saturdays at 1 p.m. May 2 through May 24. Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are $5-$8. Visit www.gamutplays.org or call 238-4111.

• The Cumberland Singers will be performing “Anything But Quiet,” broadway music from 1925 to 2011, April 13 through 17. For more information visit www.cumberlandsingers.org or call 367-8030. • Beck and Benedict Hardware will present the Carroll County Ramblers and the Patuxent Partners Bluegrass Band at 7 p.m., 118 Walnut St., Waynesboro. Admission is $13, children under 12 are free. For more information call 762-4711 or visit www.beck-benedicthardware.com. • Tommy Stinson and his band will perform at 9 p.m. Saturday, April 14 at the Spy Club, 234 N. 2nd St. Tickets are $10 and $12 and you must be 21 or older. • The Seven Mountains Bluegrass Association will present the Little Roy and Lizzie Show at 7 p.m. April 14 at the Goodwill Fire Co., 2318 S. Queen St., York. Fore more information visit www.sevenmountainsbluegrass.org. • The Susquehanna Valley Theatre Organ Society will present “Pipes and Voices Sing in Spring” featuring Jonathan Ortloff at 3 p.m. April 15, at the Capitol Theatre, York. Cost is $15 for adults and $13 for seniors and students. Visit www.SVTOS.org or www.facebook. com/SVTOS. • Gettysburg College will present a concert of latin jazz at 8:15 p.m. on April 18 at the College Union Building’s Junction. • Midtown Scholar will present Begger’s Ride and Carolann Solebello at 8 p.m. April 21. A donation of $10 is suggested. For more information visit www.midtownscholar.com • The Wednesday Club will hold auditions for performing membership on April 21 at Chapel Hill Church, Camp Hill. Application deadline is April 16. For more information call 571-5189 or visit www.wednesdayclub.org. • The Kim Thompson Group featuring guitarist Mike Moreno will perform at 6 p.m. at the Sheraton Harrisburg Hershey Hotel, 4650 Lindle Road, Harrisburg, on April 22.

Event information can be submitted via email to frontdoor@cumberlink.com, by mail, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013 or by fax at 243-3121. For more information, visit www.cumberlink.com/entertainment

21 Jump Street (R) Thu.-Thu. 10:55 a.m., 1:15, 4, 7:15, 9:50 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 12, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:25, Fri.-Thu. 12, 4:50, 7:20 American Reunion (R) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7, 9:40 The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:50, 5:30, 7:45, 10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 10:50 a.m., 12:45, 2:45, 4:45, 6:40, 8:35 Friends with Kids (R) Thu. 7:05, 9:45 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 10:20 a.m., 11 a.m., 1:10, 2:10, 4:20, 5:20, 7:25, 8:30, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 11 a.m., 1:10, 2:10, 4:20, 5:20, 7:25, 8:30 Jeff, Who Lives at Home (R) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 1:30, 3:20, 5:30, 7:50, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 2:30, 9:30 John Carter 2D (PG-13) Thu. 12:30, 9:30 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:25, 3:40 Lockout (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu.-Thu. 11:10 a.m., 1:40, 4:10, 6:45, 9:10 Safe House (R) Thu. 3:45, 6:50 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 3:30, 7:35 The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:30, 3:45, 6:50, 9:20 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Thu. 2, 7:10, Fri.-Thu. 2, 7:05 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:40 a.m., 4:30, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 4:30, 9:35

Flagship Cinemas 4590 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05 American Reunion (R) Thu.-Thu. 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10 The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri.-Thu. 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 7:50, 10:10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2, 6:40

Continued next column

Flagship continued

Great Escape continued

Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu. 4:20, 9 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 12:10, 1, 3:20, 4, 6:30, 8, 9:30, Fri.-Thu. 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 9:30 Lockout (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40, 9:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu. 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:30, 5:10, 7:30, 10 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 4:10, 8:10, Fri.-Thu. 12:30, 4:25, 8:20 The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12:05, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20, Fri.-Thu. 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40

Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3:30, 4:30, 7:30, 8:30, Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:15, 3:30, 4:15, 7:30, 8:15 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Thu. 12:20, 2:50, 5:10, 7:45, 10, Fri.-Thu. 2:50, 7:45 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 7:10, 9:30

Great Escape 3501 Paxton St. 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 2, 3:45, 4:40, 7:15, 9:10, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50 American Reunion (R) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 4, 5, 7, 7:40, 9:40, 10:10, Fri.-Thu. 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:30, 10:05 Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:40, 5, 6:50, 7:40, 9:10, 10:10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:30, 3:50, 6:50, 9, Fri.-Thu. 11:20, 1:30, 3:50 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:10, 12:50, 1:40, 2:40, 3:40, 4:50, 6:30, 7, 8, 9:35, 10:05, Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 2:35, 4:50, 6:30, 7:55, 9, 9:45 Lockout (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 12:30, 2:10, 4:35, 5:10, 7, 9:20, 10 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:45, 2:15, 4:15, 4:45, 6:45, 7:20, 9:15, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 A Thousand Words (PG-13) Thu. 12:40, 6:40 Three Stooges (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 12:15, 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:45, 6:30, 7:20, 9:35

Continued next column

Regal Carlisle Commons 8 Noble Boulevard 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 1:50, 4:40, 7:10, Fri.-Sun. 2:05, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50, Mon.-Thu. 2:05, 4:40, 7:10 American Reunion (R) Thu. 2:10, 5:10, 7:50, Fri.-Sun. 1:55, 4:30, 7:40, 10:20, Mon.-Thu. 1:55, 4:30, 7:40 The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri. 2:55, 5:20, 8, 10:30, Sat.-Sun. 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 8, 10:30, Mon.-Thu. 2:55, 5:20, 8 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 2, 4:20, 6:50 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 1:15, 3:30, 4:30, 7, 7:40, Fri. 3:50, 7, 10:10 Lockout (PG-13) Fri. 2:35, 5:10, 7:50, 10:15, Sat.-Sun. 12:05, 2:35, 5:10, 7:50, 10:15, Mon.-Thu. 2:35, 5:10, 7:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu. 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu. 2:30, 6:40, Fri. 4:15, 8:15, Sat.-Sun. 12:10, 4:15, 8:15, Mon.-Thu. 4:15, 8:15 The Three Stooges (PG) Fri. 2:45, 5, 7:20, 9:40, Sat.-Sun. 12:20, 2:45, 5, 7:20, 9:40, Mon.-Thu. 2:45, 5, 7:20 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu. 2:30, 5, 7:30, Fri. 2:25, 4:50, 7:30, 10, Sat.-Sun. 12, 2:25, 4:50, 7:30, 10, Mon.-Thu. 2:25, 4:50, 7:30

Carlisle Theatre 44 W. High St., Carlisle The Artist (PG-13) Thu. 7:30 A Separation (PG-13) Fri.-Sat. 7:30, Sun. 2, Wed.-Thu. 7:30

Regal Harrisburg 14 1500 Caughey Drive 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 2, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10, Fri.-Thu. 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 10 American Reunion (R) Thu. 11:45 a.m., 1:20, 2:20, 4, 5, 6:40, 7:40, 9:20, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 1:40, 2:40, 4:20, 5:20, 7, 8, 9:40, 10:40 The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri.-Thu. 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 12:30, 3:40, 6:30, 8:40, Fri.-Thu. 1, 3:10, 5:30 Housefull 2 (NR) Thu. 1:10, 4:45, 8:10, Fri.-Thu. 8:10 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 12, 1, 3:10, 4:10, 6:20, 7:20, 9:30, 10:30, Fri.-Thu. 12:50, 3, 4, 6:10, 7:10, 9:20, 10:20 Lockout (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 2:10, 5, 7:40, 10:10 The Metropolitan Opera: La Traviata (NR) Sat. 12:55 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu. 12:50, 1:50, 3:30, 4:30, 6:10, 7:10, 8:50, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10 October Baby (PG-13) Thu. 1:30, 4:25, 7, 10 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:40 a.m., 12:40, 3:50, 4:50, 8, 9, Fri.Thu. 12:40, 2:50, 4:50, 7:30, 9 The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.-Thu. 1:20, 2:20, 3:40, 4:40, 6:20, 7:20, 8:50, 9:50 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Thu. 1:40, 4:20, 6:50, 9:40 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:40, Fri.Thu. 1:50, 4:15, 6:40, 9:30

Midtown Cinema The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 2:50, 6:50 Jeff Who Lives at Home (R) Thu. 3:05, 5:25, 7:35 The Raid: Redemption (NR) Fri.-Sun. 3, 5:20, 7:30, Mon.-Wed. 3, 5:20, Thu. 3, 5:20, 7:30 Salmon Fishing in Yemen (PG-13) Thu. 3, 5:20, 7:30, Fri.-Sun. 3:05, 5:25, 7:40, Mon.-Wed. 3:05, 5:25, Thu. 3:05, 5:25, 7:40 We Need to Talk About Kevin (R) Fri.-Sun. 2:50, 5:15, 7:35, Mon.-Wed. 2:50, 5:15, Thu. 2:50, 5:15, 7:35

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• The Penn-Cumberland Garden Club will hold its 48th annual Bertha P. Reppert Herb Tea from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, April 16 at the Camp Hill Borough Hall, 2145 Walnut St., Camp Hill. Editor of “The Essential Herbal Magazine,” Tina Sams will be the guest speaker. There is a small fee and reservations are required. To register call Pauline Neal 761-4487 and for more information visit www.penncumberlandgarden.org.

• Gamut Theatre Group’s Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Jungle Book” at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at the Whitaker Center’s Sunoco Theatre, Harrisburg. Cost is $15.

• Crimson Frog Coffeehouse presents: Poetic Perkolations, April 12; Open mic with Jonathan Frazier, April 13; 2nd Look, April 15; Marie Smith, April 16; Tom Swartchick, April 22; Poetic Perkolations, April 26; Open mic with Jonathan Frazier, April 27; Justin Jans, April 29; and House Exit, April 30. For more information email mp.hooper@gmail.com.

Cinema Center of Camp Hill 3431 Simpson Ferry Road

Movies

Out & About

• The Shippensburg Swing Band will host a “Swing into Spring” dance from 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday, April 14 at the Thought Lot, 37 E. Garfield St. Tickets are $10. For more information visit shipband.org.

D2 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Now showing

D11 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Out & About


“Lose Yourself” from “8 Mile” (2002)

One of the greatest songs ever from one of the greatest movies ever. A favorite from childhood that’s just as moving for grown-ups, it’s full of girlish innocence and melancholy longing. Written by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg, it’s been copied and covered endlessly by singers ranging from Frank Sinatra to Kylie Minogue. Sam Harris became a minor star by belting out a soaring version of it on “Star Search” in the mid-’80s, and Katharine McPhee made it one of her signature tunes on “American Idol.” But of course it will always belong to Judy Garland. She performs it early in the film when she’s still a naive farm girl, before all the tornadic activity and house-dropping that inspire her journey down the

Associated Press

Left: In this 1939 file photo originally released by Warner Bros., Judy Garland portrays Dorothy in a scene from “The Wizard of Oz.” Right: In this film image released by Paramount Pictures, Leonardo DiCaprio, left, and Kate Winslet are shown in a scene from the 3-D version of James Cameron’s romantic epic “Titanic.” yellow brick road.

“When You Wish Upon a Star” from “Pinocchio” (1940) A personal choice, since this is the song my mother supposedly sang to me when I was a baby. Or so goes the lore — I was too young to remember. Written by Leigh Harline and Ned Washington and sung by Cliff Edwards in the voice of perky sidekick Jiminy Cricket, this is probably the greatest song ever to come from a Disney animated movie. It’s certainly the

most identifiable with the studio, since it plays along with the logo before every Disney film. It’s hopeful and earnest and unabashedly sentimental. And like the song that inspired this week’s list, this one will really get stuck in your head. It also provided inspiration for one of the more daring episodes of “Family Guy,” titled “When You Wish Upon a Weinstein.”

“Moon River” from “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961) When Audrey Hepburn

sings it alone on the fire escape of her Manhattan apartment, it’s intimate, sweet and plaintive, an indication of the insecure woman looking for love that she tries to suppress through her glamorous persona and wild nights. When it swells during the film’s climactic conclusion — in an alley in the pouring rain, as Hepburn finds

the cat she cast aside and clutches it to her chest while giving George Peppard a passionate kiss — it’s heartbreaking. I cry every time in a matter of seconds. Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer — they did not screw around. (Chevy Chase also felt prompted to belt out this song during an especially thorough doctor’s exam in “Fletch.”)

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• Sandra Blair, an award-winning wildlife artist will be the “artist in action” at the Village Artisans Gallery April 14 from 1-4 p.m.

Carlisle , 243-4151

• The SHAPE Gallery will hold an art class, “Under the Sea!” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 14 and 21 for children age 6 to 12. Cost is $25. For more information email info@shapeart.org or call 532-2559. • The Art Center School and Galleries in Mechanicsburg will hold it’s Spring Open Juried Exhibit April 14 through May 1. The public is invited to attend the opening reception from 5 to 7 p.m. April 14 at the Art Center’s red barn gallery, 18 Artcraft Drive, Mechanicsburg. For more information visit www.mechanicsburgartcenter.com.

The comic duo of Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood will be making a stop in Cumberland County next weekend. The pair, stars of “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” are sure to keep their audience in stiches!

10 N. Pitt St.

MUSIC |D4-5

Thursday, April 12: DJ 10 p.m. Friday, April 13: Band night with “Mad Men” at 9 p.m. Saturday, April 14: DJ 10 p.m. Monday, April 12: Yuengs and Wings Tuesday, April 16: Team trivia at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 17: Open mic

THEATRE | D6

at 8 p.m.

Fans of Cole Porter’s songs will find much to love in Broadway Classics’ upcoming producation of “Anything Goes.”

Appalachian Brewing Company

• Gabriel Horkowitz’s “Watercolor Works” will be on display from April 14 through May 5 at the Art Market of Pomfret St, 16 W. Pomfret St., Carlisle. An opening reception will be from 4 to 6 p.m. April 14. For more information call 960-9201.

Harrisburg, 221-1080

• Exploring the Senses: Beyond the Frame will be on display through April 14 at the Trout Gallery at Dickinson College. Call 245-1344.

Thursday, April 12: The Front Bottoms at 7 p.m. Friday,

• Karen Good will be demonstrating how to decorate Pysanka or Ukrainian Easter eggs from noon to 5 p.m. April 14 in the Anderson reading Room of the New Cumberland Public Library. • “Perry County Home” by Chris Lyter will be on display at the PCCA Gallery through April 18. • “Contextualized” by Kentucky ceramic artist Anthony Wolking will be on display April 17 through May 5 at Dickinson College’s Goodyear Gallery. Call 245-1714. • “Landscapes of Conflict: Photos by Shai Krember, Bart Michiels and Osamu James Nakagawa” will be on display through April 20 at the Pennsylvania College of Art and Design in Lancaster. Pcad.edu/maingallery. • CASD Student Art Show will be at the Carlisle Arts Learning Center, through April 21. An opening reception will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 30. • “Haiti — A Nation’s Persistence,” an exhibit by photojournalist Keely Kernan, will be on display through April 27 at Shippensburg University. An artist’s reception will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 9 in the library, followed by a talk by Kernan at 7:30 p.m. in Old Main Chapel. • Artwork by David Cubie will be on display in the Charley Krone Gallery at the New Cumberland Public Library through the month of April. • The Perry County Council of the Arts will host “Drawing the Line” through May 24 at Landis House, 67 N. Fourth St., Newport, www.perrrycountyarts.org.

Electronic-rock band Conspirator is set to perform at the Abbey Bar this weekend as part of their national tour. Music Notes covers the benefits of music to the family and early childhood education.

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BOOKS | D8-9

50 N. Cameron St.

“The Enlighted Cyclist,” a bible for bicycle commuters will make enthusiasts laugh and cry. The federal government is adding Apple to its list of lawsuits over e-books and unfair pricing. Also, see a review of 108-year-old Holocaust survivor Alice Herz-Sommer’s memoirs.

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April 13: Funky Friday Dance party with host David Dye at 4 p.m.; Les Raquet & Matuto (post XPN party) 9 p.m. Saturday, April 14: Funk Ark, 9 p.m. Sunday, April 15: Con-

MOVIES | D10-12

spirator with guests Laser Sex, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April

“Cabin in the Woods” is a must see according to AP movie critic who says the film is “frightfully clever.” And, take a step back in time with a glance at five of the best Oscar winners for original songs. Also, see what else is playing on the big screen this weekend and at area theaters.

18: Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, 7:30 p.m.

Gullifty’s Underground 1104 Carlisle Road Camp Hill, 761-6692 www.gulliftys.net Friday, April 13: Friday The 13th Mayhem: Requiem, 8:30 to Movie Review

9 p.m.; Shredfyre, 9:20 to 9:55 p.m.; Shatter‘Cabin’ X, 10:15 to 10:45 is frightfully clever p.m.; The Ok Rivals, 11:05 to 11:45 p.m.; Hiding Scarlett, By CHRISTy LEMIRE AP Movie CritiC

Stop reading this review right now. Go see “The Cabin in the Woods,” then come back and we can have a conversation about it. Just trust me on this. The less you know going into it, the better. We can say this much: The hype is justified. And that’s saying something when we’re talking about geek god Joss Whedon, who produced and co-wrote the script with director Drew Goddard, a veteran of such revered TV shows as “Lost” and Whedon’s own “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” Goddard makes his directing debut with this long-awaited film (he also previously wrote “Cloverfield”) but he keeps all the moving parts humming along with thrilling fluidity and ease. So yes, “The Cabin in the Woods” is as good as you’ve heard, or at least as good as you’ve hoped it would be, because it walks a very difficult line and manages to find the right tone pretty much the entire time. Anyone can try to be subversive. Anyone can spoof and parody and wink at the camera in making fun of a specific genre, especially one like horror in which the conventions are so deeply ingrained and staying a couple steps ahead of the characters is part of the fun. But the trick is to avoid going overboard and to play it somewhat straight. The “Scream” movies in the 1990s were super-meta and cutesy and knowing, with characters who were all-too aware of the rules of a horror movie and their roles within that structure. “The Cabin in the Woods” affectionately toys with the

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Section D April 12, 2012

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This heavenly show is filled with nostolgic hits of the 50’s and 60’s rock & roll, show tunes and dance music. You will love the songs, such as; Three Coins in the Fountain, Sixteen Tons, Rags to Riches, Love is a Many Splendored Thing, No Not Much, plus many many more! You will be glad you didn’t miss this sweet show.

Associated Press/Lionsgate

“Cabin” may not win over any new converts to the horror genre, but it’ll certainly make the faithful feel fervent all over again. “The Cabin in the Woods,” a Lionsgate release, is rated R for strong bloody horror violence and gore, language, drug use and some sexuality/nudity. Running time: 95 minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.

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Kristen Connolly is shown in a scene from “The Cabin in the Woods.” him a star), the bookishbut-sexy Holden (Jesse Williams), wisecracking stoner Marty (Fran Kranz, who gets the best lines of the group) and the wholesome Dana (Kristen Connolly). Because they are good-looking college archetypes, they must drink beer, smoke weed, undress and cavort; it heightens their vulnerability. Stop me if you think you’ve heard this one before. From the character descriptions alone, you can probably determine who’s going to get it and in what order. But wait, there’s also a parallel story line involving Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford as midlevel managers at some sort of sterile research lab who kill time one-upping each other with deadpan gallows humor. As Goddard and Whedon jump back and forth, the pieces snap into place; then just when you think you’ve got it all figured out, they throw something else at you.

64 th

Theatre Season

12:05 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday, April 14: Lucid, 8 p.m. familiarity of certain types and plot points but it also dares to take a step back and examine why we need to return to these sorts of films, why we love to laugh and jump, why we hunger for carnage and thirst for blood. This probably makes “Cabin” sound like some sort of analytical, eggheady thesis, and while it is extremely clever and intelligent, it also could not be more fun. It pays homage to the kinds of frights horror fans know and love while managing to provide surprises and twists, layers upon layers, over and over again. It’s humorously selfaware without being smugly sarcastic; again, a tough balance to strike. Let’s quickly touch upon plot and then get out: Five friends go away for the weekend to a remote cabin by a lake. There’s party-girl Jules (Anna Hutchison), her jock boyfriend Curt (Chris Hemsworth, who made this film before “Thor” made

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On the cover: ‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ stars Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood to perform at Luhrs Center in Shippensburg.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

D10 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

“Over the Rainbow” from “The Wizard of Oz” (1939)

So damn catchy. Such vivid visuals. And so crucial to the story as an exploration of the main character’s fears and ambitions. Who knows whether Eminem can actually act, but he did a great job of playing a version of himself here in Curtis Hanson’s drama about an aspiring rapper battling his demons as he struggles to make it out of his working-class Detroit neighborhood. I love what an unconventional choice this was for the Academy (and I pondered “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” from “Hustle & Flow” as one of my five selections this week for the same reason). And I think it’s hilarious that forever more, we can describe Eminem as Academy Award winner Marshall Mathers.

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He’s a bad mother ... so how do you NOT choose this song among the top five? It has such great energy and is such a fabulously funky reflection of its time: the horns, the driving chicka-chicka, the staccato strings. Isaac Hayes is at his smooth, soulful best here, crooning lyrics that seemed so racy in their day about Richard Roundtree’s character, “the black private dick that’s a sex machine to all the chicks.” This was a bold pick from the Academy, and it made Hayes the first black person to win an Academy Award outside of the acting categories. Can you dig it?

LOS ANGELES — It’s been stuck in my head for weeks like a psychotic episode: “My Heart Will Go On,” Celine Dion’s big, bombastic ballad from “Titanic.” Now that James Cameron has finally released the 3-D redo of his 1997 shipwreck epic — the winner of 11 Academy Awards, including best original song — it still won’t go away. It goes on ... and on ... But we’re all about turning a negative into a positive around here, so we’re using this as an opportunity to talk about five other great winners of the best original song Oscar. There are dozens to choose from so you’ll have some favorites of your own, but these are sure to keep you humming along:

Art

Movies

AP Movie Critic

OUT & ABOUT |D7

A look at local nightlife

D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

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“Theme From ‘Shaft’” (1971)

By CHRISTY LEMIRE

Inside

Out & About

Movies

Five great winners of the best original song Oscar

A guide to area events

The Scene

D3 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Movies & Music


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Red Hot Chili Peppers put best foot forward

Holocaust survivor, 108, shines in book

By DERRIK J. LAN

AP Entertainment Writer

OS ANGELES — Anthony Kiedis had a dream the other night. The 49-year-old frontman of the Red Hot Chili Peppers imagined that he was playing at this year’s Rock and Rock Hall of Fame induction ceremony, and the band’s on-again, offagain guitarist John Frusciante was sitting in the front row. Kiedis is quick to note that this vision won’t become a reality when the 29-year-old group is actually inducted Saturday. “No,” K iedis said in a hushed tone during a break from rehearsing at SIR Studios last month.

“That was just a dream.” “I can’t speak for (Frusciante), but I think it’s kinda like an ex-girlfriend vibe,” added 49-year-old bassist Flea. The current line-up of Flea, Kiedis, drummer Chad Smith and guitarist Josh Klinghoffer will be honored along with past bandmates like late founding member Hillel Slovak, the original Chili Peppers guitarist who died of a drug overdose in 1988, and Frusciante, who replaced Slovak and recorded five albums during his fluid tenure with the group. “We wouldn’t be here without (Slovak) because we wouldn’t have started without him,” said Flea.

Associated Press

Members of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, from left, drummer Chad Smith, bassist Flea, guitarist Josh Klinghoffer and singer Anthony Kiedis. “For him to be honored and recognized is a beautiful thing for us, not that we don’t honor and love him every day, but I feel great for him to go in, as

Music Notes

that will help their children develop fundamental music skills such as singing on pitch. Research has shown that music aids learning, and young children have the most to gain from this. Music has the power to bring families together. Playing a wide variety of music in the home, attending performances and advocating for music education programs in the schools are three specific ways parents can help shape and improve their

children’s future. The Cumberland Singers will be performing a spring concert series this weekend. The ensemble will be performing at 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 15, at Shepherdstown United Methodist Church, 1934 S. York St., Mechanicsburg. The title of the program is “Anything But Quiet! Broadway from 19252011.” The performance is free with a “freewill” offering taken at intermission. For more information, call 367-8030. According to The Cumberland Singers’ website, all ages are welcome at their performances. This is a great opportunity to share music with your children, and bring music into the home.

well as John Frusciante, of course, who gave us so much and did some serious (expletive) rocking.” But the guitarist whose melodies powered songs

group The Small Faces/ The Faces, which featured Rod Stewart and Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood. Other honorees will include late singersongwriter Laura Nyro and blues mastermind Freddie King. Flea likened the induction class of 2012 to a family reunion: He grew up in LA around Steven Adler and Slash of Guns N’ Roses; on the East Coast, the Beastie Boys followed a similarly daring trajectory at the same time as the Chili Peppers; and Wood has served as a father figure to the group. Wood even joined the Chili Peppers in 2009 for their side project, The Insects.

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Associated Press

“A Century of Wisdom: Lessons From the Life of Alice Herz-Sommer, the World’s Oldest Living Holocaust Survivor” (Spiegel & Grau), by Caroline Stoessinger: The strength of Alice Herz-Sommer’s advice lay in its simplicity. Generosity above all, she says. Gratitude is essential for happiness. Complaining never helps. As if her 108 years of experience alone were not enough to coax you, there is the overarching fact that draws people to Herz-Sommer’s story: She survived the Theresienstadt concentration camp and is believed to be the oldest living Holocaust survivor. This isn’t an entirely new story. It was the subject of a 2008 book, “A Garden of Eden in Hell,” and has also inspired a film and varied YouTube clips. But Herz-Sommer’s ability to thrive as a celebrated pianist despite the hor-

ror she experienced is timeless and inspiring, worthy of being told again and again. It is written this time by a fellow pianist, Caroline Stoessinger, who clearly idolizes Herz-Sommer. The centenarian’s life is offered in great detail, from her childhood in Prague, through her wartime imprisonment, to a post-liberation life in Israel, to the one-room London flat where she still practices piano to this day. It also offers a fascinating glimpse of the Holocaust-era relationships between Jews and Nazis. Herz-Sommer tells the author of being brought a warm applesauce cake by a neighbor and her husband, the very man she knew to be a Nazi. The next day, she was sent by the Nazis to Theresienstadt. At the camp, she tells of playing the piano with such skill that a guard thanks her profusely for her performance and promises that Herz-Sommer and her son will be kept safe. Though the author’s reverence for her sub-

ject does shine through, the book suffers at times from a disjointed chronology and writing that can fall flat. We are offered profiles of Herz-Sommer’s students, accounts of her brushes with the famous, even recipes from her kitchen. What we yearn for, though, is for her masterpiece of a life to be illuminated consistently in perfectly lyrical passages. The book is at its finest when Herz-Sommer’s voice is allowed to drive it, not only telling us of her Holocaust experience, but also allowing us a peek at who she is in old age. We find her still animated by the presence of attractive young men, still dishing out advice on love and relationships, still able to distill wonderful morsels of wisdom for visitors. She tells us that music saved her life, that each day is a new miracle. She tells us to treasure time, that each moment is fleeting. And she says that even when she’s surrounded by young people, she feels as if she’s the youngest.

Associated Press

The cover of “A Century of Wisdom: Lessons From the Life of Alice Herz-Sommer, the World’s Oldest Living Holocaust Survivor.”

E-books • Continued from D8 about Amazon. Publishers see the “agency model” as their best, short-term hope against preventing the online retailer from dominating the e-book market and driving down the price of books to a level unsustainable for publishers and booksellers. Since launching the Kindle in 2007, Amazon has made a point of offering best-sellers for $9.99. The discount is so deep from list prices of $20 and more that it’s widely believed Amazon is selling the e-books at a loss as a way of attracting more customers and forcing competitors to lower their prices. Amazon also has been demanding higher discounts from publishers and stopped offering e-books from the Independent Publishers Group, a Chicago-based distributor, after they couldn’t agree to terms. When Apple launched its tablet computer two years ago, publishers saw two ways to balance Amazon’s power:

Associated Press

The U.S. government filed an antitrust lawsuit against Apple Inc. and book publishers Wednesday, saying the publishers conspired with Apple to raise retail electronic-book prices to limit competition. Enough readers would prefer Apple’s shiny tablet over the Kindle to cut into Amazon’s sales and the agency model would stabilize prices. Apple’s iBookstore has yet to become a major force, but

publishers believes the new price model has reduced Amazon’s market share from around 90 percent to around 60 percent, with Barnes & Noble’s Nook in second at 25 percent. The iBookstore

is believed to have 10 to 15 percent. Macmillan’s Sargent has found himself at the heart of the dispute. In early 2010, as publishers were trying to get Amazon to agree to Ap-

ple’s pricing system, Amazon pulled all the listings for Macmillan books, from Jonathan Franzen’s “The Corrections” to Barbara Ehrenreich’s “Nickle and Dimed.” Sargent refused to back down and Amazon eventually gave in. New e-books from Macmillan and the other publishers investigated by the Justice Department often are priced initially between $12.99 and $14.99, with Amazon making a point of noting that the price was set by the publisher. Ironically, publishers usually make less money off the agency model than the traditional one because they receive a smaller percentage of the proceeds. Random House Inc. was the only “big six” publisher not to agree to the agency model in 2010 and was not part of the lawsuit. But the publisher of Dan Brown, John Grisham and others did agree to terms with Apple last year and now must decide whether to keep prices the same, cut them

to keep up with competitors or drop the agency model altogether. Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum — the only of the big six publishers not involved in the case — said Random would have no comments Wednesday. According to court papers, the settlement agreement reached with three publishers said the companies agreed that for two years they will not restrict, limit or impede an e-book retailer’s ability to set, alter or reduce the retail price of any electronic book. It said the retailers will be able to offer price discounts and other forms or promotions to encourage consumers to buy one or more electronic books. The agreement also calls for the defendants not to enter into any agreement or conspiracy with any electronic-book publisher to raise, stabilize, fix, set or coordinate the retail price or wholesale price of any electronic book.

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D4 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

The benefits of music for families Music is an agent of social change that can help shape future generations. My childhood was filled with music. It wasn’t classical music, and I developed a love for all kinds of music early on that has influenced who I am today. Children absorb so much through observing the adults around them. Music enables memories to be more easily stored. Many of my earliest memories are tied to music in some way. This is just one of many purposes music can have in our lives. What if music isn’t in the home? How does that affect children? There are many curricular programs that help parents introduce music into the home

like “Under the Bridge” and “Californication” is not expected to be a part of the festivities in Cleveland, where the Rock Hall is based. A spokesman for Frusciante, who left the Chili Peppers for a second time in 2009, didn’t return messages seeking comment, but Kiedis and Flea do not anticipate he will be there, and a rep for the ceremony says he is not scheduled to attend. Nonetheless, the group will still be in good company. The Chili Peppers are set to be inducted alongside Los Angeles rockers Guns N’ Roses, New York hip-hop trio Beastie Boys, Scottish folk icon Donovan and British rock

BY MATT SEDENSKY

Books

Music

Book Review

D9 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Music News


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Bike Snob returns with ‘The Enlightened Cyclist’

Forget taxes and get ready to dance April 15

By MICHAEL ASTOR Associated Press

“The Enlightened Cyclist” (Chronicle Books), by Eben Weiss: “The Enlightened Cyclist” aspires to be a kind of bible for bicycle commuters, who will read it, laugh, weep and identify with almost every detail. It’s also the kind of book that motorists and pedestrians should read but probably won’t, either because they just don’t care and/or because they just outright hate cyclists. Author Eben Weiss understands this. “It’s hard to be truly compassionate if you don’t know what it feels like to be disliked,” he writes. “Cyclists do not have this problem, because nobody likes us. Drivers think we’re smug dorks who slow them down, pedestrians think we’re deadly scofflaws, and neither of them has much trouble imagining a world without us.” Weiss made a name for

himself with his blog, Bike Snob NYC, which attracts a couple of hundred thousand page views each month and boasts some 30,000 followers on its RSS feed. When Weiss began blogging in 2007, bicycling was exploding as an alternate means of transportation in New York and across the nation. The convergence of better bike lanes with the growing fascination of hipsters for brakeless fixed-gear bikes — once exclusively the province of the velodrome — allowed Weiss to surf his way to success, snagging a column in Bicycling magazine as well as a couple of book deals. In his first book, “Bike Snob,” Weiss simultaneously celebrated and skewered bike culture and its attendant absurdities. In “The Enlightened Cyclist,” he shifts his satirical gaze slightly to the joys and indignities of bicycle commuting. Weiss starts by remind-

ing us that all commuters want the same thing: “To be happy, and to not get killed.” Then he details all the ways this goes wrong, ribbing drivers, pedestrians and, yes, even cyclists for their contribution to the chaos that reigns on many city streets. Automobiles kill far many more people each year than bicycles, but people tend to take car accidents for granted — more of an obstacle on the way to work than a reason to display any real concern for the victims. Meanwhile, cyclists are held with only slightly less contempt than terrorists. And while Weiss defends cyclists as the “Chosen Commuters,” he is quick to add, “that’s not because we’re better. Really, it’s mostly an accident, like getting called for jury duty.” Associated Press Recognizing the almost religious zeal many cyclists In this book cover image released by Chronicle bring to their daily comBooks, “The Enlightened Cyclist,” by Eben Weiss. mute, Weiss has sprinkled

the book with biblical references: Sections include “In the Beginning, There was Irritation ...” ‘’Leviticus Now” and “Genesis.” Weiss even posits that Jesus would have been a cyclist had the technology been available at the time and that the apostle Paul might have been a protobike messenger — an occupation whose noble lineage he traces back to the Greeks’ messenger of the gods, Hermes. He also tries to explain how bikes, cars and pedestrians might all get along better, placing the onus squarely on the biker. “The challenge then is to be the best cyclists we can, to rise above the primal nature of commuting and conquer this Last Frontier of Hostility and Indifference,” he writes, before conceding that this is often easier said than done. Nothing too different from the advice one finds in the actual Bible: Turn the other cheek.

Digital Books

D8 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Associated Press

NEW YORK — The U.S. government filed an antitrust lawsuit against Apple Inc. and book publishers Wednesday, saying the publishers conspired with Apple to raise retail electronic-book prices to limit competition. The government also filed papers in U.S. District Court in Manhattan saying it had reached a settlement

with publishers Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster. It will proceed with its lawsuit against Apple and other publishers, including Holtzbrinck Publishers, doing business as Macmillan, and The Penguin Publishing Co. Ltd., doing business as Penguin Group. The lawsuit said the effort was a response to the success Amazon.com had in selling e-books for just

under $10. The alleged conspiracy came as Apple was preparing to launch the iPad and called for Apple to be guaranteed a 30 percent commission on each e-book it sold, the lawsuit said. “To effectuate their conspiracy, the publisher defendants teamed up with defendant Apple, which shared the same goal of restraining retail price competition in the sale of e-

books,” the lawsuit said. Apple did not immediately respond to a comment request. Macmillan Chief Executive Officer John Sargent said in a letter to authors, illustrators and agents that the company has not settled because it is “hard to settle a lawsuit when you know you have done no wrong.” He said: “Macmillan did not act illegally. Macmillan

did not collude.” Sargent said the filing of the lawsuit came after discussions with the Department of Justice that lasted months. “But the terms the DOJ demanded were too onerous. After careful consideration, we came to the conclusion that the terms could have allowed Amazon to recover the monopoly position it had been building before our switch to

the agency model,” he said. “We also felt the settlement the DOJ wanted to impose would have a very negative and long term impact on those who sell books for a living, from the largest chain stores to the smallest independents.” At the heart of the e-book pricing debate is the industry’s ongoing concerns

• See E-books, D9

By Lisa Clarke

Sentinel Correspondent

April 15 is often a date associated with the stress and pressure of filing tax returns. This year, forget the IRS and don your dancing shoes for an evening with nationally acclaimed electronic rock band, Conspirator. Founded in 2004 by keyboardist Aron Magner and bassist Marc Browenstein, members of the Philadelphia-based band The Disco Biscuits, along with New York DJ/producer DJ Omen, Conspirator is an outlet for the members’ interest in cross-genre electronic music. “Conspirator relies heavily on our pre-production. All of the heavy lifting gets done in the studio. From there we remove the elements that we can physically play on our instruments,” Magner says. “...The more complex artifacts stay in the mix and get triggered from the computer...All the other projects I play in are more instrument and band reliant.” These days, the group also includes guitarist Chris Michetti as well as a rotat-

Submitted photo/Dave Vann

Electronic band Conspirator stops at ABC on April 15 as part of a national tour. ing guest list of some of the country’s best musicians on drums such as Darren Shearer of the New Deal, Mike Greenfield of Lotus, KJ Sawka of Pendulum, and Adam Deitch of Break Science and Pretty Lights to name a few. They are currently on tour supporting their new al-

bum, “Unlocked: Live from the Georgia Theater,” released earlier this week. The schedule includes headlining shows at such illustrious venues as Irving Plaza, The Trocadero, The Orange Peel, Georgia Theater, the Fox Theater among others, and is highly anticipated after their breakout perfor-

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mances in 2011 at such high profile events as the Ultra Music Festival and Nocturnal Festival and other sold out shows nationwide.

“We’re excited about it as its Conspirator first ever live release and really gives the fans a chance to take a piece of us home,” Magner

Gallery

says. “It truly captures the essence of a live show.” The record incorporates their signature blending of electronic dance music with genres such as rock house, dub-step, drum and bass, and electro. With influences as eclectic as Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, Grateful Dead, Hallucinogen, Shpongle, DeadMou5 and Wolfgang Gartner, Magner says that the ease of access to music available today facilitates merging various styles together in his music. “A Conspirator show is always a fun vibe. Clearly I’m biased about our music, but it’s an experience everyone should really check out,” says Magner. “There’s not that many acts out there that incorporate the energy of EDM with a live band ... and we’re really good looking.” Conspirator will perform at the Appalachian Brewing Company, 50 N. Cameron St. in downtown Harrisburg. The show will take place in the upstairs Abbey Bar at 8 p.m, with doors opening at 7 p.m. Guest acts Laser Sex and DJ Master Glass will open for Conspirator. Tickets are $16 in advance, or $18 at the door. All attendees must be age 21 or older. For tickets or more information, visit www. greenbeltevents.com.

Studios

Artist in Action

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U.S. sues Apple, publishers over electronic books

Electronic rock band Conspirator will be playing Appalachian Brewing Co.’s Abbey Bar Sunday. ■

Out & About

Books

Nightlife

D5 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Book Review


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Theatre

By Barbara Trainin Blank ing the show. Sentinel correspondent frontdoor@cumberlink.com

It isn’t easy to tire of “Anything Goes.� Maybe it’s that glorious music — and clever lyrics, he wrote both— by Cole Porter and those stereotypical but nonetheless endearing characters. Billy Crocker is a stowaway on a ship in love with ingenue heiress Hope Harcourt, who’s engaged to Lord Evelyn Oakleigh. Billy gets unexpected help from former “bad girl� turned Evangelist Reno Sweeney (once infatuated with him) and from a gangster named Public Enemy #13, Moonface Martin. Along the way Sweeney learns a thing or two about love. Jim Moyer should know about the appeal of the 1934 musical, which has been revival several times. (The most recent Broadway revival, with Sutton Foster, is ongoing — and won the Tony and Drama Desk Awards for Outstanding Revival of a Musical.) The founder and co-artistic director of Broadway Classics, along with Tom Blaisse, has been involved in several productions of “Anything Goes.� This is the fifth time he is playing Moonface Martin, as well as co-direct-

“This is the kind of show that you can see 100 times,� says Moyer. “It’s pure Americana and refreshing, and the Cole Porter music is refreshing. It’s really about his music.� The popular tunes include “You’re the Top,� “I Get a Kick out of You� and the title song. The Broadway Classics production is based on the “jazzed up� 1962 off-Broadway revival. But “Anything Goes,� Moyer adds, is also about a positive message during difficult times—especially since it was written during the Depression. “This season we decided to do shows of hope, like ‘Anything Goes’ and ‘Annie,’ in the hope times will get better.� Blaisse is portraying Lord Evelyn and co-directing. “We try to keep the veterans involved as well as young performers,� says Moyer, who emphasizes the importance of the youth program to Broadway Classics. The Sweeney of the production, Katie Moyer, is one of the young performers, but one who played the role back in high school. “Reno is extremely confident, and has sex appeal,� says Katie Moyer. “She’s the ideal type of character I like to play — big and bold. It’s

one of the best roles written for a woman.� The role has been played by such famous “belters� as Ethel Merman and Patti LuPone. Moyer loves the “vocal gymnastics� of such songs as “Blow, Gabriel, Blow,� which contrasts with the slow ballad, “I Get a Kick out of You.� Sherri Rowland, who plays gun moll Bonnie and is also choreographer, has also been involved in “Anything Goes� productions several times. The challenge for a choreographer working with cast members of varying levels of dance experience is to “find steps easy enough for novices but also give them showstopping qualities,� Rowland says. Though she enjoys choreographing, playing a part that incorporates both acting and dancing is “bliss� for her. Another “novice� is Miwon Walburn. Usually in charge of publicity and box office, this is the first time she has designed the set. Most of the musical takes place on a ship. “It’s an incredible journey to create real life on stage, then watch it come down,� Walburn says. “Theater really does touch all the emotions. It’s the beauty of escapism — and magic.�

Submitted photo

The cast of “Anything Goes� rehearses a dance routine.

“Anything Goes� runs April 20-May 20 at Broadway Classics Theater, located in the Harrisburg Mall, off Center Court. Show times are Wednesday matinees at 1 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30, and Sundays at 2. Call the box office, 877717-7969, or visit www. BroadwayClassicsPa. com to purchase tickets.

story line exists to bring in the next beautiful song — and a lot of nice dancing. The show is really a pickme-up.�

Get ready to laugh! In Focus

Chagdud Gonpa Harrisburg is hosting

Lama Padma Yontan Gyatso 'SJEBZ "QSJMrQN Saturday, April 28 and 4VOEBZ "QSJMrBNQN Friday topic: What is Buddhism? What is not Buddhism? ($15)

Saturday/Sunday: Developing Sanity in a Confused World ($50 each day) ($90 for full event if registered in advance) However, cost can be negotiated.

at the: Holiday Inn Harrisburg East On Route 441, near the I-283 Interchange Lama Padma is an American-born highly trained Tibetan Buddhist meditator and teacher. He comes to us from Seattle Washington. Contact: pisalijf@verizon.net or jlawr83962@aol.com

The comic duo of Brad Sherwood and Colin Mochrie of ‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ set to perform By Allison Hagerman SENTINEL REPORTER ahagerman@cumberlink.com

Shippensburg University is preparing to laugh the night away on Saturday, April 21 as the H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center plays host to comedians Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood, regular cast members on the hit television show “Whose Line Is It Anyway?� Sherwood, who was born in Chicago and grew up in Santa Fe, N.M., said he has been in show business for many years. “I started acting when I was eight,� he said. Sherwood would later be involved with several television series, but he gained status as one of the national faces of comedy when he joined the improvisational comedy show “Whose Line Is It Anyway?� in the early 1990s. “It was just the most fun you could possibly have in television,� Sherwood said of his experiences on the show. Sherwood said it was the only show where you could “show up, put on a shirt (and then) spend hours just making (everyone) laugh.� At the same time, there was no pressure and a lot of pressure, Sherwood said of doing improv comedy, with no way to really prepare for that kind of show. Then, about eight years ago, around the time the Emmy-nominated “Whose Line Is It Anyway?� series was going into reruns, Sherwood teamed up with castmate Colin Mochrie to do a

touring comedy show. Together, they have had a “very, very long and successful tour,� Sherwood said of the partnership. The show, titled “The Two Man Group Tour,� will be making a stop at Shippensburg University at 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. “The best thing about our show is it’s never the same twice,� Sherwood said, noting that although they play many of the same games, they are “always changing it up.� “We’re getting different audience suggestions. We’re bringing different audience members up on stage,� Sherwood said. Many times, when the tour enters a city for the second or third time, many of the same people come out again, due to the dynamics of the show. Sherwood said they have made stops in some towns multiple times, including doing roughly 16 shows in Milwaukee alone over the years. And traveling with Colin Mochrie seems to be a match made in improv heaven, with no “rock and roll disagreements� going on behind-the-scenes, Sherwood said. “It’s a lot of fun,� he said. “We both get along really well. We’re both sort of shy in our regular lives and we’re really outgoing on stage.� But in addition to getting to work with Mochrie, Sherwood said his favorite part of the business is just “making people laugh.� “When you go into comedy, it’s sort of an addiction (to) getting laughs,� he said. “It becomes a drug. (You become) a vampire of laughter.�

Who: Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood What: “The Two Man Group Tour� Where: H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center, Shippensburg University When: Saturday, April 21 at 8 p.m. Tickets: On sale now, from $29-$45. Tickets can be purchased by calling 477-7469 or online at luhrscenter.com.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

In Focus

Susan De Novas, with Hope, respectively. the help of Devon Pagosic, John Eckert stars as Bilis designing the set. They ly. “The plot is a caricature,� are also in the show — as Mrs. Harcourt Sr., and Jim Moyer says. “But the

Out & About

D6 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Lovely Porter songs connect light plot in ‘Anything Goes’

D7 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center

Broadway Classics


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Theatre

By Barbara Trainin Blank ing the show. Sentinel correspondent frontdoor@cumberlink.com

It isn’t easy to tire of “Anything Goes.� Maybe it’s that glorious music — and clever lyrics, he wrote both— by Cole Porter and those stereotypical but nonetheless endearing characters. Billy Crocker is a stowaway on a ship in love with ingenue heiress Hope Harcourt, who’s engaged to Lord Evelyn Oakleigh. Billy gets unexpected help from former “bad girl� turned Evangelist Reno Sweeney (once infatuated with him) and from a gangster named Public Enemy #13, Moonface Martin. Along the way Sweeney learns a thing or two about love. Jim Moyer should know about the appeal of the 1934 musical, which has been revival several times. (The most recent Broadway revival, with Sutton Foster, is ongoing — and won the Tony and Drama Desk Awards for Outstanding Revival of a Musical.) The founder and co-artistic director of Broadway Classics, along with Tom Blaisse, has been involved in several productions of “Anything Goes.� This is the fifth time he is playing Moonface Martin, as well as co-direct-

“This is the kind of show that you can see 100 times,� says Moyer. “It’s pure Americana and refreshing, and the Cole Porter music is refreshing. It’s really about his music.� The popular tunes include “You’re the Top,� “I Get a Kick out of You� and the title song. The Broadway Classics production is based on the “jazzed up� 1962 off-Broadway revival. But “Anything Goes,� Moyer adds, is also about a positive message during difficult times—especially since it was written during the Depression. “This season we decided to do shows of hope, like ‘Anything Goes’ and ‘Annie,’ in the hope times will get better.� Blaisse is portraying Lord Evelyn and co-directing. “We try to keep the veterans involved as well as young performers,� says Moyer, who emphasizes the importance of the youth program to Broadway Classics. The Sweeney of the production, Katie Moyer, is one of the young performers, but one who played the role back in high school. “Reno is extremely confident, and has sex appeal,� says Katie Moyer. “She’s the ideal type of character I like to play — big and bold. It’s

one of the best roles written for a woman.� The role has been played by such famous “belters� as Ethel Merman and Patti LuPone. Moyer loves the “vocal gymnastics� of such songs as “Blow, Gabriel, Blow,� which contrasts with the slow ballad, “I Get a Kick out of You.� Sherri Rowland, who plays gun moll Bonnie and is also choreographer, has also been involved in “Anything Goes� productions several times. The challenge for a choreographer working with cast members of varying levels of dance experience is to “find steps easy enough for novices but also give them showstopping qualities,� Rowland says. Though she enjoys choreographing, playing a part that incorporates both acting and dancing is “bliss� for her. Another “novice� is Miwon Walburn. Usually in charge of publicity and box office, this is the first time she has designed the set. Most of the musical takes place on a ship. “It’s an incredible journey to create real life on stage, then watch it come down,� Walburn says. “Theater really does touch all the emotions. It’s the beauty of escapism — and magic.�

Submitted photo

The cast of “Anything Goes� rehearses a dance routine.

“Anything Goes� runs April 20-May 20 at Broadway Classics Theater, located in the Harrisburg Mall, off Center Court. Show times are Wednesday matinees at 1 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30, and Sundays at 2. Call the box office, 877717-7969, or visit www. BroadwayClassicsPa. com to purchase tickets.

story line exists to bring in the next beautiful song — and a lot of nice dancing. The show is really a pickme-up.�

Get ready to laugh! In Focus

Chagdud Gonpa Harrisburg is hosting

Lama Padma Yontan Gyatso 'SJEBZ "QSJMrQN Saturday, April 28 and 4VOEBZ "QSJMrBNQN Friday topic: What is Buddhism? What is not Buddhism? ($15)

Saturday/Sunday: Developing Sanity in a Confused World ($50 each day) ($90 for full event if registered in advance) However, cost can be negotiated.

at the: Holiday Inn Harrisburg East On Route 441, near the I-283 Interchange Lama Padma is an American-born highly trained Tibetan Buddhist meditator and teacher. He comes to us from Seattle Washington. Contact: pisalijf@verizon.net or jlawr83962@aol.com

The comic duo of Brad Sherwood and Colin Mochrie of ‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ set to perform By Allison Hagerman SENTINEL REPORTER ahagerman@cumberlink.com

Shippensburg University is preparing to laugh the night away on Saturday, April 21 as the H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center plays host to comedians Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood, regular cast members on the hit television show “Whose Line Is It Anyway?� Sherwood, who was born in Chicago and grew up in Santa Fe, N.M., said he has been in show business for many years. “I started acting when I was eight,� he said. Sherwood would later be involved with several television series, but he gained status as one of the national faces of comedy when he joined the improvisational comedy show “Whose Line Is It Anyway?� in the early 1990s. “It was just the most fun you could possibly have in television,� Sherwood said of his experiences on the show. Sherwood said it was the only show where you could “show up, put on a shirt (and then) spend hours just making (everyone) laugh.� At the same time, there was no pressure and a lot of pressure, Sherwood said of doing improv comedy, with no way to really prepare for that kind of show. Then, about eight years ago, around the time the Emmy-nominated “Whose Line Is It Anyway?� series was going into reruns, Sherwood teamed up with castmate Colin Mochrie to do a

touring comedy show. Together, they have had a “very, very long and successful tour,� Sherwood said of the partnership. The show, titled “The Two Man Group Tour,� will be making a stop at Shippensburg University at 8 p.m. on Saturday, April 21. “The best thing about our show is it’s never the same twice,� Sherwood said, noting that although they play many of the same games, they are “always changing it up.� “We’re getting different audience suggestions. We’re bringing different audience members up on stage,� Sherwood said. Many times, when the tour enters a city for the second or third time, many of the same people come out again, due to the dynamics of the show. Sherwood said they have made stops in some towns multiple times, including doing roughly 16 shows in Milwaukee alone over the years. And traveling with Colin Mochrie seems to be a match made in improv heaven, with no “rock and roll disagreements� going on behind-the-scenes, Sherwood said. “It’s a lot of fun,� he said. “We both get along really well. We’re both sort of shy in our regular lives and we’re really outgoing on stage.� But in addition to getting to work with Mochrie, Sherwood said his favorite part of the business is just “making people laugh.� “When you go into comedy, it’s sort of an addiction (to) getting laughs,� he said. “It becomes a drug. (You become) a vampire of laughter.�

Who: Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood What: “The Two Man Group Tour� Where: H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center, Shippensburg University When: Saturday, April 21 at 8 p.m. Tickets: On sale now, from $29-$45. Tickets can be purchased by calling 477-7469 or online at luhrscenter.com.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

In Focus

Susan De Novas, with Hope, respectively. the help of Devon Pagosic, John Eckert stars as Bilis designing the set. They ly. “The plot is a caricature,� are also in the show — as Mrs. Harcourt Sr., and Jim Moyer says. “But the

Out & About

D6 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Lovely Porter songs connect light plot in ‘Anything Goes’

D7 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center

Broadway Classics


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Bike Snob returns with ‘The Enlightened Cyclist’

Forget taxes and get ready to dance April 15

By MICHAEL ASTOR Associated Press

“The Enlightened Cyclist” (Chronicle Books), by Eben Weiss: “The Enlightened Cyclist” aspires to be a kind of bible for bicycle commuters, who will read it, laugh, weep and identify with almost every detail. It’s also the kind of book that motorists and pedestrians should read but probably won’t, either because they just don’t care and/or because they just outright hate cyclists. Author Eben Weiss understands this. “It’s hard to be truly compassionate if you don’t know what it feels like to be disliked,” he writes. “Cyclists do not have this problem, because nobody likes us. Drivers think we’re smug dorks who slow them down, pedestrians think we’re deadly scofflaws, and neither of them has much trouble imagining a world without us.” Weiss made a name for

himself with his blog, Bike Snob NYC, which attracts a couple of hundred thousand page views each month and boasts some 30,000 followers on its RSS feed. When Weiss began blogging in 2007, bicycling was exploding as an alternate means of transportation in New York and across the nation. The convergence of better bike lanes with the growing fascination of hipsters for brakeless fixed-gear bikes — once exclusively the province of the velodrome — allowed Weiss to surf his way to success, snagging a column in Bicycling magazine as well as a couple of book deals. In his first book, “Bike Snob,” Weiss simultaneously celebrated and skewered bike culture and its attendant absurdities. In “The Enlightened Cyclist,” he shifts his satirical gaze slightly to the joys and indignities of bicycle commuting. Weiss starts by remind-

ing us that all commuters want the same thing: “To be happy, and to not get killed.” Then he details all the ways this goes wrong, ribbing drivers, pedestrians and, yes, even cyclists for their contribution to the chaos that reigns on many city streets. Automobiles kill far many more people each year than bicycles, but people tend to take car accidents for granted — more of an obstacle on the way to work than a reason to display any real concern for the victims. Meanwhile, cyclists are held with only slightly less contempt than terrorists. And while Weiss defends cyclists as the “Chosen Commuters,” he is quick to add, “that’s not because we’re better. Really, it’s mostly an accident, like getting called for jury duty.” Associated Press Recognizing the almost religious zeal many cyclists In this book cover image released by Chronicle bring to their daily comBooks, “The Enlightened Cyclist,” by Eben Weiss. mute, Weiss has sprinkled

the book with biblical references: Sections include “In the Beginning, There was Irritation ...” ‘’Leviticus Now” and “Genesis.” Weiss even posits that Jesus would have been a cyclist had the technology been available at the time and that the apostle Paul might have been a protobike messenger — an occupation whose noble lineage he traces back to the Greeks’ messenger of the gods, Hermes. He also tries to explain how bikes, cars and pedestrians might all get along better, placing the onus squarely on the biker. “The challenge then is to be the best cyclists we can, to rise above the primal nature of commuting and conquer this Last Frontier of Hostility and Indifference,” he writes, before conceding that this is often easier said than done. Nothing too different from the advice one finds in the actual Bible: Turn the other cheek.

Digital Books

D8 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Associated Press

NEW YORK — The U.S. government filed an antitrust lawsuit against Apple Inc. and book publishers Wednesday, saying the publishers conspired with Apple to raise retail electronic-book prices to limit competition. The government also filed papers in U.S. District Court in Manhattan saying it had reached a settlement

with publishers Hachette, HarperCollins and Simon & Schuster. It will proceed with its lawsuit against Apple and other publishers, including Holtzbrinck Publishers, doing business as Macmillan, and The Penguin Publishing Co. Ltd., doing business as Penguin Group. The lawsuit said the effort was a response to the success Amazon.com had in selling e-books for just

under $10. The alleged conspiracy came as Apple was preparing to launch the iPad and called for Apple to be guaranteed a 30 percent commission on each e-book it sold, the lawsuit said. “To effectuate their conspiracy, the publisher defendants teamed up with defendant Apple, which shared the same goal of restraining retail price competition in the sale of e-

books,” the lawsuit said. Apple did not immediately respond to a comment request. Macmillan Chief Executive Officer John Sargent said in a letter to authors, illustrators and agents that the company has not settled because it is “hard to settle a lawsuit when you know you have done no wrong.” He said: “Macmillan did not act illegally. Macmillan

did not collude.” Sargent said the filing of the lawsuit came after discussions with the Department of Justice that lasted months. “But the terms the DOJ demanded were too onerous. After careful consideration, we came to the conclusion that the terms could have allowed Amazon to recover the monopoly position it had been building before our switch to

the agency model,” he said. “We also felt the settlement the DOJ wanted to impose would have a very negative and long term impact on those who sell books for a living, from the largest chain stores to the smallest independents.” At the heart of the e-book pricing debate is the industry’s ongoing concerns

• See E-books, D9

By Lisa Clarke

Sentinel Correspondent

April 15 is often a date associated with the stress and pressure of filing tax returns. This year, forget the IRS and don your dancing shoes for an evening with nationally acclaimed electronic rock band, Conspirator. Founded in 2004 by keyboardist Aron Magner and bassist Marc Browenstein, members of the Philadelphia-based band The Disco Biscuits, along with New York DJ/producer DJ Omen, Conspirator is an outlet for the members’ interest in cross-genre electronic music. “Conspirator relies heavily on our pre-production. All of the heavy lifting gets done in the studio. From there we remove the elements that we can physically play on our instruments,” Magner says. “...The more complex artifacts stay in the mix and get triggered from the computer...All the other projects I play in are more instrument and band reliant.” These days, the group also includes guitarist Chris Michetti as well as a rotat-

Submitted photo/Dave Vann

Electronic band Conspirator stops at ABC on April 15 as part of a national tour. ing guest list of some of the country’s best musicians on drums such as Darren Shearer of the New Deal, Mike Greenfield of Lotus, KJ Sawka of Pendulum, and Adam Deitch of Break Science and Pretty Lights to name a few. They are currently on tour supporting their new al-

bum, “Unlocked: Live from the Georgia Theater,” released earlier this week. The schedule includes headlining shows at such illustrious venues as Irving Plaza, The Trocadero, The Orange Peel, Georgia Theater, the Fox Theater among others, and is highly anticipated after their breakout perfor-

need a ride? Cumberlink.com/autos

mances in 2011 at such high profile events as the Ultra Music Festival and Nocturnal Festival and other sold out shows nationwide.

“We’re excited about it as its Conspirator first ever live release and really gives the fans a chance to take a piece of us home,” Magner

Gallery

says. “It truly captures the essence of a live show.” The record incorporates their signature blending of electronic dance music with genres such as rock house, dub-step, drum and bass, and electro. With influences as eclectic as Led Zeppelin, Van Halen, Grateful Dead, Hallucinogen, Shpongle, DeadMou5 and Wolfgang Gartner, Magner says that the ease of access to music available today facilitates merging various styles together in his music. “A Conspirator show is always a fun vibe. Clearly I’m biased about our music, but it’s an experience everyone should really check out,” says Magner. “There’s not that many acts out there that incorporate the energy of EDM with a live band ... and we’re really good looking.” Conspirator will perform at the Appalachian Brewing Company, 50 N. Cameron St. in downtown Harrisburg. The show will take place in the upstairs Abbey Bar at 8 p.m, with doors opening at 7 p.m. Guest acts Laser Sex and DJ Master Glass will open for Conspirator. Tickets are $16 in advance, or $18 at the door. All attendees must be age 21 or older. For tickets or more information, visit www. greenbeltevents.com.

Studios

Artist in Action

Sandra Blair – Wildlife Artist Saturday, April 14

1 - 4PM

321 Walnut Street, Boiling Springs 717-258-3256 VillageArtisansGallery.com

Wednesday - Saturday 10-6 Sunday 12-5

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

U.S. sues Apple, publishers over electronic books

Electronic rock band Conspirator will be playing Appalachian Brewing Co.’s Abbey Bar Sunday. ■

Out & About

Books

Nightlife

D5 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Book Review


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Red Hot Chili Peppers put best foot forward

Holocaust survivor, 108, shines in book

By DERRIK J. LAN

AP Entertainment Writer

OS ANGELES — Anthony Kiedis had a dream the other night. The 49-year-old frontman of the Red Hot Chili Peppers imagined that he was playing at this year’s Rock and Rock Hall of Fame induction ceremony, and the band’s on-again, offagain guitarist John Frusciante was sitting in the front row. Kiedis is quick to note that this vision won’t become a reality when the 29-year-old group is actually inducted Saturday. “No,” K iedis said in a hushed tone during a break from rehearsing at SIR Studios last month.

“That was just a dream.” “I can’t speak for (Frusciante), but I think it’s kinda like an ex-girlfriend vibe,” added 49-year-old bassist Flea. The current line-up of Flea, Kiedis, drummer Chad Smith and guitarist Josh Klinghoffer will be honored along with past bandmates like late founding member Hillel Slovak, the original Chili Peppers guitarist who died of a drug overdose in 1988, and Frusciante, who replaced Slovak and recorded five albums during his fluid tenure with the group. “We wouldn’t be here without (Slovak) because we wouldn’t have started without him,” said Flea.

Associated Press

Members of the Red Hot Chili Peppers, from left, drummer Chad Smith, bassist Flea, guitarist Josh Klinghoffer and singer Anthony Kiedis. “For him to be honored and recognized is a beautiful thing for us, not that we don’t honor and love him every day, but I feel great for him to go in, as

Music Notes

that will help their children develop fundamental music skills such as singing on pitch. Research has shown that music aids learning, and young children have the most to gain from this. Music has the power to bring families together. Playing a wide variety of music in the home, attending performances and advocating for music education programs in the schools are three specific ways parents can help shape and improve their

children’s future. The Cumberland Singers will be performing a spring concert series this weekend. The ensemble will be performing at 3 p.m. on Sunday, April 15, at Shepherdstown United Methodist Church, 1934 S. York St., Mechanicsburg. The title of the program is “Anything But Quiet! Broadway from 19252011.” The performance is free with a “freewill” offering taken at intermission. For more information, call 367-8030. According to The Cumberland Singers’ website, all ages are welcome at their performances. This is a great opportunity to share music with your children, and bring music into the home.

well as John Frusciante, of course, who gave us so much and did some serious (expletive) rocking.” But the guitarist whose melodies powered songs

group The Small Faces/ The Faces, which featured Rod Stewart and Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie Wood. Other honorees will include late singersongwriter Laura Nyro and blues mastermind Freddie King. Flea likened the induction class of 2012 to a family reunion: He grew up in LA around Steven Adler and Slash of Guns N’ Roses; on the East Coast, the Beastie Boys followed a similarly daring trajectory at the same time as the Chili Peppers; and Wood has served as a father figure to the group. Wood even joined the Chili Peppers in 2009 for their side project, The Insects.

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Associated Press

“A Century of Wisdom: Lessons From the Life of Alice Herz-Sommer, the World’s Oldest Living Holocaust Survivor” (Spiegel & Grau), by Caroline Stoessinger: The strength of Alice Herz-Sommer’s advice lay in its simplicity. Generosity above all, she says. Gratitude is essential for happiness. Complaining never helps. As if her 108 years of experience alone were not enough to coax you, there is the overarching fact that draws people to Herz-Sommer’s story: She survived the Theresienstadt concentration camp and is believed to be the oldest living Holocaust survivor. This isn’t an entirely new story. It was the subject of a 2008 book, “A Garden of Eden in Hell,” and has also inspired a film and varied YouTube clips. But Herz-Sommer’s ability to thrive as a celebrated pianist despite the hor-

ror she experienced is timeless and inspiring, worthy of being told again and again. It is written this time by a fellow pianist, Caroline Stoessinger, who clearly idolizes Herz-Sommer. The centenarian’s life is offered in great detail, from her childhood in Prague, through her wartime imprisonment, to a post-liberation life in Israel, to the one-room London flat where she still practices piano to this day. It also offers a fascinating glimpse of the Holocaust-era relationships between Jews and Nazis. Herz-Sommer tells the author of being brought a warm applesauce cake by a neighbor and her husband, the very man she knew to be a Nazi. The next day, she was sent by the Nazis to Theresienstadt. At the camp, she tells of playing the piano with such skill that a guard thanks her profusely for her performance and promises that Herz-Sommer and her son will be kept safe. Though the author’s reverence for her sub-

ject does shine through, the book suffers at times from a disjointed chronology and writing that can fall flat. We are offered profiles of Herz-Sommer’s students, accounts of her brushes with the famous, even recipes from her kitchen. What we yearn for, though, is for her masterpiece of a life to be illuminated consistently in perfectly lyrical passages. The book is at its finest when Herz-Sommer’s voice is allowed to drive it, not only telling us of her Holocaust experience, but also allowing us a peek at who she is in old age. We find her still animated by the presence of attractive young men, still dishing out advice on love and relationships, still able to distill wonderful morsels of wisdom for visitors. She tells us that music saved her life, that each day is a new miracle. She tells us to treasure time, that each moment is fleeting. And she says that even when she’s surrounded by young people, she feels as if she’s the youngest.

Associated Press

The cover of “A Century of Wisdom: Lessons From the Life of Alice Herz-Sommer, the World’s Oldest Living Holocaust Survivor.”

E-books • Continued from D8 about Amazon. Publishers see the “agency model” as their best, short-term hope against preventing the online retailer from dominating the e-book market and driving down the price of books to a level unsustainable for publishers and booksellers. Since launching the Kindle in 2007, Amazon has made a point of offering best-sellers for $9.99. The discount is so deep from list prices of $20 and more that it’s widely believed Amazon is selling the e-books at a loss as a way of attracting more customers and forcing competitors to lower their prices. Amazon also has been demanding higher discounts from publishers and stopped offering e-books from the Independent Publishers Group, a Chicago-based distributor, after they couldn’t agree to terms. When Apple launched its tablet computer two years ago, publishers saw two ways to balance Amazon’s power:

Associated Press

The U.S. government filed an antitrust lawsuit against Apple Inc. and book publishers Wednesday, saying the publishers conspired with Apple to raise retail electronic-book prices to limit competition. Enough readers would prefer Apple’s shiny tablet over the Kindle to cut into Amazon’s sales and the agency model would stabilize prices. Apple’s iBookstore has yet to become a major force, but

publishers believes the new price model has reduced Amazon’s market share from around 90 percent to around 60 percent, with Barnes & Noble’s Nook in second at 25 percent. The iBookstore

is believed to have 10 to 15 percent. Macmillan’s Sargent has found himself at the heart of the dispute. In early 2010, as publishers were trying to get Amazon to agree to Ap-

ple’s pricing system, Amazon pulled all the listings for Macmillan books, from Jonathan Franzen’s “The Corrections” to Barbara Ehrenreich’s “Nickle and Dimed.” Sargent refused to back down and Amazon eventually gave in. New e-books from Macmillan and the other publishers investigated by the Justice Department often are priced initially between $12.99 and $14.99, with Amazon making a point of noting that the price was set by the publisher. Ironically, publishers usually make less money off the agency model than the traditional one because they receive a smaller percentage of the proceeds. Random House Inc. was the only “big six” publisher not to agree to the agency model in 2010 and was not part of the lawsuit. But the publisher of Dan Brown, John Grisham and others did agree to terms with Apple last year and now must decide whether to keep prices the same, cut them

to keep up with competitors or drop the agency model altogether. Random House spokesman Stuart Applebaum — the only of the big six publishers not involved in the case — said Random would have no comments Wednesday. According to court papers, the settlement agreement reached with three publishers said the companies agreed that for two years they will not restrict, limit or impede an e-book retailer’s ability to set, alter or reduce the retail price of any electronic book. It said the retailers will be able to offer price discounts and other forms or promotions to encourage consumers to buy one or more electronic books. The agreement also calls for the defendants not to enter into any agreement or conspiracy with any electronic-book publisher to raise, stabilize, fix, set or coordinate the retail price or wholesale price of any electronic book.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

D4 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

The benefits of music for families Music is an agent of social change that can help shape future generations. My childhood was filled with music. It wasn’t classical music, and I developed a love for all kinds of music early on that has influenced who I am today. Children absorb so much through observing the adults around them. Music enables memories to be more easily stored. Many of my earliest memories are tied to music in some way. This is just one of many purposes music can have in our lives. What if music isn’t in the home? How does that affect children? There are many curricular programs that help parents introduce music into the home

like “Under the Bridge” and “Californication” is not expected to be a part of the festivities in Cleveland, where the Rock Hall is based. A spokesman for Frusciante, who left the Chili Peppers for a second time in 2009, didn’t return messages seeking comment, but Kiedis and Flea do not anticipate he will be there, and a rep for the ceremony says he is not scheduled to attend. Nonetheless, the group will still be in good company. The Chili Peppers are set to be inducted alongside Los Angeles rockers Guns N’ Roses, New York hip-hop trio Beastie Boys, Scottish folk icon Donovan and British rock

BY MATT SEDENSKY

Books

Music

Book Review

D9 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Music News


“Lose Yourself” from “8 Mile” (2002)

One of the greatest songs ever from one of the greatest movies ever. A favorite from childhood that’s just as moving for grown-ups, it’s full of girlish innocence and melancholy longing. Written by Harold Arlen and E.Y. Harburg, it’s been copied and covered endlessly by singers ranging from Frank Sinatra to Kylie Minogue. Sam Harris became a minor star by belting out a soaring version of it on “Star Search” in the mid-’80s, and Katharine McPhee made it one of her signature tunes on “American Idol.” But of course it will always belong to Judy Garland. She performs it early in the film when she’s still a naive farm girl, before all the tornadic activity and house-dropping that inspire her journey down the

Associated Press

Left: In this 1939 file photo originally released by Warner Bros., Judy Garland portrays Dorothy in a scene from “The Wizard of Oz.” Right: In this film image released by Paramount Pictures, Leonardo DiCaprio, left, and Kate Winslet are shown in a scene from the 3-D version of James Cameron’s romantic epic “Titanic.” yellow brick road.

“When You Wish Upon a Star” from “Pinocchio” (1940) A personal choice, since this is the song my mother supposedly sang to me when I was a baby. Or so goes the lore — I was too young to remember. Written by Leigh Harline and Ned Washington and sung by Cliff Edwards in the voice of perky sidekick Jiminy Cricket, this is probably the greatest song ever to come from a Disney animated movie. It’s certainly the

most identifiable with the studio, since it plays along with the logo before every Disney film. It’s hopeful and earnest and unabashedly sentimental. And like the song that inspired this week’s list, this one will really get stuck in your head. It also provided inspiration for one of the more daring episodes of “Family Guy,” titled “When You Wish Upon a Weinstein.”

“Moon River” from “Breakfast at Tiffany’s” (1961) When Audrey Hepburn

sings it alone on the fire escape of her Manhattan apartment, it’s intimate, sweet and plaintive, an indication of the insecure woman looking for love that she tries to suppress through her glamorous persona and wild nights. When it swells during the film’s climactic conclusion — in an alley in the pouring rain, as Hepburn finds

the cat she cast aside and clutches it to her chest while giving George Peppard a passionate kiss — it’s heartbreaking. I cry every time in a matter of seconds. Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer — they did not screw around. (Chevy Chase also felt prompted to belt out this song during an especially thorough doctor’s exam in “Fletch.”)

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• Sandra Blair, an award-winning wildlife artist will be the “artist in action” at the Village Artisans Gallery April 14 from 1-4 p.m.

Carlisle , 243-4151

• The SHAPE Gallery will hold an art class, “Under the Sea!” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. April 14 and 21 for children age 6 to 12. Cost is $25. For more information email info@shapeart.org or call 532-2559. • The Art Center School and Galleries in Mechanicsburg will hold it’s Spring Open Juried Exhibit April 14 through May 1. The public is invited to attend the opening reception from 5 to 7 p.m. April 14 at the Art Center’s red barn gallery, 18 Artcraft Drive, Mechanicsburg. For more information visit www.mechanicsburgartcenter.com.

The comic duo of Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood will be making a stop in Cumberland County next weekend. The pair, stars of “Whose Line Is It Anyway?” are sure to keep their audience in stiches!

10 N. Pitt St.

MUSIC |D4-5

Thursday, April 12: DJ 10 p.m. Friday, April 13: Band night with “Mad Men” at 9 p.m. Saturday, April 14: DJ 10 p.m. Monday, April 12: Yuengs and Wings Tuesday, April 16: Team trivia at 7 p.m. Wednesday, April 17: Open mic

THEATRE | D6

at 8 p.m.

Fans of Cole Porter’s songs will find much to love in Broadway Classics’ upcoming producation of “Anything Goes.”

Appalachian Brewing Company

• Gabriel Horkowitz’s “Watercolor Works” will be on display from April 14 through May 5 at the Art Market of Pomfret St, 16 W. Pomfret St., Carlisle. An opening reception will be from 4 to 6 p.m. April 14. For more information call 960-9201.

Harrisburg, 221-1080

• Exploring the Senses: Beyond the Frame will be on display through April 14 at the Trout Gallery at Dickinson College. Call 245-1344.

Thursday, April 12: The Front Bottoms at 7 p.m. Friday,

• Karen Good will be demonstrating how to decorate Pysanka or Ukrainian Easter eggs from noon to 5 p.m. April 14 in the Anderson reading Room of the New Cumberland Public Library. • “Perry County Home” by Chris Lyter will be on display at the PCCA Gallery through April 18. • “Contextualized” by Kentucky ceramic artist Anthony Wolking will be on display April 17 through May 5 at Dickinson College’s Goodyear Gallery. Call 245-1714. • “Landscapes of Conflict: Photos by Shai Krember, Bart Michiels and Osamu James Nakagawa” will be on display through April 20 at the Pennsylvania College of Art and Design in Lancaster. Pcad.edu/maingallery. • CASD Student Art Show will be at the Carlisle Arts Learning Center, through April 21. An opening reception will be held from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Friday, March 30. • “Haiti — A Nation’s Persistence,” an exhibit by photojournalist Keely Kernan, will be on display through April 27 at Shippensburg University. An artist’s reception will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 9 in the library, followed by a talk by Kernan at 7:30 p.m. in Old Main Chapel. • Artwork by David Cubie will be on display in the Charley Krone Gallery at the New Cumberland Public Library through the month of April. • The Perry County Council of the Arts will host “Drawing the Line” through May 24 at Landis House, 67 N. Fourth St., Newport, www.perrrycountyarts.org.

Electronic-rock band Conspirator is set to perform at the Abbey Bar this weekend as part of their national tour. Music Notes covers the benefits of music to the family and early childhood education.

alibispirits.com

BOOKS | D8-9

50 N. Cameron St.

“The Enlighted Cyclist,” a bible for bicycle commuters will make enthusiasts laugh and cry. The federal government is adding Apple to its list of lawsuits over e-books and unfair pricing. Also, see a review of 108-year-old Holocaust survivor Alice Herz-Sommer’s memoirs.

www.abcbrew.com

April 13: Funky Friday Dance party with host David Dye at 4 p.m.; Les Raquet & Matuto (post XPN party) 9 p.m. Saturday, April 14: Funk Ark, 9 p.m. Sunday, April 15: Con-

MOVIES | D10-12

spirator with guests Laser Sex, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April

“Cabin in the Woods” is a must see according to AP movie critic who says the film is “frightfully clever.” And, take a step back in time with a glance at five of the best Oscar winners for original songs. Also, see what else is playing on the big screen this weekend and at area theaters.

18: Sister Sparrow & The Dirty Birds, 7:30 p.m.

Gullifty’s Underground 1104 Carlisle Road Camp Hill, 761-6692 www.gulliftys.net Friday, April 13: Friday The 13th Mayhem: Requiem, 8:30 to Movie Review

9 p.m.; Shredfyre, 9:20 to 9:55 p.m.; Shatter‘Cabin’ X, 10:15 to 10:45 is frightfully clever p.m.; The Ok Rivals, 11:05 to 11:45 p.m.; Hiding Scarlett, By CHRISTy LEMIRE AP Movie CritiC

Stop reading this review right now. Go see “The Cabin in the Woods,” then come back and we can have a conversation about it. Just trust me on this. The less you know going into it, the better. We can say this much: The hype is justified. And that’s saying something when we’re talking about geek god Joss Whedon, who produced and co-wrote the script with director Drew Goddard, a veteran of such revered TV shows as “Lost” and Whedon’s own “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” Goddard makes his directing debut with this long-awaited film (he also previously wrote “Cloverfield”) but he keeps all the moving parts humming along with thrilling fluidity and ease. So yes, “The Cabin in the Woods” is as good as you’ve heard, or at least as good as you’ve hoped it would be, because it walks a very difficult line and manages to find the right tone pretty much the entire time. Anyone can try to be subversive. Anyone can spoof and parody and wink at the camera in making fun of a specific genre, especially one like horror in which the conventions are so deeply ingrained and staying a couple steps ahead of the characters is part of the fun. But the trick is to avoid going overboard and to play it somewhat straight. The “Scream” movies in the 1990s were super-meta and cutesy and knowing, with characters who were all-too aware of the rules of a horror movie and their roles within that structure. “The Cabin in the Woods” affectionately toys with the

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Section D April 12, 2012

EntErtainmEnt in thE hEart of thE midstatE

This heavenly show is filled with nostolgic hits of the 50’s and 60’s rock & roll, show tunes and dance music. You will love the songs, such as; Three Coins in the Fountain, Sixteen Tons, Rags to Riches, Love is a Many Splendored Thing, No Not Much, plus many many more! You will be glad you didn’t miss this sweet show.

Associated Press/Lionsgate

“Cabin” may not win over any new converts to the horror genre, but it’ll certainly make the faithful feel fervent all over again. “The Cabin in the Woods,” a Lionsgate release, is rated R for strong bloody horror violence and gore, language, drug use and some sexuality/nudity. Running time: 95 minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.

Happenings! April 12 - Girlfriends Nite Out April 18 - Red Hat Ladies Matinee May 6 - “Jazz Me” Jazz and Blues Band May 23 thru June 24 - Gas Savers Getaway Check our website for details and other happenings at allenberry.com

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Saturday, April 14: 2nd Annual Spring Brew Haha from 1 to 4 p.m. with entertainment by Seldom Said No Friday, April 20: Hopfest, enjoy all hoppy beers on draft and in specialty in bottles Sunday, April 22: Cricket Dart Tournamanet at 5:30 p.m.

ANNIVERSARY Opening April 11 thru May 6

Kristen Connolly is shown in a scene from “The Cabin in the Woods.” him a star), the bookishbut-sexy Holden (Jesse Williams), wisecracking stoner Marty (Fran Kranz, who gets the best lines of the group) and the wholesome Dana (Kristen Connolly). Because they are good-looking college archetypes, they must drink beer, smoke weed, undress and cavort; it heightens their vulnerability. Stop me if you think you’ve heard this one before. From the character descriptions alone, you can probably determine who’s going to get it and in what order. But wait, there’s also a parallel story line involving Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford as midlevel managers at some sort of sterile research lab who kill time one-upping each other with deadpan gallows humor. As Goddard and Whedon jump back and forth, the pieces snap into place; then just when you think you’ve got it all figured out, they throw something else at you.

64 th

Theatre Season

12:05 p.m. to 1 a.m. Saturday, April 14: Lucid, 8 p.m. familiarity of certain types and plot points but it also dares to take a step back and examine why we need to return to these sorts of films, why we love to laugh and jump, why we hunger for carnage and thirst for blood. This probably makes “Cabin” sound like some sort of analytical, eggheady thesis, and while it is extremely clever and intelligent, it also could not be more fun. It pays homage to the kinds of frights horror fans know and love while managing to provide surprises and twists, layers upon layers, over and over again. It’s humorously selfaware without being smugly sarcastic; again, a tough balance to strike. Let’s quickly touch upon plot and then get out: Five friends go away for the weekend to a remote cabin by a lake. There’s party-girl Jules (Anna Hutchison), her jock boyfriend Curt (Chris Hemsworth, who made this film before “Thor” made

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Comic duo

‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ stars to appear at Luhrs Center

On the cover: ‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ stars Colin Mochrie and Brad Sherwood to perform at Luhrs Center in Shippensburg.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

D10 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

“Over the Rainbow” from “The Wizard of Oz” (1939)

So damn catchy. Such vivid visuals. And so crucial to the story as an exploration of the main character’s fears and ambitions. Who knows whether Eminem can actually act, but he did a great job of playing a version of himself here in Curtis Hanson’s drama about an aspiring rapper battling his demons as he struggles to make it out of his working-class Detroit neighborhood. I love what an unconventional choice this was for the Academy (and I pondered “It’s Hard Out Here for a Pimp” from “Hustle & Flow” as one of my five selections this week for the same reason). And I think it’s hilarious that forever more, we can describe Eminem as Academy Award winner Marshall Mathers.

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He’s a bad mother ... so how do you NOT choose this song among the top five? It has such great energy and is such a fabulously funky reflection of its time: the horns, the driving chicka-chicka, the staccato strings. Isaac Hayes is at his smooth, soulful best here, crooning lyrics that seemed so racy in their day about Richard Roundtree’s character, “the black private dick that’s a sex machine to all the chicks.” This was a bold pick from the Academy, and it made Hayes the first black person to win an Academy Award outside of the acting categories. Can you dig it?

LOS ANGELES — It’s been stuck in my head for weeks like a psychotic episode: “My Heart Will Go On,” Celine Dion’s big, bombastic ballad from “Titanic.” Now that James Cameron has finally released the 3-D redo of his 1997 shipwreck epic — the winner of 11 Academy Awards, including best original song — it still won’t go away. It goes on ... and on ... But we’re all about turning a negative into a positive around here, so we’re using this as an opportunity to talk about five other great winners of the best original song Oscar. There are dozens to choose from so you’ll have some favorites of your own, but these are sure to keep you humming along:

Art

Movies

AP Movie Critic

OUT & ABOUT |D7

A look at local nightlife

D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

“Theme From ‘Shaft’” (1971)

By CHRISTY LEMIRE

Inside

Out & About

Movies

Five great winners of the best original song Oscar

A guide to area events

The Scene

D3 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Movies & Music


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Special Events

Theater

Music

• “Writers, Illustrators, and Publishing Group of South Central Pennsylvania” will hold a meeting at 6:30 p.m. April 12 at the Shippensburg Public Library Annex, 73 W. King St. For more information contact John Graham at john@nosweetsforsanta.com.

• Wilson College Drama Club to present “Gallathea” at 7:30 p.m. April 13 and 14 in Laird Hall. Admission is free, donations appreciated. For more information contact Richard Shoap at 264-4011 or richard.shoap@wilson.edu.

• Newville Common Ground coffee house will be hosting open mic/stage night from 6 to 9 p.m. on Fridays. The coffee house is located at 2 W. Big Spring Ave., Newville. For more information visit www.newvilleground. com or call 776-1156.

• Dickinson College’s improvisation group, Run With It!, will perform its final show of the year at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 14 in the Anita Tuvin Schlechter Auditorium. For more information email, lidardc@dickinson.edu.

• Adams County School of Musical Theatre will present “Godspell” at 7 p.m. April 13 and 14 and at 2 p.m. April 14 and 15 at the school, 49 York St., Gettysburg. Reserved seating tickets are $11. For more information visit www.acsmt.org or call 334-2692.

• Cumberland County Historical Society will present a Civil War walking tour at 10 a.m. Saturday, April 14. Cost is $8 for members and $12 for nonmembers. The tour will meet at the historical society building, 21 N. Pitt St., Carlisle. For reservations or more information call Lynda Mann at 249-7610 or email, program@historicalsociety.com. • Dickinson College will present “Astrofest” from 6:30 to 10:30 p.m. on Saturday, April 14 in Tome Hall. The event includes several planetarium shows, astronomy demonstrations and roof-top observing. The event is free and open to the public. For more information email astro@dickinson.edu. • The Shippensburg University Asian American Organization will host “The Asian Extravaganza: Celebrating the Year of the Dragon” from 4 to 6 p.m. April 14 in the Ceddia Union Building. • The York County Heritage Trust will present “homebrew workshops” April 14 and May 2. Cost is $70. Call 848-1587 for more information. • Susquehanna Mysteries Alliance will present “Titanic: What Lies Beneath” event at 2 p.m. April 15 at the Mechanicsburg Mystery Bookshop in Mechanicsburg, 6 Clouser Road. For more information call 795-7470 or email mysterybooks@comcast.net. • Pat’s Singles Club will hold a dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Sunday, April 15, at the Valencia Ballroom, York. The Headliners will provide the dance music. Cost is $10.

• Dickinson College will host an opening reception for its new exhibit, “The Titanic and Cultural Memory: A Centennial Exhibit” at 6 p.m. Monday, April 16 in the Archives and Special Collections of the WaidnerSpahr Library. The event is free and open to the public. The exhibit will run through June 15. For more information call 245-1399. • Dickinson College will host internationally-acclaimed Mexican-American poet Tino Villanueva who will present a poetry reading at 7 p.m. on Monday, April 16 in the great room of the Stern Center. The event is free and open to the public. Select copies of Villaneuva’s books will be available for purchase at the event. For more information call 245-1277.

• Gamut Theatre will present an improv show featuring ShawnMikael(s) and Harrisburg natives T.M.I. at 7:30 p.m. on April 15 at the Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor of Strawberry Square in Harrisburg. • The Hershey Theatre presents “Memphis” from Tuesday, April 10 through Sunday, April 15. Tickets are $25 to $80. For more information visit hersheytheatre.com or ticketmaster. com. • Encore! Home School Productions will present Agatha Christie’s “Appointment with Death” at 7 p.m. April 19 to 21 and at 3 p.m. April 22 at Trinity High School. For tickets visit www.showtix4u.com or call (866)967-8167. • Messiah College to perform “The Miracle Worker,” at 8 p.m. April 19 to 21 and at 3 p.m. April 22. For more information or to order tickets call 691-6036 or email tickets@messiah. edu. • The Central Pennsylvania Youth Ballet presents “Giselle” at 1 and 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 21 and at 2 p.m. Sunday, April 22 at the Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts. For tickets or more information call 214-ARTS or whitakercenter.org. • Gamut Theatre Group will hold its “9th Annual Shakespeare’s Birthday Celebration,” from 4 to 7 p.m. April 22. Tickets are $100 and $150. For more information, www.gamutplays.org. • Oyster Mill Playhouse will hold auditions for an upcoming comedy, “Play On!” at 7 p.m. on April 22 and 23. For more information visit www.oystermill.com. • The Popcorn Hat Players presents “Emperor’s New Clothes,” Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10:15 a.m. and Saturdays at 1 p.m. May 2 through May 24. Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are $5-$8. Visit www.gamutplays.org or call 238-4111.

• The Cumberland Singers will be performing “Anything But Quiet,” broadway music from 1925 to 2011, April 13 through 17. For more information visit www.cumberlandsingers.org or call 367-8030. • Beck and Benedict Hardware will present the Carroll County Ramblers and the Patuxent Partners Bluegrass Band at 7 p.m., 118 Walnut St., Waynesboro. Admission is $13, children under 12 are free. For more information call 762-4711 or visit www.beck-benedicthardware.com. • Tommy Stinson and his band will perform at 9 p.m. Saturday, April 14 at the Spy Club, 234 N. 2nd St. Tickets are $10 and $12 and you must be 21 or older. • The Seven Mountains Bluegrass Association will present the Little Roy and Lizzie Show at 7 p.m. April 14 at the Goodwill Fire Co., 2318 S. Queen St., York. Fore more information visit www.sevenmountainsbluegrass.org. • The Susquehanna Valley Theatre Organ Society will present “Pipes and Voices Sing in Spring” featuring Jonathan Ortloff at 3 p.m. April 15, at the Capitol Theatre, York. Cost is $15 for adults and $13 for seniors and students. Visit www.SVTOS.org or www.facebook. com/SVTOS. • Gettysburg College will present a concert of latin jazz at 8:15 p.m. on April 18 at the College Union Building’s Junction. • Midtown Scholar will present Begger’s Ride and Carolann Solebello at 8 p.m. April 21. A donation of $10 is suggested. For more information visit www.midtownscholar.com • The Wednesday Club will hold auditions for performing membership on April 21 at Chapel Hill Church, Camp Hill. Application deadline is April 16. For more information call 571-5189 or visit www.wednesdayclub.org. • The Kim Thompson Group featuring guitarist Mike Moreno will perform at 6 p.m. at the Sheraton Harrisburg Hershey Hotel, 4650 Lindle Road, Harrisburg, on April 22.

Event information can be submitted via email to frontdoor@cumberlink.com, by mail, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013 or by fax at 243-3121. For more information, visit www.cumberlink.com/entertainment

21 Jump Street (R) Thu.-Thu. 10:55 a.m., 1:15, 4, 7:15, 9:50 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 12, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:25, Fri.-Thu. 12, 4:50, 7:20 American Reunion (R) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:25, 7, 9:40 The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:50, 5:30, 7:45, 10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 10:50 a.m., 12:45, 2:45, 4:45, 6:40, 8:35 Friends with Kids (R) Thu. 7:05, 9:45 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 10:20 a.m., 11 a.m., 1:10, 2:10, 4:20, 5:20, 7:25, 8:30, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 11 a.m., 1:10, 2:10, 4:20, 5:20, 7:25, 8:30 Jeff, Who Lives at Home (R) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 1:30, 3:20, 5:30, 7:50, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 2:30, 9:30 John Carter 2D (PG-13) Thu. 12:30, 9:30 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:25, 3:40 Lockout (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 2:20, 4:40, 7:10, 9:45 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu.-Thu. 11:10 a.m., 1:40, 4:10, 6:45, 9:10 Safe House (R) Thu. 3:45, 6:50 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 3:30, 7:35 The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:30, 3:45, 6:50, 9:20 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Thu. 2, 7:10, Fri.-Thu. 2, 7:05 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:40 a.m., 4:30, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 4:30, 9:35

Flagship Cinemas 4590 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:40, 10:05 American Reunion (R) Thu.-Thu. 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10 The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri.-Thu. 12:50, 3:10, 5:30, 7:50, 10:10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2, 6:40

Continued next column

Flagship continued

Great Escape continued

Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu. 4:20, 9 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 12:10, 1, 3:20, 4, 6:30, 8, 9:30, Fri.-Thu. 12:10, 3:20, 6:30, 9:30 Lockout (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40, 9:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu. 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:30, 5:10, 7:30, 10 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 4:10, 8:10, Fri.-Thu. 12:30, 4:25, 8:20 The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9:10 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12:05, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20, Fri.-Thu. 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40

Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3:30, 4:30, 7:30, 8:30, Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:15, 3:30, 4:15, 7:30, 8:15 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Thu. 12:20, 2:50, 5:10, 7:45, 10, Fri.-Thu. 2:50, 7:45 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 7:10, 9:30

Great Escape 3501 Paxton St. 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 2, 3:45, 4:40, 7:15, 9:10, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 11:25 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:15, 9:50 American Reunion (R) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:25, 4, 5, 7, 7:40, 9:40, 10:10, Fri.-Thu. 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 4:45, 7:30, 10:05 Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:40, 5, 6:50, 7:40, 9:10, 10:10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:30, 3:50, 6:50, 9, Fri.-Thu. 11:20, 1:30, 3:50 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:10, 12:50, 1:40, 2:40, 3:40, 4:50, 6:30, 7, 8, 9:35, 10:05, Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 2:35, 4:50, 6:30, 7:55, 9, 9:45 Lockout (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 12:30, 2:10, 4:35, 5:10, 7, 9:20, 10 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:45, 2:15, 4:15, 4:45, 6:45, 7:20, 9:15, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:15 A Thousand Words (PG-13) Thu. 12:40, 6:40 Three Stooges (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 12:15, 1:30, 2:30, 3:45, 4:45, 6:30, 7:20, 9:35

Continued next column

Regal Carlisle Commons 8 Noble Boulevard 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 1:50, 4:40, 7:10, Fri.-Sun. 2:05, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50, Mon.-Thu. 2:05, 4:40, 7:10 American Reunion (R) Thu. 2:10, 5:10, 7:50, Fri.-Sun. 1:55, 4:30, 7:40, 10:20, Mon.-Thu. 1:55, 4:30, 7:40 The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri. 2:55, 5:20, 8, 10:30, Sat.-Sun. 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 8, 10:30, Mon.-Thu. 2:55, 5:20, 8 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 2, 4:20, 6:50 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 1:15, 3:30, 4:30, 7, 7:40, Fri. 3:50, 7, 10:10 Lockout (PG-13) Fri. 2:35, 5:10, 7:50, 10:15, Sat.-Sun. 12:05, 2:35, 5:10, 7:50, 10:15, Mon.-Thu. 2:35, 5:10, 7:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu. 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu. 2:30, 6:40, Fri. 4:15, 8:15, Sat.-Sun. 12:10, 4:15, 8:15, Mon.-Thu. 4:15, 8:15 The Three Stooges (PG) Fri. 2:45, 5, 7:20, 9:40, Sat.-Sun. 12:20, 2:45, 5, 7:20, 9:40, Mon.-Thu. 2:45, 5, 7:20 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu. 2:30, 5, 7:30, Fri. 2:25, 4:50, 7:30, 10, Sat.-Sun. 12, 2:25, 4:50, 7:30, 10, Mon.-Thu. 2:25, 4:50, 7:30

Carlisle Theatre 44 W. High St., Carlisle The Artist (PG-13) Thu. 7:30 A Separation (PG-13) Fri.-Sat. 7:30, Sun. 2, Wed.-Thu. 7:30

Regal Harrisburg 14 1500 Caughey Drive 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 2, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10, Fri.-Thu. 1:30, 4:10, 6:50, 10 American Reunion (R) Thu. 11:45 a.m., 1:20, 2:20, 4, 5, 6:40, 7:40, 9:20, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 1:40, 2:40, 4:20, 5:20, 7, 8, 9:40, 10:40 The Cabin in the Woods (R) Fri.-Thu. 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 12:30, 3:40, 6:30, 8:40, Fri.-Thu. 1, 3:10, 5:30 Housefull 2 (NR) Thu. 1:10, 4:45, 8:10, Fri.-Thu. 8:10 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 12, 1, 3:10, 4:10, 6:20, 7:20, 9:30, 10:30, Fri.-Thu. 12:50, 3, 4, 6:10, 7:10, 9:20, 10:20 Lockout (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 2:10, 5, 7:40, 10:10 The Metropolitan Opera: La Traviata (NR) Sat. 12:55 Mirror Mirror (PG) Thu. 12:50, 1:50, 3:30, 4:30, 6:10, 7:10, 8:50, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 1:10, 3:50, 6:30, 9:10 October Baby (PG-13) Thu. 1:30, 4:25, 7, 10 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:40 a.m., 12:40, 3:50, 4:50, 8, 9, Fri.Thu. 12:40, 2:50, 4:50, 7:30, 9 The Three Stooges (PG) Fri.-Thu. 1:20, 2:20, 3:40, 4:40, 6:20, 7:20, 8:50, 9:50 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Thu. 1:40, 4:20, 6:50, 9:40 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 5:10, 7:50, 10:40, Fri.Thu. 1:50, 4:15, 6:40, 9:30

Midtown Cinema The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 2:50, 6:50 Jeff Who Lives at Home (R) Thu. 3:05, 5:25, 7:35 The Raid: Redemption (NR) Fri.-Sun. 3, 5:20, 7:30, Mon.-Wed. 3, 5:20, Thu. 3, 5:20, 7:30 Salmon Fishing in Yemen (PG-13) Thu. 3, 5:20, 7:30, Fri.-Sun. 3:05, 5:25, 7:40, Mon.-Wed. 3:05, 5:25, Thu. 3:05, 5:25, 7:40 We Need to Talk About Kevin (R) Fri.-Sun. 2:50, 5:15, 7:35, Mon.-Wed. 2:50, 5:15, Thu. 2:50, 5:15, 7:35

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

• The Penn-Cumberland Garden Club will hold its 48th annual Bertha P. Reppert Herb Tea from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Monday, April 16 at the Camp Hill Borough Hall, 2145 Walnut St., Camp Hill. Editor of “The Essential Herbal Magazine,” Tina Sams will be the guest speaker. There is a small fee and reservations are required. To register call Pauline Neal 761-4487 and for more information visit www.penncumberlandgarden.org.

• Gamut Theatre Group’s Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Jungle Book” at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at the Whitaker Center’s Sunoco Theatre, Harrisburg. Cost is $15.

• Crimson Frog Coffeehouse presents: Poetic Perkolations, April 12; Open mic with Jonathan Frazier, April 13; 2nd Look, April 15; Marie Smith, April 16; Tom Swartchick, April 22; Poetic Perkolations, April 26; Open mic with Jonathan Frazier, April 27; Justin Jans, April 29; and House Exit, April 30. For more information email mp.hooper@gmail.com.

Cinema Center of Camp Hill 3431 Simpson Ferry Road

Movies

Out & About

• The Shippensburg Swing Band will host a “Swing into Spring” dance from 7 to 10 p.m. Saturday, April 14 at the Thought Lot, 37 E. Garfield St. Tickets are $10. For more information visit shipband.org.

D2 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Now showing

D11 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Out & About


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Movies D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, April 12, 2012

Movie Review

‘Cabin’ is frightfully clever By CHRISTY LEMIRE AP Movie Critic

Stop reading this review right now. Go see “The Cabin in the Woods,” then come back and we can have a conversation about it. Just trust me on this. The less you know going into it, the better. We can say this much: The hype is justified. And that’s saying something when we’re talking about geek god Joss Whedon, who produced and co-wrote the script with director Drew Goddard, a veteran of such revered TV shows as “Lost” and Whedon’s own “Buffy the Vampire Slayer.” Goddard makes his directing debut with this long-awaited film (he also previously wrote “Cloverfield”) but he keeps all the moving parts humming along with thrilling fluidity and ease. So yes, “The Cabin in the Woods” is as good as you’ve heard, or at least as good as you’ve hoped it would be, because it walks a very difficult line and manages to find the right tone pretty much the entire time. Anyone can try to be subversive. Anyone can spoof and parody and wink at the camera in making fun of a specific genre, especially one like horror in which the conventions are so deeply ingrained and staying a couple steps ahead of the characters is part of the fun. But the trick is to avoid going overboard and to play it somewhat straight. The “Scream” movies in the 1990s were super-meta and cutesy and knowing, with characters who were all-too aware of the rules of a horror movie and their roles within that structure. “The Cabin in the Woods” affectionately toys with the

Allenberry Playhouse presents the

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Opening April 11 thru May 6

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The Sentinel www.cumberlink.com

Section D April 12, 2012

Entertainment in the heart of the midstate

This heavenly show is filled with nostolgic hits of the 50’s and 60’s rock & roll, show tunes and dance music. You will love the songs, such as; Three Coins in the Fountain, Sixteen Tons, Rags to Riches, Love is a Many Splendored Thing, No Not Much, plus many many more! You will be glad you didn’t miss this sweet show.

Associated Press/Lionsgate

Kristen Connolly is shown in a scene from “The Cabin in the Woods.” familiarity of certain types and plot points but it also dares to take a step back and examine why we need to return to these sorts of films, why we love to laugh and jump, why we hunger for carnage and thirst for blood. This probably makes “Cabin” sound like some sort of analytical, eggheady thesis, and while it is extremely clever and intelligent, it also could not be more fun. It pays homage to the kinds of frights horror fans know and love while managing to provide surprises and twists, layers upon layers, over and over again. It’s humorously selfaware without being smugly sarcastic; again, a tough balance to strike. Let’s quickly touch upon plot and then get out: Five friends go away for the weekend to a remote cabin by a lake. There’s party-girl Jules (Anna Hutchison), her jock boyfriend Curt (Chris Hemsworth, who made this film before “Thor” made

him a star), the bookishbut-sexy Holden (Jesse Williams), wisecracking stoner Marty (Fran Kranz, who gets the best lines of the group) and the wholesome Dana (Kristen Connolly). Because they are good-looking college archetypes, they must drink beer, smoke weed, undress and cavort; it heightens their vulnerability. Stop me if you think you’ve heard this one before. From the character descriptions alone, you can probably determine who’s going to get it and in what order. But wait, there’s also a parallel story line involving Richard Jenkins and Bradley Whitford as midlevel managers at some sort of sterile research lab who kill time one-upping each other with deadpan gallows humor. As Goddard and Whedon jump back and forth, the pieces snap into place; then just when you think you’ve got it all figured out, they throw something else at you.

“Cabin” may not win over any new converts to the horror genre, but it’ll certainly make the faithful feel fervent all over again. “The Cabin in the Woods,” a Lionsgate release, is rated R for strong bloody horror violence and gore, language, drug use and some sexuality/nudity. Running time: 95 minutes. Three and a half stars out of four.

Happenings! April 12 - Girlfriends Nite Out April 18 - Red Hat Ladies Matinee May 6 - “Jazz Me” Jazz and Blues Band May 23 thru June 24 - Gas Savers Getaway Check our website for details and other happenings at allenberry.com

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‘Whose Line Is It Anyway?’ stars to appear at Luhrs Center


Alive - entertainment Section  

April 12, 2012

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