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BROADWAY63 Years! to Central Pennsylvania FOREVER PLAID April 11 - May 6, 2012

A Heavenly Musical with a mix of 50’s and 60’s Rock and Roll, Show Tunes and Dance Music. The charming story of four young men who meet an early death, but get one last chance to entertain, providing their spirits still live on!

SIX TIME TONY AWARD WINNER CHICAGO August 15 - September 16, 2012 The “Razzle Dazzel” Dance Sensation that rocks the nation. Chicago in the late 1920’s brings in “All That Jazz”, “Hot Honey Rag”, and “Chicago After Midnight”. One of Broadways great musicals.

Out & About

HONKY TONK ANGELS May 9 - June 24, 2012 The story of three women who dream of becoming country music stars and meet on the bus to Nashville. The show features many country music classics, including “Stand By Your Man,”“9 to 5,” and “These Boots Are Made For Walking.”

D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

is bound to be one of your “favorite things!”

For reservations, call

www.cumberlink.com

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www.cumberlink.com

March 22, 2012 Section D March 29, 2012

INSIDE••• West Shore to INSIDE••• hold its ‘Taste of ‘Talk Radio’ hits Chamber’ with Open Stage in plenty of food to mid-April ••• D6 please ••• D4

The longest running Broadway Revue in history! Featuring hits like “On Broadway,” “Fools Fall in Love,”“Jailhouse Rock,” Spanish Harlem,”“Poison Ivy,”“Hound Dog,”“Stand By Me,” and many more!

ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S THE 39 STEPS October 17 - November 10, 2012

An award-winning amusing musical offering tart quips with a clerical slant. Featuring star turns, tap and ballet dancing, an audience quiz, and comic surprises, this show has become an international phenomenon. A very funny musical.

The melodious and inspiring true story of the Von Trapp Family Singers, set against the panorama of the Austrian Alps. Features “Climb Every Mountain,”“Edelweiss,”“Do-Re-Me,”“So Long, Farewell,” and more. This classic family musical

Entertainment in the Entertainment in the heart of the midstate heart of the midstate

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SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE September 19 - October 14, 2012

NUNSENSE May 23 - July 8, 2012

ROGERS & HAMMERSTEIN’S THE SOUND OF MUSIC July 11 - Aug. 12, 2012

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ALIVE

The Sentinel The Sentinel The Sentinel TheSection Sentinel D

Broadways most intriguing, most thrilling, most riotous comedy smash! The mind blowing cast plays over 150 characters in this fast-paced tale of an ordinary man on an extroordinarily entertaining adventure. Using ingenious theatrical invention, this production is an engaging, fast-paced whodunit that celebrates the magic of theatre. Tony award winner and recent broadway hit.

A BOOGIE WOOGIE CHRISTMAS November 14 - December 23, 2012 Allenberry audiences know how much the Piper family loves Christmas. Why, you’ve seen the Pipers save Christmas from catastrophe numerous times and even celebrate a wedding at the North Pole! But did you know that Christmas

has been a special time for the Pipers for several generations?

717.258.3211 www.allenberry.com

Give a gift they will never forget!

1559 Boiling SpringS road Boiling SpringS, pa

‘The Arsonists’ Hot play set to sizzle on the Mathers Theatre stage ••• D7


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Special Events

Theater

Music

• McGinley School of Irish Dance will present a mixed-media production with traditional Irish dance and other performances, at 7 p.m. March 31 at the Forum in Harrisburg. Tickets are $15 and $18. For more information call 439-2991 or visit www.mcginleyirishdancers.com.

• The Lions Community Theater will present “Annie” March 29-31 at 7:30 p.m. and March 31 at 2 p.m. at Shaull Elementary School. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for students. For more information or to order tickets call 582-2037.

• The Crimson Frog Coffeehouse presents open mic with Jonathan Frazier on March 28 and Herr Street on March 31.

• Comedian Brett Butler to perform at the Strand-Capitol Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. March 30. For more information visit www.StrandCapitol.org or call 846-1111.

• Gamut Classic Theatre will present “Speakeasy: A 1920s Cabaret” at 7:30 p.m. on March 30 and 31 at the theatre at Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are between $17 and $40.

• Metropolitan Area Dance Club will host a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. on March 31 at the PA Dance Sport Ballroom in Hummelstown. For more information call 774-2171.

• Cumberland Valley High School presents “Legally Blonde: The Musical” at 7:30 p.m. March 29 through 31 and at 2 p.m. April 1. For tickets call 506-3936. Tickets are $10 for students and $12 for adults.

• Pat’s Singles Club will hold a dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Sunday April 1, at the Valencia Ballroom, York. DJ Ray Thomas will provide the dance music. Cost is $10.

• The Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Little Mermaid,” Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10:15 a.m. and Saturdays at 1 p.m. through March 31. Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are $5-$8. Visit www.gamutplays.org or call 238-4111.

• Ballroom dance classes at Dickinson College through April 3. Beginner classes start at 6 p.m. and the Third Timer class starts at 7:15 p.m. Cost is $30. Contact devwell@dickinson.edu or fhancock@comcast.net or call 241-4483.

• Oyster Mill Playhouse presents “Out Of Order” from March 16 to April 1. Show is at 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Cost is $14, opening night tickets are $16. Call 737-6768 or visit www.oystermill.com.

• Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jennifer Egan will read from her novel, “A Visit From the Goon Squad” at 6 p.m. April 4 in the Anita Tuvin Schlecter Auditorium. For more information call 245-1875 or visit www.clarkeforum. org.

• Dickinson College to present a student performance of “The Arsonists,” March 30-31 and April 2-3, 8 p.m. Mathers Theatre in the Holland Union Building. For more information, tickets call 245-1327. Tickets are $7.

• Local author Dianne Bolyard will be signing copies of her book “Happily Ever After,” from 1 to 3 p.m. April 7 at the Courthouse Common Espresso Bar and Bistro, Hanover Street, Carlisle.

• Chambersburg Ballet Theatre presents “Collaborations Sacred and Classical” April 3, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. Call 709-1800.

• Belly dance classes for those age 16 and older will be held from 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. April 11 through May 9 at the New Cumberland Middle School. Cost is $33 for residents of the West Shore and $40 for all others, plus a West Shore School District fee of $22. For more information visit www.wsrec.org or call 920-9515.

• Harrisburg Shakespeare Company will be holding auditions for its upcoming performance of “Romeo and Juliet” from 7 to 9 p.m. April 4 and 6 and for actors out of the area auditions will be held from 11 to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, April 7. To make an audition appointment call 238-4111.

• Pat’s Singles Club will hold a dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Sunday April 16, at the Valencia Ballroom, York. The Headliners will provide the dance music. Cost is $10. • “Green Buildings of York,” a downtown walking tour will be held at 2 p.m. April 21. The tour starts at Continental Square. For more information visit downtownyorkpa.com/walking-tours. • Metropolitan Area Dance Club will host a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. on April 21 at the PA Dance Sport Ballroom in Hummelstown. For more information call 774-2171.

• The Little Theatre of Mechanicsburg will present “Extremities” through April 8. Call 766-0535 for tickets, box office opens March 12 for patrons, and March 13 for the public. • Adams County School of Musical Theatre will present “Godspell” at 7 p.m. April 13 and 14 and at 2 p.m. April 14 and 15 at the school, 49 York St., Gettysburg. Reserved seating tickets are $11. For more information visit www.acsmt.org or call 334-2692. • Gamut Theatre Group’s Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Jungle Book” at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at the Whitaker Center’s Sunoco Theatre, Harrisburg. Cost is $15.

• Nickelondeon’s The Fresh Beat Band to perform at 6:30 p.m., Thursday March 29 at the Hershey Theatre. A second show at 3:30 p.m. has been added. Tickets are $26.50 to $39.50 and are available at www.ticketmaster. com or by calling 534-3405. • Midtown Scholar’s Friday Folk Cafe performer will be Aaron Nathans and Michael Ronstandt from 8 to 10 p.m. March 30. For more information call 236-1680. • Susquehanna Folk Music Society presents Genticorum at 7:30 p.m. on March 30 at Camp Hill Methodist Church. Cost is $10 to $22. For more information call 763-5744. • Casting Crowns to perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 at the Giant Center, Hershey. Tickets are $21.50 to $75 and are available at www.ticketmaster.com or by calling 534-3911. • Lancaster International Classical Guitar Festival and Competition will be held March 30 and 31 at the Ware Center, 42 N. Prince St., Lancaster. For more information visit www.LancasterARTS.com. • Dickinson College faculty will present the works of Polish composer Karol Szymanowski at 7 p.m., March 31 at the Rubendall Recital Hall in the Weiss Center for the Arts. The event is free and open to the public. • Midtown Scholar presents Seasons in concert from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. March 31. For more information call 236-1680. • Dickinson College student Ilana Rainero-de Haan will present her multilingual work for voice and small chamber ensemble at 4 p.m. April 1 in Rubendall Recital Hall, Weiss Center for the Arts. • Midtown Scholar will present Chuck van Zyl in concert at 5 p.m. April 1. For more information call 236-1680. • The Cumberland Singers will be performing “Anything But Quiet,” broadway music from 1925 to 2011, April 13 through 17. For more information visit www.cumberlandsingers.org or call 367-8030. • Beck and Benedict Hardware will present the Carroll County Ramblers anf the Patuxent Partners Bluegrass Band at 7 p.m., 118 Walnut St., Waynesboro. Admission is $13, children under 12 are free. For more information call 762-4711 or visit www.beck-benedicthardware.com.

Event information can be submitted via email to frontdoor@cumberlink.com, by mail, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013 or by fax at 243-3121. For more information, visit www.cumberlink.com/entertainment

Flagship continued

Great Escape continued

21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 11:10 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7, 9:35, Fri.-Thu. 10:55 a.m., 1:15, 4, 7:20, 10:05 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 12, 2:30, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35, Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:35 The Artist (PG-13) Thu. 1:25, 6:30, 8:45, Fri.-Thu. 10:45 a.m., 6:30, 8:40 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 11 a.m., 1:10, 3:30, 5:40, 7:45, 9:45, Fri.Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:20, 3:30, 5:40, 7:45 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu. 10:25 a.m., 12:30, 2:35, 4:40, 6:40, Fri.Thu. 10:25 a.m., 12:30, 2:35, 4:40, 6:40, 8:35 Friends with Kids (R) Thu. 10:50 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:20, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:55 a.m., 2:35, 4:55, 7:40, 10:05 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 10:20 a.m., 11 a.m., 1:10, 2:10, 4:20, 5:20, 7:30, 8:30, 10:30 Jeff, Who Lives at Home (R) Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 1:30, 3:30, 5:35, 7:50, 9:50 John Carter 2D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 12:30, 3:45, 6:45, 9:35 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 8:35, 11:20 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 10:45 a.m., 1, 3:15, Fri.-Thu. 1:25, 3:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:40, 4:10, 7, 9:20 Project X (R) Thu. 1:30, 3:40, 5:40, 7:45, 9:50 Safe House (R) Thu. 10:40 a.m., 4, 7:05, Fri.-Thu. 10 Silent House (R) Thu. 5:30, 7:40, 9:45 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 1:40, 9:40 A Thousand Words (PG-13) Thu. 11:05 a.m., 3:50 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Wed. (April 4)-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 3:30, 7:40 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 2, 7:10 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 4:30, 9:55

Act of Valor (R) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 4:55, 7:40, 10:05, Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 4:55, 10:10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2, 6:40 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 4:20, 9 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 12:10, 1, 3:20, 4, 6:30, 8, 9:30 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12:40, 3:30, 7, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 12:40, 3:30, 6:50, 9:50 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 12:20, 6:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.-Thu. 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40 Project X (R) Thu. 3, 9:10 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 12:50, 3:40, 7:20, 10, Fri.-Thu. 2:30, 7:40 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20

Project X (R) Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5, 7:40, 9:50 Safe House (R) Thu. 1:55, 7:20 Silent House (R) Thu. 12:10, 2:20, 4:45, 7:50, 10:05 A Thousand Words (PG-13) Thu. 11:45 a.m., 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:15, Fri.Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:25, 7:35, 9:50 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Wed. (April 4)-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3:30, 4:30, 7:30, 8:30 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:40, 10 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 6:40, 7:10, 9, 9:30

Great Escape 3501 Paxton St.

21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 2:15, 5, 8, Fri.-Sun. 2, 4:40, 7:55, 10:30, Mon.-Thu. 2, 4:40, 7:55 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 1:30, 4:10, 6:45, Fri.-Sun. 1:25, 4, 6:45, 9:40, Mon.-Thu. 1:25, 4, 6:45 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15, Fri. 2:10, 4:20, 7:10, 9:20, Sat.-Sun. 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:20, 7:10, 9:20, Mon.-Thu. 2:10, 4:20, 7:10 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu. 1:45, 4 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 12:30, 1:15, 3:45, 4:30, 6:15, 7, 7:45, Fri.Sun. 12:30, 1:15, 3:45, 4:30, 6:15, 7, 7:45, 9:30, 10:15, Mon.-Thu. 12:30, 1:15, 3:45, 4:30, 6:15, 7, 7:45 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 1, 4:20, 7:25, Fri. 3:15, Sat.-Sun. 12:10, 3:15, Mon.-Thu. 3:15 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50, Sat.-Sun. 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50, Mon.-Thu. 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 Project X (R) Thu. 12:40, 2:50, 5:10, 7:35 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Wed. (April 4)-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 3:50, 8 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri. 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10, Sat.-Sun. 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10, Mon.-Thu. 2:30, 5, 7:30

Flagship Cinemas 4590 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 10

Continued next column

21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 2, 2:30, 4:40, 5:10, 7:15, 7:45, 9:55, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 2, 2:30, 4:40, 5:10, 7:15, 7:45, 9:45, 10:15 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 11:20 a.m., 4:30, 10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:30, 3:50, 6:50, 9 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 12, 2:10, 4:20 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 12:50, 1:40, 2:40, 3:40, 4:10, 4:50, 5:45, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:10, 9:40, 10:15, 10:40, Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:10, 12:50, 1:40, 2:40, 3:40, 4:10, 4:50, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:40, 10:10 John Carter 2D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 12:40, 3:30, 6:40, 9:35 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 7:10, 10:10 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 12:20, 2:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:45, 2:15, 4:15, 4:45, 6:50, 7:20, 9:20, 9:55

Continued next column

Regal Carlisle Commons 8 Noble Boulevard

Regal Harrisburg 14 1500 Caughey Drive 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 1:10, 2, 3:50, 4:50, 6:40, 7:40, 9:20, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 2:10, 5:20, 8, 10:40 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 1:30, 4:05 Agent Vinod (NR) Fri.-Thu. 4:50 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:10, Fri.-Sun. 12:40, 3:30, 6:10, 8:30, Mon.-Thu. 3:30, 6:10, 8:30 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu. 12:40, 2:50, 5:20 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 12:30, 1, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 9, 9:30, 10, 10:30, Fri.-Sun. 12, 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 8:20, 9, 9:30, 10, 10:30, Mon.-Thu. 1, 1:30, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 8:20, 9, 9:30, 10, 10:30 John Carter 2D (PG-13) Thu. 4, 10:10 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12:50, 7:10, Fri.-Sun. 12:50, 4:20 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.-Thu. 1:10, 2:20, 3:50, 5, 6:40, 7:30, 9:20, 10:10 National Theatre Live: She Stoops to Conquer Live (NR) Thu. 7 October Baby (PG-13) Thu. 1:50, 4:30, 7:30, 10:05, Fri.-Thu. 1:40, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50 Project X (R) Thu. 2:30, 8 Safe House (R) Thu. 3, 9:40 Silent House (R) Thu. 5:10, 10:15 A Thousand Words (PG-13) Thu. 6:30 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Wed. (April 4)-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 3:50, 8 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 1:20, 4, 6:30, 9:10 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri.-Sun. 12:10, 1:50, 2:30, 4:30, 5:10, 7, 7:40, 9:40, 10:20, Mon.-Thu. 1:50, 2:30, 4:30, 5:10, 7, 7:40, 9:40, 10:20

Cumberland Drive-in first feature (starts at 7:45 p.m.): The Hunger Games (PG-13) second feature: This Means War (PG-13)

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

• Susquehanna Mysteries Alliance will present “Titanic: What Lies Beneath” event at 2 p.m. April 15 at the Mechanicsburg Mystery Bookshop in Mechanicsburg, 6 Clouser Road. For more information call 795-7470 or email mysterybooks@comcast.net.

• The Penn State University Choir will perform a free concert at 7 p.m. March 29 at the Mechanicsburg Presbyterian Church.

Cinema Center of Camp Hill 3431 Simpson Ferry Road

Movies

Out & About

• The York County Heritage Trust will present “homebrew workshops” March 31, April 14 and May 2. Cost is $70 call 848-1587 for more information.

D2 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Now showing

D11 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Out & About


Associated Press

BY CHRISTY LEMIRE

D10 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Associated Press

In this undated film image released by The Weinstein Company, Alex Libby is shown in the documentary film, “Bully.” with the cliche that kids will be kids. Among them are David and Tina Long of Murray County, Ga., whose 17year-old son, Tyler, hanged himself. Tina bravely shows the closet where the family found him, in his bedroom since turned into an office, and the death has turned the Longs’ quiet suburban life into a crusade for awareness. Among the movie’s other stories is 12-year-old Alex, a scrawny kid from Sioux City, Iowa. His parents acknowledge he’s a bit weird but as his mom points out, he’d be the most devoted friend to anyone who would accept him. Hirsch’s cam-

era captures Alex’s grueling daily school bus ride as big, mean kids use him as their punching bag. Alex has no idea how to stand up for himself and no adults seem capable of doing it for him (the assistant principal of his middle school comes off as especially clueless and inept). These moments are also the ones that earned “Bully” a ridiculous R-rating for language from the Motion Picture Association of America; The Weinstein Co. is now releasing the film unrated. In conservative Tuttle, Okla., 16-year-old Kelby has been shunned since she came out as a lesbian, as

have her parents. She finds a small circle of friends who accept her as she is, including a girlfriend, and people who inspire her to get out of bed every morning, but she feels discouraged when she can’t open up more minds and hearts. Her parents’ evolution on the subject is inspiring to see. These are just some of the stories Hirsch shares in “Bully.” Any one of them might have served as its own complete film. This is especially true of a tale that comes toward the end: that of Kirk and Laura Smalley, whose 11-year-old son, Ty, took his own life because of bullying. These are admittedly simple, small-town

folks: avid hunters and St. Louis Cardinals fans with longtime family roots in the area who are forced to reexamine everything that defines them in a teary haze. Kirk’s honesty and purity of emotion are haunting, and our time with this family is tantalizingly brief. As the mother of a 2year-old boy, I’m glad “Bully” exists. As a film critic, I wish it were more accomplished. “Bully,” a Weinstein Co. release, is not rated but contains some violence and disturbing situations involving kids and teens and some language. Running time: 94 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.

• Susan Courtney, Tom Svec, Jeffrey Tritt and Gordan Wenzel will display their art at the Art Association of Harrisburg, 21 N. Front St. through March 29. • Art work from former and current Camp Hill School District visual arts faculty will be on display through the month of March at the Grace Milliman Pollack Performing Arts Center lobby. • Nature artist Jon Tritt will display artwork through the end of March at the Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art, 176 Water Company Road, Millersburg. Tritt is a native of New Cumberland and currently resides in Marysville. Visit www.nedsmithcenter.org. • Artwork by David Cubie will be on display in the Charley Krone Gallery at the New Cumberland Public Library through the month of April. • Trudi Gilliam, a metal sculptor, will be discussing her mixed metal sculptures as part of the Village Artisans Gallery’s 17th Anniversary Celebration. The anniversary celebration will be from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 1. • “Haiti — A Nation’s Persistence,” an exhibit by photojournalist Keely Kernan, will be on display April 2 through April 27 at Shippensburg University. An artist’s reception will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 9 in the library, followed by a talk by Kernan at 7:30 p.m. in Old Main Chapel. • The Council for the Arts of Chambersburg will present “Playing with Color” art class on Tuesdays from 9:30 to 11 a.m. for home schooled students age 10 and older through April 3 at the council’s Main Street site. For more information contact Laurie McKelvie at 477-2132 or lauriemckelvie@comcast.net. • York College of Pennsylvania will host its annual juried student exhibition from through April 3. • Dr. Joan Stack will present a lecture on Civil War era artist George Caleb Bingham at 5:30 p.m. on April 3 at Gettysburg College. For more information visit www.gettysburg.edu/civilwar2013. • The Council for the Arts of Chambersburg will host “Wild About Fabric” through April 6, 159 S. Main St., Chambersburg. • The HACC Artisan Marketplace will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 7 with a special “meet the artists” event from 11 a.m. to 2 2 p.m. The marketplace is located at 2 Center Square, New Oxford. April hours for the marketplace are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sundays. May hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays. For more information call Judy White at HACC at (800)222-4222 ext. 1311.

Alibis Eatery & Spirits 10 N. Pitt St. Carlisle , 243-4151 alibispirits.com Thursday, March 29: Batty Boh Night, DJ 9 p.m. Friday, March 30: Band Night: Variety of Local Stars Saturday, March 31: DJ, 10 p.m. Monday, April 2: Yuengs and Wings Tuesday, April 3: Team Trivia, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April

OUT & ABOUT | D5

Nature lovers can find plenty to do this weekend, outside and indoors! King’s Gap offers a mountaintop mansion as well as many trails for exploring while the Ned Smith Center showcases nature based artwork.

4: Open mic, 8 p.m.

Appalachian Brewing Company 50 N. Cameron St. Harrisburg, 221-1080 www.abcbrew.com

THEATRE | D6-7

Abrasive “Talk Radio” host fascinates in Open Stage show, while Dickinson College students rehearse for the upcoming production of “The Arsonists.”

Thursday, March 29: Jason Sturgeon, 8 p.m., $10 cover Saturday, March 31: Mantis with FDR & The New Deal 9 p.m., no cover Thursday, April 1: Foolish Business - The Whole Cannoli and Local Beat Reunion Show w/ The Great Northeast & Boxcar Social 8 p.m., $7 cover Saturday, April 3: Jonny Corndawg w/ Shovels & Rope and Robert Ellis 8 p.m., $7 advance, $10 at door

BOOKS | D8

Veteran actor Frank Langella dishes about celebrities he’s known in his new memoirs. Also, see reviews of “The Truth of All Things” and “Fall From Grace.”

MOVIES | D10-11

Gullifty’s Underground

Documentary, “Bully,” is a must-see for all ages. See a review of the movie which follows a half-dozen families with children who’ve been bullied at school. Also, see what else is playing on the big screen this weekend at area theaters.

1104 Carlisle Road Camp Hill, 761-6692 www.gulliftys.net Friday, March 30: The Plimsouls with Summer Twins and Parallax Project, doors at 7 and show at 8 p.m. Advance tickets $20, at door $25 Saturday, March 31: Mike Burton and DJAM, doors at 8 p.m. and show at 9:30 p.m. tickets, $7

Holly Inn

AALIVE

ing bring

BROADWAY63 Years! to Central Pennsylvania

31 S. Baltimore Ave. Mt. Holly Springs, 486-3823 www.hollyinn.com Friday, March 30: KB Blues Crew, 9:30 p.m to 12:30 a.m. Saturday, March 31: DJ Don, karoke and dancing, 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. FOREVER PLAID April 11 - May 6, 2012

A Heavenly Musical with a mix of 50’s and 60’s Rock and Roll, Show Tunes and Dance Music. The charming story of four young men who meet an early death, but get one last chance to entertain, providing their spirits still live on!

SIX TIME TONY AWARD WINNER CHICAGO August 15 - September 16, 2012

HONKY TONK ANGELS May 9 - June 24, 2012

The story of three women who dream of becoming country music stars and meet on the bus to Nashville. The show features many country music classics, including “Stand By Your Man,”“9 to 5,” and “These Boots Are Made For Walking.”

ROGERS & HAMMERSTEIN’S THE SOUND OF MUSIC July 11 - Aug. 12, 2012

Market Cross Pub & Brewery

For reservations, call

March 22, 2012 Section D March 29, 2012

INSIDE••• West Shore to INSIDE••• hold its ‘Taste of ‘Talk Radio’ hits Chamber’ with Open Stage in plenty of food to mid-April ••• D6 please ••• D4

ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S THE 39 STEPS October 17 - November 10, 2012 Broadways most intriguing, most thrilling, most riotous comedy smash! The mind blowing cast plays over 150 characters in this fast-paced tale of an ordinary man on an extroordinarily entertaining adventure. Using ingenious theatrical invention, this production is an engaging, fast-paced whodunit that celebrates the magic of theatre. Tony award winner and recent broadway hit.

A BOOGIE WOOGIE CHRISTMAS November 14 - December 23, 2012 Allenberry audiences know how much the Piper family loves Christmas. Why, you’ve seen the Pipers save Christmas from catastrophe numerous times and even celebrate a wedding at the North Pole! But did you know that Christmas

has been a special time for the Pipers for several generations?

717.258.3211 www.allenberry.com

113 N. Hanover St. Carlisle, 258-1234 www.marketcrosspub.com Thursday, March 29: Thirsty Thursday with Sylvia’s Suitcase, 8 to 11 p.m. Friday, March 30: Skip’s Museum, 9:30 p.m.

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SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE September 19 - October 14, 2012

NUNSENSE May 23 - July 8, 2012

The melodious and inspiring true story of the Von Trapp Family Singers, set against the panorama of the Austrian Alps. Features “Climb Every Mountain,”“Edelweiss,”“Do-Re-Me,”“So Long,

www.cumberlink.com

The longest running Broadway Revue in history! Featuring hits like “On Broadway,” “Fools Fall in Love,”“Jailhouse Rock,” Spanish Harlem,”“Poison Ivy,”“Hound Dog,”“Stand By Me,” and many more!

An award-winning amusing musical offering tart quips with a clerical slant. Featuring star turns, tap and ballet dancing, an audience quiz, and comic surprises, this show has become an international phenomenon. A very funny musical.

Farewell,” and more. This classic family musical is bound to be one of your “favorite things!”

EntErtainmEnt in thE EntErtainmEnt in thE hEart of thE midstatE hEart of thE midstatE

The “Razzle Dazzel” Dance Sensation that rocks the nation. Chicago in the late 1920’s brings in “All That Jazz”, “Hot Honey Rag”, and “Chicago After Midnight”. One of Broadways great musicals.

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The Sentinel TheSection Sentinel D

Give a gift they will never forget!

1559 Boiling SpringS road Boiling SpringS, pa

‘The Arsonists’ Hot play set to sizzle on the Mathers Theatre stage ••• D7

On the cover: Dickinson College theatre students put on “The Arsonists” beginning March 30. Page D7

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The documentary “Bully” is essential to see, whether you’re a parent or a kid, whether you’ve been on the giving or receiving end of such increasingly pervasive cruelty. But it’s also frustrating to watch, because while the stories included here are undeniably moving by nature, they’re not exactly told in the most artful way, rendering “Bully” far less emotionally impactful than it might have been. Director Lee Hirsch’s film grows repetitive and seems longer than its relatively brief running time. Tonally, it bounces with no rhyme or reason between a handful of students across the country who’ve suffered from bullying; technically, it feels a bit messy, with needless zooms and images that fade in and out of focus. Perhaps that was an intentional aesthetic choice. Either way, it’s distracting and headache-inducing. Still, if “Bully” does nothing more than provide the impetus for a dialogue, it achieves its purpose. Hirsch spent a year with about a half-dozen families with children who’ve been bullied at school — teased, abused, humiliated and ostracized — behavior which adults too often sweep aside

• Scrap metal artist Edward D. Baltzell’s work will be on display at the Learning Commons on HACC’s Gettysburg Campus, 731 Old Harrisburg Road through the fall of 2012. An artist’s reception will from 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday, March 29 at the Fireplace Lounge, Room 200 at the Learning Commons.

MUSIC |D4

Madonna’s still got it. The pop icon’s new album MDNA is full of upbeat dance jams and simmering slow grooves. Also, this week Music Notes explores how authentic performances can change an audience.

Out & About

Movies

AP Movie Critic

LOS ANGELES — The Weinstein Co. is moving past the R rating earned by its documentary “Bully” and plans to release the film unrated. The company announced Monday that “Bully” will hit theaters March 30 without a rating from the Motion Picture Association of America, meaning some theater may choose not to show it. The MPAA gave the film an R rating for language and declined to change it when the Weinstein Co. appealed. That inspired teen activist Katy Butler to start an online petition seeking a lower rating so more young people could see the movie. She has collected more than 475,000 signatures so far and even met with MPAA officials earlier this month, but the group stood its ground and “Bully” remained rated R, which requires children under 17 to be accompanied by a parent or guardian. John Fithian, president of the National Association of Theatre Owners, told the Weinstein Co. that releasing the film unrated could result in theaters treating the teen-focused documentary as an NC-17 film, which means no one 17 and under can be admitted.

Art • Clare Klaum will be the “artist in action” at the Village Artisans Gallery March 31 from 1-4 p.m.

A look at local nightlife

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‘Bully’ to be released without rating

Inside

Out & About

Reviewer: If “Bully” does nothing more than provide the impetus for a dialogue, it achieves its purpose. ■

The Scene

D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

‘Bully’ focuses on intolerable cruelty

A guide to area events

D3 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Movie Review


BY MESFIN FEKADU Associated Press

Madonna says it best on the opening track of her 12th album: “No one can put out my fire.” At 53, she’s still got it going on. And thankfully so. Her newest release, “MDNA” — her first apart from her longtime label, Warner Bros. — is full of upbeat dance jams and simmering slow grooves, and it delivers for the most part. True, it’s not nearly as topnotch as past records from the pop icon; the songs on “MDNA,” despite some risqu�� language, are much safer and tread familiar ground. Still, there are some

standouts. “Girl Gone Wild,” produced by Benny and Alle Benassi (Chris Brown’s “Beautiful People”), starts things off nicely with its European flavor and addictive hook. Then there’s “I Don’t Give A,” the second track on the album to feature Nicki Minaj, and the better one (first single “Give Me All Your Luvin’” sounds like a Gwen Stefani demo circa 2004, and that’s not a compliment). The album’s best song is “Love Spent,” with its Bollywood beat. It finds Madonna calling out a lover with lyrics like: “You had all of me, you wanted more, would you have married

me if I were poor?” It’s worth noting that the album is Madonna’s first collection of new songs since she di-

set, but Madonna sometimes trips over on her own disco ball. “Gang Bang” is a complete mess, “I’m Addicted” sounds overproduced and “I’m a Sinner” is mediocre. She shines brightest when she brings down the pace. “Falling Free” is soothing, the Golden Globe-winning “Masterpiece” from her film “W.E.” is soft and classic, and “I (Expletive) Up” sounds like a raw and honest apology to an ex (perhaps another ode to Ritchie). Associated Press On “MDNA,” Madonna has a wide array of helpers: vorced director Guy Ritchie Singer Priscilla Renea, who in 2008. Bitter much? has written for Rihanna and The dance sound domi- Selena Gomez, co-wrote nates most of the 12-track two tracks; Alain Whyte,

the main songwriting partner to Morrissey, co-wrote a song; and Klas Ahlund, the producer behind Swedish dance singer Robyn, coproduced a tune. The CD also has assists from producer Jean-Baptiste (Chris Brown, Black Eyed Peas, Kelis); British singer-songwriter Mika; and French DJproducer Martin Solveig. Then there’s usual suspect William Orbit, who produced Madonna’s “Ray of Light.” It’s a bit of a mash-up, and may be the reason why “MDNA” is good, but not great. CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: Both Minaj and Madonna bring the swagger

‘Truth’ is intense historical thriller Reviewer: All that is missing is a Sherlock Holmeslike twist to make Kieran Shields’ first novel a winner. ■

BY JEFF AYERS For The Associated Press

Music Notes

Associated Press

Authentic music performances change audiences a true artist perform at the Wednesday Club recital this past Sunday. The genuine emotion displayed across soprano Cheryl Crider’s face as she sang “I Dreamed a Dream” from Les Miserables touched the audience deeply. Crider’s ability to contain the emotion within the song as it drove

her performance was one of the best I’ve ever seen. Authentic performances, regardless of technical ability or flair, touch audiences and drive change. This is artistry in action. In today’s world where technical superiority and perfection are praised sometimes more than musical expression, Crider’s

Join us in Celebrating our

17th Anniversary

Artist in Action Clare Klaum – Artist Saturday, March 31 1-4 pm

performance is a reminder to me to be as authentic in my own performances. I personally strive to be more than a flutist or musician every day I work. I strive to be an artist so I can help change the world and my community into a better place. No matter at what level play or our education, we are all artists.

Sunday, April 1st 10-5 pm Gallery

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Book Review

‘Fall From Grace’ is a sappy family drama BY JEFF AYERS

For The Associated Press

“Fall From Grace” (Scribner), by Richard North Patterson: Buried secrets threaten to devastate a family in Richard North Patterson’s latest saga, “Fall From Grace.” Adam Blaine was estranged for years from his novelist-father, Ben. He returns home when his father dies in a fall off a cliff. The funeral is a somber affair, but what follows next shocks

Adam: His mother has been disinherited from his father’s will. Instead, the money is being given to Ben’s secret lover. The police are investigating whether Ben’s death was an accident. Each family member has a motive, forcing Adam to ask tough questions. Every answer opens old wounds. Secrets that have been dormant for years rise to the surface, and Adam will have to confront the reason he was estranged from his father. (Adam has secrets of his

own, some involving Ben, others involving his future.) The sappy family drama that slowly unravels over the course of the novel is neither surprising nor inventive. The twists and turns are obvious, making the final pages of “Fall From Grace” a bit of a letdown. Adam is revealed to be a CIA operative, but that’s just another unnecessary element. With no likable characters or situations, the overall experience is disappointing.

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As someone who plays cal spectrum (I can’t deny other people’s music, the the artistry of Bob Dylan), question of artistry and but I don’t think classical what we do as musicians musicians easily think of is one I ponder frequentthemselves in this way. We ly. Who or what defines a may not be particularly musical artist? We often sophisticated or we may call mainstream pop munot ever play for an audisicians “artists,” but is this change? ence, but there is a creative term used because they’re Don’t get me wrong. I urge to express something so successful or because truly believe that there are through the music we play. their music actually drives artists across the full musi- I had the honor to witness

“ T h e Tr u t h o f A l l T h i n gs ” (Crown), by Kieran Shields: Kieran Shields creates a pitch-perfect atmosphere in “The Truth of All Things,” a tale set in Portland, Maine, during the summer of 1892. Two hundred years earlier in Salem, Mass., the Salem witch trials brought about a period of paranoia and insecurity. Deputy Marshal Archie Lean’s mind is on his family and job when a case lands directly in his lap. A

prostitute is found murdered with her body laid out like a pentagram and her neck held to the ground with a pitchfork. With the help of criminalist Perceval Grey and Helen Prescott, a historian with access to old documents, the parallels to the past quickly add up. Disturbingly, they determine that this woman might not be the first one. The perpetrator, a brilliant mastermind using multiple pseudonyms from key figures of the historical witch trials, proves difficult to apprehend. Grey plays Sherlock Holmes, utilizing keen insight and pre-forensic science to uncover the

evidence necessary to capture the killer. Prescott uses her deep knowledge of the past to provide plausible links to the present in the killer’s mind. Lean brings the authority, muscle and judgment to put the various puzzle pieces together. In a time before technology and the ability to check fingerprints, blood splatter and other key elements in a murder, it was difficult to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. By setting the story in 1892, Shields adds an extra level of intensity that makes it all work. Fans of historical thrillers will love “The Truth of All Things.” Throw in a Sherlock Holmeslike twist, and this first novel by Shields is a winner.

Associated Press

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Music

Madonna still brings heat, beats on ‘MDNA’

Books

D4 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Book Review

D9 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Music Review


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The book is a collection of 66 impressionistic sketches of movie stars, social celebrities, Broadway icons, politicians and writers, including John F. Kennedy. ■

BY MARK KENNEDY

Associated Press

Frank Langella self-raising or absolutely whitewashing.” Langella says he sought out permission from relatives and intimate friends of his subjects before publishing. “I’ve chosen to write my memories — as I recall them — as honestly as I could,” he says. “None of it was meant to be coy or a tease.” One of the most touching chapters — and one of Langella’s favorites — is about Cameron Mitchell, a one-time leading man who by the mid-1970s had turned into a “fat, jowly mess, covering his sad decline with an over-the-top wisecracking demeanor.” In one story, Langella writes that fellow actors

teased Mitchell by spinning him around in a toosmall jacket. “I’ve never forgotten the look in his eyes. I’ve never forgotten the sad, broken terror when everyone around him was just laughing their heads off, thinking how funny it was,” Langella says. “That’s around the corner for everybody if we don’t watch out. I suppose that chapter means a lot to me because of the ephemeralness of life and also the ephemeralness of my profession.” Langella says there are so many people who didn’t make the cut in the book that he’s already considering a second volume of

stories over and over again and I kept asking myself, ‘Do you want to say this?’ and ‘Do you want to say that?’ A great, great deal was cut. Twice the book was cut. Because I wrote utterly without censorship. I wrote with abandon and I wrote exactly what I felt and exactly what happened in a tremendous amount of detail, which was very cathartic. And then I said, ‘OK, that was cathartic for me, but now it goes into the fireplace.’ AP: You, yourself, don’t always come off very well. Langella: I was religious about making certain that I often showed the worst of my nature. You can’t live on this planet for as long as I’ve lived and you cannot be a member of this profession for as long as I have without running up against extraordinarily complicated, difficult, loving, wonderful, marvelous, frightening, angering monsters and sweethearts — all kinds of people. You can’t be an actor without being all those things at different times in your life. AP: There are some heartbreaking stories of your subjects struggling in their final days with illness and mental problems. Langella: I think it’s everybody’s worst nightmare. I mean, I’m 74 now, so of course I’m thinking about it all the time, talking to my kids about it and talking to family members about how to handle it, should something happen. I’m concerned with mortality. I’m very concerned with how the decisions we make throughout our lives affect the last decade or two of the life we have.

Area offers several entertaining venues for those interested in nature and the environment by for the Spring Monthly Speaker Series event, “25 The Ned Years in Africa: A PhotoSmith Center graphic Journey” featuring in Millersthe works of Joe and Mary burg celAnn McDonald. The pair have spent a quarter of a ebrates the artist’s work, century leading photo safaris in East Africa, and have as well as a collected images of Gelada commitment baboons in the Ethiopian to enviHighlands, Mountain Gorilronmental las in Rwanda, Great White education. Sharks off the coast of South Africa, as well as the marsh Submitted photo and desert wildlife of Botswana and the plains game

By Lisa Clarke Sentinel Correspondent frontdoor@cumberlink.com

Spring has sprung, and though it may be a little early to start tending the vegetable garden, it’s a great time to enjoy the outdoors for entertainment. Whether you’re looking to get your boots dirty or find some leisurely learning, there are plenty of options to get involved in some natural fun.

King’s Gap Events Close to home, King’s Gap Environmental Education Center delivers much more than trail-blaze markers on their 16 miles of trekking space. With several day-use areas and a 32-room mountaintop mansion, the park delivers programming that is heating up over the next several weeks to welcome the warmer weather. This Saturday, get handson involvement with the Center’s activities as local enthusiasts team up for Volunteer Day. Meet your neighbors and help keep the facility in great shape as you pitch in with landscaping, trail maintenance and more. The Center provides lunch and participants can win eco-prizes. Other Volunteer Days will be held throughout the month. On Wednesdays starting in April, take a break from the grind with a free weekly hike starting at 6 p.m. from the King’s Gap Hollow Day Use Area and take a brisk pace over three miles of their trails. The event includes a 20-minute break. Partici-

pants should bring water and wear sturdy shoes. Friday the 13th is a perfect time for a spooky evening visit for their ever-popular Experience a Spring Night event. An annual favorite, the program uncovers the park’s lively nocturnal world as the forest comes alive with the sounds of creatures. The evening kicks off with a chance to learn about amphibians as darkness falls and continues on after sunset. Participants should wear footwear suitable for wet areas and long pants and flashlights should have red lenses. The event runs from 8 to 9:30 p.m., and starts at the Pine Plantation Area parking lot, weather permitting. On Sunday, April 15, discover what lurks in vernal pools with their Wicked Big Puddles presentation from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Participants will enjoy a short hike to the pond where experts will explain about wildlife, and those who tote binoculars along will have a chance to

do check out the park’s resident birds. The King’s Gap Environmental Education Center is located at 500 King’s Gap Road in Carlisle. Volunteer Day takes place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 31 and participation is open to anyone age 12 and older, with pre-registration required. For more information and details on all events, visit www.dcnr.gov or call 486-3799.

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Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art Located in upper Dauphin County, the Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art boasts 500 acres and includes forest, stream, and more than 12 miles of trails in addition to gallery spaces, gift shop, offices and classrooms. The facility hosts music and theater events, art exhibits from both the namesake wildlife artist and others, and educational programs, including a summer youth camp. On Thursday, April 12, stop

of Kenya and Tanzania. In addition to the photography, the educational program will also include natural history facts and a discussion on conservation issues. Admission to the Photographic Journey program is free to members and children, or $3 for non members, and starts at 7 p.m. in the Seraph Educaton Room at the Ned Smith Center, 176 Water Company Road, Millersburg. For more information, visit www.nedsmithcenter.org.

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N EW YO R K — T h e phone at Frank Langella’s home rings and rings, unanswered. The very private three-time Tony Award winner apparently is not willing to answer questions about his debut book. Oh, wait: It turns out he has inadvertently given out the number for his fax machine. “We’ll talk to Dr. Freud about that sometime,” he jokes when the right number is called and he gets on the line. It turns out that Langella, fresh off the Broadway revival of Terence Rattigan’s “Man and Boy,” would very much like to talk about his literary debut, the memoir “Dropped Names: Famous Men and Women as I Knew Them,” which went on sale this week. The book is a collection of 66 impressionistic sketches of movie stars, social celebrities, Broadway icons, politicians and writers, including John F. Kennedy, George C. Scott, Tip O’Neill, Bette Davis, Jill Clayburgh and Charlton Heston. All but one are dead. There are stories of dati n g E l i za b e t h Tayl o r, streaking in front of Sir Laurence Olivier, playing Scrabble with Paul Mellon and being wooed by both Noel Coward and Roddy McDowall (neither attempt succeeded, he writes).

He and Marilyn Monroe shared just one word, but it changed his life. Langella plumbs his long career, which has put him in arm’s reach of many famous people. He’s gone from a sexy Dracula, Cyrano and Sherlock Holmes to a mature Richard Nixon in “Frost/Nixon” onstage and on-screen, Sir Thomas More in “A Man for All Seasons” and Perry White in “Superman Returns.” Not all the celebrities come off well, including Richard Burton (“Could anyone, I wondered, be so unaware of what a crashing bore he had become?”), Anthony Quinn (“a big bully”) and Paul Newman (“emotionally vacant”). Langella also doesn’t spare himself. He acknowledges being a terrible boor around Deborah Kerr and Dinah Shore, did something “unforgivable” to Jackie Kennedy and is wistful about being a lover to a faded Rita Hayworth, saying she was “the single most tragic example of how far from the real person an image can be.” He calls “Cutthroat Island” one of his worst films, “the single most egregious example of excess I have ever witnessed in the movie world.” “I really felt very strongly that I wasn’t going to write a sweetie-darling-honeybaby book,” he says. “Most celebrities’ biographies I read I can’t get through — they’re either immensely

“Dropped Names.” The Associated Press: How was the book born? Langella: It’s been in my head for years and years and years. I’ve been a very lucky duck: I’ve run into the most extraordinary people as a result of being an actor. But it started in earnest when Jill Clayburgh died. I hadn’t spent a lot of time with her in her last years and I was so sad and regretted missing that. A friend I was with asked me who she was. He was a great deal younger. I sat down and took out a yellow legal pad and wrote for about three hours about Jill. And then I decided to write about somebody else. And then somebody else. And then pretty soon they just kept adding up. I would go, ‘Oh, I remember this’ and ‘I remember that.’ I wanted to immortalize them all, warts and all. AP: Was it fun to write? Langella: Actually, it was quite wonderful to write — and agony to rewrite. I wrote and wrote and wrote — I think it ended up to be about 110 people. And then it was very difficult to go through it and decide who to remove. People came in and went out and came back and forth. It took me a very long time to bring it down to the 65 or 66 it is. And then there was a great deal of reading them over and over. I must have reviewed every one of them several dozen times. AP: Did you have any misgivings about telling tales out of school? Langella: No. Anything I didn’t think was proper to make public, I just simply didn’t make public. I was very careful about that. I went through these

Out & About

Books

AP Drama Writer

D8 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Getting back to nature

Frank Langella dishes about the famous in memoir

D5 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Nightlife

Books


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Theatre

Abrasive ‘Talk Radio’ host fascinates in Open Stage show

Hot play ‘The Arsonists’ hits Mathers Theatre

cause she knows that his first love is his show.” In fact, Champlain seems to have trouble relating to people outside the studio and the show. Complicating Linda’s relationship with him further is the fact that she is the only woman working in the studio, which “kind of makes her one of the guys,” Baillie added. “But she’s a strong female character who reminds me of Roz in the TV show ‘Frasier.’ She’s deceivingly complex.” Also in the cast are Bill McCarthy, Jim Lewis, Michael Kirby, Lisa Haywood, Ben Forer, Cherry Kimorie and Adam Gingrich. Aside from the complex

By Barbara Trainin Blank Sentinel Correspondent frontdoor@ cumberlink.com

Submitted photo

The actors of “Talk Radio” pose for a photo. The Open Stage show runs April 13 through May 5. — was swept aside after the Broadway premiere in 2007. Starring Liev Scheiber, the play received Tony, Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle, and Drama League award nominations for Best Revival of Play and Best Actor in a Play. Schreiber also won the Drama League Award for Distinguished Performance.

On point And then, the world doesn’t lack for controversial talk-show hosts. We get to know Champlain somewhat through two people around him who are “seeking readmittance into the life” of a man who has changed toward them, Thomas Weaver said. Weaver, a “huge fan of Eric Bogosian’s work and its rich and visceral style and brilliance,” plays Stu

Noonan, Barry’s operator. “Stu is incredibly loyal,” Weaver said. “He has staggering trust and almost Zen-like patience as well. Once upon a time Barry and Stu were good friends. During the old days they would grab a bottle of something and go out looking for trouble. However, things have changed.” Trish Baillie is Linda MacArthur, the show’s associate producer, and Barry’s intermittent lover. “Linda had intimate relations with Barry about a dozen times in the past two years, but remains on a professional level with him,” Baillie said. “She does have feelings for him and cares about him, but she has kept those feelings at bay, be-

Prevention is

Dickinson College students have been busy rehearsing for the upcoming production of “The Arsonists” by Max Frisch. The play, directed by Jon Liebetrau, is set in a town overrun with arsonists. The good but naive Gottlieb Biedermann simply wants to live an ordinary life, bother no one and stay clear of issues. But things veer from the ordinary when he and his doltish wife let in a couple of strangers who have spurious credentials and rather crude personalities. When the “guests” suspiciously start filling the attic with petrol drums, Biedermann, attempting to avoid the issue, even helps them wire the fuse. Performances are slated for 8 p.m. March 30 and 31 and April 2 and 3 at Dickinson College’s Mathers Theatre in the Holland Union Building. Tickets are $7 and can be purchased at the Mathers Theatre box office during the week or onlince at http://www.dickinson.edu/ academics/programs/theatre-and-dance/ content/Season-at-a-Glance/. — Courtesy of Dickinson College Theatre and Dance Department

In Focus “Talk Radio” runs April 13 through May 5 at the Angino Family Theatre at Open Stage of Harrisburg, 223 Walnut St. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. For tickets and information, call 232-OPEN (6736) or visit www.openstagehbg. com

Key Photos by Michael Bupp/The Sentinel

Samuel Neagley, left, and Sydney Moffat rehearse a scene from the “The Arsonists,” at Dickinson College.

PREVENTION

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Pictured from left, Samuel Neagley, Gaven Trinidad and Sydney Moffat rehearse a scene from the ‘The Arsonists.’

Pictured from left, Tyler Drbal, Mariana Furey, Jeremy Lupowitz, Elizabeth Flood and Julia Roberson rehearse a scene from the ‘The Arsonists.’ Dickinson College students will be putting on four performances of the play which is set in a town overrun by arsonists, beginning March 30.

Nancy Goss 717-319-2145 Bundest@aol.com www.athome.com/Nancygoss

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Tony Leukus was drawn to the character of Barry Champlain, protagonist of “Talk Radio,” because the smart, abrasive and outrageous shock jock has a “snarky sense of humor.” But Leukus, who is playing the lead in Open Stage’s production of the Eric Bogosian play, is the first to admit it’s no easy task getting to know Champlain. “There’s no back story,” he said, “only that he claims to be from Massachusetts and did radio shows and got better gigs. We do know that he’s very driven and doesn’t suffer fools gladly.” All of which gives audience members plenty to think about when Champlain has a major meltdown later in the play, on the eve of his program gaining national syndication. “We don’t know after if he’s on a bender, or is working on his next show,” Leukus added. Whatever ambiguity there may be about Champlain, there was none concerning executive artistic director Donald Alsedek’s desire to stage the play. He had thought about it for years, but had doubts about its technical requirements and the expense of callers and commercials. “We revisited the play, and were able to simplify it,” he said. “It also helps to have an actor who can do it.” Alsedek’s concern about the pertinence of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated play — which opened offBroadway in 1987 with Bogosian as Champlain

characters — especially Barry’s — “Talk Radio” relates to the theme of loneliness and the way people try to overcome it. “We have all become obsessed with watching and listening to the bad parts of people’s lives—like reality shows,” Leukus said.

Theatre

D6 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Dickinson College

D7 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Theatre


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Theatre

Abrasive ‘Talk Radio’ host fascinates in Open Stage show

Hot play ‘The Arsonists’ hits Mathers Theatre

cause she knows that his first love is his show.” In fact, Champlain seems to have trouble relating to people outside the studio and the show. Complicating Linda’s relationship with him further is the fact that she is the only woman working in the studio, which “kind of makes her one of the guys,” Baillie added. “But she’s a strong female character who reminds me of Roz in the TV show ‘Frasier.’ She’s deceivingly complex.” Also in the cast are Bill McCarthy, Jim Lewis, Michael Kirby, Lisa Haywood, Ben Forer, Cherry Kimorie and Adam Gingrich. Aside from the complex

By Barbara Trainin Blank Sentinel Correspondent frontdoor@ cumberlink.com

Submitted photo

The actors of “Talk Radio” pose for a photo. The Open Stage show runs April 13 through May 5. — was swept aside after the Broadway premiere in 2007. Starring Liev Scheiber, the play received Tony, Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle, and Drama League award nominations for Best Revival of Play and Best Actor in a Play. Schreiber also won the Drama League Award for Distinguished Performance.

On point And then, the world doesn’t lack for controversial talk-show hosts. We get to know Champlain somewhat through two people around him who are “seeking readmittance into the life” of a man who has changed toward them, Thomas Weaver said. Weaver, a “huge fan of Eric Bogosian’s work and its rich and visceral style and brilliance,” plays Stu

Noonan, Barry’s operator. “Stu is incredibly loyal,” Weaver said. “He has staggering trust and almost Zen-like patience as well. Once upon a time Barry and Stu were good friends. During the old days they would grab a bottle of something and go out looking for trouble. However, things have changed.” Trish Baillie is Linda MacArthur, the show’s associate producer, and Barry’s intermittent lover. “Linda had intimate relations with Barry about a dozen times in the past two years, but remains on a professional level with him,” Baillie said. “She does have feelings for him and cares about him, but she has kept those feelings at bay, be-

Prevention is

Dickinson College students have been busy rehearsing for the upcoming production of “The Arsonists” by Max Frisch. The play, directed by Jon Liebetrau, is set in a town overrun with arsonists. The good but naive Gottlieb Biedermann simply wants to live an ordinary life, bother no one and stay clear of issues. But things veer from the ordinary when he and his doltish wife let in a couple of strangers who have spurious credentials and rather crude personalities. When the “guests” suspiciously start filling the attic with petrol drums, Biedermann, attempting to avoid the issue, even helps them wire the fuse. Performances are slated for 8 p.m. March 30 and 31 and April 2 and 3 at Dickinson College’s Mathers Theatre in the Holland Union Building. Tickets are $7 and can be purchased at the Mathers Theatre box office during the week or onlince at http://www.dickinson.edu/ academics/programs/theatre-and-dance/ content/Season-at-a-Glance/. — Courtesy of Dickinson College Theatre and Dance Department

In Focus “Talk Radio” runs April 13 through May 5 at the Angino Family Theatre at Open Stage of Harrisburg, 223 Walnut St. Performances are Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. For tickets and information, call 232-OPEN (6736) or visit www.openstagehbg. com

Key Photos by Michael Bupp/The Sentinel

Samuel Neagley, left, and Sydney Moffat rehearse a scene from the “The Arsonists,” at Dickinson College.

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Pictured from left, Samuel Neagley, Gaven Trinidad and Sydney Moffat rehearse a scene from the ‘The Arsonists.’

Pictured from left, Tyler Drbal, Mariana Furey, Jeremy Lupowitz, Elizabeth Flood and Julia Roberson rehearse a scene from the ‘The Arsonists.’ Dickinson College students will be putting on four performances of the play which is set in a town overrun by arsonists, beginning March 30.

Nancy Goss 717-319-2145 Bundest@aol.com www.athome.com/Nancygoss

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Tony Leukus was drawn to the character of Barry Champlain, protagonist of “Talk Radio,” because the smart, abrasive and outrageous shock jock has a “snarky sense of humor.” But Leukus, who is playing the lead in Open Stage’s production of the Eric Bogosian play, is the first to admit it’s no easy task getting to know Champlain. “There’s no back story,” he said, “only that he claims to be from Massachusetts and did radio shows and got better gigs. We do know that he’s very driven and doesn’t suffer fools gladly.” All of which gives audience members plenty to think about when Champlain has a major meltdown later in the play, on the eve of his program gaining national syndication. “We don’t know after if he’s on a bender, or is working on his next show,” Leukus added. Whatever ambiguity there may be about Champlain, there was none concerning executive artistic director Donald Alsedek’s desire to stage the play. He had thought about it for years, but had doubts about its technical requirements and the expense of callers and commercials. “We revisited the play, and were able to simplify it,” he said. “It also helps to have an actor who can do it.” Alsedek’s concern about the pertinence of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated play — which opened offBroadway in 1987 with Bogosian as Champlain

characters — especially Barry’s — “Talk Radio” relates to the theme of loneliness and the way people try to overcome it. “We have all become obsessed with watching and listening to the bad parts of people’s lives—like reality shows,” Leukus said.

Theatre

D6 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Dickinson College

D7 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Theatre


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

The book is a collection of 66 impressionistic sketches of movie stars, social celebrities, Broadway icons, politicians and writers, including John F. Kennedy. ■

BY MARK KENNEDY

Associated Press

Frank Langella self-raising or absolutely whitewashing.” Langella says he sought out permission from relatives and intimate friends of his subjects before publishing. “I’ve chosen to write my memories — as I recall them — as honestly as I could,” he says. “None of it was meant to be coy or a tease.” One of the most touching chapters — and one of Langella’s favorites — is about Cameron Mitchell, a one-time leading man who by the mid-1970s had turned into a “fat, jowly mess, covering his sad decline with an over-the-top wisecracking demeanor.” In one story, Langella writes that fellow actors

teased Mitchell by spinning him around in a toosmall jacket. “I’ve never forgotten the look in his eyes. I’ve never forgotten the sad, broken terror when everyone around him was just laughing their heads off, thinking how funny it was,” Langella says. “That’s around the corner for everybody if we don’t watch out. I suppose that chapter means a lot to me because of the ephemeralness of life and also the ephemeralness of my profession.” Langella says there are so many people who didn’t make the cut in the book that he’s already considering a second volume of

stories over and over again and I kept asking myself, ‘Do you want to say this?’ and ‘Do you want to say that?’ A great, great deal was cut. Twice the book was cut. Because I wrote utterly without censorship. I wrote with abandon and I wrote exactly what I felt and exactly what happened in a tremendous amount of detail, which was very cathartic. And then I said, ‘OK, that was cathartic for me, but now it goes into the fireplace.’ AP: You, yourself, don’t always come off very well. Langella: I was religious about making certain that I often showed the worst of my nature. You can’t live on this planet for as long as I’ve lived and you cannot be a member of this profession for as long as I have without running up against extraordinarily complicated, difficult, loving, wonderful, marvelous, frightening, angering monsters and sweethearts — all kinds of people. You can’t be an actor without being all those things at different times in your life. AP: There are some heartbreaking stories of your subjects struggling in their final days with illness and mental problems. Langella: I think it’s everybody’s worst nightmare. I mean, I’m 74 now, so of course I’m thinking about it all the time, talking to my kids about it and talking to family members about how to handle it, should something happen. I’m concerned with mortality. I’m very concerned with how the decisions we make throughout our lives affect the last decade or two of the life we have.

Area offers several entertaining venues for those interested in nature and the environment by for the Spring Monthly Speaker Series event, “25 The Ned Years in Africa: A PhotoSmith Center graphic Journey” featuring in Millersthe works of Joe and Mary burg celAnn McDonald. The pair have spent a quarter of a ebrates the artist’s work, century leading photo safaris in East Africa, and have as well as a collected images of Gelada commitment baboons in the Ethiopian to enviHighlands, Mountain Gorilronmental las in Rwanda, Great White education. Sharks off the coast of South Africa, as well as the marsh Submitted photo and desert wildlife of Botswana and the plains game

By Lisa Clarke Sentinel Correspondent frontdoor@cumberlink.com

Spring has sprung, and though it may be a little early to start tending the vegetable garden, it’s a great time to enjoy the outdoors for entertainment. Whether you’re looking to get your boots dirty or find some leisurely learning, there are plenty of options to get involved in some natural fun.

King’s Gap Events Close to home, King’s Gap Environmental Education Center delivers much more than trail-blaze markers on their 16 miles of trekking space. With several day-use areas and a 32-room mountaintop mansion, the park delivers programming that is heating up over the next several weeks to welcome the warmer weather. This Saturday, get handson involvement with the Center’s activities as local enthusiasts team up for Volunteer Day. Meet your neighbors and help keep the facility in great shape as you pitch in with landscaping, trail maintenance and more. The Center provides lunch and participants can win eco-prizes. Other Volunteer Days will be held throughout the month. On Wednesdays starting in April, take a break from the grind with a free weekly hike starting at 6 p.m. from the King’s Gap Hollow Day Use Area and take a brisk pace over three miles of their trails. The event includes a 20-minute break. Partici-

pants should bring water and wear sturdy shoes. Friday the 13th is a perfect time for a spooky evening visit for their ever-popular Experience a Spring Night event. An annual favorite, the program uncovers the park’s lively nocturnal world as the forest comes alive with the sounds of creatures. The evening kicks off with a chance to learn about amphibians as darkness falls and continues on after sunset. Participants should wear footwear suitable for wet areas and long pants and flashlights should have red lenses. The event runs from 8 to 9:30 p.m., and starts at the Pine Plantation Area parking lot, weather permitting. On Sunday, April 15, discover what lurks in vernal pools with their Wicked Big Puddles presentation from 2 to 3:30 p.m. Participants will enjoy a short hike to the pond where experts will explain about wildlife, and those who tote binoculars along will have a chance to

do check out the park’s resident birds. The King’s Gap Environmental Education Center is located at 500 King’s Gap Road in Carlisle. Volunteer Day takes place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Saturday, March 31 and participation is open to anyone age 12 and older, with pre-registration required. For more information and details on all events, visit www.dcnr.gov or call 486-3799.

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N EW YO R K — T h e phone at Frank Langella’s home rings and rings, unanswered. The very private three-time Tony Award winner apparently is not willing to answer questions about his debut book. Oh, wait: It turns out he has inadvertently given out the number for his fax machine. “We’ll talk to Dr. Freud about that sometime,” he jokes when the right number is called and he gets on the line. It turns out that Langella, fresh off the Broadway revival of Terence Rattigan’s “Man and Boy,” would very much like to talk about his literary debut, the memoir “Dropped Names: Famous Men and Women as I Knew Them,” which went on sale this week. The book is a collection of 66 impressionistic sketches of movie stars, social celebrities, Broadway icons, politicians and writers, including John F. Kennedy, George C. Scott, Tip O’Neill, Bette Davis, Jill Clayburgh and Charlton Heston. All but one are dead. There are stories of dati n g E l i za b e t h Tayl o r, streaking in front of Sir Laurence Olivier, playing Scrabble with Paul Mellon and being wooed by both Noel Coward and Roddy McDowall (neither attempt succeeded, he writes).

He and Marilyn Monroe shared just one word, but it changed his life. Langella plumbs his long career, which has put him in arm’s reach of many famous people. He’s gone from a sexy Dracula, Cyrano and Sherlock Holmes to a mature Richard Nixon in “Frost/Nixon” onstage and on-screen, Sir Thomas More in “A Man for All Seasons” and Perry White in “Superman Returns.” Not all the celebrities come off well, including Richard Burton (“Could anyone, I wondered, be so unaware of what a crashing bore he had become?”), Anthony Quinn (“a big bully”) and Paul Newman (“emotionally vacant”). Langella also doesn’t spare himself. He acknowledges being a terrible boor around Deborah Kerr and Dinah Shore, did something “unforgivable” to Jackie Kennedy and is wistful about being a lover to a faded Rita Hayworth, saying she was “the single most tragic example of how far from the real person an image can be.” He calls “Cutthroat Island” one of his worst films, “the single most egregious example of excess I have ever witnessed in the movie world.” “I really felt very strongly that I wasn’t going to write a sweetie-darling-honeybaby book,” he says. “Most celebrities’ biographies I read I can’t get through — they’re either immensely

“Dropped Names.” The Associated Press: How was the book born? Langella: It’s been in my head for years and years and years. I’ve been a very lucky duck: I’ve run into the most extraordinary people as a result of being an actor. But it started in earnest when Jill Clayburgh died. I hadn’t spent a lot of time with her in her last years and I was so sad and regretted missing that. A friend I was with asked me who she was. He was a great deal younger. I sat down and took out a yellow legal pad and wrote for about three hours about Jill. And then I decided to write about somebody else. And then somebody else. And then pretty soon they just kept adding up. I would go, ‘Oh, I remember this’ and ‘I remember that.’ I wanted to immortalize them all, warts and all. AP: Was it fun to write? Langella: Actually, it was quite wonderful to write — and agony to rewrite. I wrote and wrote and wrote — I think it ended up to be about 110 people. And then it was very difficult to go through it and decide who to remove. People came in and went out and came back and forth. It took me a very long time to bring it down to the 65 or 66 it is. And then there was a great deal of reading them over and over. I must have reviewed every one of them several dozen times. AP: Did you have any misgivings about telling tales out of school? Langella: No. Anything I didn’t think was proper to make public, I just simply didn’t make public. I was very careful about that. I went through these

Out & About

Books

AP Drama Writer

D8 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Getting back to nature

Frank Langella dishes about the famous in memoir

D5 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Nightlife

Books


BY MESFIN FEKADU Associated Press

Madonna says it best on the opening track of her 12th album: “No one can put out my fire.” At 53, she’s still got it going on. And thankfully so. Her newest release, “MDNA” — her first apart from her longtime label, Warner Bros. — is full of upbeat dance jams and simmering slow grooves, and it delivers for the most part. True, it’s not nearly as topnotch as past records from the pop icon; the songs on “MDNA,” despite some risqué language, are much safer and tread familiar ground. Still, there are some

standouts. “Girl Gone Wild,” produced by Benny and Alle Benassi (Chris Brown’s “Beautiful People”), starts things off nicely with its European flavor and addictive hook. Then there’s “I Don’t Give A,” the second track on the album to feature Nicki Minaj, and the better one (first single “Give Me All Your Luvin’” sounds like a Gwen Stefani demo circa 2004, and that’s not a compliment). The album’s best song is “Love Spent,” with its Bollywood beat. It finds Madonna calling out a lover with lyrics like: “You had all of me, you wanted more, would you have married

me if I were poor?” It’s worth noting that the album is Madonna’s first collection of new songs since she di-

set, but Madonna sometimes trips over on her own disco ball. “Gang Bang” is a complete mess, “I’m Addicted” sounds overproduced and “I’m a Sinner” is mediocre. She shines brightest when she brings down the pace. “Falling Free” is soothing, the Golden Globe-winning “Masterpiece” from her film “W.E.” is soft and classic, and “I (Expletive) Up” sounds like a raw and honest apology to an ex (perhaps another ode to Ritchie). Associated Press On “MDNA,” Madonna has a wide array of helpers: vorced director Guy Ritchie Singer Priscilla Renea, who in 2008. Bitter much? has written for Rihanna and The dance sound domi- Selena Gomez, co-wrote nates most of the 12-track two tracks; Alain Whyte,

the main songwriting partner to Morrissey, co-wrote a song; and Klas Ahlund, the producer behind Swedish dance singer Robyn, coproduced a tune. The CD also has assists from producer Jean-Baptiste (Chris Brown, Black Eyed Peas, Kelis); British singer-songwriter Mika; and French DJproducer Martin Solveig. Then there’s usual suspect William Orbit, who produced Madonna’s “Ray of Light.” It’s a bit of a mash-up, and may be the reason why “MDNA” is good, but not great. CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: Both Minaj and Madonna bring the swagger

‘Truth’ is intense historical thriller Reviewer: All that is missing is a Sherlock Holmeslike twist to make Kieran Shields’ first novel a winner. ■

BY JEFF AYERS For The Associated Press

Music Notes

Associated Press

Authentic music performances change audiences a true artist perform at the Wednesday Club recital this past Sunday. The genuine emotion displayed across soprano Cheryl Crider’s face as she sang “I Dreamed a Dream” from Les Miserables touched the audience deeply. Crider’s ability to contain the emotion within the song as it drove

her performance was one of the best I’ve ever seen. Authentic performances, regardless of technical ability or flair, touch audiences and drive change. This is artistry in action. In today’s world where technical superiority and perfection are praised sometimes more than musical expression, Crider’s

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performance is a reminder to me to be as authentic in my own performances. I personally strive to be more than a flutist or musician every day I work. I strive to be an artist so I can help change the world and my community into a better place. No matter at what level play or our education, we are all artists.

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Book Review

‘Fall From Grace’ is a sappy family drama BY JEFF AYERS

For The Associated Press

“Fall From Grace” (Scribner), by Richard North Patterson: Buried secrets threaten to devastate a family in Richard North Patterson’s latest saga, “Fall From Grace.” Adam Blaine was estranged for years from his novelist-father, Ben. He returns home when his father dies in a fall off a cliff. The funeral is a somber affair, but what follows next shocks

Adam: His mother has been disinherited from his father’s will. Instead, the money is being given to Ben’s secret lover. The police are investigating whether Ben’s death was an accident. Each family member has a motive, forcing Adam to ask tough questions. Every answer opens old wounds. Secrets that have been dormant for years rise to the surface, and Adam will have to confront the reason he was estranged from his father. (Adam has secrets of his

own, some involving Ben, others involving his future.) The sappy family drama that slowly unravels over the course of the novel is neither surprising nor inventive. The twists and turns are obvious, making the final pages of “Fall From Grace” a bit of a letdown. Adam is revealed to be a CIA operative, but that’s just another unnecessary element. With no likable characters or situations, the overall experience is disappointing.

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As someone who plays cal spectrum (I can’t deny other people’s music, the the artistry of Bob Dylan), question of artistry and but I don’t think classical what we do as musicians musicians easily think of is one I ponder frequentthemselves in this way. We ly. Who or what defines a may not be particularly musical artist? We often sophisticated or we may call mainstream pop munot ever play for an audisicians “artists,” but is this change? ence, but there is a creative term used because they’re Don’t get me wrong. I urge to express something so successful or because truly believe that there are through the music we play. their music actually drives artists across the full musi- I had the honor to witness

“ T h e Tr u t h o f A l l T h i n gs ” (Crown), by Kieran Shields: Kieran Shields creates a pitch-perfect atmosphere in “The Truth of All Things,” a tale set in Portland, Maine, during the summer of 1892. Two hundred years earlier in Salem, Mass., the Salem witch trials brought about a period of paranoia and insecurity. Deputy Marshal Archie Lean’s mind is on his family and job when a case lands directly in his lap. A

prostitute is found murdered with her body laid out like a pentagram and her neck held to the ground with a pitchfork. With the help of criminalist Perceval Grey and Helen Prescott, a historian with access to old documents, the parallels to the past quickly add up. Disturbingly, they determine that this woman might not be the first one. The perpetrator, a brilliant mastermind using multiple pseudonyms from key figures of the historical witch trials, proves difficult to apprehend. Grey plays Sherlock Holmes, utilizing keen insight and pre-forensic science to uncover the

evidence necessary to capture the killer. Prescott uses her deep knowledge of the past to provide plausible links to the present in the killer’s mind. Lean brings the authority, muscle and judgment to put the various puzzle pieces together. In a time before technology and the ability to check fingerprints, blood splatter and other key elements in a murder, it was difficult to prove guilt beyond a reasonable doubt. By setting the story in 1892, Shields adds an extra level of intensity that makes it all work. Fans of historical thrillers will love “The Truth of All Things.” Throw in a Sherlock Holmeslike twist, and this first novel by Shields is a winner.

Associated Press

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Music

Madonna still brings heat, beats on ‘MDNA’

Books

D4 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Book Review

D9 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Music Review


Associated Press

BY CHRISTY LEMIRE

D10 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Associated Press

In this undated film image released by The Weinstein Company, Alex Libby is shown in the documentary film, “Bully.” with the cliche that kids will be kids. Among them are David and Tina Long of Murray County, Ga., whose 17year-old son, Tyler, hanged himself. Tina bravely shows the closet where the family found him, in his bedroom since turned into an office, and the death has turned the Longs’ quiet suburban life into a crusade for awareness. Among the movie’s other stories is 12-year-old Alex, a scrawny kid from Sioux City, Iowa. His parents acknowledge he’s a bit weird but as his mom points out, he’d be the most devoted friend to anyone who would accept him. Hirsch’s cam-

era captures Alex’s grueling daily school bus ride as big, mean kids use him as their punching bag. Alex has no idea how to stand up for himself and no adults seem capable of doing it for him (the assistant principal of his middle school comes off as especially clueless and inept). These moments are also the ones that earned “Bully” a ridiculous R-rating for language from the Motion Picture Association of America; The Weinstein Co. is now releasing the film unrated. In conservative Tuttle, Okla., 16-year-old Kelby has been shunned since she came out as a lesbian, as

have her parents. She finds a small circle of friends who accept her as she is, including a girlfriend, and people who inspire her to get out of bed every morning, but she feels discouraged when she can’t open up more minds and hearts. Her parents’ evolution on the subject is inspiring to see. These are just some of the stories Hirsch shares in “Bully.” Any one of them might have served as its own complete film. This is especially true of a tale that comes toward the end: that of Kirk and Laura Smalley, whose 11-year-old son, Ty, took his own life because of bullying. These are admittedly simple, small-town

folks: avid hunters and St. Louis Cardinals fans with longtime family roots in the area who are forced to reexamine everything that defines them in a teary haze. Kirk’s honesty and purity of emotion are haunting, and our time with this family is tantalizingly brief. As the mother of a 2year-old boy, I’m glad “Bully” exists. As a film critic, I wish it were more accomplished. “Bully,” a Weinstein Co. release, is not rated but contains some violence and disturbing situations involving kids and teens and some language. Running time: 94 minutes. Two and a half stars out of four.

• Susan Courtney, Tom Svec, Jeffrey Tritt and Gordan Wenzel will display their art at the Art Association of Harrisburg, 21 N. Front St. through March 29. • Art work from former and current Camp Hill School District visual arts faculty will be on display through the month of March at the Grace Milliman Pollack Performing Arts Center lobby. • Nature artist Jon Tritt will display artwork through the end of March at the Ned Smith Center for Nature and Art, 176 Water Company Road, Millersburg. Tritt is a native of New Cumberland and currently resides in Marysville. Visit www.nedsmithcenter.org. • Artwork by David Cubie will be on display in the Charley Krone Gallery at the New Cumberland Public Library through the month of April. • Trudi Gilliam, a metal sculptor, will be discussing her mixed metal sculptures as part of the Village Artisans Gallery’s 17th Anniversary Celebration. The anniversary celebration will be from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 1. • “Haiti — A Nation’s Persistence,” an exhibit by photojournalist Keely Kernan, will be on display April 2 through April 27 at Shippensburg University. An artist’s reception will be from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. April 9 in the library, followed by a talk by Kernan at 7:30 p.m. in Old Main Chapel. • The Council for the Arts of Chambersburg will present “Playing with Color” art class on Tuesdays from 9:30 to 11 a.m. for home schooled students age 10 and older through April 3 at the council’s Main Street site. For more information contact Laurie McKelvie at 477-2132 or lauriemckelvie@comcast.net. • York College of Pennsylvania will host its annual juried student exhibition from through April 3. • Dr. Joan Stack will present a lecture on Civil War era artist George Caleb Bingham at 5:30 p.m. on April 3 at Gettysburg College. For more information visit www.gettysburg.edu/civilwar2013. • The Council for the Arts of Chambersburg will host “Wild About Fabric” through April 6, 159 S. Main St., Chambersburg. • The HACC Artisan Marketplace will be open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday, April 7 with a special “meet the artists” event from 11 a.m. to 2 2 p.m. The marketplace is located at 2 Center Square, New Oxford. April hours for the marketplace are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Sundays. May hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays. For more information call Judy White at HACC at (800)222-4222 ext. 1311.

Alibis Eatery & Spirits 10 N. Pitt St. Carlisle , 243-4151 alibispirits.com Thursday, March 29: Batty Boh Night, DJ 9 p.m. Friday, March 30: Band Night: Variety of Local Stars Saturday, March 31: DJ, 10 p.m. Monday, April 2: Yuengs and Wings Tuesday, April 3: Team Trivia, 7 p.m. Wednesday, April

OUT & ABOUT | D5

Nature lovers can find plenty to do this weekend, outside and indoors! King’s Gap offers a mountaintop mansion as well as many trails for exploring while the Ned Smith Center showcases nature based artwork.

4: Open mic, 8 p.m.

Appalachian Brewing Company 50 N. Cameron St. Harrisburg, 221-1080 www.abcbrew.com

THEATRE | D6-7

Abrasive “Talk Radio” host fascinates in Open Stage show, while Dickinson College students rehearse for the upcoming production of “The Arsonists.”

Thursday, March 29: Jason Sturgeon, 8 p.m., $10 cover Saturday, March 31: Mantis with FDR & The New Deal 9 p.m., no cover Thursday, April 1: Foolish Business - The Whole Cannoli and Local Beat Reunion Show w/ The Great Northeast & Boxcar Social 8 p.m., $7 cover Saturday, April 3: Jonny Corndawg w/ Shovels & Rope and Robert Ellis 8 p.m., $7 advance, $10 at door

BOOKS | D8

Veteran actor Frank Langella dishes about celebrities he’s known in his new memoirs. Also, see reviews of “The Truth of All Things” and “Fall From Grace.”

MOVIES | D10-11

Gullifty’s Underground

Documentary, “Bully,” is a must-see for all ages. See a review of the movie which follows a half-dozen families with children who’ve been bullied at school. Also, see what else is playing on the big screen this weekend at area theaters.

1104 Carlisle Road Camp Hill, 761-6692 www.gulliftys.net Friday, March 30: The Plimsouls with Summer Twins and Parallax Project, doors at 7 and show at 8 p.m. Advance tickets $20, at door $25 Saturday, March 31: Mike Burton and DJAM, doors at 8 p.m. and show at 9:30 p.m. tickets, $7

Holly Inn

AALIVE

ing bring

BROADWAY63 Years! to Central Pennsylvania

31 S. Baltimore Ave. Mt. Holly Springs, 486-3823 www.hollyinn.com Friday, March 30: KB Blues Crew, 9:30 p.m to 12:30 a.m. Saturday, March 31: DJ Don, karoke and dancing, 9 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. FOREVER PLAID April 11 - May 6, 2012

A Heavenly Musical with a mix of 50’s and 60’s Rock and Roll, Show Tunes and Dance Music. The charming story of four young men who meet an early death, but get one last chance to entertain, providing their spirits still live on!

SIX TIME TONY AWARD WINNER CHICAGO August 15 - September 16, 2012

HONKY TONK ANGELS May 9 - June 24, 2012

The story of three women who dream of becoming country music stars and meet on the bus to Nashville. The show features many country music classics, including “Stand By Your Man,”“9 to 5,” and “These Boots Are Made For Walking.”

ROGERS & HAMMERSTEIN’S THE SOUND OF MUSIC July 11 - Aug. 12, 2012

Market Cross Pub & Brewery

For reservations, call

March 22, 2012 Section D March 29, 2012

INSIDE••• West Shore to INSIDE••• hold its ‘Taste of ‘Talk Radio’ hits Chamber’ with Open Stage in plenty of food to mid-April ••• D6 please ••• D4

ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S THE 39 STEPS October 17 - November 10, 2012 Broadways most intriguing, most thrilling, most riotous comedy smash! The mind blowing cast plays over 150 characters in this fast-paced tale of an ordinary man on an extroordinarily entertaining adventure. Using ingenious theatrical invention, this production is an engaging, fast-paced whodunit that celebrates the magic of theatre. Tony award winner and recent broadway hit.

A BOOGIE WOOGIE CHRISTMAS November 14 - December 23, 2012 Allenberry audiences know how much the Piper family loves Christmas. Why, you’ve seen the Pipers save Christmas from catastrophe numerous times and even celebrate a wedding at the North Pole! But did you know that Christmas

has been a special time for the Pipers for several generations?

717.258.3211 www.allenberry.com

113 N. Hanover St. Carlisle, 258-1234 www.marketcrosspub.com Thursday, March 29: Thirsty Thursday with Sylvia’s Suitcase, 8 to 11 p.m. Friday, March 30: Skip’s Museum, 9:30 p.m.

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www.cumberlink.com

SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE September 19 - October 14, 2012

NUNSENSE May 23 - July 8, 2012

The melodious and inspiring true story of the Von Trapp Family Singers, set against the panorama of the Austrian Alps. Features “Climb Every Mountain,”“Edelweiss,”“Do-Re-Me,”“So Long,

www.cumberlink.com

The longest running Broadway Revue in history! Featuring hits like “On Broadway,” “Fools Fall in Love,”“Jailhouse Rock,” Spanish Harlem,”“Poison Ivy,”“Hound Dog,”“Stand By Me,” and many more!

An award-winning amusing musical offering tart quips with a clerical slant. Featuring star turns, tap and ballet dancing, an audience quiz, and comic surprises, this show has become an international phenomenon. A very funny musical.

Farewell,” and more. This classic family musical is bound to be one of your “favorite things!”

EntErtainmEnt in thE EntErtainmEnt in thE hEart of thE midstatE hEart of thE midstatE

The “Razzle Dazzel” Dance Sensation that rocks the nation. Chicago in the late 1920’s brings in “All That Jazz”, “Hot Honey Rag”, and “Chicago After Midnight”. One of Broadways great musicals.

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The Sentinel TheSection Sentinel D

Give a gift they will never forget!

1559 Boiling SpringS road Boiling SpringS, pa

‘The Arsonists’ Hot play set to sizzle on the Mathers Theatre stage ••• D7

On the cover: Dickinson College theatre students put on “The Arsonists” beginning March 30. Page D7

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

The documentary “Bully” is essential to see, whether you’re a parent or a kid, whether you’ve been on the giving or receiving end of such increasingly pervasive cruelty. But it’s also frustrating to watch, because while the stories included here are undeniably moving by nature, they’re not exactly told in the most artful way, rendering “Bully” far less emotionally impactful than it might have been. Director Lee Hirsch’s film grows repetitive and seems longer than its relatively brief running time. Tonally, it bounces with no rhyme or reason between a handful of students across the country who’ve suffered from bullying; technically, it feels a bit messy, with needless zooms and images that fade in and out of focus. Perhaps that was an intentional aesthetic choice. Either way, it’s distracting and headache-inducing. Still, if “Bully” does nothing more than provide the impetus for a dialogue, it achieves its purpose. Hirsch spent a year with about a half-dozen families with children who’ve been bullied at school — teased, abused, humiliated and ostracized — behavior which adults too often sweep aside

• Scrap metal artist Edward D. Baltzell’s work will be on display at the Learning Commons on HACC’s Gettysburg Campus, 731 Old Harrisburg Road through the fall of 2012. An artist’s reception will from 10 to 11 a.m. Thursday, March 29 at the Fireplace Lounge, Room 200 at the Learning Commons.

MUSIC |D4

Madonna’s still got it. The pop icon’s new album MDNA is full of upbeat dance jams and simmering slow grooves. Also, this week Music Notes explores how authentic performances can change an audience.

Out & About

Movies

AP Movie Critic

LOS ANGELES — The Weinstein Co. is moving past the R rating earned by its documentary “Bully” and plans to release the film unrated. The company announced Monday that “Bully” will hit theaters March 30 without a rating from the Motion Picture Association of America, meaning some theater may choose not to show it. The MPAA gave the film an R rating for language and declined to change it when the Weinstein Co. appealed. That inspired teen activist Katy Butler to start an online petition seeking a lower rating so more young people could see the movie. She has collected more than 475,000 signatures so far and even met with MPAA officials earlier this month, but the group stood its ground and “Bully” remained rated R, which requires children under 17 to be accompanied by a parent or guardian. John Fithian, president of the National Association of Theatre Owners, told the Weinstein Co. that releasing the film unrated could result in theaters treating the teen-focused documentary as an NC-17 film, which means no one 17 and under can be admitted.

Art • Clare Klaum will be the “artist in action” at the Village Artisans Gallery March 31 from 1-4 p.m.

A look at local nightlife

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

‘Bully’ to be released without rating

Inside

Out & About

Reviewer: If “Bully” does nothing more than provide the impetus for a dialogue, it achieves its purpose. ■

The Scene

D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

‘Bully’ focuses on intolerable cruelty

A guide to area events

D3 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Movie Review


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Special Events

Theater

Music

• McGinley School of Irish Dance will present a mixed-media production with traditional Irish dance and other performances, at 7 p.m. March 31 at the Forum in Harrisburg. Tickets are $15 and $18. For more information call 439-2991 or visit www.mcginleyirishdancers.com.

• The Lions Community Theater will present “Annie” March 29-31 at 7:30 p.m. and March 31 at 2 p.m. at Shaull Elementary School. Tickets are $12 for adults and $6 for students. For more information or to order tickets call 582-2037.

• The Crimson Frog Coffeehouse presents open mic with Jonathan Frazier on March 28 and Herr Street on March 31.

• Comedian Brett Butler to perform at the Strand-Capitol Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. March 30. For more information visit www.StrandCapitol.org or call 846-1111.

• Gamut Classic Theatre will present “Speakeasy: A 1920s Cabaret” at 7:30 p.m. on March 30 and 31 at the theatre at Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are between $17 and $40.

• Metropolitan Area Dance Club will host a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. on March 31 at the PA Dance Sport Ballroom in Hummelstown. For more information call 774-2171.

• Cumberland Valley High School presents “Legally Blonde: The Musical” at 7:30 p.m. March 29 through 31 and at 2 p.m. April 1. For tickets call 506-3936. Tickets are $10 for students and $12 for adults.

• Pat’s Singles Club will hold a dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Sunday April 1, at the Valencia Ballroom, York. DJ Ray Thomas will provide the dance music. Cost is $10.

• The Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Little Mermaid,” Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10:15 a.m. and Saturdays at 1 p.m. through March 31. Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are $5-$8. Visit www.gamutplays.org or call 238-4111.

• Ballroom dance classes at Dickinson College through April 3. Beginner classes start at 6 p.m. and the Third Timer class starts at 7:15 p.m. Cost is $30. Contact devwell@dickinson.edu or fhancock@comcast.net or call 241-4483.

• Oyster Mill Playhouse presents “Out Of Order” from March 16 to April 1. Show is at 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Cost is $14, opening night tickets are $16. Call 737-6768 or visit www.oystermill.com.

• Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jennifer Egan will read from her novel, “A Visit From the Goon Squad” at 6 p.m. April 4 in the Anita Tuvin Schlecter Auditorium. For more information call 245-1875 or visit www.clarkeforum. org.

• Dickinson College to present a student performance of “The Arsonists,” March 30-31 and April 2-3, 8 p.m. Mathers Theatre in the Holland Union Building. For more information, tickets call 245-1327. Tickets are $7.

• Local author Dianne Bolyard will be signing copies of her book “Happily Ever After,” from 1 to 3 p.m. April 7 at the Courthouse Common Espresso Bar and Bistro, Hanover Street, Carlisle.

• Chambersburg Ballet Theatre presents “Collaborations Sacred and Classical” April 3, at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $10. Call 709-1800.

• Belly dance classes for those age 16 and older will be held from 6:30 to 7:45 p.m. April 11 through May 9 at the New Cumberland Middle School. Cost is $33 for residents of the West Shore and $40 for all others, plus a West Shore School District fee of $22. For more information visit www.wsrec.org or call 920-9515.

• Harrisburg Shakespeare Company will be holding auditions for its upcoming performance of “Romeo and Juliet” from 7 to 9 p.m. April 4 and 6 and for actors out of the area auditions will be held from 11 to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, April 7. To make an audition appointment call 238-4111.

• Pat’s Singles Club will hold a dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. Sunday April 16, at the Valencia Ballroom, York. The Headliners will provide the dance music. Cost is $10. • “Green Buildings of York,” a downtown walking tour will be held at 2 p.m. April 21. The tour starts at Continental Square. For more information visit downtownyorkpa.com/walking-tours. • Metropolitan Area Dance Club will host a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. on April 21 at the PA Dance Sport Ballroom in Hummelstown. For more information call 774-2171.

• The Little Theatre of Mechanicsburg will present “Extremities” through April 8. Call 766-0535 for tickets, box office opens March 12 for patrons, and March 13 for the public. • Adams County School of Musical Theatre will present “Godspell” at 7 p.m. April 13 and 14 and at 2 p.m. April 14 and 15 at the school, 49 York St., Gettysburg. Reserved seating tickets are $11. For more information visit www.acsmt.org or call 334-2692. • Gamut Theatre Group’s Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Jungle Book” at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at the Whitaker Center’s Sunoco Theatre, Harrisburg. Cost is $15.

• Nickelondeon’s The Fresh Beat Band to perform at 6:30 p.m., Thursday March 29 at the Hershey Theatre. A second show at 3:30 p.m. has been added. Tickets are $26.50 to $39.50 and are available at www.ticketmaster. com or by calling 534-3405. • Midtown Scholar’s Friday Folk Cafe performer will be Aaron Nathans and Michael Ronstandt from 8 to 10 p.m. March 30. For more information call 236-1680. • Susquehanna Folk Music Society presents Genticorum at 7:30 p.m. on March 30 at Camp Hill Methodist Church. Cost is $10 to $22. For more information call 763-5744. • Casting Crowns to perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 at the Giant Center, Hershey. Tickets are $21.50 to $75 and are available at www.ticketmaster.com or by calling 534-3911. • Lancaster International Classical Guitar Festival and Competition will be held March 30 and 31 at the Ware Center, 42 N. Prince St., Lancaster. For more information visit www.LancasterARTS.com. • Dickinson College faculty will present the works of Polish composer Karol Szymanowski at 7 p.m., March 31 at the Rubendall Recital Hall in the Weiss Center for the Arts. The event is free and open to the public. • Midtown Scholar presents Seasons in concert from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. March 31. For more information call 236-1680. • Dickinson College student Ilana Rainero-de Haan will present her multilingual work for voice and small chamber ensemble at 4 p.m. April 1 in Rubendall Recital Hall, Weiss Center for the Arts. • Midtown Scholar will present Chuck van Zyl in concert at 5 p.m. April 1. For more information call 236-1680. • The Cumberland Singers will be performing “Anything But Quiet,” broadway music from 1925 to 2011, April 13 through 17. For more information visit www.cumberlandsingers.org or call 367-8030. • Beck and Benedict Hardware will present the Carroll County Ramblers anf the Patuxent Partners Bluegrass Band at 7 p.m., 118 Walnut St., Waynesboro. Admission is $13, children under 12 are free. For more information call 762-4711 or visit www.beck-benedicthardware.com.

Event information can be submitted via email to frontdoor@cumberlink.com, by mail, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013 or by fax at 243-3121. For more information, visit www.cumberlink.com/entertainment

Flagship continued

Great Escape continued

21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 11:10 a.m., 1:45, 4:30, 7, 9:35, Fri.-Thu. 10:55 a.m., 1:15, 4, 7:20, 10:05 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 12, 2:30, 4:55, 7:15, 9:35, Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:30, 4:50, 7:15, 9:35 The Artist (PG-13) Thu. 1:25, 6:30, 8:45, Fri.-Thu. 10:45 a.m., 6:30, 8:40 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 11 a.m., 1:10, 3:30, 5:40, 7:45, 9:45, Fri.Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:20, 3:30, 5:40, 7:45 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu. 10:25 a.m., 12:30, 2:35, 4:40, 6:40, Fri.Thu. 10:25 a.m., 12:30, 2:35, 4:40, 6:40, 8:35 Friends with Kids (R) Thu. 10:50 a.m., 2, 4:30, 7:20, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:55 a.m., 2:35, 4:55, 7:40, 10:05 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 10:20 a.m., 11 a.m., 1:10, 2:10, 4:20, 5:20, 7:30, 8:30, 10:30 Jeff, Who Lives at Home (R) Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 1:30, 3:30, 5:35, 7:50, 9:50 John Carter 2D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 12:30, 3:45, 6:45, 9:35 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 8:35, 11:20 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 10:45 a.m., 1, 3:15, Fri.-Thu. 1:25, 3:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:40, 4:10, 7, 9:20 Project X (R) Thu. 1:30, 3:40, 5:40, 7:45, 9:50 Safe House (R) Thu. 10:40 a.m., 4, 7:05, Fri.-Thu. 10 Silent House (R) Thu. 5:30, 7:40, 9:45 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 1:40, 9:40 A Thousand Words (PG-13) Thu. 11:05 a.m., 3:50 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Wed. (April 4)-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 3:30, 7:40 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 2, 7:10 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 4:30, 9:55

Act of Valor (R) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:30, 4:55, 7:40, 10:05, Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 4:55, 10:10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2, 6:40 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 4:20, 9 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 12:10, 1, 3:20, 4, 6:30, 8, 9:30 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12:40, 3:30, 7, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 12:40, 3:30, 6:50, 9:50 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 12:20, 6:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.-Thu. 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40 Project X (R) Thu. 3, 9:10 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 12:50, 3:40, 7:20, 10, Fri.-Thu. 2:30, 7:40 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20

Project X (R) Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5, 7:40, 9:50 Safe House (R) Thu. 1:55, 7:20 Silent House (R) Thu. 12:10, 2:20, 4:45, 7:50, 10:05 A Thousand Words (PG-13) Thu. 11:45 a.m., 2:05, 4:25, 6:45, 9:15, Fri.Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:25, 7:35, 9:50 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Wed. (April 4)-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 3:30, 4:30, 7:30, 8:30 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:40, 10 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:05, 4:30, 6:40, 7:10, 9, 9:30

Great Escape 3501 Paxton St.

21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 2:15, 5, 8, Fri.-Sun. 2, 4:40, 7:55, 10:30, Mon.-Thu. 2, 4:40, 7:55 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 1:30, 4:10, 6:45, Fri.-Sun. 1:25, 4, 6:45, 9:40, Mon.-Thu. 1:25, 4, 6:45 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 12:15, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15, Fri. 2:10, 4:20, 7:10, 9:20, Sat.-Sun. 11:45 a.m., 2:10, 4:20, 7:10, 9:20, Mon.-Thu. 2:10, 4:20, 7:10 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu. 1:45, 4 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 12:30, 1:15, 3:45, 4:30, 6:15, 7, 7:45, Fri.Sun. 12:30, 1:15, 3:45, 4:30, 6:15, 7, 7:45, 9:30, 10:15, Mon.-Thu. 12:30, 1:15, 3:45, 4:30, 6:15, 7, 7:45 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 1, 4:20, 7:25, Fri. 3:15, Sat.-Sun. 12:10, 3:15, Mon.-Thu. 3:15 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri. 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50, Sat.-Sun. 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:20, 9:50, Mon.-Thu. 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 Project X (R) Thu. 12:40, 2:50, 5:10, 7:35 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Wed. (April 4)-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 3:50, 8 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri. 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10, Sat.-Sun. 12, 2:30, 5, 7:30, 10, Mon.-Thu. 2:30, 5, 7:30

Flagship Cinemas 4590 Carlisle Pike, Mechanicsburg 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 10

Continued next column

21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 2, 2:30, 4:40, 5:10, 7:15, 7:45, 9:55, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 2, 2:30, 4:40, 5:10, 7:15, 7:45, 9:45, 10:15 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 11:20 a.m., 4:30, 10 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:30, 3:50, 6:50, 9 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 12, 2:10, 4:20 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:30, 12:50, 1:40, 2:40, 3:40, 4:10, 4:50, 5:45, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:10, 9:40, 10:15, 10:40, Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 12:10, 12:50, 1:40, 2:40, 3:40, 4:10, 4:50, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 8, 9:40, 10:10 John Carter 2D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 12:40, 3:30, 6:40, 9:35 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 7:10, 10:10 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 12:20, 2:50 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 1:45, 2:15, 4:15, 4:45, 6:50, 7:20, 9:20, 9:55

Continued next column

Regal Carlisle Commons 8 Noble Boulevard

Regal Harrisburg 14 1500 Caughey Drive 21 Jump Street (R) Thu. 1:10, 2, 3:50, 4:50, 6:40, 7:40, 9:20, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 2:10, 5:20, 8, 10:40 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 1:30, 4:05 Agent Vinod (NR) Fri.-Thu. 4:50 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Thu. 1:40, 4:20, 7, 9:10, Fri.-Sun. 12:40, 3:30, 6:10, 8:30, Mon.-Thu. 3:30, 6:10, 8:30 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) Thu. 12:40, 2:50, 5:20 The Hunger Games (PG-13) Thu. 12:30, 1, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 9, 9:30, 10, 10:30, Fri.-Sun. 12, 12:30, 1, 1:30, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 8:20, 9, 9:30, 10, 10:30, Mon.-Thu. 1, 1:30, 2:40, 3:10, 3:40, 4:10, 5:50, 6:20, 6:50, 7:20, 7:50, 8:20, 9, 9:30, 10, 10:30 John Carter 2D (PG-13) Thu. 4, 10:10 John Carter 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12:50, 7:10, Fri.-Sun. 12:50, 4:20 Mirror Mirror (PG) Fri.-Thu. 1:10, 2:20, 3:50, 5, 6:40, 7:30, 9:20, 10:10 National Theatre Live: She Stoops to Conquer Live (NR) Thu. 7 October Baby (PG-13) Thu. 1:50, 4:30, 7:30, 10:05, Fri.-Thu. 1:40, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50 Project X (R) Thu. 2:30, 8 Safe House (R) Thu. 3, 9:40 Silent House (R) Thu. 5:10, 10:15 A Thousand Words (PG-13) Thu. 6:30 Titanic 3D (PG-13) Wed. (April 4)-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 3:50, 8 Wrath of the Titans 2D (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 1:20, 4, 6:30, 9:10 Wrath of the Titans 3D (PG-13) Fri.-Sun. 12:10, 1:50, 2:30, 4:30, 5:10, 7, 7:40, 9:40, 10:20, Mon.-Thu. 1:50, 2:30, 4:30, 5:10, 7, 7:40, 9:40, 10:20

Cumberland Drive-in first feature (starts at 7:45 p.m.): The Hunger Games (PG-13) second feature: This Means War (PG-13)

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

• Susquehanna Mysteries Alliance will present “Titanic: What Lies Beneath” event at 2 p.m. April 15 at the Mechanicsburg Mystery Bookshop in Mechanicsburg, 6 Clouser Road. For more information call 795-7470 or email mysterybooks@comcast.net.

• The Penn State University Choir will perform a free concert at 7 p.m. March 29 at the Mechanicsburg Presbyterian Church.

Cinema Center of Camp Hill 3431 Simpson Ferry Road

Movies

Out & About

• The York County Heritage Trust will present “homebrew workshops” March 31, April 14 and May 2. Cost is $70 call 848-1587 for more information.

D2 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Now showing

D11 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

Out & About


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

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in bring

BROADWAY63 Years! to Central Pennsylvania FOREVER PLAID April 11 - May 6, 2012

A Heavenly Musical with a mix of 50’s and 60’s Rock and Roll, Show Tunes and Dance Music. The charming story of four young men who meet an early death, but get one last chance to entertain, providing their spirits still live on!

SIX TIME TONY AWARD WINNER CHICAGO August 15 - September 16, 2012 The “Razzle Dazzel” Dance Sensation that rocks the nation. Chicago in the late 1920’s brings in “All That Jazz”, “Hot Honey Rag”, and “Chicago After Midnight”. One of Broadways great musicals.

Out & About

HONKY TONK ANGELS May 9 - June 24, 2012 The story of three women who dream of becoming country music stars and meet on the bus to Nashville. The show features many country music classics, including “Stand By Your Man,”“9 to 5,” and “These Boots Are Made For Walking.”

D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 29, 2012

is bound to be one of your “favorite things!”

For reservations, call

www.cumberlink.com

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www.cumberlink.com

March 22, 2012 Section D March 29, 2012

INSIDE••• West Shore to INSIDE••• hold its ‘Taste of ‘Talk Radio’ hits Chamber’ with Open Stage in plenty of food to mid-April ••• D6 please ••• D4

The longest running Broadway Revue in history! Featuring hits like “On Broadway,” “Fools Fall in Love,”“Jailhouse Rock,” Spanish Harlem,”“Poison Ivy,”“Hound Dog,”“Stand By Me,” and many more!

ALFRED HITCHCOCK’S THE 39 STEPS October 17 - November 10, 2012

An award-winning amusing musical offering tart quips with a clerical slant. Featuring star turns, tap and ballet dancing, an audience quiz, and comic surprises, this show has become an international phenomenon. A very funny musical.

The melodious and inspiring true story of the Von Trapp Family Singers, set against the panorama of the Austrian Alps. Features “Climb Every Mountain,”“Edelweiss,”“Do-Re-Me,”“So Long, Farewell,” and more. This classic family musical

Entertainment in the Entertainment in the heart of the midstate heart of the midstate

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SMOKEY JOE’S CAFE September 19 - October 14, 2012

NUNSENSE May 23 - July 8, 2012

ROGERS & HAMMERSTEIN’S THE SOUND OF MUSIC July 11 - Aug. 12, 2012

A

ALIVE

The Sentinel The Sentinel The Sentinel TheSection Sentinel D

Broadways most intriguing, most thrilling, most riotous comedy smash! The mind blowing cast plays over 150 characters in this fast-paced tale of an ordinary man on an extroordinarily entertaining adventure. Using ingenious theatrical invention, this production is an engaging, fast-paced whodunit that celebrates the magic of theatre. Tony award winner and recent broadway hit.

A BOOGIE WOOGIE CHRISTMAS November 14 - December 23, 2012 Allenberry audiences know how much the Piper family loves Christmas. Why, you’ve seen the Pipers save Christmas from catastrophe numerous times and even celebrate a wedding at the North Pole! But did you know that Christmas

has been a special time for the Pipers for several generations?

717.258.3211 www.allenberry.com

Give a gift they will never forget!

1559 Boiling SpringS road Boiling SpringS, pa

‘The Arsonists’ Hot play set to sizzle on the Mathers Theatre stage ••• D7


Alive - Entertainment Section