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Out & About D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Nightlife

Eliot Lipp to electrify ABC this weekend By Lisa Clarke Sentinel Correspondent Frontdoor@cumberlink.com

Today we turn our calendars to a new month and look forward to daylight savings time and the official end of winter. On Friday, March 2, kick off the new season with nationally-known electronic music artist Eliot Lipp headlining a show at the Appalachian Brewing Company’s Abbey Bar. Originally hailing from Tacoma, Wash., Lipp got his start making beats for local rappers. His musical ambitions eventually led him to Los Angeles where he first pursued his career, signing with Eastern Developments record label in 2004 and releasing his first LP, which was made using sequential circuits and korg ms-20 synths. “When I first heard electro and glitch I got excited about the possibilities of mixing those styles with hip hop,” says Lipp. “Part of my journey through discovering the history of electronic music led me to analog synths, vintage samplers and drums machines. I still collect that kind of gear and use it quite a bit in my own production.” He subsequently released two more albums, ‘Tacoma Mockingbird’, a collection of works that remind the artist of his hometown, and

Electronic music artist Eliot Lipp will perform at ABC Harrisburg tomorrow night. Submitted photo

‘Steele Street Scraps’ on which he collaborates with notable artists John Hughes and Earmint. In 2009, he released “Peace Love Weed 3D”, and is slated to release his newest work next month. With his eclectic range of equipment and influences, it’s clear that Lipp is an artist with range and creative consideration that shows in his work. “I’m influenced by so many styles, house, hip

hop, instrumental stuff... I like a lot of what the labels Alpha Pup & PLM have been releasing,” says Lipp. “I like some of the new U.K. club stuff too. Lately I’m just really influenced by people playing really bass heavy tracks with interesting rhythms.” While Lipp leaves the theatrics off the stage, his show is by no means lacking energy. He uses two live analog synths while doing live remixes on his laptop,

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and expertly blends a range of music together. “I’m playing a lot of my high energy tracks but I’m slipping in a few of the pretty ones too. I love sampling records so at my show you’ll hear a lot of different genres of music squashed into one tune sometimes,” he says. “I don’t wear a mask or have a giant video wall or anything so I just try to play really good music and connect with the crowd.”

He notes that although his music is not typical club music, it is designed to fill the dance floor. “My goal is to get people dancing,” he says. “One of my favorite things about my shows is the group of people that my music brings together.” Eliot Lipp will perform on Friday, March 2 at the Appalachian Brewing Company’s Abbey Bar, located on the second floor of the 50 N. Cameron St. facil-

A

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Entertainment in the heart of the midstate

The Sentinel www.cumberlink.com

The Sentinel www.cumberlink.com

Section D March 1, 2012

INSIDE..... Rosencrantz and Guildenstern come to the Gamut stage while an Italian opera opens locally

Dervish

ity in Harrisburg. Tickets are $10, and patrons must be age 21 or older. The show begins at 9 p.m. with Heirosonic, followed by Minshara at 10 p.m. Lipp takes the stage at midnight. For more information, visit www.greenbeltevents. com. For venue information, visit www.abcbrew. com.

food. movies. entertainment. sports. parenting.

Celtic group to perform March 9 at the Carlisle Theatre •••D7


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Special Events

Theater

Music

• Metropolitan Area Dance Club will host a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. on March 10, 17. 24 and 31 at the PA Dance Sport Ballroom in Hummelstown. For more information call 774-2171.

• Chambersburg Community Theatre presents “The Sound of Music” at 7:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays, from March 23 to 25 and March 30 to April 1, at the Capitol Theatre. Cost is $15 for adults; $10 for students; and $5 for children age 5 and younger. Visit www.cctonline. org or call 263-0202.

• Midtown Scholar’s Friday Folk Cafe presents “Timurid” from 8 to 10 p.m. Friday, March 3. There is no cover for the event but donations are strongly encouraged. All proceeds will go to the Leukemia Lymphoma Society. For more information visit www.MidtownScholar.com or call 236-1680.

• The Capitol Steps will perform at 8 p.m. March 15 at the H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center at Shippensburg University. Tickets are $20 to $35. Call 477-SHOW for visit luhrscenter.com for tickets. • Comedian Brett Butler to perform at the Strand-Capitol Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. March 30. For more information visit www.StrandCapitol.org or call 846-1111.

• Dickinson College will host it’s 9th Annual Local Food Dinner at 6:30 p.m. on March 24 in the Holland Union Building, College Street. Tickets go on sale Monday, March 12 and donation of $15 to Carlisle Farmers on the Square is suggested. For more information visit http:/blogs.dickinson.edu/farm/blog/ or call 245-1251. • Pat’s Singles Club will hold dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 11 at the Valencia Ballroom, York. “Rumor Has It” will perform, cost is $10. • Susquehanna Mysteries Alliance will present “Titanic: What Lies Beneath” at 2 p.m. April 15 at the Mechanicsburg Mystery Bookshop in Mechanicsburg, 6 Clouser Road. For more information call 795-7470 or email mysterybooks@comcast.net. • Pat’s Singles Club will hold its St. Patrick’s Day dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 18 at the Valencia Ballroom, York. “The Headliners” will perform, cost is $10. • Julie Newmar, who played “Cat Woman” in the original Batman series will be at the Pennsylvania Garden Show of York at the York Expo Center at 2 p.m. on Saturday at the Toyota Arena. She will be signing copies of her book “The Conscious Cat Woman’s Guide to Living.”

• Oyster Mill Playhouse presents “Out Of Order” from March 16 to April 1. Show is at 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Cost is $14, opening night tickets are $16. Call 7376768 or visit www.oystermill.com. • Gamut Theatre Group’s Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Jungle Book” at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at the Whitaker Center’s Sunoco Theatre, Harrisburg. Cost is $15. • The Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Little Mermaid,” Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10:15 a.m. and Saturdays at 1 p.m. March 14 through March 31. Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are $5-$8. Visit www.gamutplays.org or call 238-4111. • West Perry High School presents “Footloose” March 8,9 and 20 in the school’s auditorium. • Harrisburg Shakespeare Company will present “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from March 9 through March 25 at the Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg.Tickets are $17 to $25. • Cumberland Valley High School presents “Legally Blonde: The Musical” at 7:30 p.m. March 29 through 31 and at 2 p.m. April 1. For tickets call 506-3936. Tickets are $10 for students and $12 for adults.

• The “Joys of Springtime” flower show will take place March 2 through 4 as part of the Pennsylvania Garden Show of York, at the York Expo. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students and children under 12 are free. For more information email babrand@embarqmail.com or call 642-9776.

• The Little Theatre of Mechanicsburg will present “Extremities” March 23 through April 8. Call 766-0535 for tickets, box office opens March 12 for patrons, and March 13 for the public.

• Ballroom dance classes at Dickinson College through April 3. Beginner classes start at 6 p.m. and the Third Timer class starts at 7:15 p.m. Cost is $30. Contact devwell@ dickinson.edu or fhancock@comcast.net or call 241-4483.

• Open Stage of Harrisburg presents “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” through Feb. 25 at the theater, 223 Walnut St., Harrisburg. Visit www.openstagehbg.com or call 232-OPEN.

• The Metropolitan Area Dance Club will host a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, March 3 at the PA Dance Sport Ballroom in Hummelstown with the band Bob Kreitz and Friends. Call 774-2171. • Messiah College presents Michael Cooper’s “Masked Marvels and Wondertales” at 7 p.m. in Miller Auditorium in the Climenhaga Fine Arts Center March 9. Tickets are $12 to $23 and are available at tickets@messiah.edu or by calling 691-6036.

• The Popcorn Hat Players will present “Hansel and Gretel” at 10:15 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays and 1 p.m. Saturdays, through March 3, at Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are $5-$8. Visit www. gamutplays.org or call 238-4111.

• Cormorant’s Fancy will perform at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 11 at the First Lutheran Church, 21 S. Bedford St., Carlisle. Call 249-3310 or visit www.firstlutherancarlisle. org. • Dervish will perfom at the Carlisle Theatre at 8 p.m. Friday, March 9. Tickets are $26 to $36 and $10 for students. Call 258-0666 or visit www.carlisletheatre.org. • John Hollandsworth will present an autoharp workshop Saturday, March 10 at Orthey Instruments, 18 Burd Road, Newport. Cost is $20, reservations required. Call 567-6406 or 567-9469, email, gorthey@gmail.com • The Kim Thompson Group featuring guitarist Mike Moreno will perform at 6 p.m. at the Sheraton Harrisburg Hershey Hotel, 4650 Lindle Road, Harrisburg, on April 22. • Dickinson College presents “An Evening with the Music of Gabriel Faure” at 7 p.m., Saturday, March 3 at the Rudendall Recital Hall, Weiss Center for the Arts. • The Harrisburg Choral Society to present a “Lenten Reflections” concert at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 4 at the Camp Hill Presbyterian Church, Carlisle. Coast is $12 for adults and $5 for students. Vists www.harrisburgchoralsociety.org. • The West Shore Shag and Bop Club will be hosting a dance at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 10 at the Lewisberry Ballroom. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students with ID. Call 938-6959. • John Prine with special guest Leo Kottke will perform at 7 p.m., Saturday, March 3 at Hershey Theatre. Tickets are $49.50 to $59.50 and are available at www.ticketmaster.com or by calling 534-3405. • Eliot Lipp will perform at 12 a.m. at The Abbey Bar at Appalachian Brewing Co., Harrisburg. Tickets are $10. Call 221-1080 or visit www.abcbrew.com. • Casting Crowns to perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 at the Giant Center, Hershey. Tickets are $21.50 to $75 and are available at www.ticketmaster. com or by calling 534-3911.

Event information can be submitted via email to frontdoor@cumberlink.com, by mail, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013 or by fax at 243-3121. For more information, visit www.cumberlink.com/entertainment

Flagship continued

Act of Valor (R) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50, Fri.Thu. 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50 The Artist (PG-13) Thu. 10:55 a.m., 1:15, 3:50, 6:45, 9:05, Fri.Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:25, 3:50, 6:40, 8:55 Chronicle (PG-13) Thu. 12:25, 7:25 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11 a.m., 1:10, 3:30, 5:40, 7:45, 9:45 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:45, 8:50 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12, 2:25, 4:45, 7:50, 10:05 Gone (PG-13) Thu. 11:25 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 7:05, 9:30, Fri.-Thu. 11 a.m., 1:10, 4:15, 7:05, 9:20 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 11:05 a.m., 6:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:20, 4 Project X (R) Fri. 1:25, 3:40, 5:45, 7:45, 9:55, 11:59, Sat.-Thu. 1:25, 3:40, 5:45, 7:50, 10 Safe House (R) Thu. 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 7, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 7, 9:30 The Secret World of Arriety (G) Thu. 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 4:25, 6:50, 9, Fri.-Thu. 12:25, 2:35, 5:05 Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 1:20, 4:10, 9:20 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 7:30, 9:50, Fri.Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 7:30, 9:55 Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds (PG-13) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 10, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 9:50 The Vow (PG-13) Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:15, 9:45, Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 Wanderlust (R) Thu. 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:40, 10, Fri.-Thu. 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:40, 9:55 Woman in Black (PG-13) Thu. 2:35, 5, 9:35, Fri.-Thu. 7:25, 9:35

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40, 10 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50 Project X (R) Fri.-Thu. 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40 Safe House (R) Thu. 12, 2:40, 7, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 9:20 The Secret World of Arriety (G) Thu. 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20, Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7 Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:45 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 12:10, 3:10, 7:10, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 12:10, 3:40, 7:10, 9:55 The Vow (PG-13) Thu. 12:10, 3:10, 7:20, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 12:10, 3:30, 7, 10:05

Flagship Cinemas Act of Valor (R) Thu. 12:20, 3:20, 7:45, 10:10, Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 3:10, 6:50, 9:30 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 4:20, 9 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 2, 6:40

Continued next column

Great Escape Act of Valor (R) Thu. 11:20 a.m., 12:10, 1:55, 2:45, 4:30, 7:20, 8, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 4:30, 7:20, 10 Chronicle (PG-13) Thu. 5:20, 10:30 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 3:50, 6:30, 8:45 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 12:30, 2:40, 4:50, 7:15, 9:25 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 2D (PG-13) Thu. 12:30, 3:50, 6:30, 9, Fri.-Thu. 7:45, 10:05 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 4:45, 7:55, 10:15, Fri.-Thu. 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 4:45 Gone (PG-13) Thu. 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:10, 9:25, Fri.-Thu. 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:10, 9:35 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 11:35 a.m., 2, Fri.-Thu. 11:35 a.m., 2, 4:15 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 4:15, 7:25, 9:45, Fri.-Thu. 7:25, 9:45 Project X (R) Fri.-Thu. 12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:40, 9, 9:50 Safe House (R) Thu.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:35, 10:10 Secret World of Arrietty (G) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 6:45, 9:05, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:35, 4, 6:30 Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 12:45, 4, 7:15, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 12:45, 3:30, 6:45, 9:10

Continued next column

Great Escape continued Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds (PG-13) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 12, 1:50, 2:35, 4:25, 5:10, 7, 7:45, 9:35, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 11:25 a.m., 12:25, 2:05, 3:40, 4:35, 6:40, 7:30, 9:15, 10:05 The Vow (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20 Wanderlust (R) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:30, 10, Fri.Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30

Regal Carlisle Commons 8 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 2:30, 5, 7:50, Fri. 2:20, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30, Sat.-Sun. 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30, Mon.Thu. 2:20, 5:10, 7:50 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri. 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9, Sat.-Sun. 12, 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9, Mon.-Thu. 2:10, 4:30, 6:50 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri. 2:50, 5:20, 7:30, 9:40, Sat.-Sun. 12:40, 2:50, 5:20, 7:30, 9:40, Mon.-Thu. 2:50, 5:20, 7:30 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu. 2:20, 4:50, 7:40, Fri.-Sun. 1:40, 4:40, 7:20, 10, Mon.-Thu. 1:40, 4:40, 7:20 Gone (PG-13) Thu. 2:40, 5:10, 8, Fri.-Sun. 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:50, Mon.-Thu. 1:50, 4:20, 7 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 2:10, Fri.-Thu. 2:30 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 4:40, 7, 9:30, Fri. 4:50, 7:10, 9:30, Sat.Sun. 12:10, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30, Mon.-Thu. 4:50, 7:10, 9:30 Project X (R) Fri. 2:40, 5:30, 8, 10:20, Sat.-Sun. 12:30, 2:40, 5:30, 8, 10:20, Mon.-Thu. 2:40, 5:30, 8 Safe House (R) Thu. 1:30, 4:20, 7:30 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 1, 3:55, 6:50 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 1:45, 4:10, 7:10 The Vow (PG-13) Thu. 2, 4:30, 7:20, Fri.-Sun. 2, 5, 7:40, 10:10, Mon.-Thu. 2, 5, 7:40

Carlisle Theatre A Dangerous Method (R) Thu. 7:30 The Descendants (R) Fri.-Sat. 7:30, Sun. 2, Wed.-Thu. 7:30

Regal Harrisburg Act of Valor (R) Thu. 2:10, 5, 7:40, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:20 Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Love Never Dies (PG) Wed. (March 7) 7:30 The Artist (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:40 Chronicle (PG-13) Thu. 1:30, 4:10, 6:40, 9:20 The Descendants (R) Thu. 12:55, 3:30 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 2, 4:10, 6:20, 8:30, 10:40 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 12:50, 3, 5:10, 7:20, 9:30 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 2D (PG-13) Thu. 6:10, 8:50 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu. 1:40, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 12:55, 3:40, 6:45, 9:45 Gone (PG-13) Thu. 2:30, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10, Fri.-Thu. 2:30, 5:15, 8, 10:25 The Grey (R) Thu. 1:45, 7:45 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 4, Fri.-Thu. 3:50 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 1:20, 6:30, 9:10, Fri.-Thu. 1:20, 6:40, 9:10 National Theater Live: The Comedy of Errors (NR) Thu. 7 Project X (R) Fri.-Thu. 1, 3:10, 5:20, 7:50, 10 Safe House (R) Thu. 2:20, 5:10, 8, 10:40, Fri.-Thu. 1:15, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10 The Secret World of Arriety (G) Thu. 1, 3:40, 6:20, 9, Fri.-Thu. 1:10, 4:05, 6:30, 9 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 6:50, 9:50 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 1:10, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45, Fri.-Thu. 2:20, 5, 7:25, 10:05 Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds (PG-13) Thu. 2, 4:40, 7:20, 10, Fri.-Thu. 1:40, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50 The Vow (PG-13) Thu. 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:30, Fri.-Thu. 1:30, 4, 6:50, 9:20 Wanderlust (R) Thu. 2:40, 5:20, 7:50, 10:30, Fri.-Thu. 2:40, 5:30, 8:10, 10:30 Woman in Black (PG-13) Thu. 5:15, 10:25

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

• The Capital City Polka Dancers Association will hold a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, March 10 at the Holy Name of Jesus gymnasium, Harrisburg. John Stanky and the Coal Miners band will be playing. Cost is $12 for advance tickets and $14 at the door. Call 975-0114 or visit www.ccpda.info.

• Midtown Scholar presents “Silent Old Mountains” and “Life After You” from 8 to 10 p.m. Saturday, March 3. For more information visit www.MidtownScholar.com or call 236-1680.

Cinema Center of Camp Hill

Movies

Out & About

• “Stars on Ice” coming to the Giant Center in Hershey at 4 p.m. Sunday, March 18. For tickets or more information visit www.starsonice.com or ticketmaster.com. Tickets start at $25.

D2 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Now showing

D11 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Out & About


A guide to area events Art • Habitat for Humanity’s seventh annual art auction will be held March 9. Artist’s reception at 6:30 p.m., auction at 7:30 p.m. Cost is $25. For more information, www.harrisburghabitat.com or 545-7299. • First Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 3 in downtown Carlisle. The Garden Gallery will host “Photographyâ€? by March Weinberg; Nancy Stamm’s Galleria will feature “Songbirdsâ€? by Nancy Stamm; and Dave Reinbold’s “The Visual Poetry of Dave Reinboldâ€? will be at Haverstick Gallery and Studios.

“At the center of it is the question we all live with as people, which is how do we face loss and how do we live in the face of loss,� Gordon said. The detective wears colored wristbands to keep his lives straight. Isaacs insists viewers have it easier. When the pilot was being developed, he said, there was concern that the idea was so tricky, his character might need to be bearded in one world and beardless in the other to help viewers distinguish between them. “But my daughter, who’s 5, told me the story in three sentences,� Isaacs recalled. “So I told the producers, ‘We don’t need to worry.’ It’s

such a powerful and imaginative premise.� Besides, he said, anytime his character is confused, “It’s great drama: ‘What’s happening today? What’s happening in this world?’� While keeping a grip on his sanity, Britten is trying to prove to his superiors that he’s fit for work and trying to help his grieving wife and son cope with their losses. “We want him to put his life back together and have his wife and son,� Killen said. “You and he become invested in those two worlds.� Elements from one sometimes cross over to the other, Killen said. That raises the intriguing notion that the

two may ultimately merge, but the producers aren’t saying. “Awake� employs a classic trick to allow viewers to dip in at any point: It’s what Gordon calls an “old-school title sequence� that restates the concept before each episode. “So if you tune in for episode seven, you have the tools to sit down and enjoy that hour of television,� Gordon said. “For an idea like this, clarity is your friend and you want to make the barrier as low as possible.� (He credits the “Run for Your Life� playbook. The 1960s drama, starring Ben Gazzara as a terminally ill man, started each week

with the scene in which the character learned his death sentence and then intoned, “Guess I’ll try to squeeze 30 years of living into one, or two.�) If any cast and crew are up to the task it’s this one. Isaacs routinely is a standout in whatever he tackles, including his role as Lucius Malfoy in the “Harry Potter� films and as Michael Caffee in the series “Brotherhood.� Britten’s therapists are portrayed by Cherry Jones (“24�) and BD Wong (“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit�). Valderrama of “That ‘70s Show� gets to play against type and makes the most of his earnest, ambitious lawman.

Producer Gordon’s latest triumph is the Showtime drama series “Homeland,� starring Claire Danes. Killen wrote the provocative Jodie Foster-Mel Gibson movie, “The Beaver,� and the wellreviewed, sadly short-lived Fox drama “Lone Star.� Now it’s time for U.S. viewers to weigh in on “Awake,� the English-born Isaacs said, and he has faith in them. “There’s a lot of discussion online and among my friends, who say, ‘I love it, but I don’t think the public will get it,’� the actor said, dismissing that as a “patronizing idea.� “We underestimate them at our peril,� Isaacs said.

Harrisburg, 221-1080

NIGHTLIFE | D12

www.abcbrew.com

p.m., $7 advance, $10 at door. Friday, March 2: Hierosonic with Eliot Lipp & Minshara, show at 9 p.m., $7 advance.

cover.

Gullifty’s Underground 1104 Carlisle Road

BOOKS | D8-9

“Miss Manners� resonates with reviewer while “Falling Machine� dissapoints.

Camp Hill, 761-6692

• Spring art classes are forming now at The Art Center School and Galleries in Mechanicsburg. For more information call 6972072 or visit www.mechanicsburgartcenter.com.

Friday, March 2: Platform Soul, doors at 8 p.m. and show

• Ethan Grosso’s “Restlessâ€? will be on display through March 10 at the Goodyear Gallery at Dickinson College.

$5 min. donation at the door.

• The Perry County Council of the Arts will host “Drawing the Lineâ€? from March 16 through May 24 at Landis House, 67 N. Fourth St., Newport, www.perrrycountyarts.org.

Holly Inn

• Therese Zemlin will display her artwork through March 9 in the Aughinbaugh Art Gallery at Messiah College’s Climenhaga Fine Arts Center. • “Mechanicsburg – A Look at Bygone Daysâ€? will be on display through May 26 at the Mechanicsburg Museum Association, 2 W. Strawberry Alley, Mechanicsburg. This exhibit features artifacts and photographs of Mechanicsburg’s bygone days of business and industry. Free and open to the public. Visit www. mechanicsburgmuseum.org or call 697-6088. • “The Blues,â€? a CALC member exhibit, will run through March 17 at Carlisle Arts Learning Center, 19 N. Hanover St., Carlisle. An opening reception will be held 6:30-8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17. Two pieces of artowrk allowed per member; cost is $10 per piece. Prizes will be awarded by jurror Anthony Wolking, visiting professor of art at Dickinson College. visit www.carlislearts.org.

THEATRE | D4-5

Catch an Italian opera duo at several local venues. Also, absurdist play, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead� opens at Gamut Classic Theatre March 9 and runs through the 25.

Saturday, March 3: Across The Pond, show at 9 p.m., no

• Gary McGeary, a traditional coverlet weaver, will the “Artist in Actionâ€? at the Village Artisans Gallery from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 3.

• Mechanicsburg artist Patty Toth will display her exhibition “Grandeur of Yosemiteâ€? through March 7 at the Perry County Council of the Arts Gallery, 1 S. Second St., Newport. An opening reception will be held 7-8:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. Visit www.perrycountyarts.org or call 567-7023.

Electronic music artist Eliot Lipp to hit the stage at Appalachian Brewing Co.’s Abbey Bar, Harrisburg on Friday night.

Thursday, March 1: Pert’ Near Sandstone, doors open at 7

www.gulliftys.net

MOVIES & TV | D10-11

New TV show ‘Awake’ has everyone guessing. Also, see a list of movies opening this weekend in area theaters on D11.

at 9:30 p.m., $7 Saturday, March 3: JAM for BC, 1-5 p.m.

31 S. Baltimore Ave. Mt. Holly Springs, 486-3823 www.hollyinn.com

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Associated Press

Wilmer Valderrama, left, and Jason Isaacs arrive at the Independent Spirit Awards, in Santa Monica, Calif.

50 N. Cameron St.

AALIVE

Nightlife

Eliot Lipp to electrify ABC this weekend

March 11: Best of Bluegrass - Monroe Crossing By Lisa CLarke

Sentinel CorreSpondent Frontdoor@Cumberlink.Com

Today we turn our calendars to a new month and look forward to daylight savings time and the official end of winter. On Friday, March 2, kick off the new season with nationally-known electronic music artist Eliot Lipp headlining a show at the Appalachian Brewing Company’s Abbey Bar. Originally hailing from Tacoma, Wash., Lipp got his start making beats for local rappers. His musical ambitions eventually led him to Los Angeles where he first pursued his career, signing with Eastern Developments record label in 2004 and releasing his first LP, which was made using sequential circuits and korg ms-20 synths. “When I first heard electro and glitch I got excited about the possibilities of mixing those styles with hip hop,� says Lipp. “Part of my journey through discovering the history of electronic music led me to analog synths, vintage samplers and drums machines. I still collect that kind of gear and use it quite a bit in my own production.� He subsequently released two more albums, ‘Tacoma Mockingbird’, a collection of works that remind the artist of his hometown, and

EntErtainmEnt in thE hEart of thE midstatE

113 N. Hanover St. Carlisle, 258-1234

www.marketcrosspub.com

Submitted photo

‘Steele Street Scraps’ on which he collaborates with notable artists John Hughes and Earmint. In 2009, he released “Peace Love Weed 3D�, and is slated to release his newest work next month. With his eclectic range of equipment and influences, it’s clear that Lipp is an artist with range and creative consideration that shows in his work. “I’m influenced by so many styles, house, hip

hop, instrumental stuff... I like a lot of what the labels Alpha Pup & PLM have been releasing,� says Lipp. “I like some of the new U.K. club stuff too. Lately I’m just really influenced by people playing really bass heavy tracks with interesting rhythms.� While Lipp leaves the theatrics off the stage, his show is by no means lacking energy. He uses two live analog synths while doing live remixes on his laptop,

and expertly blends a range of music together. “I’m playing a lot of my high energy tracks but I’m slipping in a few of the pretty ones too. I love sampling records so at my show you’ll hear a lot of different genres of music squashed into one tune sometimes,� he says. “I don’t wear a mask or have a giant video wall or anything so I just try to play really good music and connect with the crowd.�

 

Friday, March 2: Pocket Change, 9 p.m. Saturday, March

He notes that although his music is not typical club music, it is designed to fill the dance floor. “My goal is to get people dancing,� he says. “One of my favorite things about my shows is the group of people that my music brings together.� Eliot Lipp will perform on Friday, March 2 at the Appalachian Brewing Company’s Abbey Bar, located on the second floor of the 50 N. Cameron St. facil-

www.cumberlink.com

section D March 1, 2012

rosencrantz and Guildenstern come to the Gamut stage while an italian opera opens locally

Dervish

Electronic music artist Eliot Lipp will perform at ABC Harrisburg tomorrow night.

Market Cross Pub & Brewery

iNsiDe..... www.cumberlink.com

The Sentinel

ity in Harrisburg. Tickets are $10, and patrons must be age 21 or older. The show begins at 9 p.m. with Heirosonic, followed by Minshara at 10 p.m. Lipp takes the stage at midnight. For more information, visit www.greenbeltevents. com. For venue information, visit www.abcbrew. com.

    

Celtic group to perform March 9 at the Carlisle Theatre •••D7

    

3: Grand Point Station, 9 p.m. Thursday, March 8: Brewery tours at 6 p.m. Friday, March 9: Finks Constant, 9:30 p.m. Saturday, March 10: Erica Everest, 9 p.m.

On the cover: The members of Dervish. The celtic music group is traveling all the way from Ireland to perform at the Carlisle Theatre next week.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

LOS ANGELES — NBC’s new drama “Awake� has the kind of intricate, high-concept premise that can test viewers. But that’s nothing compared with what its producers face. Howard Gordon, a master at juggling challenging plots (“24� and “The X-Files� among them), puts it flatly: “I learned nothing, and nothing I experienced prepared for me this.� “This is a vehicle that no one has driven before and has no operating instructions,� said Gordon, who produces “Awake� with its creator, Kyle Killen. The series, debuting 10 p.m. EST Thursday, stars Jason Isaacs as police Detective Michael Britten, a man living in two worlds. A car accident has claimed a family member’s life: his wife, Hannah (Laura Allen), in one, and his teenage son, Rex (Dylan Minnette), in another. The duality extends to Britten’s work, where he investigates cases with two partners (Steve Harris, Wilmer Valderrama), and discovers that straddling different realities gives him crime-busting insights. While other TV shows with parallel universes and outcomes have dabbled in extreme explanations — quick, explain “Lost� again — Gordon and Killen insist this is a (relatively) simple case of a guy living one life and dreaming another. Britten and the audience are just not sure which is which. Neither are the therapists who are treating him, with both assuring him that his OTHER life is the dream. He’s unwilling to give up the balancing act that allows him to keep hold of both wife and son.

MUSIC |D6-7

Irish group Dervish to perform its more modern celtic music on stage at the Carlisle Theatre March 9. Also, see a review of Dierks Bentley’s new CD, “Home� and also Music Notes.

Appalachian Brewing Company

Out & About

AP Television Writer

Inside

A look at local nightlife

D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

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TV News

BY LYNN ELBER

• Carlisle High School to hold a music department concert at 7:30 p.m. today in the McGowan Building’s Clyde and Lyn Barr Auditorium. The concert is free and open to the public.

The Scene

Out & About

D10 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

‘Awake’ keeps hero, viewers guessing at reality

Music

D3 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

TV News


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Theatre

One-acts, often paired, performed by Center Stage Opera

‘Falling Machine’ lands short of a good book

By Barbara Trainin Blank

Book is the first in Andrew P. Mayer’s ‘Society of Steam’ series

Sentinel correspondent frontdoor@ cumberlink.com

Set in the 1880s, “The Falling Machine” tells the story of a fresh plot by an unknown enemy to destroy New York City’s famous Paragons, an aging team of super heroes. ■

By Matthew McLaughlin Sentinel Reporter mmclaughlin @cumberlink.com

Submitted photo

From left to right: Tim Kjer/Michael Popovsky/Mariella Pacchioli/Andrea Broido/Konrad Fritz/Vickie Kline/Linda Priebe/Steve Pollack/Laura Lupinacc lissa Angelo-Schiumo and Fabiola Eschazabal), has performed such diverse roles as Mimi in “La Boheme” and Micaela in “Carmen.” But it has been some twenty years since she appeared as the unhappy wife in “Pagliacci”— then with the Little Lyric Opera of Philadelphia. Returning to it is “so much fun,” Broido says. “My voice is more mature now, and more earthy— which is more true to the character. She’s a Gypsy, and very intense. I’m an intense person, but not like her— she loves, fears

and hates intensely.” Konrad Fritz and Steve Gokool share the role of Canio; Steve Pollack is Tonio; Vickie Kline is Peppe; and Silvio, the lover, is sung by Michael Popovsky and Robert Yacoviello. Salvatore Motisi, who p l ays Tu r i d d u ( ro l e shared with Gokool), the impulsive protagonist in “Cav,” has sung it many times. Still, he finds it “one of the most difficult in opera.” T h a t’s b e ca u se , t h e te n o r ex p l a i n s, i t i s “ based on truth,” with the music closely related

to the singing. Verismo requires a “full-throated voice,” like those of Enrico Caruso, Franco Corelli and Richard Tucker. Motisi made his debut in a supporting role in “Turandot,” with Corelli. Despite the challenges, the singer loves this style of opera. “Wagner (the German composer) is wonderful, and French opera is wonderful,” he says. “But there’s nothing like Italian opera.” Also “wonderful” in the view of Motisi and t h e o t h e r s i n ge rs i s Kathryn Foster— for the opportunities she brings

for area audiences to hear opera and for singers to sing it. “She should be more appreciated,” he says. Also in the “Cav” cast are Fran Bjorneby Kraemer, Tess Lang, Laura Lupinacci and Linda

Priebe as Santuzza, Turiddu’s rejected love; Ke i ko B r jo rk m a n a n d Mariela Pacchioli; and Timothy Kjer and Ralph Schatzki. Pacchioli and Priebe also alternate as Lola, the married mistress.

In Focus “Pagliacci”/”Cavalleria” takes place Saturday, March 10, at 7:30 p.m. at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle; and Friday and Saturday, March 16-17 at 7:30 p.m. at the Camp Hill United Methodist Church, Camp Hill. Other performances are in York and Hanover. Tickets are $10 for students and $20 for adults— cash and check only and available at the door. For information, call 774-4352 and www.csopera.org.

I stumbled upon the second book in Andrew P. Mayer’s Society of Steam series at a book store one night and was so excited by the premise I immediately ordered book one, “The Falling Machine,” from Amazon the same night (said book store did not carry book one for some odd reason). The premise of “The Falling Machine” is one any geek worth their Firefly DVDs and Avengers comic book collection would love, steampunk superheroes. Being such a geek myself, I really wanted to love this book, but I am sad to report I could not.

Steampunk heroes Let me take a step back, however, and explain the basic plot of the novel, which I do find to be its most redeeming quality. Set in the 1880s, “The Falling Machine” tells the story of a fresh plot by an unknown enemy to destroy New York City’s famous Paragons, an aging team of super heroes (think the Avengers or the Justice League) whose power comes from the amazing steampowered technology created by their leader Dennis Darby. With Darby’s death in the be-

ginning of the novel, his last will and testament dividing the group and suspicions rising that there may be a traitor among them, the Paragons are thrown into chaos. In the middle of it all is Sarah Stanton, Darby’s pupil and daughter of the Paragon’s new leader the Industrialist (a gun-toting, shield-wielding hero). Together, Sarah, the Sleuth (equal parts Batman and Sherlock Holmes) and the Automaton (a clockwork man made by Darby) attempt to unravel the mystery and perhaps fulfill Darby’s final wishes as well. In addition to the premise, Mayer actually does the mystery quite well. There are plenty of them, and they are all connected to the larger mystery of who killed Darby, why they did it and what their plans are. Unfortunately, that is all the praise I can really muster for this book.

Too much “The Falling Machine,” like the superhero team comics it borrows from, is very much a story with an ensemble cast. Told in third-person limited, Mayer switches perspective between his assortment of characters with each chapter. Sadly, that decision to give the reader time inside the head of multiple characters may have been the stumbling block that led the book’s biggest failure, charac-

none could quite get there. A prime example is Sarah, a forward thinking woman, who is clearly ahead of her time when it comes to her feminist principles. But that part of her character is so dominating, with her complaining about the clothes she must wear on virtually every page, she becomes more a caricature than a character. This seems to be the common problem will all the characters in the book. They have one strongly developed trait making up their personality and not much else My final complaint is Mayer’s writing. He has talent, but he went overboard so much as to take me out of the story. This happened in two ways— his description of mechanics and his flowery language. Mayer clearly has a technical mind, which is to his detriment rather than his benefit in the steampunk genre. His descriptions of the mechanisms in “The Falling Machine” are often unnecessarily convoluted, which regrettably tends to match his general writing style. At times, I truly felt as though Mayer was simply trying to show off just how well he could use adjectives and describe the intricacies of his settings. I don’t wish that he had taken a minimalist approach, but rather that he had reigned himself in somewhat to Photo illustration preserve the story unfolding in some of scenes. The cover of “The Falling Machine” by Andrew P. Mayer. In conclusion, I find it hard to recommend this book, despite a really fun premise. There are few terization. and, while a few came very close things worse than spending severEvery character in the book was to having me care about them (the al hours reading about characters disappointingly two-dimensional, Sleuth probably being the closest), you don’t care about.

There are few things worse than spending several hours reading about characters you don’t care about.

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The image of the sad clown is one of the most emblematic in opera. The clown in question is Canio, head of a traveling actors’ troupe who suspects his wife is unfaithful, in “Pagliacci”— which contains one of the most famous arias, “Vesti la Giubba.” Often performed with “Pagliacci” is “Cavalleria Rusticana,” the story of a peasant who has resumed an affair with a married woman— with tragic consequences. The upcoming production of Center Stage Opera features both operas in a double bill. Although written by d i f f e re n t c o m p o s e rs — Leoncavallo and Mascagni, respectively — the operas have commonalities: both short and thematically related, they belong to a genre called “verismo,” or realism. Because the names together are a mouthful, the operas are referred to as “Cav/Pag” for short. “They weren’t always done together, but this has become a traditional pairing, “ says Kathryn Foster, artistic director of the West Shore-based opera company, which features both local and out-of-state professional singers. “The two operas complement each other.” They also offer, in spite of their relative brevity, meaty roles. A n d rea B ro i d o, t h e soprano who is singing Nedda in “Pag ” (a role shared with Me-

Literature

D4 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Book Review

D9 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Performing Arts


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Literature

‘Miss Manners’ rules over weddings Book is a perfect guide for the bridal couple and their guests By Lauren McLane Sentinel Reporter lmclane@cumberlink.com

‘Miss Manners’ offers current, useful tips on the proper wedding behavior. Photo illustration

dicative of whether or not he loves you and whether or not he is ambivalent about getting married. The earliest you would ever need to consult him about such matters again is a whole generation from now, and Miss Manners assures you that your daughter will not be all that interested in whether her father thinks the wedding cake should be vanilla or chocolate.” Do you hear that, Bri-

dezillas? That means that not only is it OK for the groom — the other primary participant in the wedding — not to care about the china pattern or cake icing flavor, it’s OK for me not to care, too.

Roles The days of two-parent, four-grandparentseach families are gone, and don’t think Miss Manners hasn’t noticed. The rules

Actually, no, it’s not. It’s about the bride, the bridegroom, and the blending of two families, and unless you want his family to come away from the wedding reception shaking their heads and muttering to themselves, “What a tacky family he married into!,” you will buy and read and memorize and follow Miss Manners’ dictates.

0ut of date That being said, there are things Miss Manners objects to that I find myself unable to get worked up about. I don’t care if the invitations are engraved and addressed in calligraphy, even though that is Proper Formal. I’m only mildly annoyed when I get an invitation addressed to “Lauren and Guest,” although Miss Manners decrees that if you are inviting people to a party (which is essentially what a wedding reception is), you should know their names. Some things never go out of style, and they include: writing prompt thank-you notes to everyone, even if they didn’t give you a gift (if you’re the bridal couple); not asking if you can bring a friend/guest/date/ your six kids/your dog (if you’re a guest); RSVP’ing promptly, one way or the other (if you’re a guest); and remembering that you invited these people because you either like them or are related to them and, while the latter won’t change after the wedding, if you’re demanding enough, the former might (if you’re the bridal couple).

By Barbara Trainin Blank Sentinel correspondent frontdoor@cumberlink.com

There’s a little bit of “Waiting for Godot” in it. And a lot of confusion. When playwright Tom Stoppard, maybe on a bet, took two minor characters in “Hamlet” and made them the centerpiece of his “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,” he added a new dimension to absurdist, existentialist theater. For one thing, despite the serious underlying themes, it is a linguistically clever and “very funny play,” says Dan Burke, who is directing a production of “R&G” at Gamut Theatre Group. There are a number of in-jokes, referring to other Shakespearean plays. And Stoppard himself described “R&G” as “a comedy” with a purpose of entertaining. In a divergence from other plays in the same genre, the absurdism diminishes as time goes on. Both the main characters and the audience become more aware, and “elements of reality start to seep” into the illusion, says Alex Jane Bailey, who is playing Rosencrantz. Initially, the two characters are so bewildered they even get other’s identities mixed up. But that is also a play on the fact that in “Hamlet,” they are almost indistinguishable. Here they are similar but also two sides of the same coin, with Rosencrantz being more accepting, and Guildenstern, questioning everything. “He’s just as lost as Rosencrantz, but doesn’t admit it,” says Eric Dexter Brown, the production’s Guildenstern. “The only thing they know about themselves is what’s in ‘Hamlet,’ “ he

Alex Jane Bailey as Rosencrantz, left, and Eric Dexter Brown as Guildenstern, right.

ert Campbell. Nicholson as the Player; The balance of the cast consists of Randy Hodson; Toby Bradbury; Philip Wheeler; Ian Potter; Charles Hooker; Julia Hatmaker as Ophelia; Larry Gessler; Lauri D. Rawley; and Charles Smith. Potter also designed the set, inspired by a painting of Salvador Dali with a melting sundial. Costume design is by L. A. Hammond, and Mike Banks is the sound designer.

Submitted photo

presents... continues. “They had no life before the play and exist only in the framework of the play.” One of Stoppard’s points is what happens to actors, especially bit players,in a play when they are not onstage. Hamlet himself is given only a small part. As actors do, Bailey wanted to create a back story for her character, but says Burke advised her against it, because “that would go against the play. The only thing they understand is their friendship.” The title of play, arguably Stoppard’s most famous, comes from a line in “Hamlet”: the English Ambassador announces, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.” There is an absurdity there, too, since the audience’s attention is focused on the dramatic deaths of the lead characters. In both plays, K ing Claudius brings the two

men, old friends of Hamlet’s, to court to discover the motives of the Prince of Denmark’s actions and ultimately, to plot against him. But in “R&G,” the characters are missing the three constants in life that give human beings a sense of who and where they are: time, direction and location, Bailey points out. What’s more, they’re in an environment that doesn’t lend itself to logic or reason—making them pa r t i c u l a rly “ v u l n e rable and with no control,” Brown says. From their perspective, the action of “Hamlet,” which many consider the greatest play in the English language, is “truly absurd,” Burke adds. Originally, the Stage Door Series of Gamut presented the idea doing “R&G” — a mirror production to the “Hamlet” produced earlier in the sea-

son” — as a staged reading. But, according to Burke, an actor and fight choreographer (who played Claudius in “Hamlet” and is making his directorial debut here), artistic director Clark Nicholson preferred a full staging. When Nicholson asked Burke to direct, Burke was at first enthusiastic. Then, in appropriate Rosencrantz and Guildenstern fashion, he found himself “petrified.” He got over it by thinking like an actor— asking

Bailey and Brown to sit in a room for an hour and do and say nothing. “That helped solidify our character dynamic,” laughs Bailey. Burke’s choice of a woman to play a man was not a deliberate or nondeliberate one. “I had an open mind,” he says. “It could have been two males, two females, or a male and female. But Alex gave a great audition, and I liked the dynamic between her and Eric.” Hamlet is played by Rob-

In Focus “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” is presented March 9-25 at Gamut Classic Theatre in Harrisburg’s Strawberry Square. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $27 for adults and $17 for students/seniors. Friday performances are “Buy-One-Get-One-Free shows”; Sunday performances are “Bring Your Own Price”, when any size donations buys your admission. For information, call 238-4111, or visit: www.gamutplays.org.

Ireland’s Premier Traditional Music Group! with Very Special Guests The John Byrne Band

March 9th at 8:00 PM

Sponsored by:

online ticket purchases

CarlisleTheatre.org

40 West HigH st • Carlisle

717 258-0666

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In light of my impending third and fourth trips down the aisle this year, once again wearing a dress shaped like a pastel pastry, I recently bought and read “Miss Manner’s Guide to (Painfully Proper) Weddings.” I have already read pretty much every other book the etiquette doyenne has written, so this seemed like a good way to round out my knowledge of etiquette. After having read it, I firmly believe that it should be required reading by every woman in America who wishes to get married and still have friends who like her after her wedding. With such fun chapter titles as, “Terrible Idea I: The Wedding as ‘My Day,’” “Terrible Idea II: The Wedding as Fund-raiser,” and “Terrible Idea III: The Wedding as Show Business,” Miss Manners (a.k.a. Judith Martin) dispenses witty, pithy, pointy advice that lays the ever-so-gentle white-gloved smack-down on the ambitions of brides whose fantasies outrun first, then what food can be purchased to feed them their finances. all, not picking the menu Advice first and then limiting the Chapter One gets right to guest list to pay for lobster the point with a 13-point and prime rib), whether the list of “Things a Bride Need postage stamp on the inviNot Trouble Her Pretty tations carries out the color Head About,” which in- scheme (nobody cares), cludes whether you like and, my personal favorite, your relatives (you have to “Do not worry about wethinvite them anyway), the er the bridegroom is sufproper formula for deter- ficiently interested in the mining food choice (num- wedding. He may or may ber of guests to be invited not be, but this is not in-

of etiquette aren’t so staid and static as to be unable to cope with step-parents, parents’ partners, parents of the same gender, stepgrandparents, children from previous marriages and/or relationships, and stepcousins twice-removed. That Miss Manners has noticed isn’t to say that brides have, and the maven of morals and manners gently reminds brides that any parents who divorced did so for a reason, and forcing them to pretend for one day to be a happy couple is unlikely to foster good will and amity in future relations. Another topic tackled in the book is the sticky issue of money — from who pays for what (traditionally, the bride’s parents hosted the wedding and paid for it, but that doesn’t mean she gets to present them with a bill after the fact), to what names go on the invitation in what order (traditionally bride’s parents first; if they are divorced, her mother and step-father, if any, followed by father and step-mother, if any), to what family traditions can be ignored on the basis of it being the couple’s “day” (you may forego the garter removal or cake-smashing, but not the manners that require you to be a gracious hostess and attentive to guests’ needs). I cannot count the number of times I have heard some variation of the sentence, “It’s my day, and I’ve dreamed of it since I was a little girl, and I’m going to do what I want because I’m the bride and it’s all about me.”

Absurdist play at Gamut combines humor, serious themes

Theatre

D8 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Theatre

D5 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Book Review


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In Music Notes, I highlight many community groups that make classical music accessible across the area with events that are low cost or free. Many times, the local musicians involved perform for free. Some events are well attended while others aren’t. This leads to the question of why aren’t these events better attended? How do we find that sweet spot of charging the right ticket price so that more people might see more value in the concert? With almost any-

thing being available on the Internet for free nowadays, there are new challenges in figuring out what audiences are willing to pay to come to your performance. It’s a tricky question, and it takes trial and error when determining your value. Learning what is important

to the audience is the first step. For me, accessibility and community involvement are two key values. Putting value on ourselves and what we hold dear is important in making sure that community based music continues to thrive in Cumberland County. I think it’s wonderful that all of Dickinson College’s music events are free to the public and the quality is very high. This is a gift to the community that should not be ignored. At 7 p.m. this Saturday, pianist Eun Ae

Baik-Kim will present a selection of instrumental and vocal selections by composer Gabriel Fauré. Soprano Lynn Helding, violinists Jennifer Sacher Wiley and Blanka Bednarz, and Cheung Chau (cello). The performance will be held in the Rubendall Recital Hall at the Weiss Center for the Arts. Take a moment to consider your value and what you have to offer to our community. Don’t sell yourself short.

Music Review

Dierks Bentley returns ‘Home’ to mainstream sound BY MICHAEL MCCALL

A banjo kicks off Dierks Bentley’s new album “Home,” recalling a backwoods sound prevalent on his previous, bluegrass-inspired album “Up on the Ridge.” The similarities stop there. The bluegrass album generated rave reviews and but no radio hits. With “Home,” Bentley returns to contemporary country music and the top of the charts — in the distinctive fashion that has established him among country music’s most interesting hit-makers. Bentley always utilizes banjo, fiddle, mandolin and especially dobro in his music, but with a modern beat and energy that, along with his distinctive voice, gives him a compelling sound of his own. Like his peers, he regularly offers songs about celebrating with friends. “Am I The Only One,” already a No. 1 hit, as well as “Tip It On Back” and “51-5-0” are as entertaining as any partying songs coming from Jason Aldean and Eric Church. But the Arizona native separates himself from his peers with love songs, which feature a sensual quality rare in modern country music. The steamy

AP

Dierks Bentley’s “Home” “Breathe You In” and the tortured “In My Head” are outstanding relationship songs, while “Home,” a valentine to America, is a patriotic ode that doesn’t stoop to jingoism. “Home” indeed finds Bentley back where he belongs: On the top of the

country music charts. CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: The soulfully swaying “When You Gonna Come Around,” a sexy duet with Karen Fairchild of Little Big Town, makes flirting sound as if it’s going to lead to an inevitably positive conclusion.

Top Songs 1. “We Are Young (feat. Janelle Monae),” Fun. 2. “Stronger (What Doesn’t Kill You),” Kelly Clarkson 3. “Glad You Came,” The Wanted 4. “Part of Me,” Katy Perry 5. “So Good,” B.o.B. 6. “Set Fire to the Rain,” ADELE 7. “Starships,” Nicki Minaj 8. “Somebody That I Used to Know,” Gotye 9. “Turn Up the Music,” Chris Brown 10. “Good Girl,” Carrie Underwood Top Albums 1. “21,” ADELE 2. “Careless World — Rise of the Last King,” Tyga 3. “Some Nights,” Fun. 4. “Breakfast,” Chiddy Bang 5. “Whitney — The Greatest Hits,” Whitney Houston 6. “Reign of Terror,” Sleigh Bells 7. “Making Mirrors,” Gotye 8. “19,” ADELE 9. “Take Care,” Drake 10. “1,” The Beatles Top Paid iPhone Apps 1. Where’s My Water? (Disney) 2. Fruit Ninja (Halfbrick Studios) 3. Angry Birds (Clickgamer. com) 4. Midway Arcade (Warner Bros.) 5. Scramble With Friends (Zynga) 6. Draw Something by OMGPOP (OMGPOP) 7. Clear (Realmac Software) 8. Cut the Rope (Chillingo Ltd) 9. Camera+ (tap tap tap) 10. WhatsApp Messenger (WhatsApp Inc.) Top Free iPhone Apps: 1. Move the Box (Bitchin’ Games) 2. Draw Something Free (OMGPOP)

3. Temple Run (Imangi Studios, LLC) 4. Blood & Glory (Glu Games Inc.) 5. Flashlight ? (iHandySoft Inc.) 6. MONOPOLY Hotels (Electronic Arts) 7. Police Chase Smash (Fun Time Games) 8. Instagram (Burbn, Inc.) 9. Contract Killer (Glu Games Inc.) 10. Cut the Rope: Experiments Free (ZeptoLab UK Limited) Top Paid iPad Apps: 1. Midway Arcade (Warner Bros.) 2. Where’s My Water? (Disney) 3. procreate (Savage Interactive Pty Ltd) 4. Pages (Apple) 5. Angry Birds Seasons HD (Rovio Mobile Ltd.) 6. Penultimate (Cocoa Box Design LLC) 7. Fruit Ninja HD (Halfbrick Studios) 8. Toca House (Toca Boca) 9. Cut the Rope: Experiments HD (ZeptoLab UK Limited) 10. MONOPOLY for iPad (Electronic Arts) Top Free iPad Apps 1. OnLive Desktop (OnLive, Inc.) 2. Cut the Rope: Experiments HD Free (ZeptoLab UK Limited) 3. Temple Run (Imangi Studios, LLC) 4. MONOPOLY Hotels (Electronic Arts) 5. Skype for iPad (Skype Software S.a.r.l) 6. Where’s My Water? Free (Disney) 7. Wind-up Knight (Robot Invader) 8. iBooks (Apple) 9. Angry Birds HD Free (Rovio Mobile Ltd.) 10. Draw Something Free (OMGPOP)

Dervish puts a modern spin on Celtic music The Irish music group is set to perform next week in Carlisle By Lauren McLane Sentinel Reporter lmclane@cumberlink.com

If you think Celtic music is “Riverdance” and the formal-gown clad women of “Celtic Women,” think again. Next Friday night, the Celtic group Dervish will make you re-think what Celtic music is. “A lot of people, when they ask for Celtic (music), ask for the same things Carlisle has had before. Not too many Celtic groups will play a Cher song. Well, this isn’t exactly the old Celtic everybody has had. They’re a little bit more spirited, a little bit more pop, a little bit more relevant,” Thom O’Neil, programming coordinator for Carlisle Theatre, said. The group rarely tours in the U.S., so getting them to come to Carlisle was quite a coup. “In Ireland, they’re treated as Celtic gods. They don’t come to the United States all that often, so we’re very excited about it,” O’Neil added. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 9, with opening act John Byrne, an Irishman who now lives in Philly. Tickets are $36, $31, $26 and $10 for students.

History Dervish hails from the Irish coastal town of Sligo, which is renowned for its picturesque setting and shellfish. In Gaelic, the town’s name is rendered “Sligeach,” meaning “shelly place.”

Submitted photo

Dervish is set to peform at the Carlisle Theatre March 9. For literary buffs, it’s also the home of W.B. Yeats. Roughly the same size as Carlisle, Sligo is internationally known in the world of music for its traditional Irish music, according to a press release from the theatre. Dervish, the most successful band ever to come out of Sligo, started in 1989 as the Boys of Sligo. They changed their name to Dervish in honor of the groups of spiritual people who are

enraptured by music, according to the press release. The band comprises Cathy Jordan, Tom Morrow, Seamus O’Dowd, Shane Mitchell, Liam Kelley, Michael Holmes and Brian McDonagh. Some of the instruments they play are familiar — flute, drums, accordion, guitar, mandolin — but the bouzouki might throw people. A bouzouki is a musical instrument with Greek ori-

gin in the lute family. The band has been awarded the “Freedom of Sligo” medals and have been documented as ambassadors for Ireland, as they have been asked to accompany Ireland’s prime minister on trips to China, Latvia and Lithuania.

at Rock in Rio, the worlds biggest music festival. • Dervish was one of the acts that opened Ireland’s first Irish language TV station, TG4. • Dervish are free people of their native Sligo following in the foot steps of W.B. Yeats, Mother Theresa of Calcutta and others. Fun facts • Dervish songs have been According to the group’s part of the music curriculum in colleges in various website: • Dervish is the only band parts of the U.S. • The Football Associaever from Ireland to appear

tion of Ireland’s commissioned Dervish to write a piece of music “The Mighty Tribe” to enhance the national soccer team’s new brand image. • The music of Dervish was used as part of an official TV advertisement for the Kentucky Derby. • Cathy Jordan was voted in the top ten most distinctive voices in Ireland by the listeners of the popular John Creedon radio show in Ireland.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

D6 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

For the Associated Press

Compiled by The Associated Press

Music

Music

Putting a price on music

iTunes Top 10

Music

D7 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Music Notes


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

In Music Notes, I highlight many community groups that make classical music accessible across the area with events that are low cost or free. Many times, the local musicians involved perform for free. Some events are well attended while others aren’t. This leads to the question of why aren’t these events better attended? How do we find that sweet spot of charging the right ticket price so that more people might see more value in the concert? With almost any-

thing being available on the Internet for free nowadays, there are new challenges in figuring out what audiences are willing to pay to come to your performance. It’s a tricky question, and it takes trial and error when determining your value. Learning what is important

to the audience is the first step. For me, accessibility and community involvement are two key values. Putting value on ourselves and what we hold dear is important in making sure that community based music continues to thrive in Cumberland County. I think it’s wonderful that all of Dickinson College’s music events are free to the public and the quality is very high. This is a gift to the community that should not be ignored. At 7 p.m. this Saturday, pianist Eun Ae

Baik-Kim will present a selection of instrumental and vocal selections by composer Gabriel Fauré. Soprano Lynn Helding, violinists Jennifer Sacher Wiley and Blanka Bednarz, and Cheung Chau (cello). The performance will be held in the Rubendall Recital Hall at the Weiss Center for the Arts. Take a moment to consider your value and what you have to offer to our community. Don’t sell yourself short.

Music Review

Dierks Bentley returns ‘Home’ to mainstream sound BY MICHAEL MCCALL

A banjo kicks off Dierks Bentley’s new album “Home,” recalling a backwoods sound prevalent on his previous, bluegrass-inspired album “Up on the Ridge.” The similarities stop there. The bluegrass album generated rave reviews and but no radio hits. With “Home,” Bentley returns to contemporary country music and the top of the charts — in the distinctive fashion that has established him among country music’s most interesting hit-makers. Bentley always utilizes banjo, fiddle, mandolin and especially dobro in his music, but with a modern beat and energy that, along with his distinctive voice, gives him a compelling sound of his own. Like his peers, he regularly offers songs about celebrating with friends. “Am I The Only One,” already a No. 1 hit, as well as “Tip It On Back” and “51-5-0” are as entertaining as any partying songs coming from Jason Aldean and Eric Church. But the Arizona native separates himself from his peers with love songs, which feature a sensual quality rare in modern country music. The steamy

AP

Dierks Bentley’s “Home” “Breathe You In” and the tortured “In My Head” are outstanding relationship songs, while “Home,” a valentine to America, is a patriotic ode that doesn’t stoop to jingoism. “Home” indeed finds Bentley back where he belongs: On the top of the

country music charts. CHECK OUT THIS TRACK: The soulfully swaying “When You Gonna Come Around,” a sexy duet with Karen Fairchild of Little Big Town, makes flirting sound as if it’s going to lead to an inevitably positive conclusion.

Top Songs 1. “We Are Young (feat. Janelle Monae),” Fun. 2. “Stronger (What Doesn’t Kill You),” Kelly Clarkson 3. “Glad You Came,” The Wanted 4. “Part of Me,” Katy Perry 5. “So Good,” B.o.B. 6. “Set Fire to the Rain,” ADELE 7. “Starships,” Nicki Minaj 8. “Somebody That I Used to Know,” Gotye 9. “Turn Up the Music,” Chris Brown 10. “Good Girl,” Carrie Underwood Top Albums 1. “21,” ADELE 2. “Careless World — Rise of the Last King,” Tyga 3. “Some Nights,” Fun. 4. “Breakfast,” Chiddy Bang 5. “Whitney — The Greatest Hits,” Whitney Houston 6. “Reign of Terror,” Sleigh Bells 7. “Making Mirrors,” Gotye 8. “19,” ADELE 9. “Take Care,” Drake 10. “1,” The Beatles Top Paid iPhone Apps 1. Where’s My Water? (Disney) 2. Fruit Ninja (Halfbrick Studios) 3. Angry Birds (Clickgamer. com) 4. Midway Arcade (Warner Bros.) 5. Scramble With Friends (Zynga) 6. Draw Something by OMGPOP (OMGPOP) 7. Clear (Realmac Software) 8. Cut the Rope (Chillingo Ltd) 9. Camera+ (tap tap tap) 10. WhatsApp Messenger (WhatsApp Inc.) Top Free iPhone Apps: 1. Move the Box (Bitchin’ Games) 2. Draw Something Free (OMGPOP)

3. Temple Run (Imangi Studios, LLC) 4. Blood & Glory (Glu Games Inc.) 5. Flashlight ? (iHandySoft Inc.) 6. MONOPOLY Hotels (Electronic Arts) 7. Police Chase Smash (Fun Time Games) 8. Instagram (Burbn, Inc.) 9. Contract Killer (Glu Games Inc.) 10. Cut the Rope: Experiments Free (ZeptoLab UK Limited) Top Paid iPad Apps: 1. Midway Arcade (Warner Bros.) 2. Where’s My Water? (Disney) 3. procreate (Savage Interactive Pty Ltd) 4. Pages (Apple) 5. Angry Birds Seasons HD (Rovio Mobile Ltd.) 6. Penultimate (Cocoa Box Design LLC) 7. Fruit Ninja HD (Halfbrick Studios) 8. Toca House (Toca Boca) 9. Cut the Rope: Experiments HD (ZeptoLab UK Limited) 10. MONOPOLY for iPad (Electronic Arts) Top Free iPad Apps 1. OnLive Desktop (OnLive, Inc.) 2. Cut the Rope: Experiments HD Free (ZeptoLab UK Limited) 3. Temple Run (Imangi Studios, LLC) 4. MONOPOLY Hotels (Electronic Arts) 5. Skype for iPad (Skype Software S.a.r.l) 6. Where’s My Water? Free (Disney) 7. Wind-up Knight (Robot Invader) 8. iBooks (Apple) 9. Angry Birds HD Free (Rovio Mobile Ltd.) 10. Draw Something Free (OMGPOP)

Dervish puts a modern spin on Celtic music The Irish music group is set to perform next week in Carlisle By Lauren McLane Sentinel Reporter lmclane@cumberlink.com

If you think Celtic music is “Riverdance” and the formal-gown clad women of “Celtic Women,” think again. Next Friday night, the Celtic group Dervish will make you re-think what Celtic music is. “A lot of people, when they ask for Celtic (music), ask for the same things Carlisle has had before. Not too many Celtic groups will play a Cher song. Well, this isn’t exactly the old Celtic everybody has had. They’re a little bit more spirited, a little bit more pop, a little bit more relevant,” Thom O’Neil, programming coordinator for Carlisle Theatre, said. The group rarely tours in the U.S., so getting them to come to Carlisle was quite a coup. “In Ireland, they’re treated as Celtic gods. They don’t come to the United States all that often, so we’re very excited about it,” O’Neil added. The show begins at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 9, with opening act John Byrne, an Irishman who now lives in Philly. Tickets are $36, $31, $26 and $10 for students.

History Dervish hails from the Irish coastal town of Sligo, which is renowned for its picturesque setting and shellfish. In Gaelic, the town’s name is rendered “Sligeach,” meaning “shelly place.”

Submitted photo

Dervish is set to peform at the Carlisle Theatre March 9. For literary buffs, it’s also the home of W.B. Yeats. Roughly the same size as Carlisle, Sligo is internationally known in the world of music for its traditional Irish music, according to a press release from the theatre. Dervish, the most successful band ever to come out of Sligo, started in 1989 as the Boys of Sligo. They changed their name to Dervish in honor of the groups of spiritual people who are

enraptured by music, according to the press release. The band comprises Cathy Jordan, Tom Morrow, Seamus O’Dowd, Shane Mitchell, Liam Kelley, Michael Holmes and Brian McDonagh. Some of the instruments they play are familiar — flute, drums, accordion, guitar, mandolin — but the bouzouki might throw people. A bouzouki is a musical instrument with Greek ori-

gin in the lute family. The band has been awarded the “Freedom of Sligo” medals and have been documented as ambassadors for Ireland, as they have been asked to accompany Ireland’s prime minister on trips to China, Latvia and Lithuania.

at Rock in Rio, the worlds biggest music festival. • Dervish was one of the acts that opened Ireland’s first Irish language TV station, TG4. • Dervish are free people of their native Sligo following in the foot steps of W.B. Yeats, Mother Theresa of Calcutta and others. Fun facts • Dervish songs have been According to the group’s part of the music curriculum in colleges in various website: • Dervish is the only band parts of the U.S. • The Football Associaever from Ireland to appear

tion of Ireland’s commissioned Dervish to write a piece of music “The Mighty Tribe” to enhance the national soccer team’s new brand image. • The music of Dervish was used as part of an official TV advertisement for the Kentucky Derby. • Cathy Jordan was voted in the top ten most distinctive voices in Ireland by the listeners of the popular John Creedon radio show in Ireland.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

D6 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

For the Associated Press

Compiled by The Associated Press

Music

Music

Putting a price on music

iTunes Top 10

Music

D7 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Music Notes


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Literature

‘Miss Manners’ rules over weddings Book is a perfect guide for the bridal couple and their guests By Lauren McLane Sentinel Reporter lmclane@cumberlink.com

‘Miss Manners’ offers current, useful tips on the proper wedding behavior. Photo illustration

dicative of whether or not he loves you and whether or not he is ambivalent about getting married. The earliest you would ever need to consult him about such matters again is a whole generation from now, and Miss Manners assures you that your daughter will not be all that interested in whether her father thinks the wedding cake should be vanilla or chocolate.” Do you hear that, Bri-

dezillas? That means that not only is it OK for the groom — the other primary participant in the wedding — not to care about the china pattern or cake icing flavor, it’s OK for me not to care, too.

Roles The days of two-parent, four-grandparentseach families are gone, and don’t think Miss Manners hasn’t noticed. The rules

Actually, no, it’s not. It’s about the bride, the bridegroom, and the blending of two families, and unless you want his family to come away from the wedding reception shaking their heads and muttering to themselves, “What a tacky family he married into!,” you will buy and read and memorize and follow Miss Manners’ dictates.

0ut of date That being said, there are things Miss Manners objects to that I find myself unable to get worked up about. I don’t care if the invitations are engraved and addressed in calligraphy, even though that is Proper Formal. I’m only mildly annoyed when I get an invitation addressed to “Lauren and Guest,” although Miss Manners decrees that if you are inviting people to a party (which is essentially what a wedding reception is), you should know their names. Some things never go out of style, and they include: writing prompt thank-you notes to everyone, even if they didn’t give you a gift (if you’re the bridal couple); not asking if you can bring a friend/guest/date/ your six kids/your dog (if you’re a guest); RSVP’ing promptly, one way or the other (if you’re a guest); and remembering that you invited these people because you either like them or are related to them and, while the latter won’t change after the wedding, if you’re demanding enough, the former might (if you’re the bridal couple).

By Barbara Trainin Blank Sentinel correspondent frontdoor@cumberlink.com

There’s a little bit of “Waiting for Godot” in it. And a lot of confusion. When playwright Tom Stoppard, maybe on a bet, took two minor characters in “Hamlet” and made them the centerpiece of his “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead,” he added a new dimension to absurdist, existentialist theater. For one thing, despite the serious underlying themes, it is a linguistically clever and “very funny play,” says Dan Burke, who is directing a production of “R&G” at Gamut Theatre Group. There are a number of in-jokes, referring to other Shakespearean plays. And Stoppard himself described “R&G” as “a comedy” with a purpose of entertaining. In a divergence from other plays in the same genre, the absurdism diminishes as time goes on. Both the main characters and the audience become more aware, and “elements of reality start to seep” into the illusion, says Alex Jane Bailey, who is playing Rosencrantz. Initially, the two characters are so bewildered they even get other’s identities mixed up. But that is also a play on the fact that in “Hamlet,” they are almost indistinguishable. Here they are similar but also two sides of the same coin, with Rosencrantz being more accepting, and Guildenstern, questioning everything. “He’s just as lost as Rosencrantz, but doesn’t admit it,” says Eric Dexter Brown, the production’s Guildenstern. “The only thing they know about themselves is what’s in ‘Hamlet,’ “ he

Alex Jane Bailey as Rosencrantz, left, and Eric Dexter Brown as Guildenstern, right.

ert Campbell. Nicholson as the Player; The balance of the cast consists of Randy Hodson; Toby Bradbury; Philip Wheeler; Ian Potter; Charles Hooker; Julia Hatmaker as Ophelia; Larry Gessler; Lauri D. Rawley; and Charles Smith. Potter also designed the set, inspired by a painting of Salvador Dali with a melting sundial. Costume design is by L. A. Hammond, and Mike Banks is the sound designer.

Submitted photo

presents... continues. “They had no life before the play and exist only in the framework of the play.” One of Stoppard’s points is what happens to actors, especially bit players,in a play when they are not onstage. Hamlet himself is given only a small part. As actors do, Bailey wanted to create a back story for her character, but says Burke advised her against it, because “that would go against the play. The only thing they understand is their friendship.” The title of play, arguably Stoppard’s most famous, comes from a line in “Hamlet”: the English Ambassador announces, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are dead.” There is an absurdity there, too, since the audience’s attention is focused on the dramatic deaths of the lead characters. In both plays, K ing Claudius brings the two

men, old friends of Hamlet’s, to court to discover the motives of the Prince of Denmark’s actions and ultimately, to plot against him. But in “R&G,” the characters are missing the three constants in life that give human beings a sense of who and where they are: time, direction and location, Bailey points out. What’s more, they’re in an environment that doesn’t lend itself to logic or reason—making them pa r t i c u l a rly “ v u l n e rable and with no control,” Brown says. From their perspective, the action of “Hamlet,” which many consider the greatest play in the English language, is “truly absurd,” Burke adds. Originally, the Stage Door Series of Gamut presented the idea doing “R&G” — a mirror production to the “Hamlet” produced earlier in the sea-

son” — as a staged reading. But, according to Burke, an actor and fight choreographer (who played Claudius in “Hamlet” and is making his directorial debut here), artistic director Clark Nicholson preferred a full staging. When Nicholson asked Burke to direct, Burke was at first enthusiastic. Then, in appropriate Rosencrantz and Guildenstern fashion, he found himself “petrified.” He got over it by thinking like an actor— asking

Bailey and Brown to sit in a room for an hour and do and say nothing. “That helped solidify our character dynamic,” laughs Bailey. Burke’s choice of a woman to play a man was not a deliberate or nondeliberate one. “I had an open mind,” he says. “It could have been two males, two females, or a male and female. But Alex gave a great audition, and I liked the dynamic between her and Eric.” Hamlet is played by Rob-

In Focus “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” is presented March 9-25 at Gamut Classic Theatre in Harrisburg’s Strawberry Square. Performances are at 7:30 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays and 2:30 p.m. on Sundays. Tickets are $27 for adults and $17 for students/seniors. Friday performances are “Buy-One-Get-One-Free shows”; Sunday performances are “Bring Your Own Price”, when any size donations buys your admission. For information, call 238-4111, or visit: www.gamutplays.org.

Ireland’s Premier Traditional Music Group! with Very Special Guests The John Byrne Band

March 9th at 8:00 PM

Sponsored by:

online ticket purchases

CarlisleTheatre.org

40 West HigH st • Carlisle

717 258-0666

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

In light of my impending third and fourth trips down the aisle this year, once again wearing a dress shaped like a pastel pastry, I recently bought and read “Miss Manner’s Guide to (Painfully Proper) Weddings.” I have already read pretty much every other book the etiquette doyenne has written, so this seemed like a good way to round out my knowledge of etiquette. After having read it, I firmly believe that it should be required reading by every woman in America who wishes to get married and still have friends who like her after her wedding. With such fun chapter titles as, “Terrible Idea I: The Wedding as ‘My Day,’” “Terrible Idea II: The Wedding as Fund-raiser,” and “Terrible Idea III: The Wedding as Show Business,” Miss Manners (a.k.a. Judith Martin) dispenses witty, pithy, pointy advice that lays the ever-so-gentle white-gloved smack-down on the ambitions of brides whose fantasies outrun first, then what food can be purchased to feed them their finances. all, not picking the menu Advice first and then limiting the Chapter One gets right to guest list to pay for lobster the point with a 13-point and prime rib), whether the list of “Things a Bride Need postage stamp on the inviNot Trouble Her Pretty tations carries out the color Head About,” which in- scheme (nobody cares), cludes whether you like and, my personal favorite, your relatives (you have to “Do not worry about wethinvite them anyway), the er the bridegroom is sufproper formula for deter- ficiently interested in the mining food choice (num- wedding. He may or may ber of guests to be invited not be, but this is not in-

of etiquette aren’t so staid and static as to be unable to cope with step-parents, parents’ partners, parents of the same gender, stepgrandparents, children from previous marriages and/or relationships, and stepcousins twice-removed. That Miss Manners has noticed isn’t to say that brides have, and the maven of morals and manners gently reminds brides that any parents who divorced did so for a reason, and forcing them to pretend for one day to be a happy couple is unlikely to foster good will and amity in future relations. Another topic tackled in the book is the sticky issue of money — from who pays for what (traditionally, the bride’s parents hosted the wedding and paid for it, but that doesn’t mean she gets to present them with a bill after the fact), to what names go on the invitation in what order (traditionally bride’s parents first; if they are divorced, her mother and step-father, if any, followed by father and step-mother, if any), to what family traditions can be ignored on the basis of it being the couple’s “day” (you may forego the garter removal or cake-smashing, but not the manners that require you to be a gracious hostess and attentive to guests’ needs). I cannot count the number of times I have heard some variation of the sentence, “It’s my day, and I’ve dreamed of it since I was a little girl, and I’m going to do what I want because I’m the bride and it’s all about me.”

Absurdist play at Gamut combines humor, serious themes

Theatre

D8 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Theatre

D5 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Book Review


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Theatre

One-acts, often paired, performed by Center Stage Opera

‘Falling Machine’ lands short of a good book

By Barbara Trainin Blank

Book is the first in Andrew P. Mayer’s ‘Society of Steam’ series

Sentinel correspondent frontdoor@ cumberlink.com

Set in the 1880s, “The Falling Machine” tells the story of a fresh plot by an unknown enemy to destroy New York City’s famous Paragons, an aging team of super heroes. ■

By Matthew McLaughlin Sentinel Reporter mmclaughlin @cumberlink.com

Submitted photo

From left to right: Tim Kjer/Michael Popovsky/Mariella Pacchioli/Andrea Broido/Konrad Fritz/Vickie Kline/Linda Priebe/Steve Pollack/Laura Lupinacc lissa Angelo-Schiumo and Fabiola Eschazabal), has performed such diverse roles as Mimi in “La Boheme” and Micaela in “Carmen.” But it has been some twenty years since she appeared as the unhappy wife in “Pagliacci”— then with the Little Lyric Opera of Philadelphia. Returning to it is “so much fun,” Broido says. “My voice is more mature now, and more earthy— which is more true to the character. She’s a Gypsy, and very intense. I’m an intense person, but not like her— she loves, fears

and hates intensely.” Konrad Fritz and Steve Gokool share the role of Canio; Steve Pollack is Tonio; Vickie Kline is Peppe; and Silvio, the lover, is sung by Michael Popovsky and Robert Yacoviello. Salvatore Motisi, who p l ays Tu r i d d u ( ro l e shared with Gokool), the impulsive protagonist in “Cav,” has sung it many times. Still, he finds it “one of the most difficult in opera.” T h a t’s b e ca u se , t h e te n o r ex p l a i n s, i t i s “ based on truth,” with the music closely related

to the singing. Verismo requires a “full-throated voice,” like those of Enrico Caruso, Franco Corelli and Richard Tucker. Motisi made his debut in a supporting role in “Turandot,” with Corelli. Despite the challenges, the singer loves this style of opera. “Wagner (the German composer) is wonderful, and French opera is wonderful,” he says. “But there’s nothing like Italian opera.” Also “wonderful” in the view of Motisi and t h e o t h e r s i n ge rs i s Kathryn Foster— for the opportunities she brings

for area audiences to hear opera and for singers to sing it. “She should be more appreciated,” he says. Also in the “Cav” cast are Fran Bjorneby Kraemer, Tess Lang, Laura Lupinacci and Linda

Priebe as Santuzza, Turiddu’s rejected love; Ke i ko B r jo rk m a n a n d Mariela Pacchioli; and Timothy Kjer and Ralph Schatzki. Pacchioli and Priebe also alternate as Lola, the married mistress.

In Focus “Pagliacci”/”Cavalleria” takes place Saturday, March 10, at 7:30 p.m. at the Second Presbyterian Church, 528 Garland Drive, Carlisle; and Friday and Saturday, March 16-17 at 7:30 p.m. at the Camp Hill United Methodist Church, Camp Hill. Other performances are in York and Hanover. Tickets are $10 for students and $20 for adults— cash and check only and available at the door. For information, call 774-4352 and www.csopera.org.

I stumbled upon the second book in Andrew P. Mayer’s Society of Steam series at a book store one night and was so excited by the premise I immediately ordered book one, “The Falling Machine,” from Amazon the same night (said book store did not carry book one for some odd reason). The premise of “The Falling Machine” is one any geek worth their Firefly DVDs and Avengers comic book collection would love, steampunk superheroes. Being such a geek myself, I really wanted to love this book, but I am sad to report I could not.

Steampunk heroes Let me take a step back, however, and explain the basic plot of the novel, which I do find to be its most redeeming quality. Set in the 1880s, “The Falling Machine” tells the story of a fresh plot by an unknown enemy to destroy New York City’s famous Paragons, an aging team of super heroes (think the Avengers or the Justice League) whose power comes from the amazing steampowered technology created by their leader Dennis Darby. With Darby’s death in the be-

ginning of the novel, his last will and testament dividing the group and suspicions rising that there may be a traitor among them, the Paragons are thrown into chaos. In the middle of it all is Sarah Stanton, Darby’s pupil and daughter of the Paragon’s new leader the Industrialist (a gun-toting, shield-wielding hero). Together, Sarah, the Sleuth (equal parts Batman and Sherlock Holmes) and the Automaton (a clockwork man made by Darby) attempt to unravel the mystery and perhaps fulfill Darby’s final wishes as well. In addition to the premise, Mayer actually does the mystery quite well. There are plenty of them, and they are all connected to the larger mystery of who killed Darby, why they did it and what their plans are. Unfortunately, that is all the praise I can really muster for this book.

Too much “The Falling Machine,” like the superhero team comics it borrows from, is very much a story with an ensemble cast. Told in third-person limited, Mayer switches perspective between his assortment of characters with each chapter. Sadly, that decision to give the reader time inside the head of multiple characters may have been the stumbling block that led the book’s biggest failure, charac-

none could quite get there. A prime example is Sarah, a forward thinking woman, who is clearly ahead of her time when it comes to her feminist principles. But that part of her character is so dominating, with her complaining about the clothes she must wear on virtually every page, she becomes more a caricature than a character. This seems to be the common problem will all the characters in the book. They have one strongly developed trait making up their personality and not much else My final complaint is Mayer’s writing. He has talent, but he went overboard so much as to take me out of the story. This happened in two ways— his description of mechanics and his flowery language. Mayer clearly has a technical mind, which is to his detriment rather than his benefit in the steampunk genre. His descriptions of the mechanisms in “The Falling Machine” are often unnecessarily convoluted, which regrettably tends to match his general writing style. At times, I truly felt as though Mayer was simply trying to show off just how well he could use adjectives and describe the intricacies of his settings. I don’t wish that he had taken a minimalist approach, but rather that he had reigned himself in somewhat to Photo illustration preserve the story unfolding in some of scenes. The cover of “The Falling Machine” by Andrew P. Mayer. In conclusion, I find it hard to recommend this book, despite a really fun premise. There are few terization. and, while a few came very close things worse than spending severEvery character in the book was to having me care about them (the al hours reading about characters disappointingly two-dimensional, Sleuth probably being the closest), you don’t care about.

There are few things worse than spending several hours reading about characters you don’t care about.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

The image of the sad clown is one of the most emblematic in opera. The clown in question is Canio, head of a traveling actors’ troupe who suspects his wife is unfaithful, in “Pagliacci”— which contains one of the most famous arias, “Vesti la Giubba.” Often performed with “Pagliacci” is “Cavalleria Rusticana,” the story of a peasant who has resumed an affair with a married woman— with tragic consequences. The upcoming production of Center Stage Opera features both operas in a double bill. Although written by d i f f e re n t c o m p o s e rs — Leoncavallo and Mascagni, respectively — the operas have commonalities: both short and thematically related, they belong to a genre called “verismo,” or realism. Because the names together are a mouthful, the operas are referred to as “Cav/Pag” for short. “They weren’t always done together, but this has become a traditional pairing, “ says Kathryn Foster, artistic director of the West Shore-based opera company, which features both local and out-of-state professional singers. “The two operas complement each other.” They also offer, in spite of their relative brevity, meaty roles. A n d rea B ro i d o, t h e soprano who is singing Nedda in “Pag ” (a role shared with Me-

Literature

D4 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Book Review

D9 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Performing Arts


A guide to area events Art • Habitat for Humanity’s seventh annual art auction will be held March 9. Artist’s reception at 6:30 p.m., auction at 7:30 p.m. Cost is $25. For more information, www.harrisburghabitat.com or 545-7299. • First Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. March 3 in downtown Carlisle. The Garden Gallery will host “Photographyâ€? by March Weinberg; Nancy Stamm’s Galleria will feature “Songbirdsâ€? by Nancy Stamm; and Dave Reinbold’s “The Visual Poetry of Dave Reinboldâ€? will be at Haverstick Gallery and Studios.

“At the center of it is the question we all live with as people, which is how do we face loss and how do we live in the face of loss,� Gordon said. The detective wears colored wristbands to keep his lives straight. Isaacs insists viewers have it easier. When the pilot was being developed, he said, there was concern that the idea was so tricky, his character might need to be bearded in one world and beardless in the other to help viewers distinguish between them. “But my daughter, who’s 5, told me the story in three sentences,� Isaacs recalled. “So I told the producers, ‘We don’t need to worry.’ It’s

such a powerful and imaginative premise.� Besides, he said, anytime his character is confused, “It’s great drama: ‘What’s happening today? What’s happening in this world?’� While keeping a grip on his sanity, Britten is trying to prove to his superiors that he’s fit for work and trying to help his grieving wife and son cope with their losses. “We want him to put his life back together and have his wife and son,� Killen said. “You and he become invested in those two worlds.� Elements from one sometimes cross over to the other, Killen said. That raises the intriguing notion that the

two may ultimately merge, but the producers aren’t saying. “Awake� employs a classic trick to allow viewers to dip in at any point: It’s what Gordon calls an “old-school title sequence� that restates the concept before each episode. “So if you tune in for episode seven, you have the tools to sit down and enjoy that hour of television,� Gordon said. “For an idea like this, clarity is your friend and you want to make the barrier as low as possible.� (He credits the “Run for Your Life� playbook. The 1960s drama, starring Ben Gazzara as a terminally ill man, started each week

with the scene in which the character learned his death sentence and then intoned, “Guess I’ll try to squeeze 30 years of living into one, or two.�) If any cast and crew are up to the task it’s this one. Isaacs routinely is a standout in whatever he tackles, including his role as Lucius Malfoy in the “Harry Potter� films and as Michael Caffee in the series “Brotherhood.� Britten’s therapists are portrayed by Cherry Jones (“24�) and BD Wong (“Law & Order: Special Victims Unit�). Valderrama of “That ‘70s Show� gets to play against type and makes the most of his earnest, ambitious lawman.

Producer Gordon’s latest triumph is the Showtime drama series “Homeland,� starring Claire Danes. Killen wrote the provocative Jodie Foster-Mel Gibson movie, “The Beaver,� and the wellreviewed, sadly short-lived Fox drama “Lone Star.� Now it’s time for U.S. viewers to weigh in on “Awake,� the English-born Isaacs said, and he has faith in them. “There’s a lot of discussion online and among my friends, who say, ‘I love it, but I don’t think the public will get it,’� the actor said, dismissing that as a “patronizing idea.� “We underestimate them at our peril,� Isaacs said.

Harrisburg, 221-1080

NIGHTLIFE | D12

www.abcbrew.com

p.m., $7 advance, $10 at door. Friday, March 2: Hierosonic with Eliot Lipp & Minshara, show at 9 p.m., $7 advance.

cover.

Gullifty’s Underground 1104 Carlisle Road

BOOKS | D8-9

“Miss Manners� resonates with reviewer while “Falling Machine� dissapoints.

Camp Hill, 761-6692

• Spring art classes are forming now at The Art Center School and Galleries in Mechanicsburg. For more information call 6972072 or visit www.mechanicsburgartcenter.com.

Friday, March 2: Platform Soul, doors at 8 p.m. and show

• Ethan Grosso’s “Restlessâ€? will be on display through March 10 at the Goodyear Gallery at Dickinson College.

$5 min. donation at the door.

• The Perry County Council of the Arts will host “Drawing the Lineâ€? from March 16 through May 24 at Landis House, 67 N. Fourth St., Newport, www.perrrycountyarts.org.

Holly Inn

• Therese Zemlin will display her artwork through March 9 in the Aughinbaugh Art Gallery at Messiah College’s Climenhaga Fine Arts Center. • “Mechanicsburg – A Look at Bygone Daysâ€? will be on display through May 26 at the Mechanicsburg Museum Association, 2 W. Strawberry Alley, Mechanicsburg. This exhibit features artifacts and photographs of Mechanicsburg’s bygone days of business and industry. Free and open to the public. Visit www. mechanicsburgmuseum.org or call 697-6088. • “The Blues,â€? a CALC member exhibit, will run through March 17 at Carlisle Arts Learning Center, 19 N. Hanover St., Carlisle. An opening reception will be held 6:30-8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 17. Two pieces of artowrk allowed per member; cost is $10 per piece. Prizes will be awarded by jurror Anthony Wolking, visiting professor of art at Dickinson College. visit www.carlislearts.org.

THEATRE | D4-5

Catch an Italian opera duo at several local venues. Also, absurdist play, “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead� opens at Gamut Classic Theatre March 9 and runs through the 25.

Saturday, March 3: Across The Pond, show at 9 p.m., no

• Gary McGeary, a traditional coverlet weaver, will the “Artist in Actionâ€? at the Village Artisans Gallery from 1 to 4 p.m. Saturday, March 3.

• Mechanicsburg artist Patty Toth will display her exhibition “Grandeur of Yosemiteâ€? through March 7 at the Perry County Council of the Arts Gallery, 1 S. Second St., Newport. An opening reception will be held 7-8:30 p.m. Friday, Feb. 3. Visit www.perrycountyarts.org or call 567-7023.

Electronic music artist Eliot Lipp to hit the stage at Appalachian Brewing Co.’s Abbey Bar, Harrisburg on Friday night.

Thursday, March 1: Pert’ Near Sandstone, doors open at 7

www.gulliftys.net

MOVIES & TV | D10-11

New TV show ‘Awake’ has everyone guessing. Also, see a list of movies opening this weekend in area theaters on D11.

at 9:30 p.m., $7 Saturday, March 3: JAM for BC, 1-5 p.m.

31 S. Baltimore Ave. Mt. Holly Springs, 486-3823 www.hollyinn.com

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Associated Press

Wilmer Valderrama, left, and Jason Isaacs arrive at the Independent Spirit Awards, in Santa Monica, Calif.

50 N. Cameron St.

AALIVE

Nightlife

Eliot Lipp to electrify ABC this weekend

March 11: Best of Bluegrass - Monroe Crossing By Lisa CLarke

Sentinel CorreSpondent Frontdoor@Cumberlink.Com

Today we turn our calendars to a new month and look forward to daylight savings time and the official end of winter. On Friday, March 2, kick off the new season with nationally-known electronic music artist Eliot Lipp headlining a show at the Appalachian Brewing Company’s Abbey Bar. Originally hailing from Tacoma, Wash., Lipp got his start making beats for local rappers. His musical ambitions eventually led him to Los Angeles where he first pursued his career, signing with Eastern Developments record label in 2004 and releasing his first LP, which was made using sequential circuits and korg ms-20 synths. “When I first heard electro and glitch I got excited about the possibilities of mixing those styles with hip hop,� says Lipp. “Part of my journey through discovering the history of electronic music led me to analog synths, vintage samplers and drums machines. I still collect that kind of gear and use it quite a bit in my own production.� He subsequently released two more albums, ‘Tacoma Mockingbird’, a collection of works that remind the artist of his hometown, and

EntErtainmEnt in thE hEart of thE midstatE

113 N. Hanover St. Carlisle, 258-1234

www.marketcrosspub.com

Submitted photo

‘Steele Street Scraps’ on which he collaborates with notable artists John Hughes and Earmint. In 2009, he released “Peace Love Weed 3D�, and is slated to release his newest work next month. With his eclectic range of equipment and influences, it’s clear that Lipp is an artist with range and creative consideration that shows in his work. “I’m influenced by so many styles, house, hip

hop, instrumental stuff... I like a lot of what the labels Alpha Pup & PLM have been releasing,� says Lipp. “I like some of the new U.K. club stuff too. Lately I’m just really influenced by people playing really bass heavy tracks with interesting rhythms.� While Lipp leaves the theatrics off the stage, his show is by no means lacking energy. He uses two live analog synths while doing live remixes on his laptop,

and expertly blends a range of music together. “I’m playing a lot of my high energy tracks but I’m slipping in a few of the pretty ones too. I love sampling records so at my show you’ll hear a lot of different genres of music squashed into one tune sometimes,� he says. “I don’t wear a mask or have a giant video wall or anything so I just try to play really good music and connect with the crowd.�

 

Friday, March 2: Pocket Change, 9 p.m. Saturday, March

He notes that although his music is not typical club music, it is designed to fill the dance floor. “My goal is to get people dancing,� he says. “One of my favorite things about my shows is the group of people that my music brings together.� Eliot Lipp will perform on Friday, March 2 at the Appalachian Brewing Company’s Abbey Bar, located on the second floor of the 50 N. Cameron St. facil-

www.cumberlink.com

section D March 1, 2012

rosencrantz and Guildenstern come to the Gamut stage while an italian opera opens locally

Dervish

Electronic music artist Eliot Lipp will perform at ABC Harrisburg tomorrow night.

Market Cross Pub & Brewery

iNsiDe..... www.cumberlink.com

The Sentinel

ity in Harrisburg. Tickets are $10, and patrons must be age 21 or older. The show begins at 9 p.m. with Heirosonic, followed by Minshara at 10 p.m. Lipp takes the stage at midnight. For more information, visit www.greenbeltevents. com. For venue information, visit www.abcbrew. com.

    

Celtic group to perform March 9 at the Carlisle Theatre •••D7

    

3: Grand Point Station, 9 p.m. Thursday, March 8: Brewery tours at 6 p.m. Friday, March 9: Finks Constant, 9:30 p.m. Saturday, March 10: Erica Everest, 9 p.m.

On the cover: The members of Dervish. The celtic music group is traveling all the way from Ireland to perform at the Carlisle Theatre next week.

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

LOS ANGELES — NBC’s new drama “Awake� has the kind of intricate, high-concept premise that can test viewers. But that’s nothing compared with what its producers face. Howard Gordon, a master at juggling challenging plots (“24� and “The X-Files� among them), puts it flatly: “I learned nothing, and nothing I experienced prepared for me this.� “This is a vehicle that no one has driven before and has no operating instructions,� said Gordon, who produces “Awake� with its creator, Kyle Killen. The series, debuting 10 p.m. EST Thursday, stars Jason Isaacs as police Detective Michael Britten, a man living in two worlds. A car accident has claimed a family member’s life: his wife, Hannah (Laura Allen), in one, and his teenage son, Rex (Dylan Minnette), in another. The duality extends to Britten’s work, where he investigates cases with two partners (Steve Harris, Wilmer Valderrama), and discovers that straddling different realities gives him crime-busting insights. While other TV shows with parallel universes and outcomes have dabbled in extreme explanations — quick, explain “Lost� again — Gordon and Killen insist this is a (relatively) simple case of a guy living one life and dreaming another. Britten and the audience are just not sure which is which. Neither are the therapists who are treating him, with both assuring him that his OTHER life is the dream. He’s unwilling to give up the balancing act that allows him to keep hold of both wife and son.

MUSIC |D6-7

Irish group Dervish to perform its more modern celtic music on stage at the Carlisle Theatre March 9. Also, see a review of Dierks Bentley’s new CD, “Home� and also Music Notes.

Appalachian Brewing Company

Out & About

AP Television Writer

Inside

A look at local nightlife

D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

TV News

BY LYNN ELBER

• Carlisle High School to hold a music department concert at 7:30 p.m. today in the McGowan Building’s Clyde and Lyn Barr Auditorium. The concert is free and open to the public.

The Scene

Out & About

D10 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

‘Awake’ keeps hero, viewers guessing at reality

Music

D3 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

TV News


Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

Special Events

Theater

Music

• Metropolitan Area Dance Club will host a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. on March 10, 17. 24 and 31 at the PA Dance Sport Ballroom in Hummelstown. For more information call 774-2171.

• Chambersburg Community Theatre presents “The Sound of Music” at 7:30 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. on Sundays, from March 23 to 25 and March 30 to April 1, at the Capitol Theatre. Cost is $15 for adults; $10 for students; and $5 for children age 5 and younger. Visit www.cctonline. org or call 263-0202.

• Midtown Scholar’s Friday Folk Cafe presents “Timurid” from 8 to 10 p.m. Friday, March 3. There is no cover for the event but donations are strongly encouraged. All proceeds will go to the Leukemia Lymphoma Society. For more information visit www.MidtownScholar.com or call 236-1680.

• The Capitol Steps will perform at 8 p.m. March 15 at the H. Ric Luhrs Performing Arts Center at Shippensburg University. Tickets are $20 to $35. Call 477-SHOW for visit luhrscenter.com for tickets. • Comedian Brett Butler to perform at the Strand-Capitol Performing Arts Center at 7:30 p.m. March 30. For more information visit www.StrandCapitol.org or call 846-1111.

• Dickinson College will host it’s 9th Annual Local Food Dinner at 6:30 p.m. on March 24 in the Holland Union Building, College Street. Tickets go on sale Monday, March 12 and donation of $15 to Carlisle Farmers on the Square is suggested. For more information visit http:/blogs.dickinson.edu/farm/blog/ or call 245-1251. • Pat’s Singles Club will hold dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 11 at the Valencia Ballroom, York. “Rumor Has It” will perform, cost is $10. • Susquehanna Mysteries Alliance will present “Titanic: What Lies Beneath” at 2 p.m. April 15 at the Mechanicsburg Mystery Bookshop in Mechanicsburg, 6 Clouser Road. For more information call 795-7470 or email mysterybooks@comcast.net. • Pat’s Singles Club will hold its St. Patrick’s Day dance from 7 to 10:30 p.m. on Sunday, March 18 at the Valencia Ballroom, York. “The Headliners” will perform, cost is $10. • Julie Newmar, who played “Cat Woman” in the original Batman series will be at the Pennsylvania Garden Show of York at the York Expo Center at 2 p.m. on Saturday at the Toyota Arena. She will be signing copies of her book “The Conscious Cat Woman’s Guide to Living.”

• Oyster Mill Playhouse presents “Out Of Order” from March 16 to April 1. Show is at 8 p.m. Thursday, Friday and Saturday and 2 p.m. Sunday. Cost is $14, opening night tickets are $16. Call 7376768 or visit www.oystermill.com. • Gamut Theatre Group’s Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Jungle Book” at 2:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Saturday, April 14 at the Whitaker Center’s Sunoco Theatre, Harrisburg. Cost is $15. • The Popcorn Hat Players presents “The Little Mermaid,” Wednesdays and Thursdays at 10:15 a.m. and Saturdays at 1 p.m. March 14 through March 31. Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are $5-$8. Visit www.gamutplays.org or call 238-4111. • West Perry High School presents “Footloose” March 8,9 and 20 in the school’s auditorium. • Harrisburg Shakespeare Company will present “Rosencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead” Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays from March 9 through March 25 at the Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg.Tickets are $17 to $25. • Cumberland Valley High School presents “Legally Blonde: The Musical” at 7:30 p.m. March 29 through 31 and at 2 p.m. April 1. For tickets call 506-3936. Tickets are $10 for students and $12 for adults.

• The “Joys of Springtime” flower show will take place March 2 through 4 as part of the Pennsylvania Garden Show of York, at the York Expo. Admission is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and students and children under 12 are free. For more information email babrand@embarqmail.com or call 642-9776.

• The Little Theatre of Mechanicsburg will present “Extremities” March 23 through April 8. Call 766-0535 for tickets, box office opens March 12 for patrons, and March 13 for the public.

• Ballroom dance classes at Dickinson College through April 3. Beginner classes start at 6 p.m. and the Third Timer class starts at 7:15 p.m. Cost is $30. Contact devwell@ dickinson.edu or fhancock@comcast.net or call 241-4483.

• Open Stage of Harrisburg presents “Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom” through Feb. 25 at the theater, 223 Walnut St., Harrisburg. Visit www.openstagehbg.com or call 232-OPEN.

• The Metropolitan Area Dance Club will host a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, March 3 at the PA Dance Sport Ballroom in Hummelstown with the band Bob Kreitz and Friends. Call 774-2171. • Messiah College presents Michael Cooper’s “Masked Marvels and Wondertales” at 7 p.m. in Miller Auditorium in the Climenhaga Fine Arts Center March 9. Tickets are $12 to $23 and are available at tickets@messiah.edu or by calling 691-6036.

• The Popcorn Hat Players will present “Hansel and Gretel” at 10:15 a.m. Wednesdays and Thursdays and 1 p.m. Saturdays, through March 3, at Gamut Classic Theatre, third floor, Strawberry Square, Harrisburg. Tickets are $5-$8. Visit www. gamutplays.org or call 238-4111.

• Cormorant’s Fancy will perform at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 11 at the First Lutheran Church, 21 S. Bedford St., Carlisle. Call 249-3310 or visit www.firstlutherancarlisle. org. • Dervish will perfom at the Carlisle Theatre at 8 p.m. Friday, March 9. Tickets are $26 to $36 and $10 for students. Call 258-0666 or visit www.carlisletheatre.org. • John Hollandsworth will present an autoharp workshop Saturday, March 10 at Orthey Instruments, 18 Burd Road, Newport. Cost is $20, reservations required. Call 567-6406 or 567-9469, email, gorthey@gmail.com • The Kim Thompson Group featuring guitarist Mike Moreno will perform at 6 p.m. at the Sheraton Harrisburg Hershey Hotel, 4650 Lindle Road, Harrisburg, on April 22. • Dickinson College presents “An Evening with the Music of Gabriel Faure” at 7 p.m., Saturday, March 3 at the Rudendall Recital Hall, Weiss Center for the Arts. • The Harrisburg Choral Society to present a “Lenten Reflections” concert at 3 p.m., Sunday, March 4 at the Camp Hill Presbyterian Church, Carlisle. Coast is $12 for adults and $5 for students. Vists www.harrisburgchoralsociety.org. • The West Shore Shag and Bop Club will be hosting a dance at 7 p.m. on Friday, March 10 at the Lewisberry Ballroom. Tickets are $10 for adults and $5 for students with ID. Call 938-6959. • John Prine with special guest Leo Kottke will perform at 7 p.m., Saturday, March 3 at Hershey Theatre. Tickets are $49.50 to $59.50 and are available at www.ticketmaster.com or by calling 534-3405. • Eliot Lipp will perform at 12 a.m. at The Abbey Bar at Appalachian Brewing Co., Harrisburg. Tickets are $10. Call 221-1080 or visit www.abcbrew.com. • Casting Crowns to perform at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 30 at the Giant Center, Hershey. Tickets are $21.50 to $75 and are available at www.ticketmaster. com or by calling 534-3911.

Event information can be submitted via email to frontdoor@cumberlink.com, by mail, 457 E. North St., Carlisle, PA 17013 or by fax at 243-3121. For more information, visit www.cumberlink.com/entertainment

Flagship continued

Act of Valor (R) Thu. 11:30 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50, Fri.Thu. 11:30 a.m., 2, 4:40, 7:10, 9:50 The Artist (PG-13) Thu. 10:55 a.m., 1:15, 3:50, 6:45, 9:05, Fri.Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:25, 3:50, 6:40, 8:55 Chronicle (PG-13) Thu. 12:25, 7:25 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11 a.m., 1:10, 3:30, 5:40, 7:45, 9:45 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:30, 6:45, 8:50 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu. 12, 2:25, 4:45, 7:50, 10:05 Gone (PG-13) Thu. 11:25 a.m., 1:45, 4:15, 7:05, 9:30, Fri.-Thu. 11 a.m., 1:10, 4:15, 7:05, 9:20 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 11:05 a.m., 6:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:05 a.m., 1:20, 4 Project X (R) Fri. 1:25, 3:40, 5:45, 7:45, 9:55, 11:59, Sat.-Thu. 1:25, 3:40, 5:45, 7:50, 10 Safe House (R) Thu. 11 a.m., 1:30, 4, 7, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 7, 9:30 The Secret World of Arriety (G) Thu. 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 4:25, 6:50, 9, Fri.-Thu. 12:25, 2:35, 5:05 Star Wars: Episode I – The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 1:20, 4:10, 9:20 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 7:30, 9:50, Fri.Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 7:30, 9:55 Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds (PG-13) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 10, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:50, 4:35, 7:20, 9:50 The Vow (PG-13) Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:15, 9:45, Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:15, 9:40 Wanderlust (R) Thu. 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:40, 10, Fri.-Thu. 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:40, 9:55 Woman in Black (PG-13) Thu. 2:35, 5, 9:35, Fri.-Thu. 7:25, 9:35

Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 12:40, 3, 5:20, 7:40, 10 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu.-Thu. 12:30, 2:50, 5:10, 7:30, 9:50 Project X (R) Fri.-Thu. 12:20, 2:40, 5, 7:20, 9:40 Safe House (R) Thu. 12, 2:40, 7, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 9:20 The Secret World of Arriety (G) Thu. 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7, 9:20, Fri.-Thu. 12, 2:20, 4:40, 7 Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 12:50, 3:50, 6:50, 9:45 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 12:10, 3:10, 7:10, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 12:10, 3:40, 7:10, 9:55 The Vow (PG-13) Thu. 12:10, 3:10, 7:20, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 12:10, 3:30, 7, 10:05

Flagship Cinemas Act of Valor (R) Thu. 12:20, 3:20, 7:45, 10:10, Fri.-Thu. 11:50 a.m., 3:10, 6:50, 9:30 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 4:20, 9 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 2, 6:40

Continued next column

Great Escape Act of Valor (R) Thu. 11:20 a.m., 12:10, 1:55, 2:45, 4:30, 7:20, 8, 9:55, Fri.-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:55, 4:30, 7:20, 10 Chronicle (PG-13) Thu. 5:20, 10:30 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 11:30 a.m., 1:40, 3:50, 6:30, 8:45 Dr. Seuss The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 12:30, 2:40, 4:50, 7:15, 9:25 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 2D (PG-13) Thu. 12:30, 3:50, 6:30, 9, Fri.-Thu. 7:45, 10:05 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu. 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 4:45, 7:55, 10:15, Fri.-Thu. 11:45 a.m., 2:25, 4:45 Gone (PG-13) Thu. 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:10, 9:25, Fri.-Thu. 12:15, 2:30, 4:55, 7:10, 9:35 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 11:35 a.m., 2, Fri.-Thu. 11:35 a.m., 2, 4:15 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 4:15, 7:25, 9:45, Fri.-Thu. 7:25, 9:45 Project X (R) Fri.-Thu. 12:40, 2:50, 5, 7:40, 9, 9:50 Safe House (R) Thu.-Thu. 11:40 a.m., 2:15, 4:50, 7:35, 10:10 Secret World of Arrietty (G) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:40, 4:05, 6:45, 9:05, Fri.-Thu. 11:15 a.m., 1:35, 4, 6:30 Star Wars: Episode 1 – The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 12:40, 3:40, 6:40, 9:40 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 12:45, 4, 7:15, 9:50, Fri.-Thu. 12:45, 3:30, 6:45, 9:10

Continued next column

Great Escape continued Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds (PG-13) Thu. 11:15 a.m., 12, 1:50, 2:35, 4:25, 5:10, 7, 7:45, 9:35, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 11:25 a.m., 12:25, 2:05, 3:40, 4:35, 6:40, 7:30, 9:15, 10:05 The Vow (PG-13) Thu.-Thu. 11:20 a.m., 1:45, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20 Wanderlust (R) Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:30, 10, Fri.Thu. 11:50 a.m., 2:10, 4:40, 7:05, 9:30

Regal Carlisle Commons 8 Act of Valor (R) Thu. 2:30, 5, 7:50, Fri. 2:20, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30, Sat.-Sun. 11:45 a.m., 2:20, 5:10, 7:50, 10:30, Mon.Thu. 2:20, 5:10, 7:50 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri. 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9, Sat.-Sun. 12, 2:10, 4:30, 6:50, 9, Mon.-Thu. 2:10, 4:30, 6:50 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri. 2:50, 5:20, 7:30, 9:40, Sat.-Sun. 12:40, 2:50, 5:20, 7:30, 9:40, Mon.-Thu. 2:50, 5:20, 7:30 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu. 2:20, 4:50, 7:40, Fri.-Sun. 1:40, 4:40, 7:20, 10, Mon.-Thu. 1:40, 4:40, 7:20 Gone (PG-13) Thu. 2:40, 5:10, 8, Fri.-Sun. 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:50, Mon.-Thu. 1:50, 4:20, 7 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 2:10, Fri.-Thu. 2:30 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 4:40, 7, 9:30, Fri. 4:50, 7:10, 9:30, Sat.Sun. 12:10, 4:50, 7:10, 9:30, Mon.-Thu. 4:50, 7:10, 9:30 Project X (R) Fri. 2:40, 5:30, 8, 10:20, Sat.-Sun. 12:30, 2:40, 5:30, 8, 10:20, Mon.-Thu. 2:40, 5:30, 8 Safe House (R) Thu. 1:30, 4:20, 7:30 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 1, 3:55, 6:50 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 1:45, 4:10, 7:10 The Vow (PG-13) Thu. 2, 4:30, 7:20, Fri.-Sun. 2, 5, 7:40, 10:10, Mon.-Thu. 2, 5, 7:40

Carlisle Theatre A Dangerous Method (R) Thu. 7:30 The Descendants (R) Fri.-Sat. 7:30, Sun. 2, Wed.-Thu. 7:30

Regal Harrisburg Act of Valor (R) Thu. 2:10, 5, 7:40, 10:20, Fri.-Thu. 2:10, 4:50, 7:40, 10:20 Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Love Never Dies (PG) Wed. (March 7) 7:30 The Artist (PG-13) Fri.-Thu. 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:40 Chronicle (PG-13) Thu. 1:30, 4:10, 6:40, 9:20 The Descendants (R) Thu. 12:55, 3:30 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 2D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 2, 4:10, 6:20, 8:30, 10:40 Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax 3D (PG) Fri.-Thu. 12:50, 3, 5:10, 7:20, 9:30 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 2D (PG-13) Thu. 6:10, 8:50 Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance 3D (PG-13) Thu. 1:40, 4:30, 7:10, 9:40, Fri.-Thu. 12:55, 3:40, 6:45, 9:45 Gone (PG-13) Thu. 2:30, 4:50, 7:30, 10:10, Fri.-Thu. 2:30, 5:15, 8, 10:25 The Grey (R) Thu. 1:45, 7:45 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 2D (PG) Thu. 4, Fri.-Thu. 3:50 Journey 2: The Mysterious Island 3D (PG) Thu. 1:20, 6:30, 9:10, Fri.-Thu. 1:20, 6:40, 9:10 National Theater Live: The Comedy of Errors (NR) Thu. 7 Project X (R) Fri.-Thu. 1, 3:10, 5:20, 7:50, 10 Safe House (R) Thu. 2:20, 5:10, 8, 10:40, Fri.-Thu. 1:15, 4:40, 7:30, 10:10 The Secret World of Arriety (G) Thu. 1, 3:40, 6:20, 9, Fri.-Thu. 1:10, 4:05, 6:30, 9 Star Wars: Episode I - The Phantom Menace 3D (PG) Thu. 6:50, 9:50 This Means War (PG-13) Thu. 1:10, 4:25, 7:05, 9:45, Fri.-Thu. 2:20, 5, 7:25, 10:05 Tyler Perry’s Good Deeds (PG-13) Thu. 2, 4:40, 7:20, 10, Fri.-Thu. 1:40, 4:30, 7:10, 9:50 The Vow (PG-13) Thu. 1:50, 4:20, 7, 9:30, Fri.-Thu. 1:30, 4, 6:50, 9:20 Wanderlust (R) Thu. 2:40, 5:20, 7:50, 10:30, Fri.-Thu. 2:40, 5:30, 8:10, 10:30 Woman in Black (PG-13) Thu. 5:15, 10:25

Get all of your entertainment news online at www.cumberlink.com

• The Capital City Polka Dancers Association will hold a dance from 7 to 11 p.m. Saturday, March 10 at the Holy Name of Jesus gymnasium, Harrisburg. John Stanky and the Coal Miners band will be playing. Cost is $12 for advance tickets and $14 at the door. Call 975-0114 or visit www.ccpda.info.

• Midtown Scholar presents “Silent Old Mountains” and “Life After You” from 8 to 10 p.m. Saturday, March 3. For more information visit www.MidtownScholar.com or call 236-1680.

Cinema Center of Camp Hill

Movies

Out & About

• “Stars on Ice” coming to the Giant Center in Hershey at 4 p.m. Sunday, March 18. For tickets or more information visit www.starsonice.com or ticketmaster.com. Tickets start at $25.

D2 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Now showing

D11 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Out & About


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Out & About D12 — The Sentinel, Carlisle, Pa. Thursday, March 1, 2012

Nightlife

Eliot Lipp to electrify ABC this weekend By Lisa Clarke Sentinel Correspondent Frontdoor@cumberlink.com

Today we turn our calendars to a new month and look forward to daylight savings time and the official end of winter. On Friday, March 2, kick off the new season with nationally-known electronic music artist Eliot Lipp headlining a show at the Appalachian Brewing Company’s Abbey Bar. Originally hailing from Tacoma, Wash., Lipp got his start making beats for local rappers. His musical ambitions eventually led him to Los Angeles where he first pursued his career, signing with Eastern Developments record label in 2004 and releasing his first LP, which was made using sequential circuits and korg ms-20 synths. “When I first heard electro and glitch I got excited about the possibilities of mixing those styles with hip hop,” says Lipp. “Part of my journey through discovering the history of electronic music led me to analog synths, vintage samplers and drums machines. I still collect that kind of gear and use it quite a bit in my own production.” He subsequently released two more albums, ‘Tacoma Mockingbird’, a collection of works that remind the artist of his hometown, and

Electronic music artist Eliot Lipp will perform at ABC Harrisburg tomorrow night. Submitted photo

‘Steele Street Scraps’ on which he collaborates with notable artists John Hughes and Earmint. In 2009, he released “Peace Love Weed 3D”, and is slated to release his newest work next month. With his eclectic range of equipment and influences, it’s clear that Lipp is an artist with range and creative consideration that shows in his work. “I’m influenced by so many styles, house, hip

hop, instrumental stuff... I like a lot of what the labels Alpha Pup & PLM have been releasing,” says Lipp. “I like some of the new U.K. club stuff too. Lately I’m just really influenced by people playing really bass heavy tracks with interesting rhythms.” While Lipp leaves the theatrics off the stage, his show is by no means lacking energy. He uses two live analog synths while doing live remixes on his laptop,

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and expertly blends a range of music together. “I’m playing a lot of my high energy tracks but I’m slipping in a few of the pretty ones too. I love sampling records so at my show you’ll hear a lot of different genres of music squashed into one tune sometimes,” he says. “I don’t wear a mask or have a giant video wall or anything so I just try to play really good music and connect with the crowd.”

He notes that although his music is not typical club music, it is designed to fill the dance floor. “My goal is to get people dancing,” he says. “One of my favorite things about my shows is the group of people that my music brings together.” Eliot Lipp will perform on Friday, March 2 at the Appalachian Brewing Company’s Abbey Bar, located on the second floor of the 50 N. Cameron St. facil-

A

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The Sentinel www.cumberlink.com

Section D March 1, 2012

INSIDE..... Rosencrantz and Guildenstern come to the Gamut stage while an Italian opera opens locally

Dervish

ity in Harrisburg. Tickets are $10, and patrons must be age 21 or older. The show begins at 9 p.m. with Heirosonic, followed by Minshara at 10 p.m. Lipp takes the stage at midnight. For more information, visit www.greenbeltevents. com. For venue information, visit www.abcbrew. com.

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Celtic group to perform March 9 at the Carlisle Theatre •••D7


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