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vol. 4 #13 – 26 July 2011

The Sentinel Amsterdam

Integrity, heart, humour

FEATURE

Amsterdam when the sun shines! PERSPECTIVES

LOST & FOUND Lifestyles Opinion Travel Technology Cartoon Trends Sport Classifieds


Contents

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CONTENTS

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In this issue FEATURE p. 03 PERSPECTIVES

Amsterdam when the sun shines!

‘A perfectly good option for living normally in ‘central’ Amsterdam’

P. 14 travel

Lost & Found in Ciderspace

P. 22

Tripping days 43° N 79° W

‘I’d have my pick of the most eclectic/esoteric therapies Albion had to offer’

trends p. 34 sport p. 38 more:

Elk nadeel heb z’n voordeel

The Sentinel Fantasy Football League

PERSPECTIVES p. 28 I love Amsterdam TECHNOLOGY p. 30 G+O=EMC2

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FILM REVIEW Room 2C CARTOON

p. 33

SPORT Fantasy Football Gold Champions League

p. 39

p. 33

CLASSIFIEDS ColoPHon The Sentinel Amsterdam e-mail: sentinelpost@gmail.com website: www.thesentinel.eu The Sentinel Amsterdam does not intentionally include unaccredited photos/illustrations that are subject to copyright. If you consider your copyright to have been infringed, please contact us at sentinelpost@gmail.com.

Editors – Gary Rudland & Denson Pierre Design, realisation and form – Andrei Barburas & No-Office.nl Webmaster – www.sio-bytes.tumblr.com Webhost – Amsterjammin.com

Contributors: Jules Marshall, Sharmin de Vries, Alina Croitoru, Simon Owusu, David King, Colin Bentley & Dirkje Bakker


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Amsterdam when the sun shines! By Denson Pierre

In part three of his series on Amsterdam districts and their particular appeal in his eyes, Denson Pierre turns toward the rising sun to find...


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feature

‘Volkert van der Graaf, for instance, did not assassinate Pim Fortuyn because he was influenced to do so by a renegade Imam’

Amsterdam Oost (East) So much is made of Amsterdam Oost’s edginess but it is always clear that such reporters have neither lived nor properly socialised there at any time over the past decade. They simply rush to report on ills when they occur and then go full throttle at painting the district rather negatively, as if exactly the same misdemeanours do not take place elsewhere across the city. Yes, Theo van Gogh was butchered in Amsterdam Oost a few years ago but it was not the butcher but Van Gogh who hailed from that district. Van Gogh’s agenda, displayed via his art, was seemingly impacting catastrophically upon the esteem of folk of the Islamic faith. As always in this type of case, a madman (or woman) grasps the opportunity to act out life-threatening violence as ‘vengeance’, when they are actually more likely deluded by blind radicalism or simply criminally insane. Volkert van der Graaf, for instance, did not assassinate Pim Fortuyn because he was influenced to do so by a renegade Imam.

‘What they will indeed find is the most ethnically diverse of Amsterdam’s districts’ In reality, Amsterdam Oost is an area where the average new arrival, student or non-bourgeois artist with a healthy respect for the real-estate rip-off trap predominant in the city, can easily end up living. When he or she eventually explores the neighbourhood, what they will indeed find is the most ethnically diverse of Amsterdam’s districts.

Despite the inevitable encroachment by virtually corrupt estate agents and dodgy apartment key-holding hustlers preying on naïve (especially young female) new arrivals desperate to be housed, Amsterdam Oost remains, in general, affordable and really good value for your euro. It is clearly on a gentle improvement trajectory that will make it a sort of new ‘Pijp’ in another few years. As soon as the remaining sagging frontline facades are freshened-up and its current generation of higher-educated students graduate, only to realise that they were living just 15 minutes from the centre of this great city at reasonable rates all along, they will surely go on to buy or continue renting in this homely district. There are, of course, some new and developing areas, like the beautiful Java Eiland, the less elegant KNSM Eiland and the IJburg phases I and II, where those who insist upon investing more heavily in ‘classy’ new-build real estate can take the gamble that these modern, if rather standard and only gently stylish, accommodation blocks will turn to gold over the next 20 years. Properly old Watergraafsmeer with all its patches of greenery has, since last year, also been officially annexed by Amsterdam Oost.

‘Only 40 minutes walking distance from the more glitzy entertainment-branded street clusters’ Otherwise, all that you need for happy urban living is easily at hand in Oost and the heart of the district is only 40 minutes walking distance from the more glitzy entertainment-branded street clusters. Within its own


FEATURE

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‘For those who wish to gloriously step up and stagger back down, the world famous Brouwerij ‘t IJ is also just around the corner’ borders, however, the Tropen (Tropical) Museum and cultural complex is arguably the most atmospheric of its kind in the city. Eight minutes further along by bicycle are Flevopark and Flevobad (50-metre outdoor swimming pool), whose beauty, space and ease of use may surprise some. There is less population pressure at this ‘edge’ of the city, so even in high summer you may be able to find waterside green spots for relaxation or clearings for free sport. Oosterpark, on the other hand, is maybe the busiest park in the city, in terms of regularly staging funky little festival-type events. It is also a beautiful, yet much smaller, Victorian garden-designed park that is popular with ‘park sports’ enthusiasts all year round. For bars, event drinking and cafe/restaurant food, the offer is particularly good, varied and impressively very regularly a few per cent cheaper to consume than in other districts. Not that The Sentinel is a guide but there are two cafes I personally always try to get to in Oost, when I can. The first I think is really the centre of the community there and the other is just nice. Try http://www.ponteneur. nl/ and http://www.badhuis-javaplein.nl/ when you can. I have never been disappointed on any of my dozens of visits to them over the years. For those who wish to glori-

ously step up and stagger back down, the world famous Brouwerij ‘t IJ is also just around the corner. At least one opportunity to enjoy a high-yeast, quality local beer list in this micro-brewery and cafe, housed within one of only two traditional and historic windmills remaining in Amsterdam, should not be passed by. On another day you can shop the length of the award-winning Dappermarkt, also situated nearby.

‘Older folk and new arrivals lacking in street wisdom scream ghetto fever’ So, Oost may not be the most glamorous of Amsterdam’s districts but, as we know, it only takes 20 trouble-making teenagers acting out every five years, or so, to make older folk and new arrivals lacking in street wisdom scream ghetto fever. Each time one of these spikes in low-grade but highly irritating street crime surfaces, it seems like a simple re-alignment of policing easily releases the neighbourhoods to continue on peacefully in the folksy way they do.


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‘We have our proportional share of psychopaths, drug fiends, raving alcoholics, rapists, fraudsters and gunslingers’ There is nothing that can really be said here about the heavier professional criminal dramas that have and occasionally still play out on random streets in this district and all others. Amsterdam is a city of a million people, when full. We have our proportional share of psychopaths, drug fiends, raving alcoholics, rapists, fraudsters and gunslingers, just like any other city and, as it happens, with its international mix and pan-cultural exotica clashing naturally, there is sometimes easy sensation to be had, regrettably. All in all, however, if you are not too busy faking class through the nature or size of your mortgage loan or the almost criminal steepness of your rent, Amsterdam Oost

is a perfectly good option for living normally in ‘central’ Amsterdam. With simple life-skill tools at the ready to run the urban gauntlet, Oost remains an open option, in my mind. On balance, nothing has soured my positive view of the area after the three long spells I have spent living and socialising there, spread over a 12-year period.


FEATURE

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FEATURE

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CLASSIFIEdS SPORT

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CLASSIFIEdS

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perspectives

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How 10 days a Glastonbury l illegal alien h my saddened

Lost & Found in Ciderspace

‘I was so the legen

By Jules Marshall


perspectives

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at living as an helped salve heart

old on the prospect of hard, mind-occupying labour, ndary festival itself, that we’d be in the Green Field’

In June, I was back in the corner of England that, despite 20-plus years in Amsterdam, I still refer to as ‘home’. It was not what you’d call a happy trip, although it did end well. On the day we buried my youngest sister, I received a mail from an old Amsterdam friend now living in London. Karen was heading to Glastonbury in two days to help with a project for the famous festival; would it be crass to ask me along, too? It might be therapeutic. I weighed up my options. Return to an empty apartment in Amsterdam to rend my flesh with sadness, or spend an indeterminate number of days living in a tent helping build… what exactly she wasn’t very clear about. “Some sort of sustainable, recycled, off-grid, Transition-Townytype thing,” was the best I could get from a follow-up phone call. Which was good enough. I was sold on the prospect of hard, mind-occupying labour, the legendary festival itself, that we’d be in the Green Field (the ‘spiritual heart of Glastonbury’) and finally that I’d have my pick of the most eclectic/esoteric therapies Albion had to offer. THE TONIC I NEEDED? My folks agreed it would do me good, so I borrowed Dad’s gardening jacket and galoshes and took a lift down to Croydon with my sister’s would-have-been husband, from whom I borrowed a tent, sleeping bag and air mattress.

‘We drove West under glowering skies, past Stonehenge, to the town of Glastonbury’ I hauled all this, plus my original rucksack stuffed with a funeral suit and what not, across London to Karen’s flat and the next morning – Saturday with the festival due to

start on Thursday – we drove West under glowering skies, past Stonehenge, to the town of Glastonbury. Not that I saw much of this spiritual centre, with its Ley lines, ruined abbey, new age shops and eccentric citizenry. The skies finally opened as we arrived, so we sat in a tea shop and waited to be picked up by Chris, the project initiator, and taken on site. WELCOME TO TIN VILLAGE It might augment your reading experience to click on this BBC clip. The project turned out to be building a number of shacks from reclaimed tin and timber. A dozen people were already at Tin Village, putting the roof on the second structure and the finishing touches to an oven made from a traditional sand-clay mix called cob.

‘The plan was to sell makeyour-own pizzas during the festival’ The plan was to sell make-your-own pizzas during the festival, to cover our eating and cider-drinking costs. I set to work as best I could, getting the rocket stove working, making a brew, chopping more wood and cutting a drainage ditch to stop water flowing through the kitchen, popping my tent up during a lull in the rain. The village would swell to more than 30; a few old-timers and a bunch of teenagers, locals who’d been coming to the festival with their parents since they were children. As an anarchist collective, everyone could do what they felt like, with a brief morning meeting each day to prioritize, and quite quickly out of the mud emerged a covered piano bar, a swing, a bunkhouse, lighting and phone juice from solar panels, a chill-out space and even a blacksmith’s forge.


perspectives

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perspectives

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Omer. – Winner (Gold) – World Beer Cup 2010

‘I woke to find 170,000 people camped next door and a completely different vibe’ BUILDING CERES, THE CORN GODDESS On Tuesday, we decided to build a smaller oven to accompany a fire pit, over which we’d cook a massive vat of soup. I volunteered and, over the course of a blissfully busy day, made cob and moulded the little oven. By the evening, I’d made and baked bread in it – one of the most satisfying things I’ve ever done. We also had a Health & Safety visit, on which the officers involved will dine out for years, laughing as they recount the scene. Trying to shoehorn our operation – essentially a shack built on the mud covering a mud-floored kitchen and oven made out of mud – into the list of prerequisites was indeed a tall order. We managed to assure them that we could get the joint ship-shape in 24 hours and wade through the inch-thick set of papers that needed filling in. We decided not to tell them about the fire pit soup. That night, our neighbours from the permaculture wood dropped by with musical instruments for an extensive jam session. As the cider flowed, we danced on damp carpets under our tin roof. It was like the scene in Titanic where a shebeen is held down in the bowels of the ship. A WIZARD IDEA On Wednesday, the day before the Big Arrival, I treated myself to some small expenditure in the Healing Field, choosing from the assorted chiropractors, crystal healers and colour therapists to have a half-hour ‘vortex healing’ from wizard Max (details covered by wizard-credulous loon confidentiality), who resides in the aether at wizardwellness.co.uk, followed by a deep tissue massage from Rosie. Next morning, I woke to find 170,000 people camped next door and a completely different vibe. Green fields were trampled into mud as our little village was invaded.

Brendan the Blacksmith’s van for an hour, and another on Wednesday afternoon by calmly finding my galoshes, slipping out the back of our field and losing myself in the crowds. I would eventually get busted trying to get out of a rather frightening crush late on Saturday night, but it’s a long and very un-Glastonbury story that ended with me being allowed to disappear back into the crowd with a warning to keep my head down or face “serious fucking trouble”. IT ALL COMES TOGETHER The only must-see for me was Friday night’s show by Primal Scream, reprising their Screamadelica tour of 20 years ago, which I’d seen in our own Paradiso and remains one of the highlights of my 30-year gigging history. Come 10.00pm, I found Lee, a lesbian fashion graduate and fellow Villager with whom I’d struck up an unlikely friendship, and persuaded her and her lawyer girlfriend, who’d arrived from London that evening, that it would be a historically significant event at which to join me. Grabbing as much booze as we could carry in our pockets, we headed off in the pouring rain. Opening with their epochal Loaded, we tore into our elderflower champagne & rum and the rest was sublime. It was one of those gigs where every song seems sung for you personally, enhanced by the sadness of my recent loss. I had indeed got to loosen up; I was – I hoped – movin’ on up now, yeah out of the darkness and my light would in fact shine on. Co-oh-ome, too-ge-ther as one! A lesbian on each arm, swaying with new friends made while bawling “Fuck U2!” (U2 were playing on the main stage at the time), we were together, we were unified. Yes! I’d had my Glastonbury Moment. LEAVING WITH SOME RESOLUTION Lots more happened over the course of a wet Saturday and a Sunday that was the hottest day of the year. Watching Lykke Li as the sun went down, I decided on one last Glasto Moment: I’d sit up in the Stone Circle Field and watch the sun come up over the temporary city.

Unsurprisingly, I was not very hedonistically inclined and was not particularly disappointed to catch none of the warm up night’s entertainment on Wednesday nor a single band all day Thursday. Instead, I threw myself into baking bread and serving soup to an appreciative public. With our two pianos, the site was rarely quiet and many musicians dropped by to perform impromptu gigs.

Ten days in beautiful surroundings with no responsibilities, emails, phone calls or appointments, no shopping or cooking had given me ample time to meditate on my the loss of my sister. I’d talked to strangers about her, cried unashamedly a couple of times, and made resolutions regarding my own life.

If I was happy, I was also a little inhibited by my illegal status. The 30 of us shared only 12 wristbands. I’d survived the first of the threatened security sweeps by hiding in

On Tuesday morning I bailed, catching a bus back to London and a culture shock only overshadowed by the one I got arriving back in Amsterdam. It had been great, but the regular world was insisting I pay it attention.


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‘A lesbian on each arm, swaying with new friends made while bawling “Fuck U2!”’


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CLASSIFIEdS

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CLASSIFIEdS

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travel

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Toronto: concrete jungle or multicultural garden


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‘A true Canadian can no longer be defined on the basis of possessing certain facial features’ By Sharmin de Vries

The Economist Intelligence Unit’s 2011 report on the most liveable cities in the world placed Vancouver at the top of the list (again). Canada’s biggest commercial hub, Toronto, holds fourth place, followed by Calgary in fifth. The report suggests that, in particular, mid-sized cities in developed countries with low population densities tend to attain a high ranking, since they have lots of cultural and infrastructural benefits with fewer crime and congestion issues. On my trip to Toronto, I also realised that a city made up largely of immigrants from various parts of the world, where a true Canadian can no longer be defined on the basis of possessing certain facial features, is another huge benefit. Not in the least for creating a fantastic multicultural blaze, which makes you forget the fact that you’re actually surrounded by a concrete jungle most of the time. From vintage shops to strong espresso and from the renowned university campus to Chinatown; it’s all about finding the nooks and crannies that make this Canadian city special. On my first day, I wandered through the streets of downtown aimlessly, until I entered the world of Yorkville. Yorkville is an area for the well-heeled, who like to spend money on designer clothes and in plush restaurants. However, it is certainly not your typical, brash, brand-laden, soulless, upper-crust district that seems to be a compulsory feature of most big cities (think PC Hooftstraat in Amsterdam). Instead, Yorkville blends the historic charm of its buildings with designer boutiques, (coffee) bars and cafés that provide a slice of low-rise soul amid high-rise sterility. I sampled my first official Torontonian coffee, which was a damn fine espresso from a small traditional Italian espresso bar called Zaza, in Yorkville and got that instant kick I needed to fight off the impending jetlag that would try to overcome me. After this, I kept walking down a long road into the heart of downtown Toronto, which is a heady mix of commercialism – from the ubiquitous billboards to the endless rows of chain stores and fast food outlets – but, strangely enough, with a few saloon-type buildings thrown in. I didn’t stay very long as there was certainly more to explore. On the Eastern part of town, in the Kensington market neighbourhood, the multicultural aromas wafting from various restaurants and small grocery stores greeted me

with the warmest smile. Kensington market boasts an eclectic, partly outdoor market, vintage shops dotted alongside and hippie-ish looking people. It is a true feast for foodies and shopaholics alike who are looking for something different without having to break the bank. This is by far my favourite part of Toronto. What’s more, the Kensington market area links-up with other ethnic areas, such as Chinatown, Little Italy and Little Portugal, which display the multicoloured blaze in its truest form. Albeit, the only ethnic district really worth visiting is Chinatown. It’s much larger than most Chinatown’s in Europe with a lot of street vendors selling everything from traditional Chinese cakes to coconut water straight from the coconut. Standing tall and steep from practically every angle of the city is Toronto’s famed CN tower (the world’s tallest freestanding tower). According to the Toronto Time Out guide, the best thing about visiting the tower is the fact that, once inside, you won’t have to see it. It certainly isn’t the prettiest building you will ever come across, but still well worth a visit. Don’t just buy a ticket to go up to the top for a quick glimpse of the city, but splash out a little and have dinner in the revolving restaurant. The food is actually pretty excellent and you can slowly and leisurely take in the view from different angles. For the more adventurous, walk up to the top floor and stand on the transparent glass floor while looking down. A mere two hours from the city is Canada’s infamous Niagara Falls, which is the country’s number one tourist attraction. If you set out early, you’ll be able to avoid the huge tourist crowd that rapidly takes shape around midday. Avoid all the Niagara trappings you pass on the way – just because it’s a Niagara burger doesn’t make it any more special – and don’t spend the night in one of the high-rise hotels overlooking the falls. You only need a couple of hours to take in the most powerful waterfall in all of North America. The waterfall drops about 53 metres in a horseshoe shape and is a beautiful and powerful force of nature. After all this, a drive to nearby Niagara-on-thelake will provide that instant old-style village charm that provides a stark contrast to bustling Toronto. It made for a welcome, more peaceful break before I threw myself back into the hurly-burly of multifarious Toronto, a city made up of various identities waiting to be further uncovered.

‘Kensington market boasts an eclectic, partly outdoor market, vintage shops dotted alongside and hippie-ish looking people’


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‘Just because it’s a Niagara burger doesn’t make it any more special’


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CLASSIFIEdS

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perspectives

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‘I can easily find pretexts for my daily dose of melancholy’


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‘I like that it rains a lot in the winter and that the snow, when there is any, has a certain mysterious charm’

By Alina Croitoru

I like Amsterdam. I like it because it rains so often and I can easily find pretexts for my daily dose of melancholy. I like the ever-blowing magnificent breeze, harsh enough to drive your melancholies away in the winter and gentle enough in the summer to permeate the atmosphere with a vacation vibe, no matter how much work you have to get done. I like that you can get a fresh mint tea loaded with honey at virtually any cafe. I like that I rarely see furrows of worry and that people smile when you pass them by, as if they know you, even if they’ve never seen you before. I like the wild ducks that never leave the parks, not even in the deepest winter. I like that the streets never feel empty and deserted, however narrow and concealed they might be. I like that the bicycle is a cool accessory that complements anything, including high heels and business ties. I like that the flowers are so beautiful and cheap that they can make someone like me, who wasn’t a flower nut to begin with, now not ever leave the market without a huge bouquet in hand. I like that it rains a lot in the winter and that the snow, when there is any, has a certain mysterious charm. I like the city, because not all the interesting shops are crammed into the centre and you can hunt for real treasure on any little side street; from dinosaur fossils or pieces of a meteorite to vintage clothes and home-made cookies. I like that the people are open-minded and sunbathe in the parks from April till late September. I like that kids are very loud and that nobody tells them off for it. And I like that they love Sinterklaas more than Santa Claus. I like that everybody has a cat. I like that it’s not cool to wear fur and that people gaze at you with unforgiving, loathing eyes whenever you do. I like that you can work

your ass off for three weeks at the university for a mark of 8. I like that you have colleagues from all over the world and that each one brings a small part of their country into your heart. I like that there are so many types of cheese that if you were to eat one each day, it would take you more than a year to go through them all. I like that there are some houses built before 1600 and that people live in them without ever modifying their architecture. I like that some of the houses take on such crooked angles they make you wonder whether a three-year-old drew them. I like that you usually can find a seat on the tram and that there are very few cars along my regular tram route. I like the fact that Albert Heijn has an organic alternative for virtually any product. I like that swans always roam around the canals in the Red Light District. I like that you can smell weed whenever you go out and that nobody seems bothered by it. I like that when school is over, kids hang their backpacks up above their front doors and leave them there until autumn. I like that everybody speaks English and that you can get directions or ask for information right away. I like that you can wake-up in the morning and hear seagulls, even if you’re not exactly by the seaside. I like that every month there’s at least one important concert that you can’t miss, without it becoming a national event, where thousands and thousands of people stumble into each other. I like that there are no really ugly places in Amsterdam regardless of area or neighbourhood. I like that you can discover a small architectural gem anywhere and that every corner and back-alley of this city has the potential to become a breath-taking photograph. I like that all that you see has a type of beauty that no photographer, no matter how skilled, can fully capture. And I like that from the first moment I set foot in this city I instantly felt adopted and loved. Just like after a long overdue return to where I belong, a place that I hope will one day be home. I love you, Amsterdam!

‘I like that there are no really ugly places in Amsterdam’


TEChnOLOgy

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‘Probably the most exciting Google+ feature is the group video chat’

hangouts

circles

sparks circle editor

hangouts

stream

sandbar


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‘Google+ is a cross between Facebook and Twitter’

TechBit: Sio-Bytes

G+O=EMC2 By Simon Owusu

Social networks, these days, are a pound a penny. Facebook this, Twitter that, LinkedIn here, Foursquare everywhere. Our latest offering in the social network space is Google+. With 10 million users, so far, and people screaming for invites, this is the exclusive party everybody is talking about. So, here is a brief rundown of what makes this network such a plus! Google+ is a cross between Facebook and Twitter, taking the best aspects of both social worlds. The whole look is easy on the eye and has a touch of Apple about it, in that it is elegant and easy to use (the interface was designed by ex-Apple guru, Andy Hertzfeld). The layout and content is well-spaced with clean navigation, which clearly differentiates it from a lot of awful-looking Google products (think Gmail). Similar to Facebook, there is a wall of content called a Stream, where you can see posts by you or your friends. Any content can be commented on or ‘Plus-oned’ (‘+1ed’), which is equivalent to the ‘Like’ button on Facebook. However, in Google+, a running total of how many people have ‘+1ed’ the content is also displayed. The +1 button is already becoming ubiquitous on the internet, like the Tweet button. So, when you +1 something, it automatically shows up on your stream to show your friends what you like or what you are interested in. Circles – Circles on Google+ are akin to Facebook groups or Twitter lists. Circles allow you to create groups of friends by placing them into categories that you label. You can then share content with that particular circle of friends, multiple circles or even the Public circle (which is everyone). In this way, you can tell Phantom Menace jokes to your Star Wars aficionados without disturbing the Jedi heathens. Likewise, the comment “My boss is such a moron” can be shared outside of the ‘Co-workers’ circle without reprimands, and pictures of the family get-together can be seen by only the Family circle. People in your circles cannot tell what circle they are in, so you can be brutal with

the naming. You can also put friends into more than one circle. In conjunction with your Google+ Stream, you can filter content based on your circles, so you only see content from a particular circle when required. You can only tolerate some of your friends all the time! Hangouts – Probably the most exciting Google+ feature is the group video chat. This is like a multi-user version of Chat-roulette. Hangouts enables up to ten people to simultaneously video conference for free. Google+ displays one large video stream for the person speaking and a group of smaller video streams beneath that for everyone else in the hangout. By detecting spikes in the audio, the person who is speaking (loudest) gets switched to the large video stream automatically. Invite a circle of friends to your Hangout and only they will see the invite in their streams. They simply click on the Join Hangouts button to participate. It’s a video party in a few clicks! Sparks - Sparks combines a few of Google’s own products, like Google News and Google Alerts, to find articles, news features, blogs, etc. that you are interested in and then provides links to that content. It is similar to Facebook Pages, where you have pages set up for particular interests, but here you can create the topics you want. When you click on a Spark, you will see all the new content on that topic, which you can read through or share amongst your circles. Essentially, Google+ is what Facebook used to be without the privacy issues, multiple layout changes and mafia wars. So far, it is like moving to a new neighbourhood; you need to either make new friends there or drag your old friends along (from other social networks) to enjoy the experience. On the whole, Google+ is refreshing and fun at the same time, and it is likely to be around for a while. However, bear in mind that Google’s main business is advertising and Google+ adds the last piece of the puzzle to their empire, your social information. As with any service that is free, you are the product and giving Google your social data is the price you have to pay to enter their social park.

‘Bear in mind that Google’s main business is advertising and Google+ adds the last piece of the puzzle to their empire, your social information’


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your objective, our resolution.

www.concultancymarketmedia.com


Film review

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Room 2c film By David King

Million Dollar Baby (2004) The sport of boxing is a great plot to furrow when making a weepy movie and a path that has been exploited many times. What sets this film apart from the rest is the absolute quality of the acting and, for me, the wholly unexpected ending, which made me reclassify Clint Eastwood’s power of direction as being up there with the very best. Watch it today, you’ll laugh, cry and in the end realise its WOW factor.

Cartoon By Colin Bentley The early bird may catch the worm...

But it’s the late mouse that gets the cheese!


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stock market

‘The good news is that the mini is back’

Elk nadeel heb z’n voordeel (Every disadvantage has its advantage)

skirtlength

- Johan Cruyff By Dirkje Bakker

Traditional football ‘logic’ and wisdom is something we can use to solve or explain many life issues. As we saw in the very recent Apprentice UK, contestant Natasha Scribbens was constantly trying creative imitations of football coaches in telling people to “just get the job done, yeah?” It can also be quite useful to dust off your famous quotes from football in the world of fashion and in economic circles, if you run into a conundrum or have an important life question that you need answered. One particular case made me recall good old Johan at the time when he was still cool (it is true that everything used to be much cooler and better). The fact that every positive has a negative works both ways, apparently. BAD economic times equal GOOD times for leg lovers. As we all know, unfortunately, we are and have been balancing on the brink of total economic meltdown for quite a while now and there doesn’t seem to be an end in sight; no sunshine breaking through the clouds in the far distance, just grey fog. Having said that, one of the big trends for this autumn is the mini-skirt. Yes, really, it’s back! I think I’ve even read the word micro somewhere. So, in these dark, grey finan-

cial times, fashion is taking its responsibility seriously by providing something quite like sunshine to cheer up the downcast: lots of female leg! This represents a shift in a long-running historical trend. In the past, when the economy was under pressure, skirts traditionally got longer and longer (and longer), while in better times they would shrink and fabric would appear to rapidly evaporate. Often, the rise and fall of skirt lengths have been inversely proportional to movements on the stock market. What does this mean? Are we now experiencing a reverse reaction? Or is the skirt length right and are times actually great? Does it mean the economy isn’t really crumbling that much or, rather, that we are all in some sort of denial? Or has this got something to do with all of the cuts? Should skirts also be cut? Is it more economical to use less fabric? Do we actually not only help the economy but also the environment by being more sustainable as we use as little material as possible? Sustainability wasn’t something people were too busy with in the previous century, so maybe that has influenced our contradictory reaction. So, there you have it, and I really I don’t give a damn about the reason. The good news is that the mini is back. In other words, “It’s the result that counts” (as another Dutch coach preaches, but this one shall remain unnamed).


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Amsterdam Property Finder is a company designed to help Expats go through the process of buying their own home. Get onus: housing, What you willadvice get from rental contracts

Informal financial services and apartments Working hours to suit you - evenings and weekends normal Amsterdam Propertyare Finder is a company designed to help Exp in Amsterdam will find you a home! Independence from any other makelaar (realWe estate agent) Expert knowledge of the property market You will www.wswonen.nl/english be accompanied through every stage of the process A bespoke service Amsterdam Property Finder is a company designed to help Exp Low fees (about half of a Dutch makelaar) We will find you a home!

Amsterdam Property Finder is a company design to help Expats go through the process of buying their own home. What you will get from us:

Informal financial services Amsterdam Property Finder is a company design Working hours to suit you - evenings and weekends are normal Independence from any makelaar (realprocess estate agent) to help Expats goother through the of buying Expert of the property market theirknowledge own home. You will be accompanied through every stage of the process A bespoke service What you will get from us:their own home. Amsterdam Property Finder is a company designed to help Expats go through the process of buying Low fees (about half of a Dutch makelaar) Informal financial services Working hours to suit you - evenings and weekends are normal Independence from any other makelaar (real estate agent) Expert knowledge of the property market You will be accompanied through every stage of the process A bespoke service Low fees (about half of a Dutch makelaar)

We will find you a home! W: www.AmsterdamPropertyFinder.com E: info@AmsterdamPropertyFinder.com T: +31 (0)6 46613315

Amsterdam Property Finder is a company designed to help Expats go through the process of buying their own home.

W: www.AmsterdamPropertyFinder.com E: info@AmsterdamPropertyFinder.com T: +31 (0)6 46613315

What you will get from us: Informal financial services Working hours to suit you - evenings and weekends are normal Independence from any other makelaar (real estate agent)

W: www.AmsterdamPropertyFinder.com E: info@AmsterdamPropertyFinder.com


classifieds

37

the global expat network

AMSTERDAM

www.yourtuliptour.com


sport

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Fantasy Football League 2011-2012

The blue one is back! If you are not already signed-up to play our fantasy football game you can do so now! Mail to: sentinelfantasyfoootball@gmail.com for rules and conditions. Paper forms also available from behind the bar at O’Donnell’s Grand Irish Pub (Amsterdam). Act now as due to heavy demand from our regular players late reactions can lead to disappointment as we do have a preferred upper limit on managers/players we accommodate in the game.


sport

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All that glistens is sometimes...

FANTASY FOOTBALL GOLD CHAMPIONS LEAGUE 2011-2012

The master managers are grouped again to challenge for the golden envelope. We use this game to complement our main reporting on matches, teams and players from the English Premier League involved in their domestic and European competitions.


SPORT CLASSIFIEdS

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CZECH REPUBLIC STUNNINGLY DIFFERENT! www.czechtourism.com


The Sentinel Amsterdam vol. 4 #13