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Design Poetics Paper Images & Physical Artifacts Chris Kline


Design Poetics

Paper Images & Physical Artifacts Chris Kline


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CV

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MCC East PDX

13 Timeline 15 Illicit Swim 17 Oxford House 23 Craft Gallery 27 Gateway 31 Capoeira 33 Habitat Housing 37 Local Choice 39 520 41 Formwork

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Curriculum Vitae Chris Kline


Education

Master of Architecture Expected June 2014 Portland State University, Portland, Oregon Bachelor of Science in Architecture Graduated Cum Laude August 2012 Portland State University, Portland, Oregon GPA: 3.85

Experience

Architecture Intern LRS Architects, Portland, Oregon May 2012 - Present Architecture Intern Evergreen EDC, Hillsboro, Oregon June 2011 - April 2012 Engineering Intern Goodfellow Brothers Inc, Honolulu, Hawaii April 2007 - Sept 2009

Skill Set

SEED A+P (Social Economic and Environmental Design) Competition winner for Oregon City Gateway Project Class collective submission AIA NW Regional Student Design Award Citation, Professor Rudy Barton Proficiency in AutoCAD, Sketchup, Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Office, Rhino, Prezi, Maxwell Render, Revit, Fluid Dynamic and Wind Modeling. Talents in physical artifact creation; hand craft, laser cutting and CNC milling. Design-build custom furniture.

Contact

References

Phone. 808.230.1045 Email. chrisklinebusiness@gmail.com Web. www.chrisakline.com Rudy Barton, Professor Portland State University Email - bartonl@pdx.edu B.D. Wortham-Galvin, Professor Portland State University Email - b.d.worthamgalvin@pdx.edu Trish Nixon, Principal LRS Architects Email - tnixon@lrsarchitects.com

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Multi-Cultural Center East PDX Final Scheme

The Multi-Cultural Center project was a two part comprehensive studio, which focused on developing a center for the East Portland communities. With Part one of the stuido focusing on programmatic and research based evaluation, three schemes were laid out each focusing on different variations on a connecting theme. The overarching connecting theme for this multi-cultural center is focused around food. Cooking and preparing different types of meals is a practice valued and shared by every culture. Part two of the studio focused on the technical evaluation of the structure. The center evolved from a set of programmatic sketches to a documented set of drawings, from typical wall sections, specifications and details to a concept structural system and presentation drawings.

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T. PARAPET 35’-6” T. ROOF 33’-0”

LEVEL 2 18’-0”

LEVEL 1 0’-0”

T. ELEVATOR 40’-0” T. PARAPET 35’-6” T. ROOF 33’-0”

LEVEL 2 18’-0”

LEVEL 1 0’-0”

T. PARAPET 35’-6” T. ROOF 33’-0”

LEVEL 2 18’-0”

LEVEL 1 0’-0”

T. ELEVATOR 40’-0” T. PARAPET 35’-6” T. ROOF 33’-0”

LEVEL 2 18’-0”

LEVEL 1 0’-0”

A smaller food based multi-cultural center has less programmatic elements but larger community engagement spaces. The market acts as a farmers market during warmer months and is reprogrammed using strong landscape architecture during the colder season. Part of the market can take place indoor, allowing a pared down program but still provide essential elements to the program. The kitchen becomes one of the most important programs as it operates in the public realm, with classrooms adjacent, hosting cooking and healthy lifestyle classes. Flex space allows for exhibits and other community events to happen such as harvest celebrations and other community celebrations. Dining space focuses on large community meals and becomes a large programmatic element. Floors above focus more on service spaces, with classrooms and conference spaces. Open office space is toward the perimeter for natural light purposes and become a common workspace for various tasks. Administrative and staff rooms are smaller rooms around the perimeter.


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30' - 0" 15' - 0" 30' - 0" 30' - 0"

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DINING

Level 1 - Furniture Level 1 - Furniture 1/32" = 1'-0" 1 1/32" = 1'-0"

ADMIN/ SERVICES

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OPEN OFFICE

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ASSEMBLY

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4 COFFEE/ BAKERY

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LIBRARY / COMPUTER LAB

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First Floor

Second Floor

SERVICE A 2

SERVICE A Level 2 - Furniture Level 2 - Furniture 1/32" = 1'-0" 2

1/32" = 1'-0"

CONNECTIVE ELEMENT Scale 1/32" = 1'-0"

SERVICE B

Scale 1

SERVICE B Program Concept

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Multi-Cultural Center East PDX Scheme One : Meeting Ground


First Floor

Second Floor

The ‘Meeting Ground’ focuses on the convergence of people through shared activities. A central walkway guides users past small community gardens, towards a large set of plaza stairs, passing the local bakery and into the central atrium space. Open offices, shared workspaces, libraries and computer labs offer users full access to resources currently not available. Kitchens and dining spaces complement the bakery, offering cooking classes and training in the cooking of cultural dishes. 10


Scheme One : Meeting Ground Central Lobby


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Multi-Cultural Center East PDX Scheme Two : Main Street


First Floor

Second & Third Floors

Roof

A mixed-use structure composed of two rectangles with a ‘main street’ multi-height lobby joining them. The bottom floor offers space for local grocery, coffee shops, bike repair as well as small business such as nail salons and small offices, creating valuable income to the buildings owners. Floors two through four offer all resources from classrooms and library, to communal kitchens, childe care and rentable rooftop space. 14


Multi-Cultural Center East PDX Scheme Three : Marketplace


First Floor

Second Floor

The ‘Marketplace’ provides access to local produce, farmers markets and food carts. The structure forms a large outdoor plaza, creating a community meeting ground, in which farmers markets and events can take place. During colder months, a large street side produce market provides excellent access to healthy, local foods. The multicultural center offers a large kitchen for cooking classes as well as spaces for community dinners. Offices, classrooms, workshop spaces and large event spaces fill out the program. 16


Timeline Walkway


Timeline

Gateway to Oregon City Awarded winner for competition Oregon City’s rich and vibrant history is compiled of landmark moments, from the designation of Oregon City as the Capitol in 1844 to the first newspaper in the West, ‘The Spectator” in 1846. These snapshots develop the city’s character and provide a sound foundation for future generations. The ’Timeline’ Gateway proposal celebrates history and creates a lasting and dynamic threshold into Oregon City, that will continue to evolve with the city. Landmarks emerge from the natural ecology to display facts, tidbits and milestones in the city’s history, while establishing a safe and family friendly transit path to the river. Landmarks layered of concrete and acrylic allow for dynamic lighting bands, along with highlighting cyclist travel lanes.

Above: Roadway Axonometric Below: Night Lighiting and Safe Cycle Lane

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Micro-Industry Oxford House Outside / In

Working with Outside / In, a nonprofit that provides transitional services to homeless youth, a new housing model was proposed that provided long term living solutions rather than just transitional housing. The Oxford House model is built on the idea of community living and proposes a support system that the homeless youth are currently lacking. Along with providing this strong supportive network, the home functions as a micro-industry, an incubator space for the youth to both work on personal projects and connect with the community as they become hosts to the community garage. This system builds both the youths’ craft skills and extends their supportive network, helping them make a full transition off the streets and into a better life.

Ground

Community Workshop at Night

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Home Construction Process With Build Help From The Youth

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Final Model Workshop Accessory Structure in Front

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Illicit Swim

Skinny Dipping in the City

Developed from a studio based on the night condition, Illicit Swim emerged from the question: what you do at night that you wouldn’t do during the day? A floating barge operates as a skinny-dipping facility, with the city of Portland as the backdrop. Thoughtful use of lighting create opportunity for the most timid to the most outgoing to take part in exciting experience.


Foot lighting guides the way for the more timid skinny dippers while allowing them to remain anonymous 22


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Final Section A series of transparencies: A perforated entrance wall (right) slightly masks the visitors, the changing space with frosted glass creates a silhouette, a series of panels provide small alcoves to peek out as the last visual cover before the rush into the dark waters 24


WILLAMETTE RIVER

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A jump off point out into the waters of downtown Portland

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Woodshop Gallery High prison recedivism is a constant issue in our society that is often not discussed due to whom it affects. Most recently release offenders are ones who have made mistakes and lack the support systems when placed back into the community and often end back up in prison in a matter of months. A program based on reintegration for recently released offenders through the means of craft production, a workshop space and public gallery gives job training, life skills and pride to its users. The program features a private counseling space which allowed the realms of public, private and semi-public all to interact under one roof. The large curved roof houses the workshop space, while highlighting the aspect of reintegration and welcoming, as the community was able to directly engage with the users and make the transition back into society more positive by building a sense of pride and support.

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View From Fremont Street


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Interior Gallery Space

A space to showcase furniture made by the workers becomes a community viewing space and allows interaction and purchase of the work. On top a counseling space provides the recently released with the services needed for a positive transition back into society and provides a private space away from the other services. Counseling Space


Final Model 30


Reconnecting Gateway Sullivan’s Gulch divides the North and South boundaries of Eastern Portland. With dense infrastructure and high vehicle movement, the regions have become divided and communities lack engagement with one another as their briding points have been cut off. By utilizing highway berm space and existing assets, such as Gateway transit center, the project became a set of nodes or connection points, with intermediary spaces creating engaging landscape design along with public park spaces to counteract the intersection of two major freeways.

Existing Site Conditions, Massing Model, Suturing the Gap & Highway Overpass Model

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With the division of Sullivan’s Gulch running through much of the east side of Portland, North and West communities find themselves with little connective fabric to one another. Addressing the most Eastern point at the Gateway district, a suture was proposed using existing highway berms and re-purposing space underneath highway overpasses, along with a pedestrian based connective element. The urbanism concept focused on heavy pedestrian and cyclist traffic, which was non existent due to the existing massive infrastructure and public transit lines.

Reprogramming Infrastructure for Public Use


Pedestrian and Cyclist Crossing

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Capoeira Theater Located on Alberta Street in East Portland, in the Arts District a new program was proposed bring in the cultural art of Capoeira. With a structural system that was representational of the movements made in the dance along with the outside street being able to be part of the show, the art of Capoeira was able to embellish its culture as well as engage new users and interested onlookers.

First

Second

Third


Based on the cultural dance, fighting art of Capoeria, the architecture used a tilted structural system and push-pull facade as design elements to enhance the art form. Along with created space that allowed audience members to be performers to the passing street, the facade used opacity and silhouettes to make this architecture a dynamic part of Portland. 36


Multi-Family Neighborhood


Multi-Family Living Habitat for Humanity

A project to developing a multi-family model of housing to the Habitat for Humanity organization. This proposal not only focused on end design, but looked to re-evaluate the way Habitat made their decisions and their methods of building. Proposed prefabricated modular building methods allowed for neighborhood development along with the new program of Post-Sweat Equity, allowed new homeowners knowledge on how to maintain and upkeep their home.

Decision Webs

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3 BDRM Units

4 BDRM Units

Site Plan Multi-family housing allows for less units but an overall higher number of rooms. Leaving space for playgrounds, bbq areas and other community gathering grounds.


Individual Platting Development

Overall Site Development

? 5. Prefab Build Starts Empty Platting

1. Original Platting

L UA EQ

6. Construction Continues 2. 18’ Wide Plats

5’

Home Footprint 30’

Home Pushed to Back of Platting 7. Construction Completes

L UA EQ

3. 20’ Wide Plats

“FAB YARD”

COMMUNITY SPACE

Porch & Yard Emerge

8. Fab Yard Repurposed

4. Fabrication Yard SITE FEATURES Platting Becomes Location a Home 24 Total Units 84 Total Rooms 42 Parking Spaces Porchfront Community Front Yard Space Redeveloping the way Habitat for Humanity approached a new site, allowed focus The to narrow shif t from the individual user to the community as a whole. Allowing platting of Allen Estates already make building simple, decent and affordable homes a challenge. Community Backyard Replatting the space into more helps establish a simplier method for prefab building, developprogram participants to help build one another’s houses and leave build-out space for the public, such as equal parkdivisions spaces and playgrounds in turn creates -BBQ Area ment of community space and platting that can accomidate housing, yard space and parking stronger communities and Habitat for Humanity thrives by being able to help more people. -Playground -Picnic Deck 40

Site Development


View from Everett & 9th

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Completed Building

Local Choice Market Pearl District, Portland

Designed by LRS Architects, with the client of Local Choice Produce, a set of renderings was created for public consumption. The intent of the images was to create a “European style produce market with a welcoming feel.� The Produce market is fully realized in the heart of the Pearl district. The images were displayed during construction and featured in an article in the Oregon Live newspaper. 42


Reconfiguring Pontoons for an Underwater Experience

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520 Floating Bridge Competition Out of dozens of entries, our project was shortlisted as a potential winner. A Seattle-based competition posed the question of what do with the mass of large pontoons that create the 520 bridge crossing the Puget Sound in Seattle, WA. As a team, we worked to facilitate placing and program that would serve the public realm. We proposed the re-purpose the pontoons as an underwater dive center, focused on the native marine ecology, the public could immerse themselves into what lies under the waters surface. Creating a space that reintegrated the pontoons into new geometeries provided a place for families to view underwater ecologies and provide new attractions for the residents and visitors of the surrounding Seattle area.

Project Team Andrew Pulliam Katie Tucker Chris Kline Both Images Produced by Chris Kline

Exisiting Conditions and Current Site

Diving Point and Submersion Enterance

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Form Work Designing furniture is a labor of love, as is architecture. Hours of milling, sanding and detail represent the love put into each project I build. Projects include multiple hardwood cutting boards, vertical compression knife storage, pixelated wall sconce, custom made guitar along with a zebra wood and maple jewelery box and a CNC-milled deck chair


With the advancements in digital capability, furniture is now able to become more complex in form and repetition no longer falls on mastery of craft. Designed to only use a single sheet of plywood and have 5% waste, this louge chair was digitally designed and CNC milled. A process that would take weeks by hand was completed in several hours.

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Design Poetics Chris Kline

# 808.230.1045

email chrisklinebusiness@gmail.com

web www.chrisakline.com


Portfolio