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JUNE 2018

M A LT O F T H E M O N T H : A GENIAL GENIE OF SWEET SMOKE CASK No. 66.111 See it emerge: Friday 1st June


CELLARMASTER'S NOTE Dear Members, You may have seen or heard through various drinks publications or online media that Diageo Australia recently launched its biggest national brand campaign in a decade for Johnnie Walker. The campaign has a $15M budget to be activated over the next 18 months and you may already have seen the new advertisement on television. Diageo expects over 11 million people to see elements of the campaign f ive times during the next year and a bit.

is adored all over the world. If ever there was a distillery that could survive purely off sales of its single malt, you’d reckon Laphroaig would be it. And, yet, one third of its production is still going straight into blends! Growth in the blended market is required for growth in the single malt stakes.

The key “takeaway” here is that this campaign is purely for Australia! $15M is being spent to expose and reinforce a whisky brand to over 11M people in a country that – historically – associates its drinking habits with beer, wine, and bourbon. (If that last one caught you by surprise, you’ll be interested to learn Australia is the USA’s biggest export market for bourbon!). Those who focus on the world of single malts (and, let’s be honest, that’s kind of the Society’s raison d’etre) can lose sight of the fact that blended whisky is still where the big action is. Most people are introduced to Scotch whisky through the big-name blends of Johnnie Walker, Dewars, Famous Grouse, Chivas Regal, and so forth. Some people start their whisky journey in that category and happily stay there; others “graduate” to the world of single malts and never look back. But not looking back is a mistake, because it’s the direction and health of the blended whisky scene that drives and dictates what the malt distilleries do for us. For example, the reason why the Society recently managed to get its hands on some stunning and relatively youthful casks of Caol Ila is because Diageo upped production a few years back to support and drive sales of Johnnie Walker into new and expanding markets! There are few, if any, Scottish distilleries that exist purely to feed the single malt market exclusively. As a case in point, consider Laphroaig: It is a relatively small distillery; it is an iconic brand; and its heavily peated whisky

And so I, for one, welcome Diageo’s investment in Australia, and it can only be a good thing to see the striding gent back on our screens. It fuels category growth, which has positive and far-reaching implications for all whisky drinkers, regardless of your brand or malt/ blend preferences. Johnnie Walker Black Label remains the number-one-selling deluxe whisky in the world, and it alone has contributed a staggering 15% of the $27.8M Retail Sales Value growth in the whisky category in Australia since July last year. That’s no mean feat. But, most importantly of all, it helps ensure there are plenty of casks getting filled up with new-make spirit in Scotland right now. And a number of those – the good ones – will be emptied and filled into little green bottles wearing the Society’s label. Drink up, Australia! :-) Cheers,

ANDREW DERBIDGE | DIRECTOR, CELLARMASTER & NSW MANAGER


CHANGES TO MEMBERSHIP As the Society grows, both globally and here in Australia, we need to inform you of some small changes coming up, effective from 1st July 2018.

EVENT TICKET PRICING

As you already know, we offer preferential pricing to members and partners at our events. This is unchanged, however we’d now like to extend that offer to any guests that you bring along. Currently, guests have needed to pay the dearer non-member rate, but as of July 1st, we’ll be offering member ticket rates for guests of members. We hope that this encourages you to invite friends and family along to experience the Society as well! P O S TA G E

For the last few years, we’ve been absorbing the cost of picking, packing, and posting your bottles to you, with no fee. With everincreasing costs, this is simply not tenable anymore. So to avoid any increases to our bottle prices, we are adding a small $15 postage and handling fee to each order placed from July 1st onwards. This fee, whether you order one or six bottles, is the same. This way we can keep our whisky prices accessible too. T H E T H O U S A N D R E WA R D

Did you know that if you spend $1,000 or more in your membership year, we offer you a $120 store credit for your following year? Well, previously that $1000 spend only applied to bottle purchases. After some member feedback, we’re now expanding that spend calculation to include any purchases at all. That means events, glassware, and bottles. Hooray! In making the above changes we continue our singular pursuit to ensure that your Society remains as accessible and enjoyable as possible. Thank you for being with us…!

ANDRÉ TAMMES | DIRECTOR – MEMBERSHIP SERVICES


F L AV O U R P R O F I L E S EVERY SOCIETY WHISKY FALLS INTO ONE OF OUR TWELVE FLAVOUR PROFILES. LET FLAVOUR BE YOUR GUIDE!

H E AV I LY P E AT E D

YO U N G & S P R I T E LY S W E E T, FRUITY & M E L LOW

P E AT E D

L I G H T LY P E AT E D

O I LY & C O A S TA L

THE 12 FLAVOUR PROFILES

SPICY & SWEET

SPICY & DRY

D E E P, R I C H & DRIED FRUITS

J U I C Y OA K & VA N I L L A LIGHT & D E L I C AT E

OLD & DIGNIFIED

Society bottlings are grouped together into 12 flavour profiles that tell you something about their character. The nature of single cask whiskies means that it’s difficult to pinpoint exactly what makes a dram special, so each flavour profile is a broad classification which makes it simpler for you to navigate our whisky listings.


ALL NEW RELEASES WILL BE AVAILABLE ONLINE FROM FRIDAY 1ST JUNE AT MIDDAY AEST.

W I N T E R WA R M E R S Cozy up next to the fire and indulge the senses with cask strength expressions of liquid nectar. From the multi-faceted richness of a seven year old to the divine elegance of a thirty year old, each dram has its own story to tell. And not just single cask whisky but single cask spirits too. Thirteen sensational bottlings to celebrate the start of winter. Hooray!

OLD & DIGNIFIED

CASK No. G14.3 L I G H T, F I N E A N D S C U L P T E D TASTING NOTES: The nose is utterly fascinating and appealing – it has frosted corn cereals and clover honey; it’s bourbon-like (in a good way) and it evokes something celebratory – wedding cake and polished dance floors. The velvet smooth palate perfectly balances Demerara, candy corns and cola cube sweetness with the slight bitterness of wood (tea chests, cigar boxes). A drop of water shifts the nose into something light, fine and sculpted – an artist’s studio (oil paints, canvas), a jeweller’s work bench, moonlit wheat fields, old Calvados and rum and raisin marshmallows. But water slightly highlights the bitterness on the palate – so maybe just don’t. 30 YEARS R E F I L L

01 OCTOBER 1986

B O U R B O N

48.7%

B A R R E L

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 1 8 B O T T L E S

LOWLAND

1 of 168 bottles PRICE: $549


M A LT O F T H E M O N T H P E AT E D

CASK No. 66.111 A GENIAL GENIE OF SWEET SMOKE Sweet smoke. Two very straight-to-the-point sensory indicators that will excite those hunting an affordable and peated Malt of the Month. Distillery 66 has been peating its spirit as standard practice long before it was cool, and always offers a delicious alternative to the boggy and damp peat you often associate with Islay, with a chocolatey clean and dry Highland peat that is a delight to taste. Unbelievable value for an eight year old, it was $160 and for June only, $145 while stocks last.

TASTING NOTES: The nose offers sweet peat reek – some nougat and candy, but mainly tar, charred wood, black bun, treacle, liquorice and blackcurrant and Van Nelle halfzware shag in a leather pouch. The palate is a genial genie of sweet smoke– treacle scones, liquorice imps, cinder toffee, nicotine tar and balsamic on seared scallops; the finish – dry, ashy and eternal. The reduced nose finds burnt pastry, singed orange peel, coltsfoot rock, tarragon, burning bings and a vanilla ice-lolly melting before an autumn bonfire. The palate is sweeter, but with roasted chestnuts and fennel, pepper and salt: a bothy dram – medicine for the soul. 8 YEARS R E F I L L

04 JUNE 2009

B O U R B O N

B A R R E L

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 5 4 B O T T L E S

58.9%

HIGHLAND

1 of 210 bottles PRICE: $145

$145 REDUCED FROM $160.


L I G H T LY P E A T E D

CASK No. 10.125 CHARRED STICKS IN A HONEY POT TASTING NOTES: A mineralic edge of crushed flint combined with salty sea breeze and freshly sanded oak with its vanilla laced sweetness being reminiscent of pink wafer biscuits. A delicate smoke shrouded the glass like charred bonfire embers but with a sweet coating of runny honey. With water a light fruitiness evolved with freshly juiced blood oranges and tangy gooseberry tart beside a rock pool. The palate carried a delightfully nutty character with salted pistachio nuts wrapped in a creamy blanket of thick milkshake and cranachan. Blackcurrant jam and sultanas followed before a lasting finish of sea salt on lemon skin. 9 YEARS

07 F E B R UA RY 2 0 0 8

R E F I L L

61.1%

I S L AY

1 of 224 bottles

B A R R E L

PRICE: $195

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 4 2 B O T T L E S

S W E E T, F R U I T Y & M E L L O W

CASK No. 63.42 FRESH ORANGE SHERBET TASTING NOTES: The attractive summery perfumed sweet fruity aroma of orange sherbet greeted the Panel. This one was made with freshly-squeezed orange and lemon juice, orange zest and, for that extra kick, a spoonful of Triple sec (orange flavoured liqueur from dried peels of bitter and sweet oranges). The taste neat was light and airy like a Pavlova with kiwi, pomegranate and mint – crisp on the outside with a creamy chewy middle. When adding water a perfumed note of rosewater appeared next to the still refreshing sweet creamy notes as we indulged in a Turkish delight ice cream and a tongue tingling lightly sparkling ginger beer.

9 YEARS

0 6 D E C E M B E R 2 0 07

R E F I L L

B A R R E L

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 3 6 B O T T L E S

59.7%

SPEYSIDE

1 of 199 bottles PRICE: $155


P E AT E D

CASK No. 29.234 S M O K E D A N D S A LT E D TOFFEE APPLES Winning a “Double Gold” at this year’s prestigious San Francisco Spirits Competition, this third release from the Society’s Vaults Collection is an absolute stunner. Cask 29.234 “Smoked and salted toffee apples” is a 27-year-old single malt from Islay. Matured in a refill oloroso butt since 1989, this bottling provides the perfectly balanced combination of peat, smoke and sherry. With such depth and harmony incredibly hard to find and even more difficult to achieve, this is an outstanding piece of whisky history.

TASTING NOTES: The alluring colour of orange toffee proceeded onto the nose with aromas of caramel, fudge and toffee apples, perhaps sprinkled with a light dusting of sea salt. Soft smoke drifted in with the sea air and carried with it the impression of scallops, sweet crabmeat and lobster nets tied with old nautical rope. Sea air became sea spray, dowsing the remains of a driftwood bonfire and scattering charcoal across the beach. Ginger and cloves were teasing with the idea of antiseptic antics but veered back towards cinnamon spice with caramelised brown sugar and salted honeycomb crunch. The finish embraced the maritime but with the lingering depth of dark chocolate mousse. 27 YEARS R E F I L L

0 9 N OV E M B E R 1 9 8 9

O L O R O S O

54.9%

B U T T

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 1 2 B O T T L E S

I S L AY

1 of 368 bottles PRICE: $949*

*BALLOT SYSTEM – REGISTER YOUR INTEREST! ONLY 12 BOTTLES AVAILABLE. How to buy: Due to the extremely limited availability of Cask 29.234, we invite interested members to enter the ballot by emailing their name and membership number to ballot@smws.com.au Closing date for entries: Thursday 7th June midday AEST.


...a love letter in liquid form, its gentle smokiness leaving me staring dreamily into the dying embers of a beach bonfire. HANS OFFRINGA Whisky Expert and Author


OLD & DIGNIFIED

CASK No. 50.82 FEEL-GOOD DRAM TASTING NOTES: We found the nose heady, satisfying and ‘feel-good’ – beeswax polished wood, sherbet straws, honey, Danish pastries, buttered corn and delicate floral notes (honeysuckle, hyacinth, wild flower meadows). The palate was sweet and tart (toffee, honey-glazed wings), with a healthy spice kick (ginger cake, toasted hot-cross buns, onion chutney) and leather, tobacco and wood in the finish. The reduced nose had acacia honey, orange blossom, nectarines, dark chocolate, corn candies and cinnamon – ‘something of the Deep South’ (which, in a way, it is). The palate now seemed juicier – orange zest, ginger beer, sticky toffee, fudge and Gran Marnier – delicious and well-integrated.

25 YEARS

1 5 M AY 1 9 9 0

R E F I L L

60.8%

LOWLAND

1 of 84 bottles

B A R R E L

PRICE: $429

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 1 2 B O T T L E S

RUM

CASK No. R6.2 MY THAI SPICE IN BIMSHIRE TASTING NOTES: As you sit at the Thai restaurant looking at the setting warm Barbados sun, the sweet, tangy spices from the Asian cuisine caresses your nose. There is a touch of pear drops in the air too, probably from the pear tree hanging over our outdoor beachside dinner table. The spicy fruit continues onto the palate, opening up with even more intense peppers, green orchard fruit, orange peel, almonds and a touch of bitter wood to lengthen to taste. The long slightly caramelised sugar finish, was like the burnt sugar on a crème brûlée. The perfect ending to a Bajan Thai experience.

14 YEARS

3 1 O C TO B E R 2 0 0 2

R E F I L L

B A R R E L

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 1 8 B O T T L E S

56.8%

BARBADOS

1 of 228 bottles PRICE: $195


SPICY & SWEET

CASK No. 70.22 MALAGA RAISIN ICE CREAM TASTING NOTES: We felt transported to a park, rug spread out, sitting on a lush green lawn with colourful flower beds surrounding us. We had lunch and were now drinking a cup of coffee whilst the children bought from the ice cream van cones with scoops of marshmallow ice cream. Having seen them happily licking away we got ourselves Neapolitan choc sandwiches; strawberry, vanilla and chocolate ice cream in biscuit wafers dipped in a chocolate coating. After a drop of water some went back to the van and came back with gently spiced cinnamon tutti-frutti as well as vanilla ice cream with raisins soaked in Malaga sweet fortified wine.

11 YEARS

19 MAY 2006

R E F I L L

55.9%

HIGHLAND

1 of 194 bottles

B A R R E L

PRICE: $170

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 2 4 B O T T L E S

L I G H T LY P E A T E D

CASK No. 93.80 ‘ROUGH AROUND THE EDGES’ TASTING NOTES: On the nose neat it was a real mixed bag of aromas ranging from smoked mussels and Thai sweet chilli scallops, to custard creams served with mint tea to a freshly laid tar road and finally a hint of medicinal cough remedy. Quite an experience which was aptly followed by the taste; an explosion of peat smoke and chilli heat combined with tart cherries, slightly unripe gooseberries and a freshly brewed Lapsang Souchong tea. After dilution sweeter notes appeared like that of a smoked cardamom vanilla latte while on the palate a spicy smoky crab cake Panini and to finish plenty of salty liquorice.

7 YEARS 1 S T

F I L L

04 MARCH 2010

B O U R B O N

60.6%

B A R R E L

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 2 4 B O T T L E S

C A M P B E LT O W N

1 of 222 bottles PRICE: $179


O I LY & C O A S T A L

CASK No. 4.232 A L L T H E F U N O F T H E FA I R TASTING NOTES: We found this untypical and unusual – the nose evoked seaside funfairs – candy floss, hot-dogs, popcorn and donuts; seashells, seaweed and sand dunes – also sea breezes carrying hints of axel grease and diesel motors – maybe someone selling grilled scallops and tiger prawns. The palate was hot and sharp – charred sticks, ash and smoke from a costal croft; char-grilled tuna and sweet and sour duck on the menu. The reduced nose had roasted chestnuts and dark chocolate Brazils, singed orange peel, burning straw and honey-glazed barbecued pork. The reduced palate found earthy, mouth-numbing spices (ginger, nutmeg, liquorice, clove) and honey on burnt toast.

15 YEARS

20 AUGUST 2001

R E F I L L

58.9%

HIGHLAND ISLAND

1 of 409 bottles

B U T T

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 2 4 B O T T L E S

PRICE: $265

D E E P, R I C H & D R I E D F R U I T S

CASK No. 35.190 HOT APPLE AND CINNAMON SPONGE TASTING NOTES: The initial nose neat was like a pomander scented candle reminiscent of orange oil, cloves and cinnamon next to mince pies made with Bramley apples, cider, damsons, sherry-soaked currants, chopped peel and spices. The taste was deep, rich and dark like a sticky date pudding with a butterscotch sauce and roasted figs in honey and Marsala wine. Water added aromas of hot apple and cinnamon sponge cake with pecans and plenty of maple syrup next to a boozy cherry trifle. On the palate now slightly more tannic and spicy, like chilli pepper chutney, but soon developing into a creamy caramel & walnut pudding.

16 YEARS R E F I L L

1 7 M AY 2 0 0 1

B U T T

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 3 6 B O T T L E S

59.5%

SPEYSIDE

1 of 588 bottles PRICE: $225


ARMAGNAC

CASK No. A3.1 G R AV I TA S A N D S O P H I S T I C AT I O N TASTING NOTES: This delightful old Armagnac is like an elderly statesman full of gravitas and urbane sophistication; a glass to accompany thoughtful contemplation. The nose has floral perfumes and polished wood, syrup of figs, raisins and molasses, orange oil and spiced rum punch – maybe even a medicinal, old-fashioned apothecary’s note. The palate is viscous, intense and weighty – lots of wood (no surprise), gingerbread, treacle and various dried fruits. That dark fruity sweetness is complimented by a dry, spicy finish; imagine a toffee apple laced with cough linctus, imagine PX drizzled on black bun and imagine a tantalising doorway to a time long gone. 30 YEARS

1987

A R M A G N A C

49.8%

BAS ARMAGNAC

1 of 501 bottles

B A R R E L

PRICE: $395

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 4 2 B O T T L E S

Y O U N G & S P R I T E LY

CASK No. 64.96 FRUIT AND SPICE DUALITY TASTING NOTES: The fairly gentle nose had these components – rosewater and flower gardens – also perfumed fruit (peach melba, tutti frutti) and pink wafer and iced Victoria sponge sweetness. The palate hinted at airport perfume counters but mainly balanced attractive fruitiness (banana split, citric peel, fruit punch) with a more energized, tingly heat and spice kick (chilli, ginger, new wood and wasabi). The reduced nose found a lady’s handbag (leather, cigarettes, powder puff ) and lots of fruit (dried mango and pineapple, tinned fruit salad, citrus). The palate still had that duality – lemon, grapefruit, vanilla and strawberry fool, against wood, tobacco and root ginger tingles.

9 YEARS

05 MARCH 2008

R E F I L L

B A R R E L

A U S A L L O C AT I O N : 2 4 B O T T L E S

60.1%

SPEYSIDE

1 of 192 bottles PRICE: $160


AMBASSADOR’S ADDRESS As I write this, I’m in-between packing my bags to make the pilgrimage to The Vaults, boarding a flight tomorrow where I’ll be until nearly the end of the month. I absolutely cannot wait and I promise to bring back some spoils of Scotland to share with members liberally! I’ve also just recovered from our incredibly successful Archie Rose pop-up bar last weekend where it was just amazing to see so many members, friends, colleagues and new members pop up! We cracked open so many gems and shared them by the dram in one of my favourite bars in the world. Don’t despair if you missed out, as the shelves at Archie Rose are currently nicely stocked with Society goodies and more to come, plus don’t forget to flash your SMWS member card for that sweet discount off all drinks at the bar (and yes, that includes that tasty ale of local beer on tap).

That’s what is now, and what’s been, but we always like looking forward at the Society, so after you’ve read this, go to the back page and start circling your dates in the diary for one of our tasty Winter events coming up. As always, members get preference in both ticketing and pricing, so make the most of your membership and come along! We’ll be rolling out some truly delicious casks at these experiences, @smws_matt

but as always, feedback is welcomed. These events are for you after all and open the door to whisky and other spirits like no other.

Lastly, it wouldn’t feel right if I didn’t mention the Champs at least once again here. The CHAMPS are back in 2018 and it’s as simple as this: • Book a ticket to come. Saturday 28th July. • 72 hours before the competition starts, we will send you the ‘pre-list’ of 50 malt whiskies, of which eight will be on the table in front of you at the competition. • On the night, you’ll have 30 minutes to nose and taste eight malt whiskies all core range and easily accessible, non-special release bottlings. • If you guess the most correctly, you’ll take out first prize, which is MASSIVE this year.

• You’ll then come to the after-party and have a ball of a time. Easy! See you there.

bailey@smws.com.au MATT BAILEY, SMWS NATIONAL AMBASSADOR


THE AUSTRALIAN M A LT W H I S K Y TA S T I N G CHAMPIONSHIP 2018 Drink whisky, win big – the countdown is on! And seats are filling up fast! July 28th will see a fun night of whisky, nosing, tasting, and an exciting after-party with Society bar, live music, cocktail bar and more, all included in the ticket. Someone will take home the trophy and our biggest first prize ever (anyone fancy a trip for two to Edinburgh, the home of the Society?!) And last but not least, bragging rights. It will be a fun and unforgettable night for everyone who comes along – competitors and non-competing party-goers alike! BOOK NOW!

DETAILS

BOOKINGS

Saturday 28th July 6.30pm until late

Book now for a chance to win – snooze and you lose! www.amwtc-smws.com

Powerhouse Museum, Ultimo, Sydney


LET’S DISCOVER ARMAGNAC! Take a flip through this month’s Outturn and you’ll notice we’re releasing our first single cask Armagnac in years. It’s been a while between casks, but you can’t rush perfection! So with that in mind, let’s discover what Armagnac actually is and how to properly appreciate this fine French spirit.

A

rmagnac is the oldest French eau-de-vie, dating back to the early 14th century, with evidence of distillation taking place at least 200 years before cognac was being produced. It is produced in the Gascony region in the south-west of France under the guidelines of its own industry body, the Bureau National Interprofessionnel de l’Armagnac (BNIA). Like cognac, armagnac has been recognised as an “Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée” (Controlled Appellation of Origin) since 1936. But the difference in both production processes, grape varieties, volumes and in the character of the two spirits is considerable.

Armagnac is still predominantly produced on single estates by families rather than larger houses or conglomerates, on a much smaller scale than cognac. There are around 800 wine growers in the region, but many of them don’t own or operate their own stills, known as alambics. Many farmers sell their grapes to distillers. There are also négociants, who buy eaux de vie from distillers, then age and blend them themselves to produce armagnac. Other farmers still rely on mobile distillers who tow their alembic – often wood-fired – from farm to farm, distilling the wines according to the specification of each house.


Although 10 grape varieties are allowed for armagnac production, four are most commonly used. These are: • UGNI BLANC (55%) – the most widely

used variety, giving acidic and low alcohol wines.

• BACO (35%) – previously known as Baco

22A, this is a hybrid of Folle Blanche and Noah varieties named after its creator, François Baco. It contributes roundness, smoothness and aromas of ripe fruits.

• FOLLE BLANCHE (5%) – the oldest and

the best-known variety used in armagnac. It produces fine and floral eauxde-vie, but because it is more fragile and susceptible to frost, its production has now become quite rare.

• COLOMBARD (5%) – widely used in table

wines, but distillation for armagnac is rarer. Its fruity and spicy aromas are appreciated in blends.

HOW IS IT MADE?

The grapes used to create the wine for distillation are harvested from September to October, and the addition of any sulphur treatment or sugar is forbidden. Distillation takes place during the winter once fermentation has finished, with a deadline of 31 March of the year following the harvest. One of the key differences between armagnac and cognac is that 95 per cent of armagnac is only distilled once, and distillation is done using a specific form of continuous still – the Armagnac alambic. Up to 30 per cent of distillation is still carried out by travelling

alambics that make their way from farm to farm, using LPG or even sometimes still wood as fuel for distillation. Imagine working on a traveling still! As for maturation, Armagnac is aged in 400-litre oak barrels and stored in cellars similar to Scottish dunnage warehouses. It typically goes into new barrels for between six months to two years of its life, before being transferred to older barrels so that the extract of wood and tannin compounds doesn’t dominate the flavour. Most producers use French oak from the Limousin or Tronçais forests, whose oak offers wide grain for bigger flavours and tannins and narrow grain for more restrained flavours and tannins. Each of these impart a unique character to the final spirit. Some producers use local casks of black oak from Gascony, which has even wider grain and tends to be more tannic and imparts much more colour, with a more intense and dark fruity character. Black oak is becoming less common as the supply has diminished. Armagnac can continue its maturation over the course of decades – up to 50 years or so in the cask – before being transferred into large glass demijohns or steel tanks. The majority of Armagnac is blended, and while some Armagnac is single cask, the SMWS only ever bottles single cask and is able to legally print the vintage on the bottle, unlike Cognac. Armagnac’s production is on a very small scale – around five million bottles sold a year worldwide, compared with 175  million for cognac or 1.2 billion for Scotch whisky.

G R AV I T A S & S O P H I S T I C A T I O N

Cask A3.1, the first ever from this distillery for the SMWS, is a 1987, 30 year old, single cask Armagnac bottled at natural cask strength.


UPCOMING EVENTS M ELBOURN E

WO L LO NG O NG

SPOILS FROM SCOTLAND WHISKY DINNER WEDNESDAY 13TH JUNE 6.30PM FOR 7.00PM

WINTER WONDERLAND SUPPER FRIDAY 13TH JULY 6.30PM FOR 7.00PM

P.J. O’Brien’s Irish Pub Southgate Ave, Southbank Host: Matt Bailey, National Ambassador

Novotel Northbeach Hotel 2-14 Cliff Rd, North Wollongong Host: Fred Apolloni, Wollongong Manager C ANB E R RA

PERTH PEAT & SMOKE SENSATIONS THURSDAY 28TH JUNE 6.30PM FOR 7.00PM

Bar Lafayette, Brookfield Pl, 125 St Georges Tce, Lower Georges Ln, Perth Host: Jason Davies, WA Manager

SPOILS FROM SCOTLAND WHISKY TASTING THURSDAY 21ST JUNE 6.00PM FOR 6.30PM

Hippo Co 1/17 Garema Pl, Canberra Host: Matt Bailey, National Ambassador B R I S B ANE

SY D N EY SMWS BOILERMAKERS FRIDAY 29TH JUNE 6.30PM FOR 7.00PM

Royal Automobile Club 89 Macquarie St, Sydney Host: Andrew Derbidge, Cellarmaster & NSW Manager For more information or to book in for any of the whisky experiences listed, please visit: smws.com.au/events

MIDWINTER FEAST FRIDAY 22ND JUNE 7.00PM FOR 7.30PM

The Brisbane Club 241 Adelaide St, Brisbane Host: Scott Mansfield, QLD Manager A DE L A I DE FIRE – THE 3RD ELEMENT FRIDAY 17TH AUGUST 6.00PM FOR 6.30PM

Rob Roy Hotel 106 Halifax St, Adelaide Host: Jenny Forrest, SA Manager

W W W. S M W S . C O M . A U

0 2 9 9 74 3 0 4 6

All day every day

Mon-Fri, 9:00am–5:00pm AEST

AUSTRALIANSMWS

SMWS_AUSTRALIA

Society whiskies are offered and sold through The Wine Empire Pty Ltd, Liquor Licence LIQP770010175.

Profile for The Scotch Malt Whisky Society

Outturn June 2018  

Outturn June 2018