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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

Table of Contents Important Dates ................................................................................................................................................ 3 Six Flags Adventure - Allie Clayton............................................................................................................ 4 Leaders-in-Residence - Elizabeth Finely................................................................................................... 4 All-Nighter - Grace Lucas ............................................................................................................................... 5 Rent-a-Geek - Zachary Ragland ................................................................................................................... 5 Procrastination - Eric Staggs ........................................................................................................................ 6 To Accept the Ambiguity - Brittany Bishop............................................................................................. 6 Dream (With thanks to Les Miserables) - Payton Mink ...................................................................... 7 Junior/Senior Projects Abigail Castleberry ........................................................................................................................... 7 Elyse Murrell ....................................................................................................................................... 8 Sarah Appleton................................................................................................................................... 9 Elizabeth DeVlieger .......................................................................................................................... 9 Caryce Gilmore ................................................................................................................................ 10

Senior Editors: Photographer: Payton Mink Katrina Moeller Charles Busby Paige Mason

The University of Tennessee at Martin’s University Scholars Organization

Disclaimer: Any views or opinions herein expressed are not representative of the University Scholars Organization as a whole

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

Director’s Corner Dr. Lionel Crews Greetings to all readers! I hope this edition of The Scholar finds you happy and healthy. If you aren’t already aware, I was appointed the 4th Director of Honors Programs in January 2011, succeeding Dr. Dan McDonough. Dan and the former directors, Drs. Ernie Blythe and Bill Zachary, left an amazing program in place, one which I am very excited to lead given my past experiences on Honors Council and as an Assistant Director. Working with such excellent students has been very rewarding thus far and I hope to stay as Director for many years to come. One of my initiatives as a new Director was to transform The Scholar to a publication that can be used not only as an outlet of creative expression for current Scholars, but also as an information source for alumni and prospective students. I hope this journal will serve you in such a way, and if you have questions feel free to contact me or any of the Scholars featured in this issue. Also as a new Director, I have my own philosophy about University Scholars, which I’d like to sum up in four basic concepts … Totality, Impact, Performance, and Fun. I’ll give my thoughts about each concept, as well as an initiative I have for University Scholars in every issue. Totality: As Dr. Thomas Fuller once said … “Education begins a gentleman, conversation completes him.” Scholars should provide an environment conducive to growth in all areas of life. The main focus of a University Scholar is in completing their academic work, but there are many other important aspects of being a successful person. The ability to socially interact with others is vital, so we encourage activities ranging from movies and pizza to overnight trips. The ability to work together is important, so we engage in group projects throughout the 1st and 2nd years. The ability to lead is extremely useful, so we give many opportunities to do so through the various activities in USO. In all, what Scholars do should enhance their experience at UT Martin and give them skills for the future. The Honors Center Initiative: I am currently working with Dr. Eunju Hwang in the Family and Consumer Sciences department to revamp the Honors Center. The rooms have undergone many changes over the years, with varying levels of thought about decorative planning and utility. I would like to see the Center become much more active, and the best way to do it is to make it more useful and pleasing to the eye. Along with her students, Dr. Hwang has come up with some interesting proposals, such as furniture for the courtyard, more comfortable furniture and amenities in the study, and an expanded kitchen with thought toward active rather than infrequent use. The next step … find money to do it! Warmest Regards, Lionel

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

Important Dates Summer Semester 2012 

Monday, June 4: Classes Begin, First Half & Full Term

Wednesday, July 4: Independence Day

Friday, July 6: Classes End (Final Exams), First Term

Spring Semester 2012 Thursday, Jan. 12: Day and evening classes

Monday, July 9: Advising, Second Term

begin

Tuesday, July 10: Classes Begin, Second Term

Monday, Jan. 16: Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Monday, Feb. 27: Mid-Term Progress Reports

Friday, Aug. 10: Classes End (Final Exams), Second & Full Term

due 

Monday-Sunday, March 5-11: Spring Break

Friday, April 6: Good Friday

Friday, April 27: Classes End

Saturday—Friday, April 28-May4: Final

Fall Semester 2012 

Initiative 

Friday, Aug. 24: Advising

Monday Aug. 27: Day and Evening Classes

Exams 

Saturday, May 5: Commencement

Maymester 2012 

Monday, May 14: Classes Begin

Monday, May 28: Memorial Day

Friday, June 1: **Classes End (Final Exams)

“Data is not information, information is not knowledge, knowledge is not understanding, understanding is not wisdom” - Clifford Stoll

Thursday-Sunday, Aug. 23-26: First-Year

Begin 

Monday Sept. 3: Labor Day

Friday Oct. 12: Mid-Term Progress Reports Due

Saturday-Tuesday Oct. 13-16: Fall Break

For more information, visit: http://catalog.utm.edu/content.php? catoid=5&navoid=251#Fall_Semester__2012

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

“What’s Happening?” Freshmen News Reports Six Flags Adventure Allie Clayton “Breathe. Laugh. Scream. Breathe. Laugh. Scream.” That was the mantra echoing through my head as I rode on some of the most insane rides I have ever experienced. I have never been a thrillseeker or an adrenaline junkie, but I knew that the trip with Scholars to Six Flags would be my opportunity to do some insane things that those types of people enjoy. The drive up was a blast; most of the freshmen that went hung out and bonded in the back of Lionel’s van. There was tons of singing and laughing. Poor Mary Medling confused a truck with a house, but luckily Hunter Lindburg was there to straighten her out. Once we arrived, everyone quickly hurried to get on a ride. The first ride that we went on was by no means the craziest, but it was still pretty extreme. The more we rode, the more we laughed. We even rode a carousel and raced around the moving horses. At the end of the day, we had to go home. But not before we stopped at Steak & Shake and made a poor waitress’s life ten times more stressful. The rest of the trip was filled with jokes (courtesy of Brandon Smith and Michael Martin) and (for the freshman) a healthy game of “Never Have I Ever.” All in all, the entire group gave this trip two thumbs up!

Leaders-in-Residence Elizabeth Finely On September 15, 2011, a ceremony was held to mark the 50-year anniversary of integration at the University of Tennessee at Martin. The ceremony include the dedication into the Unity Circle of two benches with plaques in honor of Jesse Pryor and Beverly Echol, In the summer of 1961, Jessie Pryor enrolled at the University of Tennessee at Martin as the first AfricanAmerican student. Four years later, Beverly Echols graduated as the first African-American graduate of the University of Tennessee at Martin. At the ceremony, students and faculty, of all different ethnic backgrounds, came together to celebrate the achievements of these two women. The Chancellor, Tom Rakes, introduced both of these women and their families, and he elaborated on all of their accomplishments. Then Theotis Robinson, the UT Vice President of Equity and Diversity, presented the women with tokens to remember this historical day. Because of the true leaders of the past who began opening the doors of desegregation of southern agricultural colleges, such as George Washington Carver at Tuskegee Institute, these women were able and confident enough to continue to open doors for future students. Thanks to the visionary leaders of the past, our campus is a better place, and because of our visionary leaders of today, our campus will continue to grow and improve.

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

All-Nighter Grace Lucas Last month I experienced my first Scholar all-nighter. The night began with delicious candy and friendly conversation. Mostly freshman were present, along with a few upperclassmen, and, of course, Dr. Crews. First, we talked about life experiences, and then we moved on to something less serious, YouTube videos. We shared the funniest ones we could remember seeing and had a great time laughing it up. Then the activities began. Some played board games, some talked, and the rest had bigger plans. I was impressed by the elaborate scavenger hunt most of the group went on. The list of things to find was extremely random and obscure, but the craziest thing about it was the list of photo finds. Teams were to take pictures of themselves doing certain actions of with different objects to earn points on the hunt. Some of the goals were to build a tower of fries at McDonald's, take a picture holding a cat up as if he were Simba from The Lion King, and plank, koala, or owl in various places. Bonus points were given if a picture involved people from outside of the hunt. This turned into a wild, two hour activity that took the teams all over Martin. The night ended for me at about 12:00 a.m. because I had to be ready to run a race the next morning, but I’m sure that at the next all-nighter there will be even more fun to be had.

Rent-a-Geek Zachary Ragland I have always been active in serving others and my community, and so I was very excited to participate in Rent-aGeek. For this service project, professors hire different Scholars to help them with any job they need. The professors can then donate money that goes directly to the University Scholars Organization. It was a good experience for me because I was able to meet a new professor, make some money for scholars, and learn a simple but important lesson. I learned that before I do any kind of event, I should check my email to make sure there have not been any last minute changes. The day of Rent-a-Geek, I arrived at Dr. Alexander’s house at one p.m. She was not there, so I waited. Then I waited and waited some more. At one thirty, I was able to contact the scholar in charge of the schedules, and she apologetically informed me that I was not supposed to arrive until two that afternoon. So instead of getting frustrated, I did the smartest thing I could do; I took a nap. When Dr. Alexander finally arrived around 2 o’clock, we started working. I helped her move a cabinet and replace an old television. We also moved some left over boards into her garage. She is currently having her porch remodeled, so I finished up on a few little jobs that needed doing. My big sibling, Cayce Wood, also helped with rent a geek. She did yard work, such as trimming bushes and pulling weeds, and a lot of other little jobs. Another scholar helped put mulch around a professor’s yard. My job was simple and straightforward, unlike Cayce’s, which took five hours. My overall experience with Rent-a-Geek was a good one, and hopefully, I will have many such experiences in the future.

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

“Creative Outlet” Sophomore Creative Pieces Procrastination Eric Staggs The hands on the wall are moving too fast to clock. I want to slow down, but it's so hard to stop. We live in a world completely ruled by time. If it wasn’t this way, I would probably be fine. Instead of looking down or just walking away, I keep my head up, and I conquer the day. Now my work is getting done, and I'm passing every test. I am completely exhausted, but there's no time for rest. I work until I'm finished – until the job is through. I work until I think I have nothing left to do.

To Accept the Ambiguity Brittany Bishop

People have always tried to figure out life; to predict its truths, to find explanations. No one has succeeded, yet we all continue to try. Big plans and blueprints for the future can be made, but in all reality they rarely come to fruition. We look back on these thoughts from our past and shake our heads in amusement at the ideas that once filled our minds. Though unexpected changes, dark days, and golden opportunities pave new roads, the sun will come, and the mysteries of life will be taken in stride.

But when I lay my head down before I go to sleep, I remember an assignment I forgot, and I begin to weep.

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

Dream With thanks to Les Miserables Payton Mink Now I’m all alone again with no one to go to. The light is fading and night grows ever colder, but a little fall of rain can hardly hurt me now. I dreamed a dream in a time gone by. The skies begin to clear; I’m at rest a breath away from where you are. I dreamed my life would be so different now from what it seems. I’m without a friend, without a face to say hello to. I dreamed that love would never die, but there’s a darkness that comes without a warning, and dreams are turned to shame. I dreamed that God would be forgiving, but everyday I find I’m still learning that all my life I’ve only been pretending.

“Independent Studies” Junior & Senior Projects Abigail Castleberry Scholar Project The focus of my Senior Project is mediation. Mediation is a form of conflict resolution, and it is used in a multitude of situations in the legal field. One area in which mediation is quite often used is during a divorce. The core principle of mediation is that both sides are more likely to maintain any agreement or settlement when the main participants in the decision making process are the litigants themselves. A mediator’s job is to impartially construct an atmosphere of clear communication as well as suggest solutions that the litigants might not have considered. I was exposed to mediation during the summer of 2010 while I was interning at a law office. In the state of Tennessee, mediation in required in every divorce. With each mediation I experienced, my curiosity became increasingly more intrigued. This led to the topic of my project. There is very little literature on the effectiveness of mediation, and the subject matter of these studies are quite narrow. The intent of my project is to look at mediation in a multifaceted format. Most studies judge the success of mediation upon whether an agreement was

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

reached. I believe this is misguided. To be successful, mediation must reach a set of indicators. For example, were both litigants treated fairly in the process, and do both litigants intend to maintain any settlement? This research is important because the price of a single mediation can cost hundreds of dollars. If Tennessee and other states plan to continue to reacquire the use of mediation, there needs to be some evidence to support the continuation of this policy. Also, the mediation process is not consistent in every case. For example, some mediations occur with litigants face to face, while others occur with the litigants separated. In my project, I also hope to suggest ways in which to streamline the mediation process.

“Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.� - William Butler Yeats Elyse Murrell Scholar Project In social work, there are not many issues that go without being talked about. Social workers are not shy about bringing up controversial issues. One area that has still gone largely unaddressed is intersexuality. The GBLTQ (Gay, Bisexual, Lesbian, Transgendered, Questioning) movement has paved the way for this topic. My goal is to bring intersexuality to the forefront of sexual issues in Western culture. I am doing a study on intersexuality, and my focus is on casework with intersex infants and their families in a hospital setting. The degree and extent to which unethical medical treatments are implemented is shocking. Approximately 1.7% of all live births are intersexed children, according to a study conducted by Anne Fausto-Sterling and a group of Brown University students. A vast majority of these babies are operated on. These are physically and emotionally traumatic operations and require long-term follow up medical care. I was stunned when I began to understand the depth of the trauma these infants experience over their lifetime. For my project, I will be conducting a workshop on casework with intersexed infants and their families on September 22nd and 23rd. I will be presenting these issues and roles in which social workers and other professionals who come in contact these infants can and should play. I hope to open discussion on an issue that makes people uncomfortable at best. I intend to carry this research into graduate work and specialize in sexuality and sexual development with a particular emphasis on intersexuality. I hope to work in a clinical setting as well as in advocacy to help blur gender lines in Western culture and eradicate the ignorance that surrounds these issues.

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

Sarah Appleton Scholar Project My research project is a study of political socialization. More specifically, I am looking at the how the civic education that adolescents receive in school can impact their political behaviors later in life. My ultimate goal is to find ways that schools can improve civic education in order to encourage students toward a greater level of political knowledge and participation that will carry into adulthood. I am currently in the first stage of the project: reading the research that has already been done on political behavior, psychology, and socialization. I am becoming familiar with how people form attitudes toward politics and politicians, how people decide whether to vote in elections and who to vote for, how much people tend to know about politics, and the impact that political knowledge has on their political behaviors. I will soon begin an in-depth look at the process of political socialization, especially within schools. As I read, I am constantly thinking of how to narrow down my research topic. By the end of the semester I will have a very specific research question chosen, and this is what I will use to determine where to go with the project in the spring semester. After I have completed more reading, I will decide what aspects of civic education could have the greatest impact on adolescents' political attitudes. I will then be seeking to determine how to structure civic education in order to maximize its efficacy. Elizabeth DeVlieger Mentor: Dr. Kate Stumpo Scholar Project My Senior Project is a chemistry research project. The goal of my project is to characterize the N-linked glycans, sugars, attached to pollen proteins, specifically those that cause allergic responses in humans. I will be extracting the glycans from the protein and characterizing them using mass spectrometry, which is a technique that will give me the structure and mass of my glycans. So far in my project, I have worked with a known carbohydrate, lactose. Lactose did not need to be extracted from a protein, so this was basically a way to “practice” and familiarize myself with the lab and instruments. I am currently working with a known protein, ovalbumin. I am working on method development of a micro-technique because the samples that I will be working with are very small. Therefore, standard procedures are not entirely accurate for what I want to accomplish. Once I work my way through ovalbumin a few times, I will move to a known pollen and perform the same procedure and analyze my results. Once I am completely confident that I have the technique where I need it to be, I will begin with the unknown pollen proteins. I expect to find certain things that have been already found in allergen glycans such as β(1,2)-xylose and α(1,3) – fucose linkages. However, I am hoping to find some other commonalities between the structures in hopes to get a better understanding of what exactly causes the immunogenic responses in humans. I have run into a few minor, inevitable difficulties with my research; however, the project is going very well, overall. I plan on presenting in Vancouver, Canada in May at the American Society of Mass Spectrometry annual conference. I also anticipate getting the opportunity to be a part of as many poster sessions as possible, on campus and off.

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The Scholar November 2011 Edition

Caryce Gilmore Scholar Project Have you ever noticed how old farmers can look at the livestock in the field and say, "Rain's a'comin in"? This project is designed to prove their knowledge. When conducting research for the subject, I realized that not much has been done on this topic thus far. My findings were sparse, especially for sheep. If any research had been performed on relating animal behavior to livestock, it was conducted with cattle. I decided to use sheep for my study because they are highly gregarious. They travel in groups, so by observing the behavior of a few animals, we can predict the behavior of several animals in the flock. For the past year, three GPS collars have been placed on sheep in UTM's sheep pasture. This tracking data will keep record of how much the sheep are outside of the barn and where they are in the pasture. A map of the pasture has been made, which shows what type of vegetation grows in which region of the pasture. Through this data, we will be able to determine what type of grasses the sheep prefer to eat, and if time of day and weather conditions have an effect on this eating preferences. In addition, a record of the weather conditions is being collected through the university's weather towers. By combining all the data, my project will show whether or not a connection can be made between the animal's behavior and incoming storms. My hypothesis is that sheep will have increased grazing in the hours before hazardous weather. They will take shelter in the barn, where there is no food. Therefore, they will prepare for the time spent in the barn by eating more rapidly. If this is true, livestock managers should be able to predict an oncoming storm by watching their flock's eating habits. This research should help sheep management projects, as well as add validity to old farmers' conversations everywhere.

“The illiterate of the future will not be the person who cannot read. It will be the person who does not know how to learn.” - Alvin Toffler

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November 2011  

November 2011 Edition

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