Page 1

Art by Maddie Jones


02 soundtrack: “Watcha say” Jason Derulo

05•06•10 community

s e h s i w Best s s a l c e to th ! 0 1 0 2 f o Odd things heard around RCHS

Rock-arazzi

• “That kid has been a giant goofy gomer since he got here.” “Was that alliteration intentional?” “No, I don’t speak Spanish.” • “Get your hair out of my salsa!” “Get your salsa out of my hair!” • “You know, it’s a good thing you don’t sell drugs, because you would be really good at it.” • “Come here, child. Let me pierce your belly button!”

• “They have ducks in their car!” •”Spray cheese, hooray!” • “I can’t go back there, I just can’t! She scares me too much!” “Dude, she’s 12.” “So?!” • “Iran is, like, the capital of Iraq, right?“ • “Like, OMG. I just... I don’t know, all I thought was OMG. There’s no other way to put it.“

Bonus!

Visual Rock-arazzi

This picture was found in the trash can of David Sapienza’s classroom, drawn on a sheet of notes about ancient civilizations. As far as the staff of The Rock can tell, it appears to be a dinosaur holding a Confederate-esque flag and an assault rifle. It is also wearing a bow tie. All that is left to wonder is what the artist was thinking at the time he or she drew it and what the dinosaur represents (if anything).

Mile High Magic After Prom

Thank you to everyone who made After Prom 2010 such a success:

Donations/Gift Cards/Prizes: Chipotle Tokyo Joes Bang’s Salon Wendy’s Lydia Noble Staples Target Big Five Sporting Goods Elitches Walmart Proformance Petsmart Home Depot (Castle Rock) CJ Frozen Custard Sherwin-Williams (Parker) The Rusted Gate (in the Barn, Castle Rock) Phantom 8 Tattoo Shop Best Buy Dairy Queen Jim McClurg Jostens King Scooper Murdoch’s BC Surf & Sports Pac Sun Vans Falcon Park Dental Group Hair Color Experts Nathan Stormo Corrnzapoppin Dr. Bilby, DDS Papa John’s Costco Country Club of Castle Pines

Massage Therapists: Jean Rehnkee Amber Sponsel Caretha Mouzon Terrence Benally Debra Lopez Valerie Thompson Liese Lemay Jennifer Broker Michelle Paddock Julie Gray Wes Eggett & Lucas Gonzales - MCs for Minute to Win RCHS Administration

And, especially, all the parent volunteers. Thank you to Qdoba Mexican Grill for their donation to the 2010 Rock Canyon High School After Prom. Don’t forget! Qdoba caters and offers a great selection of hot bars for graduation parties! Call 1.888.Qdoba2go to place your order!

a r o f s k Than ! t h g i n t grea


rumor mill setting the record straight

Rumor:

Rumor:

Rumor:

Next year’s schedules will be released early

Next year, varsity players will be able to obtain credit from the sports they play.

Students are allowed to smoke electronic cigarettes on campus

Fiction

Fiction

Depends

Students can expect their schedules sometime around the beginning of July. Registrar Susan Judge says that students should not expect them any earlier. “Last year we released them around the month of June,”said Judge. “But there is no telling what time we will release it next year.”

According to Assistant Principal Stacey Riendeau, this is false. Students will have to take regular Physical Education classes to fulfill their one credit required by the district.

Tobacco is not allowed on campus at any time. But electronic cigarettes are different. Technically, they must be pre-approved by an administrator. According to assistant principal Greg Doan, “Any controlled substance must be approved.” compiled by Evan Ann Boose

Rock Canyon, Rock Canyon is about to suffer a serious loss. English teacher and adviser of “The Rock,” Jack Kennedy will be retiring from teaching high school at the end of this school year. Anyone who has ever been his student will attest to his dedication to education, and his love for his pupils. He honest to God likes and respects teenagers as if they were adults. He gives his newspaper students full reign of the publication. We are allowed to publish what we want, when we want, and he will never censor us, just advise us. This is because he believes in students. It is this belief that has turned so many kids into young adults ready to conquer the world around them. On behalf of the staff of “The Rock,” you will be missed, Jack Kennedy, and we wish you the best in everything you do. Have a great summer, and seniors, good luck in everything you do. Alex Rowe

A look inside: These arethe maestros the pages with coverage that don’t fit into one of our four sections

Medical Marijuana Take a closer look inside the growing cannabis culture in Colorado. pg. 5

Prom

A look back on Prom, After Prom, and what made the night special and safe for the students. pg. 6

Senior Section Pull-Out

One last look at the graduating class of 2010; in depth profiles and a list of what the seniors have planned for the future. pg. 11-26

You’re Invited!

Who: The Yearbook Staff What: Early yearbook distribution When: Tuesday, May 11; 2:50-4 p.m. Where: RCHS Courtyard Bring $5 to get your yearbook with… 16 more autograph pages Clear yearbook cover

Q&A

With Lizzy Rooney, Diversity Club president

The Rock: As a senior and the President of Diversity Club, what is your reflection on the year for the club? Rooney: Everything we’ve done this year as a club has been super awesome. And I’m really glad I got the chance to play such a big role in it and see it grow so much. The Rock: Did you accomplish everything that you hoped to accomplish? If not, how so? Rooney: I think our plan was to go on more cultural excursions and just do our best to expand Diversity Club and our own personal definitions of diversity. The Rock: What do you think is the best thing Diversity Club did this year? Rooney: Personally, my favorite thing was the Cherry Creek Diversity Conference. Jake Jose and I played such a big role in planning it, and the overwhelming majority of people who went (1000 people from 80 schools attend the conference) said that it was the best one they’d ever been to in 17 years. So for me, it was really cool to see everyone benefit so much from all of our hard work. The Rock: What has Diversity Club taught you? Rooney: I’ve really taken so much from Diversity Club. [It] has been my favorite thing this year about high school and it gave me something else to talk about on my college essays. Plus, all the time I got to spend with LB and helping her expand Diversity Club. I’ve definitely tried to give back as much as possible. It’s been a really great experience. Compiled by Amber Cole

S

Sophomores Robbie Purdy, Abbey Reagan, and Ellen Hefner enjoy the leftover marshmallows from their lab on allele frequencies. “Ms. Fordham suggested it, “said Hefner. “They were quite delicious!” Photos by Logan Thompson

Bunsen burners brighten Biotech Learning the process of PCR (a DNA replication technique used to amplify DNA in crime scenes) isn’t what you would normally call an electrifying lesson. “I knew that a hands-on lesson might make the learning a little easier, and let’s face it, nothing gets kids more excited than candy,” said biotechnical engineering teacher Shawndra Fordham. After constructing DNA out of marshmallows, toothpicks, Mike and Ikes, and gummy bears and learning everything they needed from the lab, the second period class found themselves with ten extra minutes. “There is really only one logical thing to do when presented with free time and marshmallows,” said biotech student Will Ready ’10, “cook them with Bunsen Burners.” For the rest of class, students roasted their DNA atop graham crackers left over from an earlier lab. “In-depth knowledge is good,” said Ready, “but a marshmallow on fire is great.” Logan Thompson

tuCo packs a powerful punch When Student Council sponsor Katherine Hartline started out the year, she had no idea that the 2009-2010 school year would make such a positive difference for Rock Canyon. “Looking back on things, I’d say I’m most proud of Wish Week,” said Hartline. “It’s something we’ve never done and it was amazing to be able to grant all those wishes and start a new tradition.”

and the winners are... Student Body : President: Madi Strimbu Vice President: Stefan McLaren

Juniors : President: Nancy Hunt Vice President: Chloe Thorderson

Seniors : President: Chloe Yarusso Vice Presidents: Hannah Wilson, Kate Ready

Sophomores : President: Virginia Vaughn Vice President: Darrian Felsen

compiled by Skyler Draper

NHS will continue to progress The National Honor Society was all about the numbers this year. 70 members, one of the largest induction groups in NHS history, $1500 raised for Haiti, 100 meals served on their trip to the Denver Rescue Mission where they prepared and handed out food to the needy, and one teacher appreciation breakfast to show their support to Rock Canyon’s hardworking staff. “We did a lot of work this year, raising money and helping around the community,” said Priya Sudendra ‘11, newly-elected president of the academic club. “The soup kitchen was really cool because we got to make food and serve it to the homeless people who came to the shelter.” They didn’t just help around the RC community, but also worked to help those around the world. “We raised $1500 for Haiti” said former president Anne McCarthy ‘10. “I would consider this to have been very successful for NHS.” The prestigious club are already gearing up for next year. “All the officers have a lot of good ideas,” said Sudendra. “I have a feeling next year is going to be another great year.” Paige Hesen

Q&A

With Ashley Tussing

The Rock: Where will you be moving to? Tussing: I am moving to Atlanta, Georgia. The Rock: What will you be doing there? Tussing: I will be the Director of Events and Promotions for the Atlanta Falcons. The Rock: What led you to make the move? Tussing : I started looking for jobs because mine wasn’t safe. I am on the low end of the totem pole. The Rock: Why does this job interest you? Tussing: I find sports so interesting because they create camaraderie. Everyone comes together to support their team and watches whether they win or lose. The Rock: Do you think you will ever teach again? Tussing: Right now, I would say no, but the nice thing about teaching is that it will always be there. The Rock: What will you miss about teaching? Tussing: I will miss the volleyball program, it’s my baby. I’ll also miss my students. The Rock: Do you think you will coach volleyball again? Tussing : I’m going to try to coach but I probably can’t teach high school so I’ll probably end up coaching competitive volleyball. compiled by Lauren Scheirman


Gay-Straight Alliance fought prejudice On top of their successful awareness week, GSA has kept busy this past year with multi-high school meetings, meeting with LGBT community speakers, and learning about world wide prejudices. “The things we have done have really been eye-opening” said member Jarrod Collins ‘11,” I think even the most open-minded person could have learned something [about prejudices members face].” Emma Kate Fittes

Free Thinkers changed perspectives There are only a dedicated few gathered in room 9350 on Thursdays. Although the club has had decreased activity since baseball season commenced (club sponsor is head baseball coach Tyler Munro), the small club of five to six members is excited for their end of the year meeting. They will be discussing if the club will have a presence at Rock Canyon next year, and what the students want to do

Vocal music has fantastic growth

with their lives in general. Club founder and president Will Ready ‘10, recalls his favorite moment of the club as the time when Munro told of the joys and splendors of being an adult. He made his speech very believable, sparking protest in the club members. When he concluded, everyone realized he was being completely sarcastic. Ready regards his experience with the club to be a positive one. Said Ready: “It’s a way of giving our lives a significant importance of opinion and self expression.” Evan Almon

Geoff (Alex Rowe ‘10) gets more then he bargained for when he opens up the cupboard and discovers soda water, sherry, and a fresh corpse (Morgan Hayes ‘12).

Every day during seventh period, the sound of 72 voices fills the music hallway as students crowd the choral room, their chairs crammed together, and sing. “Being a class of 72 was always a little hectic,” said Julia Dale, the vocal music teacher, “but they can have really great moments in their music-making.” With so many students ranging from Bass (the lowest male voice) to Soprano (the highest female voice), their voices can meld into one, and their crescendos can sound seamless. “It was a great year,” Dale said. “We had tons of growth.” Maddie Jones

Below: Andrew and Jane (Bria Pellandini ‘10) begin to get frustrated by their son-in-law’s antics. Photos by Zach Anderson

Drew Walter has found a home

To give an example for the final assignment in his Drawing and Painting classes, Drew Walter brought in a $15,000 original painting by the artist Thomas Hart Benton. The task is to depict people in a variety of states, something the artist ironically experiences while creating the very work. As for next year’s tasks, Walter plans on making his assignments a little more “open-ended,” a change from the slightly pedantic methods he admits to employing throughout this year. Previously a teacher at Douglas County High School, Walter claims to have enjoyed the environment here at Rock Canyon much more than his previous location. “Students here are a little more polite,” said Walter. “There are some very creative kids here. The facilities are much nicer as well.” Myles Wallingford

DECA participant goes big Special congratulations to Justin Fast ‘10, who got into the top 20 international finals round at the DECA Nationals Conference last week in Kentucky. Great job!

We bid you farewell The following faculty and staff have indicated that they will not be returning to RCHS next year. The Rock thanks them for their hard work, and wishes them the best in whatever place life takes them next. This list is accurate as of May 3, 2010. Lissa Cullen - English Anne Fender-Williams - English Louis Goldin - English Michael Hall - Technology Jack Kennedy - English Jennifer Langford - Social Studies Tim Marshall - Social Studies Madi McPherson - SPED Deb Nienburg - Attendance Trina Pfeiffer - Math Sharon Ryan-Benson - Attendance Suzie Tellefson - Orchestra Ashley Tussing - English/Social Studies

Theatre goes above and beyond (a joke) Quoted

"[Next year, without seniors] will be different because I've known these seniors for three years, so it will be a sad change. We will do what we always do: survive and keep putting on phenomenal plays."

"It's fun. It's really funny! It still challenges everyone because it has British accents.”

–Guillermo Arribas ‘10

–Alyssa Collins ‘13

–Hayley Zulkoski ‘11

Class of 2011 Let us capture the moment.

Call for an early season discount

“It’s just another play that I get to mess around with my friends in. “Without the seniors [next year] it might be a little chaotic because we will have to find a lot more techies.”

Five ways to say “Happy summer” 1. Gelukkige zomer Dutch 2. Glücklichen sommer German 3. Verão feliz Brazilian Portuguese 4. Lycklig sommar Swedish

www.lightwritephoto.com 303-345-4991

5. Estate felice Italian

Geoff’s situations are complicated further when the local vicar (Jacob Donaldson ‘11) stops in unexpectedly for a cup of coffee. Alex Tuccy ‘10, plays Sarah, the daffy, drunken sister of Andrew (Guillermo Arribas ‘10). Photos by Zach Anderson

if you go “Beyond a Joke”by Derek Benfield will be playing a special matinee for students on May 11 from 3:15 to 5:15 for $3. The show will then play May 12, 13, and 14 at 7 p.m. Tickets will be $5 for everyone The Cast

Andrew – Guillermo Arribas ‘10 Audrey – Jordan Fickling ‘11 and Quinn Kennedy ‘13 Jane – Bria Pellandini ‘10 Edgar – Daniel Wheeler ‘10 Geoff – Alex Rowe ’10 and Jarrod Collins ‘11 Sally – Hayley Zulkoski ‘11 Vicar– Jacob Donaldson ‘11

Congratulations, Class of 2010! Lindsey Orthodontics Gregg A. Lindsey, D.D.S. Two convenient locations: 62 N. Founders Pkwy., Unit C Castle Rock, CO 80104 Phone: 720.733.8388 7200 E. Dry Creek Road Suite #A-105 Centennial, CO 80112 Phone: 303.770.1453

We’ll give you a reason to smile!


05•06•10 cannabis

soundtrack: “Rocky mountain high” John Denver

Licensed

Cannabis professionals Mile High Medical Gardens is Located in the back of Advanced Sports Therapy off of Happy Canyon Road. Mile High Medical Gardens is owned and operated by Cassie Heckenkamp, a woman who is considered an expert in the field of cannabis. Heckenkamp recently attended a medical conference focused solely on cannabis in Rhode Island. Around 20 of the top medical cannabis professionals attended and discussed the results of research that had been conducted in the last year. Cannabis is currently one of the top controversial topics in the medical field and has the largest number of research studies conducted in comparison to other pharmaceuticals and non pharmaceuticals. “I personally witnessed live, a researcher place CBD in a petri dish containing a cancerous cell. The CBD attached to the white blood cells and ate away with in about thirty seconds. Canniboids are likely to be the first cure if any for cancer,”said Heckenkamp. by Drew Dodds

THE MEDICATED Guest Commentator

All photos by Drew Dodds

Rock Canyon parent opens dispensary

A package of edible cannabinoid medicine.

Got a minute? • Cannabinoids are contained in a variety of plants, however the Marijuana plant contains the highest percentage. • There are 66 known cannabinoids, a few well known ones include: THC, CBN, CBD and more. • THC is the cannabinoids best known for providing patients the psycho-active effects of Marijuana and pain relief. • CBN is a great anti inflammatory, helps appetite, and increases immune strength. CBN is only found in the Marijuana plant. • Every plant varies, even when two plants of the same breed are grown in the same environment they will mature differently. • CBD attaches to white blood cells and has killed cancerous cells in a petri dish on multiple occasions. •Cannabinoids nerve receptors naturally occur in the body, and differ from the dopamine receptors that most narcotics attach to. •Pills that are prescribed at the pharmacy for Marijuana only contain THC, the only way to obtain the health benefits of Marijuana is by consuming it by vaperizing, smoking, or eating. • THC binds to CB2 receptors in the brain while CBD and CBN bind to CB1 receptors that are connected to the immune system. • THC is oil based, and is not water soluble. • Marijuana does not effect the frontal lobe of the brain. • Medical Marijuana is a constitutional right, similar to freedom of speech. Compiled by Drew Dodds

05

Freshman Stacee Horwitz’s father is on the cutting edge of Medical Marijuana in Colorado. Prior to 2009 with the crash of the market and the plummet into the recession, Steve Horwitz was the owner of his own company that manufactured and sold magnets to real-estate firms. “I had a monopoly on the real-estate market in Colorado. All the magnets that people had on their refrigerators came from me.” However in 2009, the market crashed leaving many real-estate companies bankrupt, Steve’s business was no exception. “I decided at that point, after hearing a little about Medical Marijuana to open my own dispensary.” Steve used what had previously been a building that housed magnets and cubicles, to house his Marijuana dispensary restaurant. Steve had owned the building so the flip was an easy procedure, and with the flip, the first Medical Marijuana restaurant in the nation came to life. Its been proven that during times of recession, that liquor and pharmaceutical drug sales go up, so it wouldn’t be a long stretch to say that Medical Marijuana sales would as well. Steve took a bad situation and made the best of it, doing what he enjoys, helping people cure there pain through the help of Marijuana.

the couch. Sativa is a mind high upper that relieves patients of such effects as depression and ADD. Sativa stimulates the senses, and increases focus, while Indica stimulates senses, however decreases focus, and relaxes the muscles. Ganja Gourmet is not your typical dispensary, it allows for a much tastier experience for patients.

Colorado law

Legal is really just a term used by an optimist. According to state law, medical marijuana is a legal form of treatment, however federal law prohibits it. This difference in variation between state law and federal had previously posed as an issue as seen in California with multiple DEA busts on dispensaries and caregivers(growers). The majority of these busts took place under the Bush administration causing controversy. DEA reported to have shut down 30 of the 40 dispensaries in the state of California during Bush’s administration and arrested over 755 people nationwide. When Obama took office in 2008, as he had previously advocated during his campaign, he supported Medical Marijuana, “My attitude is if the science and the doctors suggest that the best palliative care and the way to relieve pain and suffering is medical marijuana, then that’s something I’m open to,” said Obama in November of 2007. On Feb 27, roughly a month and a half into his Behind the counter of term in office, Obama cronic called a cease and desist Walking into Ganja of federal agents interferGourmet you are greeted ing with state law. Since at the window of a waiting that date the amount of room similar to what you functioning dispensaries would experience at a in Colorado have been Ganja Gourmet Staff; Steve Horwitz is left center pharmacy or doctors office. increasing, with Ganja Once admitted into the Gourmet being one of them. dispensary you are greeted at the “bud bar” and handed a Only about two months ago a caregiver was arrested menu. in his house across from Sand Creek Elementary, about 10 At Ganja Gourmet patients are offered a wide variety of minutes away from Rock Canyon after going on 9News food that contains marijuana, allowing patients to gain the displaying his house. Many believed the cause for his arrest benefits of the marijuana without the downside of smoking was due to that divide between federal and state law, howit. ever he had consequently broken both. “Edibles are a completely different experience,” says “Yes, I am familiar with the incident,” said Steve. “He Steve. “you can smoke, smoke, smoke all you want but you had decided to go on 9News displaying all of his plants and will only get so high and you will end up killing your lungs, his operation, however he hadn’t checked with his attorney however with edibles you can receive the full effect of the which was dumb. He had more plants then he had a license, THC(chemical in marijuana).” causing for his arrest.” The employees at Ganja Gourmet are trained to help He was arrested on the charge of possession with the the patients find the Marijuana that best suits them in their intention to distribute. This is a prime example of why healing process. I was shown a packet that each waiter has, Medical Marijuana is a new frontier; Colorado, however, is it contained the different names of strands and what they nothing like California and the turmoil they have involved were most effective at healing. The names ranged all the with their Medical Marijuana. way from “Alaskan Thunder Struck” to “Gravity”. The two Warren Edison the author of the bill Medical Marijuana major strands are Indica and Sativa. From these two plants bill in Colorado, wrote it taking into account the failures of all other strands are created allowing certain mixes to cause California’s bill leaving Colorado with a much more solid different, however similar, effects. Indica is a term that backing, with fewer loop holes, and making Colorado the derives from the effect of the strand of Marijuana, leaving precedent of Medical Marijuana for the nation. patients with a feeling like they are being sucked down on to Drew Dodds

Walking into Karma Ceuticals, I was unsure whether or not I would be granted a license. I had talked to a few other Rock Canyon students who had obtained theirs quite easily and after receiving an English assignment on Medical Marijuana, I decided to take my paper to the next step and get a card for myself. At first I was skeptical of the ease in the process. Upon entry I was handed a fifteen page packet in which I had to fill out. I was now becoming more aware of the seriousness of the process. This was my first encounter on the premises of the dispensary, and my first consultation with a doctor. After completing my paperwork and giving copies of my ID to the secretary, I was called back into the doctor’s office. Dr. Cohen greeted me in the same way that my main physician would, inquiring about my well being and my reasoning for the appointment. I had mixed thoughts; I was not sure if he truly believed in the medical relief of Marijuana or if he was just looking to make a profit. After asking me a series of questions, he explained to me that he had diagnosed me with insomnia and chronic pain of various sorts. His prescription was for medical marijuana, and in specific, edible marijuana. After my quick ten minute appointment, I was greeted in the dispensary and given a first time deal. Ten dollars off every gram, and 10 percent off all food products. After the professionalism I experienced with the doctor, my entry into the dispensary seemed a set back from what I had previously experienced. Having an on-site doctor began to seem like a marketing scheme to reel in more customers. You can see a doctor for only 70 dollars, no insurance accepted, then ten minutes later enter a room filled with marijuana of all varieties. I support the legality of medical marijuana, however, I feel that the system needs a little honest clean up, and restriction. Half off medicine sales cards, and on site doctors are giving the business a bad name, when many are just trying to help patients rehabilitate.

A package of medical marijuana

Q&A

With Dr. Richard Cohen

Rock:Is this your every day profession? Dr. Cohen: No, this is not my typical everyday profession. I only prescribe Medical Marijuana if it will help a patient. Rock: What would you recommend for medicating using Marijuana? Dr. Cohen:Edibles are better for you, and I have heard positive feedback regarding them; however they affect everyone differently.

Rock: What strand would you recommend for specific pain such as back or migraines? Dr. Cohen: I am only aware of the benefits and effects of marijuana; the caregivers at the dispensary are the experts in that field and can help you find the right medication and dosage. Compiled by the guest commentator


06 soundtrack: “Party in the USA” Miley Cyrus

05•06•10 prom

Photo by Jenn Burton

WHAT A NIGHT Clockwise from above: Dustin Dodd ’11, on the Rock’em Sock’em trying to knock Cooper Ryburn off. “It was so much fun to fight a friend and show them who’s boss. And my mask just couldn’t stay on, I had to fix it all the time. I would have rather fought with it off, but it made me look better, so I kept it on,”said Dodd. Rachel Nickell ‘11, flipping on the Bungee Tramp. “It was really nice having after prom at the school, instead of having friends spread out at all diffrent parties.”saidl Nickell. Rachel Branson ’12, gets dragged by Dustin Dodd

‘11, when playing human tug of war. “I had no idea what to do. I was being dragged around by him. I couldn’t stand up so I just lay down,”said Branson Matt Porter’10, dips Shaina Hoday’10, at Prom. “I was really suprised when he dipped me,”said Hoday. Court Pietra ‘10, and Amanda Ross ‘10, dance together after being announced prom King and Queen. “It was really cool being the senior prom king. It’s really nice knowing that all your friends think so much of you to vote you the prom king of the senior class,”said Pietra.

Photo by Lauren Scheirmanan ++++

Photo by Lauren Scheirman

Prom and After Prom go off without a hitch thanks to Student Council and the many parents volunteers that put them together Prom night started out with valets opening your door, walking down a red carpet, and dancing with your friends for hours. Then it ended with free Qdoba, Chik-fil-a, an iPad, and enough games to keep you busy all night. Held at the EXDO Event Center, Rock Canyon’s 2010 prom and after prom was a total success. “I thought prom was fabulous! The venue was cool and kind of edgy and the staff there was amazing and helpful,” said Suzanne McKay (Teacher who attented prom). “For the most part the kids were appropriate and had a great time. It was one of the best proms I’ve been to, and I’ve been to a lot!” Driving there, I’m sure a lot of people were thinking the same thing, “Where are we?” But that was part of what made it so exciting. Students were out of the bubble and somewhere totally new. The location was fun and modern, and Student Council did an amazing job setting up. It looked like an actual club. The DJ was great as well; there wasn’t a bad song played all night.

Photo by Jenn Burton

“I loved that prom was like an actual Hollywood club,” Abby Barrofio ‘12 said, “and after prom made me feel like a little kid again. It was so fun playing all night long!” After prom was incredible, as usual, and the theme was Mile High Magic. From Red Rocks and Park Meadows to gold mines and old saloons, it was all there. There were enough activities to keep you entertained that no one was bored before it ended at 4 a.m. “It was just all so cool, I was really impressed,” Sarah Bruner ‘11 said. “Plus, I don’t know where I would have gone if there was no after prom! It was definitely worth attending.” After prom requires many volunteers who spent late hours ensuring that students have a good night, you could really tell they put a lot of effort into decorating the school. They stayed all night to make sure everyone had fun and was safe. “I have nothing going on between 12-4,” said Denise McNally (volunteer), “and I love the people working there, and I like to support the local school.” Jenn Burton

Photo by Lauren Scheirman


Gary Davis ‘10 provides comical relief for the rest of the dugout during the Littleton game. From right to left: Danny DiPetro 10, Tanner Krietemeier ‘10, Gary Davis ‘10, Reid Carter ‘10, and Chris Gibbons ‘12

Boys baseball

13-4 as of 5/3

Game

Date

Score

Outcome

Heritage

4/16

6-0

Win

Douglas County

4/21

10-8

Win

Gateway

4/26

18-8

Win

Littleton

4/28

13-0

Win

Girls lacrosse

9-3 as of 5/3

Game

Date

Score

Outcome

Grandview

4/26

23-6

Win

Valor Christian

4/27

19-0

Win

Date

Outcome

Track Meet

John Tate Cup 4/9-4/10

Girls: 1st Boys: 6th

Thomas Jefferson

20 girls in top 8 18 boys in top 8

4/16

Girls soccer

4-6 as of 5/3

Game

Date

Score

Outcome

Heritage

4/27

3-0

Loss

Gateway

4/28

10-0

Win

ThunderRidge

4/29

1-0

Loss

Boys lacrosse 3-5 as of 5/3 Game

Date

Score

Outcome

ThunderRidge

4/16

13-6

Win

Denver East

4/17

10-9

Loss

Castle View

4/20

14-12

Win

Douglas County

4/26

9-8

Win

Boys swimmingundefeated Game

Date

Outcome

Regis

4/13

Win

Heritage

4/15

Win

Cherry Creek

4/20

Win

Douglas County

4/30

Win

Boys volleyball

9-9 as of 5/3

Game

Date

Outcome

Mountain Vista

3/30

Win

2-1

Sand Creek

4/22

Win

2-0

Ponderosa

4/22

Loss

2-1

Girls tennis

1-10 as of 5/3

Game

Date

Outcome

Gateway

4/20

Win

5-1

Highlands Ranch

4/27

Loss

4-3

Ponderosa

4/28

Loss

6-1

Boys swimming

Regis boys swimming hasn’t lost at state in 15 years, and have won 15 out of the last 17 5A state meets. This year the combined Highlands Ranch team has a chance to break the trend. “We can win state this year if we all swim to our potential,” said Kyle Milberg ‘10. “We have put in the hard work and it will pay off.” Milberg is seated first in the 100 back and the 100 fly. In the 100 back he will face the national champion from Cherry Creek high school who touched Milberg in the duel meet. “It will be a very close race, he beat me by 0.3 second at our duel meet against creek,” said Milberg. Also predicted to make finals from Rock Canyon is Hunter Vanderpoel ‘11, in the 100 back and 200 free. Andrew Parker ‘12, in the 200 free and 500 free. And Lucas Karasek ‘13, in the 100 breast. Meghan Long

Girls tennis

It was a rocky season from start to finish for the girls tennis team. “We consider this season as a ‘practice season’ for us,” said Valeria Gavidia ’11. We were building up our skills so that next year we can take [the competition] by storm.” This year there are very few graduating seniors, so both junior varsity and varsity will be able to build up not only their skills but their team chemistry, in order for a state championship run next year. Though it was a difficult season for the team, they made sure to keep their spirits high and stay positive throughout. “It’s all about the mindset,” said Gavidia. “We just have to keep our heads high and focus on doing well next year.” Taylor Pettaway

Girls lax

Girls soccer scored more than just goals this year; they made friendships. Six new freshman were added to the team this season. Even though the girls did not have the best season they can still look at it positively. “Any senior would say that it was a good season because we made friendships. We just hope for the best for the girls next season,” said Torri Karst ‘10. “They are really good players. I’m really excited to watch them the next couple years.” The teams final game was last Thursday against Thunderidge. The team fell to an unlucky half field shot with 22 seconds left in the game. “It was hard to lose our last game as a senior but the overall season experience was positive,” said Karst. Lauren Scheirman

The girls of the ThunderRidge lacrosse team all love the team bonding activities that they do together. They accredit some of their success to their new found unity. Their record is 9-3, including multiple games won in the last seconds on the clock. “We have a lot of depth on our team this year. Eight different girls have scored,” said Alanna Gilbertson, head coach. At the end of this year the varsity team is loosing nine seniors compared to the three seniors that they lost last year. They can’t wait to see what the future has in store for them. “I think we are doing pretty well this season”, said Taylor Phelps ‘12, “I loved all of the fun team bonding things that we did this year and overall, lacrosse has been a lot of fun.” Sam Pusar

Girls golf

Track

The girls golf team recently lost Alex Pedrianan ‘12 due to a n injury that she suffered while playing golf. “I was on the first tee and when I was in the middle of the swing, I just heard a pop,” said Pedrianan. “I knew it was bad. It doenst’t hurt that bad,; only when I walk around a bunch.” The doctors as of this previous Tuesday believe that Pedrianan tore her Miniscus, or at the very least strained it. Pedrianan is waiting for the MRI results on her knee and the possibilty of surgery still remains. Despite the injury, the rest of the team, Allie Johnston ‘12, Carlie McCalister ‘11, Sam Lee ‘10, and Laura Gritz ‘10, have managed to regain momentum. They recently won the Highlands Ranch Golf Club Invitational last Tuesday. The team managed to take the top spot in the Invitational by compiling a total score through 18 holes of 317. Leading the team was Gritz who shot a 76. “Everything just came together,” said Gritz. “I knew I was close to doing it and had beeen for a while. It was great to finally do it.” Zach Tornabene

Tornados, blizzards, lightning storms, and hail storms have plagued the area. Numerous times, junior varsity and varsity track practice has been forced to be held inside. Due to the terrible weather, many athletes have come to practice covered in welts from the hail storms and hurricane-like winds. “The weather sprung up so quickly, we were literally running for cover!” said Megan Sajbel ’11. Although three meets have been cancelled due to bad weather, the girls team managed to pull off their first ever first place finish at the John Tate Cup in Pueblo. “We were all really excited to finally win something, especially the senior girls who are leaving this year. We have been waiting a long time for this. We should all be very proud,” said Sajbel. Sara Heyn

Boys volleyball

In the previous seasons, the RC boys volleyball team has always been combined with students from Mountain Vista; however, this year, the jags finally stood alone. “Beating Vista was the monumental moment of the season,” said Coach Ashley Tussing. “Vista always brags about how much better they are and how they would beat us.” The boys were overwhelmed with excitement. “It was a great game,” said Tussing. “We just like to have fun. We just like to enjoy ourselves and go with the flow.” Caley Pavillard

Girls soccer

Boys lacrosse

After the Jags lacrosse team clinched a playoff seed with a win in the final regular season game, all they could do was wait and see what position they received. On Monday, the playoff seeding came out and the #20 Jags were matched up with the #13 Monarch Coyotes. Because the Jags are not the higher seed, they will play away next Friday. The day seeds were announced, head coach Goldin was absent but the team had a fun and constructive practice headed by coach Bob Diehl. “Practices are extremely important

because we need to be able to relax,” said Cooper Ryburn ‘11. “We need to be able to focus on what we need to do in order to play our best.” The team knows that if they play a sound game, there are ways they can beat the higher seeded Monarch. “On defense we need to get to all of the ground balls,” said Ryburn. “We need to complete our clears, and just overall play a sound defensive game.” If the Jags move past the Coyotes, they will play one of the top eight seeds. Zach Tornabene


08 soundtrack: “Lean on Me” Bill Withers

05•06•10 baseball

Top left; Ty Wiest ‘13. Top right; seniors Tanner Krietemeier, Danny Dipetro, and Stevie Rodriguez. Above right; Chris Gibbens ‘12 . Bottom right; Coach Brian Givens and Tanner Krietemeier. Center; seniors Reid Carter and Gary Davis. Above left; Danny Dipetro and Matt Gilbert ‘11. Bottom left; Erik Wetzel ‘10. All photos by Caley Pavillard.

band of brothers

Ten years ago, six 8-year-olds on a Little League team learned how to swing a bat and run around bases. Today, the same six boys stand together on the field for their last season of baseball together. They’ve learned that it’s about the little things. Each strike, each ball that misses the glove of the outfielders, and each miniscule error can drastically turn the tide of the game. And for those seniors, it’s more than their last season of baseball – it’s their last season as best friends, their last season as a family.

Loveland After six successful games, the team of fifteen walks onto the field on an early April morning, hoping to secure a seventh win. Only this time they bring a 16th member: Woompus the jaguar, the team mascot and squeaking dog toy that hangs right next to the scratched bats. “Batters, rub Woompus on the way to the plate to get your mojo up,” yells outfield coach Steve Tschetter. “Pick your heads up. This is when we find out what you’re made of,” says Tschetter in the huddle before the Jaguars clack out of the dugout and pick up their bats. It’s time to battle. It’s the 4th inning and the Jags are trailing 6-1.

“We’re gonna have to earn this one,” Gary Davis ‘10, mumbles as he paces the dugout. Lead off hitter Steven Rodriguez ’10, singles. A few of the boys sing out “I Gotta Feeling” by the Black Eyed Peas in celebration. Stevie steals second. Reid Carter ‘10, drives a single to center, allowing Stevie to score, bumping the score to 6-2. A few hitters later, and the bases are loaded with two outs. Gary’s single brings Bryce (Bubba) Campbell ’10 sliding home from third: 6-3. Then, senior Drew Sandlin singles Reid home: 6-4. And finally, Austin Enterline’s single scores Tanner. It’s 6-5 going into the 6th. “This is us unleashing,” says the catchers’ coach Darren Withey. But Loveland comes back with three runs in the sixth, and the 9-5 score remains ominously on the scoreboard going into the 7th inning. The only freshman on the senior-dominated team, Ty Wiest, starts off the 7th inning with something that dispels the seriousness of the situation. The wind sends his hat flying, and as he chases it from the dugout to homeplate, all the seniors laugh. “That’s a true freshman move,” chuckles Charlie (Chuck) Newton ’10. Reid’s flies out, but seniors Erik Wetzel, Tanner, and Gary all single, loading the bases. Drew’s hit sends Erik home: 9-6. Austin’s single sends Tanner home: 9-7. Gary

Reported by Caley Pavillard and Kate Ready

scores, but Kris Brown ‘11, fans for the second out. Stevie steps to the plate,with runners on 2nd and 3rd. His hard ground ball glances off the shortstop’s glove and both runners score for an improbable 10-9 win. The dugout empties, and Stevie is lifted on the shoulders of two of his teammates. The rest of the team reaches the boys, jumping one by one on top of each other into a dog pile and squashing Stevie. “We showed that we can play the game hard and overcome the adversity in baseball,” says head coach Tyler Munro. “We need to take this momentum against Highlands Ranch.” Once the field empties, everyone knows that it was their talent, their team dynamic, and energy that won the game for them. Or, just maybe, it was Woompus. Ranch Highlands Ranch is the first team conference game and the Falcons are not intimidated by the Jags 8-0 record. The nine seniors have been working together for years to beat Ranch, and this is their last chance. “I hope you didn’t think they weren’t gonna play hard,” says Tschetter as the Jags are down 3-2 in the fifth inning. “It don’t mean a thing if you don’t take a swing.” Gary doubles in the seventh inning and is sent home by senior Keith Link’s line drive to center. Keith tries to stretch to a double, and is out in a close play for the third out.


05•06•10 baseball

soundtrack: “We are the Champions” Queen

The game goes into extra innings tied 3-3. In the top of the eighth, Tanner gets in trouble with the bases loaded, but gets the third out on a pop out. “This is something special,” says Munro. “This is what our year is all about right here. This is the moment you guys have been waiting for.” The boys are so close to beating Ranch for the first time. “Magic guys, this is magical,” Withey says to the team as Ranch’s new pitcher warms up, attempting to intimidate the boys. “We need a lot of energy here. Your energy is either positive or negative, there’s no in between and we need it to be positive right now. Don’t let them get to you.” Neither team pulls through to score in the 8th, 9th, or 10th. “Battle and grind,” says coach Tschetter to Reid, stepping in as the relief pitcher for Tanner. “We all got your back, we got ya covered. Let’s mash this inning so we can go home.” But Ranch erupts for four runs in the top of the 11th. Their energy vanishes along with the stands that were filled just thirty minutes ago. They’ve lost hope. “This is the best game in the world,” says Munro attempting to empower his team. “It’s time to show everyone you guys can play baseball.” Gary steps up. He strikes out. Drew steps up. He strikes out. “You’re going to have to figure something out,” says Tschetter. “You gotta swing the damn thing. It’s like going to dinner, ordering a steak, and walking out. Swing the damn bat.” Austin Enterline is sent to the plate. “If it gets to the point where we have to shake their hands after a loss, keep it classy boys,” says Tschetter. Austin’s fly ball is caught. The third out and a broken record all in one. Disappointment settles on the faces of all fifteen players. “This will be the hardest game to lose,” says Erik. “We never beat them in our four year career. That was really tough to lose that close of a game to them.” “If anything that one should sting. You’re gonna be pissed at yourself,” says Munro. “You had that moment right there and you didn’t embrace it or seize it. There’s not much to talk about. It was one hell of a game.”

From left; Kris Brown ‘11, and seniors Charlie Newton, Tanner Krietemeier, Reid Carter, Erik Wetzel and Stevie Rodriguez celebrate in the dugout as the team leads 13-0 in the Littleton game. “Our team has such a good relationship because we have been together for so long. We trust eachother in everything we do,”said Charlie Newton. “Our job in the dugout is to support the boys who are out on the field and to keep each others spirits up when we make mistakes. It’s great to have someone say ‘hey go get the next one and turn the page on the next play.’” Photo by Caley Pavillard.

You’re going to have to figure something out. You gotta swing the damn thing.

ThunderRidge The close-knit team is falling apart on the ThunderRidge field. “We can’t play catch,” says hitting coach Brian Givens while watching the fourth inning. “Can anybody play catch? It’s baseball!” The coaches’ frustration is mounting, along with the players’ as the score reads 9-3, with four of those ThunderRidge runs scored in the first inning. “We’re down but we’re not out, guys,” says Gary, as he paces through the line of fuming boys. The scoreboard is not reflecting their talent, and they all know it. “We’re hitting it right to them,” says Givens when Tanner steps back into the dug out. “We’re hitting right to them and they’re hitting it in the gaps.” Chuck steps onto the pitcher’s mound in the sixth inning but silence resonates from the dugout once again. “Look like you want to play!” yells Tschetter to the disheartened boys. But it’s too late. The game ends early, with ThunderRidge leading by ten at the end of the sixth. Mitts are chucked into the dugout, helmets and equipment are thrown. For the first time all season, there will be no seventh. “You have no clue how often you’re gonna be humbled,” says Munro to a huddle of kneeling and disappointed boys. “How you respond to these challenges show your true colors as a team, and you all gave up. We need to turn the page and regroup. It’s all 15 of us together, all season.” Heritage Right behind home plate, five major league scouts stand uniformly in a line, radar guns in hand, focusing on the team’s ace pitcher, Tanner. “I try to clear my mind and not think,” says Tanner. “When you think you can over think what needs to be done.” Tanner averages 91 mph, just one of the reasons he will be pitching for Nebraska

Meet the players

Reid Carter ‘10, watches the flight of the ball during the 6-0 win over Heritage. “Reid is exactly like Ichiro. He slaps the ball and forces the defense to make plays, which is deadly,”said Erik Wetzel. “He’s a typical lead off hitter and gets on base like he’s supposed to.” Reid will be attending the University of Nebraska-Omaha on a baseball scholarship next year. Photo by Caley Pavillard.

Reid Carter

Tanner Krietemeier

Pitcher/ Outfielder

Pitcher/ Outfielder

“Reiders”

09

“TiKi” or “Tannemeier”

next spring. “A baseball doesn’t hurt… unless it’s thrown by Tanner,” says Chuck. True to form, Tanner registers three quick strikeouts in the first inning. “Talk it up,” he says as Reid walks up to home plate. “Get in the game.” Reid leads off with a flyout, sending him back to the dugout. “Let everybody know what you saw Reider,” says Tschetter. Each game the first hitters out will fill the team in on the pitchers style hoping to help their teammates. The third inning swings around and Ty, batting first, doubles. “That a baby, fresh!” yells Tanner. Reid singles, sending Ty to third. Moments later, the fence shakes as the team shouts “back!” when the Heritage pitcher attempts to pick him off. “We always have each other’s back,” says Erik. “We all trust each other to make the plays that we should make or we always help one another if we see a play that needs to be made. That’s why our team chemistry is so good.” Tanner lines to left center and takes advantage of a small bobble to reach second. “Wow, Tanner read that perfectly,” says Bubba. “If you want to be a good baseball player, just watch Tanner,” says Tschetter, realizing that many on the team do, especially Ty. “Tanner’s a great leader,” says Ty. “I look up to him because of his success and attitude on the field. He is very competitive and is always trying to make everyone better.” Although he is the only freshman on a seniordominated team, Ty feels comfortable playing with his teammates. “When I was a freshman I made some stupid decisions that I still regret today,” says Tanner. “I took Ty under my wing because I know that he has great potential and athletic ability that will get him far. I don’t want to see him make the same mistakes that I did. I want him to get to where I know he can be someday. We all look after him like a younger brother and care about what he does.” The Jags continue to hit the ball well, making the score 5-0 when Ty slides home, around the tag on a single by Chirs Gibbons ‘12. “Bunny, you’ve gone mad,” yells Bubba. (The team calls Ty “WeisterBunny.”) Tanner later drives Stevie home– final score: 6-0. “It’s the first time we’ve ever beaten Heritage,” says Tschetter. “It’s a good win.” Final Push The last regular season game brings the team to Chaparral, feeling good about their earlier back-to-back wins over Littleton, 13-0, and Gateway, 18-8. They have secured their place in the 4A playoffs, but today they’re fighting for something bigger: the number one seed. The Jags lead 2-0 at the end of the third inning.

Erik Wetzel “E Wetz” Shortstop

Ty Wiest

“Weisterbunny” Pitcher

“That’s good baseball, there we go,” says Bubba after Matt Gilbert ‘11, scores the second run. But when Chaparral scores three in the fourth inning, Munro calls everyone into the dugout. “We have played four years for this,” he says to the panting boys. “And now we’re playing like we don’t want this. I want this more than anything, that’s why I put my life into this. If you guys want to be the number one seed, you’re going to have to play better than this.” Nodding, the boys file out of the dugout and back onto the field, their spirits renewed. “Play defense,” yells Givens. “And get back in it, stop complaining.” By the end of the 5th, the Jags have pulled even, 4-4, but this is when the “little things” of baseball start to haunt them. Two passed balls allow Chap to take a 6-4 lead. “How resilient are we?” asks Munro to the energized dugout. The answer is clear. A single by Erik sends Gary home, but two outs later the score is 6-5. Ty is up, with two outs. “Time to shine,” Chuck yells. “Come on, fresh.” Drew steals second, and Ty delivers a double, tying the score 6-6. The Jags load the bases, but can’t push another run across. Reid comes in to pitch the bottom of the 7th. “It was all up to me; the pressure was the main part of the situation,” recalls Reid about this moment. “But I try to keep my composure no matter the situation.” A walk and a single are sandwiched around two outs. The next hitter drives the ball to center, just out of the reach of a diving Tanner, and Chap celebrates a 7-6 win. “Let’s do ten quick,” says Munro after the game. The boys start running, and after ten, they stop. “Three more,” says Tschetter. “Go hard. That run was for the eighth inning. How hard are you going to go in the ninth inning? We’re in the playoffs, boys. Go hard! The next run is for the tenth: Are you going to go hard enough to win it in playoff games?” The exhausted boys finally take a knee. “For seniors, I want you to remember when you were sophomores and we were 3-15 and we didn’t know how to deal with adversity,” says Munro. The boys listen intently. “I wanted a playoff atmosphere today,” coach continues. “I wanted to feel that today. It took us a while to get there, and we all know we should’ve won. We can’t change it, but we can change how we’re going to react to it. I believe in this team, I believe we’re the best in this league. I think we’re better from being in this league and now we lead in playoffs. “We’ve been knocked down for so many years and we’re still here because we are only out when we quit believing in ourselves,” Munro says. “Monday is a brand new season. It’s playoffs. Keep your heads high. I’m proud of you.” Team members head back to the dugout to pack up, full of mixed emotions. Play-offs will begin soon, but there’s something about the end of the regular season. “Leaving this team is going to be leaving a huge part of me,” says Reid. “All of my best friends are on this team and it’s one of the hardest things to know it’s all over soon.” “It will feel weird to leave all of my friends,” says Erik. “But we’ve had some good times and it’s time to move onto the next level.” In baseball, it’s all about the little things. Missing a catch by inches could lose you a game, and hitting a ball centimeters too far could result in a foul. The “little things” bound nine seniors who completed a journey that began in elementary school. A freshman found brothers who helped him realize his true potential, and coaches let go of boys they’ve watched grow for four years. No matter how the play-offs end up, this team leaves behind the most successful baseball season in Rock Canyon history.


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05•06•10 senior salute

soundtrack: “Don’t stop believin’ ” Journey

Salutetotheseniors A 16-page pullout dedicated to the class of 2010 with profiles of many seniors, commentaries from some seniors, and a list of where everyone is going next year.

A lot has changed since this graduating class was born. Besides elcecting our first black president, President Reagan died, and several wars in the Middle East, iPods were invented! Here is a brief look at some of the fun things that have happened in the last 18 years, with a pinch of satyr sprinkled in. class of 2010 was born. 1992 The Reebok shoes gambles $25 million on Dan O’Brian in the Olympics. They lost.

Nye the Science Guy begins his show. Basic 1993 Billscience education has reached new heights.

1994 1995

Sony introduces the PlayStation. Young minds everywhere are slowly brainwashed into an addicting cycle of sitting on the couch and button mashing. Dolly the sheep is the first mammal to be cloned. Soon after that nobody cared and continued eating lamb chops.

class of 2010 entered kindergarten!!! 1996 The Also, Princess Diana was killed in a car crash. Clinton did not have sexual relations with that 1998 Billwoman. On another note, congrats to Mr. Clinton for getting with an attractive young intern.

Fanning releases the Napster file sharing 1999 Shawn service and MP3 files. Later hard core, stick it to the

class of 2010 enters Rock Canyon. 2005 The Call of Duty 2 is released, thus giving gamers

first season of “Survivor”happened and 51 2000 The million people tuned in to watch strangers make

purchases Youtube for $1.65 billion. Also, 2006 Google 1.65 billion people watched funny videos of cats.

man, head-banging, metal band Metallica was upset that their fans are not always law abiding.

2001 2002

fire. After great panic, there was not a nuclear holocaust at midnight of the new year. “Final Fantasy: the Spirits Within”is the first attempt at a 3-D feature film. Nerds everywhere partied like it was 1999. After slight panic there was no nuclear holocaust. Kelly Clarkson is sent to superstardom thanks to American Idol and millions of fans. Good job Ms. Independent!

of 2010 enters middle school. 2003 Class MySpace is founded. Finally counterculture preteens have a place to vent their angst.

2004

Ken Jennings ends his Jeopardy streak with $2,520,700 to pocket on the way out. Brooke Skinner is elected president of the eighth grade class.

everywhere the right to start anticipating Call of Duty 3.

million people watch “High School Musical 2007 17.2 Two”on TV. They all learned valuable lessons about getting their heads in the game.

trillion text messages sent world wide. The 2008 2.5majority only said, Hi, LOL, or JK LMFAO. Jackson died. I no longer know what to 2009 Michael think when I see the man in the mirror. of 2010 graduates! 2010 Class First edition of “Superman”issue 1 sells for

$1,000,000. Buyer gets lots of confused looks. Sources: www.historyofscience.com/g2i/timeleine www.islandnet.com www.thepeoplehistory.com Compiled by Alex Rowe and Emma Kate Fittes

11


12 soundtrack: “Angel” Sarah McLachlan

05•06•10 senior salute

Healing over time It is quite a monumental moment for a father to take a picture with his baby girl at her senior prom or to see her receive her high school diploma on graduation day. However experiencing those moments with your father is not something one really thinks about until it’s no longer possible. On Nov. 3, 2006 Brent Webber was diagnosed with a malignant brain tumor (Glioblastoma), devastating his wife Cara, and two daughters Brittney and Carli. Three days later he was in surgery, his situation changing the life of his high school daughter Brittney and family. “I really didn’t understand what was going on so I kind of ignored it and thought everything would work out,” said Brittney. After extensive radiation and chemotherapy the Webber family believed he made it to remission after almost 18 months of being cancer free. However a second tumor appeared. “This time it hit my family hard. I remember my dad and mom coming home from his doctor’s appointment and telling me and my sister to come sit in the family room,” said Brittney. “He broke out into tears and that was the first time in my whole life I had ever heard my dad cry.” Brittney proceeded to cry for the first time in 18 months, since her dad was initially diagnosed. Doctors went about treatment very different than they did for Brent’s first tumor. Instead of removing the tumor, doctors inserted small radiation seeds around the tumor which would dramatically reduce and destroy the cancer. The radiation seeds not only affected Brent but the entire family. “We had to keep a good six foot distance from him at all times due to the mass amounts of radiation that came out of his head,” said Brittney. “What sucked even more was that these seeds lasted a whole year so if we ever wanted to hug or sit next to my dad he had to wear a lead hat that blocked the radiation from getting to us.” Another year passed and the cancer shrunk in size and completely disappeared, giving the Webber family hope. On May 6, 2009 Brent had a stroke and cancer was found once again in his body, this time in the front of his brain, an inoperable area. This was a complete devastation to the entire family. At the end of June, Brittney’s dad was put in hospice care where he had his own hospital bed in the house and a nurse that checked on him daily. “It was really hard to see my dad become completely immobile,” said Brittney. “My mom, sister, and I fed him because he couldn’t lift a spoon and direct the food into his mouth.” Just one month later at the end of July, his condition worsened to the point that he couldn’t swallow food, talk, or move any muscle in his body. “I remember coming home late at night on July 28 and just weeping over my father’s body, praying to God

Carli Webber ‘13, Brent Webber, and Brittney in a family photo early last summer. Brittney and her sister have a very close relationship, not only with their dad but with each other. “As we have grown together I remember always wanting to be like her. I always wanted to hang out with her and her friends and go where ever they were going. I wanted to wear her clothes and look like her,”said Carli. “I was her little sister just wanting to follow in her footsteps. I hope now, she is just as proud of me as I am of her. I hope I was just as strong through the years, like B was, because she is who I look up too, she is who I want to be like.”

Prepare for failure, seniors CLOSING

I am not going to get nostalgic about high school, I am going to worry about college. I don’t know why more people don’t worry, because none of us are ready. We are all going to leave this place, this safe haven for the ignorant, and when we do make it out there to the real world we might as well give up because all we will ever know is failure. We are going to be given our fake diplomas at graduation and then, BAM! We are prey for the hawks of reality. Just give it time, we are all going to crash and burn. Sugarcoating is all we have ever received here at Rock Canyon, so I am going to step out of the box of nice, tasty, sweet, delicious words of encouragement to give you the truth; consider this commentary my senior gift. This graduating class is going to be pushed into the ocean of well trained mercenary fish and we will indeed be fighting for our lives. Most of us will lose, figuratively speaking, and when we do there will be no one to blame except for Barack Obama. Make the connections, people; he gets into office and we are torn away from the teet that is high school into the real world of lions and bears and told to fend for ourselves. Who else is to blame? I am just asking questions… There is definitely a breaking point where it is of course easier to be cynical than optimistic. That doesn’t make it right or any better, often times being cynical is just a way to avoid actually being decisive on anything life has rolled our way. I for one tend to be a relatively cynical person, and guess what, I hate it. Generally speaking I use my cynicism to compensate for some lack of actual knowledge or effort, and it really is miserable. Look, this school prepares us as well as we let it. If none of us work hard for anything we will never achieve anything. It is as simple as that. We can’t blame Rock Canyon for any success or failure after we leave this establishment, by that point any responsibility for our actions will actually rest on our shoulders. We can’t blame Obama, we can’t blame the cushy environment of Highlands Ranch, we can only blame ourselves. Don’t try to blame anyone else for your failure unless you are willing to attribute your success to them too. Just work hard, actually dedicate yourself to something, and invest your mind and soul to whatever that something may be. If you end up failing, which you most likely will, who cares? Consider it a momentary setback for a bigger life accomplishment. All I have to say is don’t make excuses, and that goes for everyone. Work hard, be kind, accept the responsibility of life, and things will find a way of working themselves out. Good luck, everyone.

THOUGHTS Curtis Stuck

Family facts • Carli was on JV Cheerleading this past season, while Brittney has been a Pom for the past four years. • “Survivor”was the family’s favorite TV show. • The family used to go mountain biking together often. • They love water sports and boating. • They have a dog named Auggie. • Each family member loves to work out. Compiled by Caley Pavillard

Blades of glory For Conor McCue, his years at Rock Canyon have been filled with academic rigor and a constant flow of hockey. While striving to achieve the highest GPA he could personally attain, Conor also gave a lot of his free time to hockey practice between two different teams, and still had a lot of fun during his remaining time. Conor was not able to play for Rock Canyon Ice Hockey freshman year due to being injured on his AA competitive travel club team, the Arapahoe Warriors, prior to the season. Sophomore year he was able to play for both Rock Canyon and Arapahoe and thoroughly enjoyed the hectic season. Junior year, however, his club team made it to Nationals, and so Conor decided that he should focus primarily on this newly presented opportunity, and ended up not playing for the Jaguars on ice. “ Junior year is tough enough as it is, and I just felt like I needed to focus primarily on this opportunity presented to my team, dedicating all of my time to practicing so that we could perform our absolute best at nationals,” Conor said. Senior year, Conor was ready to play full throttle for both Rock Canyon and Arapahoe. While being a captain for Rock Canyon, Conor and the Warriors were once again graced with the opportunity to play in the National Tournament. Although Conor was juggling quite the workload in school, while combating the infamous Senioritis, he decided that this is his Senior year and that he wanted to bid farewell by doing something epic. Not only did he maintain his grades with excellence, and continue leading as a captain on the school hockey team, but the warriors also finished an impressive run at the National title in quadruple overtime in the quarter finals. “Although the defeat was hard to endure after a grueling battle for victory, I am extremely proud with how far we made it,” said Conor. Leading the Jags on ice, the season has yielded two wins, seven losses, and one tie. “The conference has been a bit of a struggle, but as a team we are holding our own,” said Conor. “ We are a lot better than anyone ever expected.” Playing with good friends and fellow seniors AJ Nuss ‘10, and Court Pietra ‘10, with a selective group of other talented hockey players composing the varsity team, Conor said, “We are not very deep compared to other teams, but we are performing the best we can.”

that he would take my father and release him from his pain,” said Brittney. “I didn’t even care if it was on my birthday.” (Brittney’s birthday is July 28) July 31, 2009 at 5:45 p.m. the cancer took Brent’s life. “We didn’t call the morgue until 7:00 because we wanted to have what little time we could left with him,” said Brittney. “It’s definitely something you don’t forget, holding a limp cold hand and watching your father become pale and lifeless, but I know that everything happens for a reason and he is now happy and cancer free in heaven and I couldn’t ask for anything more.” One night, Brent had a dream that God came to him in the form of a monarch butterfly and wrapped his wings around him. “My dad told us that the dream meant everything was going to be okay,” said Brittney. “My mom decided at his celebration we would release 100 monarch butterflies after the service representing my dad’s release and that he has now made it to heaven.” The Webber’s found out just weeks later that butterflies, according to the ancient Greeks, were the souls of those who have passed away. The seriousness of her father’s illness really hit Brittany hard her junior year. “I decided that I would try really hard in school so that my parents would have one less thing to worry about,” said Brittney. “My Junior year ended up being my best year of high school since I found some amazing friends and my grades were the best I had ever gotten in my life.” Brittany ended her junior year with a 4.0 weighted GPA. “Brittney was always positive and had an optimistic outlook about her dad’s death,” said her close friend Bri Johnson ‘10. “She never let it drag her down.” Not only was Brittney inspiring to her friends, but she was now the role model to her younger sister Carli who is now a freshman. “Britt has been such a role model in my life, I don’t even think she realizes it. She stayed strong through everything, or i only saw the strong side of her. It was like she never wanted to let me see her when she was upset, and I admire that,” said Carli. “Through my dad’s illness she still managed to live her life to the fullest. She received great grades, had leadership abilities, her poms team won two state titles, and she made many friends. I can honestly say that her accomplishing all these things while our dad was dying from cancer is how I know she is the strongest girl out there. ” Brittney will graduate high school earning four Varsity Poms letters, winning two State Championships, and leading her team as Varsity Captain her senior year. Brittney has struggled living without a father but thanks God each and every day because she knows her dad is with her in spirit. The Webber family has finally begun to rebuild strength. As Brittney said, “We have really found a healing through God and all the miracles he does.” Caley Pavillard

I know that everything happens for a reason and he is now happy and cancer free in heaven and I couldn’t ask for anything more.

Photo by Alex Rowe

AJ,who plays Goalie for the team confidently states, “I have been playing on teams with Conor since around middle school, and I can honestly say he is the most reliable defender any Goalie could ask for, I am never too worried when I have him on the ice.” Conor will be attending University of Colorado at Boulder next year, and his passion for hockey will continue to thrive as he is planning to play club league at CU, or just play intramural if he can not balance hockey with his collegiate endeavors. Conor said, “I am just really checked out of High School and excited to leave home to find out what life has in store for me, but I also have to keep my head up and finish up strong.” As Conor’s high school career comes to an end, he feels like he could not be more proud of what he has accomplished and he is anxious to find out what he can conquer in the future. Evan Almon


05•06•10 senior salute

soundtrack: “Who let the dogs out” Baha Men

Volunteering for a future

The first day Jami Becker walked into the Animal Care Center of Castle Pines, she knew that was where she wanted to be. It was her freshman year of high school that she realized she could make a career out of her lifelong passion for animals through veterinary medicine. “I started volunteering there my freshman year,” Jami said. “At first I only did it because I needed community service for college and it seemed like a fun way to get it.” “We were using that vet for our dog Luke,” said Lori Becker, Jami’s mother. “And we saw the clinic everyday since she was going to dance near there.” Jami started by filing papers, then cleaning up after the animals, and progressing to observing operations. “I remember seeing my first surgery,” said Jami. “It was a huge tumor removal. I got so dizzy from the blood but thankfully I got over that.” “One day, she went on a large animal call for a horse that had been attacked by a porcupine,” said Lori. “She watched as they sedated the horse in order to take the quills out.” Jami’s passion for animals was seen not only in the clinic, but at home as well. “I remember when we lived in Pennsylvania, a tagged pigeon landed on our deck,” said Lori. “And Jami spent so much time trying to find out where and how to return this pigeon! So our whole family has always taken animals very seriously and compassionately.” Once Jami worked with veterinarians up close, she was hooked. “She absolutely loved it, she would wake up every Saturday morning at 7:30 am with no complaints,” said Lori.” She loved going.” Jami volunteered her freshman, sophomore, and junior years of high school every saturday, and contributed most of the summer before her senior year to volunteering. In the end, Jami received over 220 hours for her volunteering at the clinic. “Unfortunately, I couldn’t volunteer my senior year due to varsity cheer and AP classes,” said Jami. Jami is planning to go into veterinary medicine for the future at Tulane University in Louisiana. “I’m majoring in biology and minoring in business,” Jami said. “Not a lot of people know the business side of a veterinary practice so that’s why I’m minoring in it.” “Tulane has a great pre-professional program for her final destination of getting into vet school,” Lori said. Jami’s advice for underclassmen is to volunteer before picking a career in order to know what you’re

Fashion savvy A few months ago, Laura Gritz traded in her faded jeans and ice cream stained shoes for skirts and boots. With her upgrade in employment from Ben and Jerry’s to Steve Madden came a visible upgrade in not only her fashion, but in her personality as well. Laura had always been a quiet girl, but she knowing that she would have to improve her attitude to help her sell stand-out shoes intimidated her. “It was really tough at first. There was so much to learn, and it took me a while to get comfortable providing customers with personal service,” explained Laura. Though the task of expanding her comfort levels was daunting, she took the challenge face on, and as she gained experience working at Steve Madden, Laura also gained experience dressing for the job. “Laura has become a lot more fashionable since starting here,” said her manager Christen Munoz. “She really knows how to accessorize an outfit from head to toe.” It has been said that imitation is a form of flattery, and though Laura doesn’t mimic those she works with, she definitely looks up to them. “I used to dress all American Eagle, but I’ve taken a lot of advice from the people I work with. Now I look for complementary shapes and dress a lot more high fashion. I’m always looking at what the other girls are wearing and making their looks my own,” said Laura. “The girls here are like my sisters. I’ve learned how to talk to people and really be able to connect with them,” said Laura. “Because of their help, it’s a lot easier to start conversations out of nowhere, and that will help me with anything I do in life.” Since beginning at Steve Madden, Laura has not only learned how to sell shoes and dress more individually, but has also learned the life views of the older people she works with. “They’ve helped me to learn that you really do only live once. I’m taking that mindset with me next year as I go to CSU, and to the world beyond. I look forward to travelling, especially through Europe, and experiencing other cultures. It’s a big step out of anyone’s comfort zone to travel far away, but after abandoning my comfort zone at Steve Madden, I feel prepared for anything life may throw my way.” Rachel Curtright

13

Photo by Alex Rowe

Dealing with change

getting into. “It was really helpful for me to see what veterinarians do because there are a lot of things about every career that you may not know about,” said Jami. “Witnessing the career first hand really helped me to know that it was what I wanted to do, and that being a vet was the career for me.” Kate Ready

Fast facts

• Jami works on average four hours a week at the vet’s office. • Jami’s favorite kind of dog is a Labrador, like her dog Luke. • Four veterinarians work at the Animal Care Center that she volunteers at. Compiled by Evan Almon

From Legos to lunettes While her peers played with barbies and bubbles, Erin Oehm and her brothers played with legos. From little plastic blocks, they would build everything from skyscrapers to village homes. “When I was little I wanted to be a million different things, but even as a kid my interest in architecture and design was always there,”said Erin. “I was always meticulous with my creations and made sure that everything was perfect and beautiful.” Her love of designing and building, along with her natural talent in math is what inspired Erin to go into architecture. Erin plans to go to Kansas State University and complete their fiveyear masters program in the College of Architecture Planning and Design. “The program crams six years of undergraduate and graduate material into five years, so I will complete my undergrad in three years and for the final two years I complete all my graduate course work,” said Erin. Though excited to be attending one of the top ranked schools for architecture in the nation next fall, Erin also has some fears about the course load. “I’m terrified because I have an uncle who tried to go through the same program but ended up switching his major cause it was way too hard,” said Erin. “He also tells me that I will be sacrificing quite a bit of my social life for this, but I think it could be worth it.” Ade Eichie

Erin Oehm shows a Lego creation she constructed during class one day. Photo by Ade Eichie

Kristen Cole started her freshman year at Albert M. Lowry High School in Winnemucca, Nevada. She spent her first two years of high school there playing freshman and JV volleyball, running Varsity track, and participating in National Honor Society. He sophomore year Kristen was a part of the drama class and performed in two plays, “Get Smart” and “The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe.” “Being in drama was the best part about my sophomore year,” she said. “I love to act and we had a lot of fun.” Kristen planned on being in Drama for the remainder of her high school years, but toward the end of her sophomore year, Kristen learned that her father was switching positions in the company he worked for. Kristen was leaving Winnemucca. “I was thrilled [about leaving]. I mean, I was sad because that was my home but I didn’t want to be there anymore.” Her family was going to relocate to Colorado. The family would relocate in time for the new school year and Kristen and her sister would attend Rock Canyon in the fall of her junior year. However, Kristen didn’t make it to RCHS that year. Instead of accepting the job in Colorado, Kristen’s father took a job at Freeport McMoRan Copper and Gold Inc, in Arizona. “I cried. I was not happy about that at all,” Kristen said. “It didn’t sound appealing to me. I’m not sure why, I just didn’t want to go there, but it ended up being the best thing ever.” In the middle of June, two weeks after school was dismissed, the Cole family moved to a suburb of Phoenix. After settling into their new house, Kristen enrolled at Highland High School. A school with over 5,000 students and a reputation of excellence. “I was intimidated by Highland. They were a 5A school and were probably better in sports,” she said. “I was going from having a class of around 200 to a class of around 800.” Although intimidated, Kristen still managed to make friends quickly and adjust to the new environment. “I soared like a hawk at Highland High school, “ Kristen said jokingly. “I met all the best friends that I have now. It was the best school I’ve ever been to.” Unfortunately, Highland didn’t last long when Kristen’s father returned to the job he would’ve had before moving to Gilbert. The family moved, once again, to Castle Pines North. “[The move] was disappointing, but at that point, I didn’t really feel anything about it,” she said. As she entered her senior year in school, Kristen had to adjust to the a new environment again, while trying to prepare for college. “I was not happy about going to Rock Canyon,” Kristen said. “I wanted to graduate from Highland. I had my sister and my brother, but I felt alone, depressed, and scared; I didn’t want to be there. But I still met some amazing people, friends, and teachers. But if we had not moved here, I would not be going to ASU.” Kristen found that Rock Canyon had no effect on her college acceptances. She was admitted into all three universities that she applied to: Gonzaga, Northern Arizona University, and Arizona State. She decided on ASU, and will be majoring in Genetics, Cell and Developmental Biology. “Since I was ten, I wanted to be a lawyer, I wasn’t sure what kind of lawyer, I just knew I wanted to be a lawyer. After I took Anatomy, I wanted to be a doctor, the first Dr. Cole, but my friend told me to go on and be a lawyer and after contemplating it and decided to major in genetics, but still leave law school open. It’s the best of both worlds.” Reflecting back on her high school years, Kristen finds herself more sure of who she is and the knowledge to handle various situations that most people don’t learn how to handle until later in life. “You can’t fight change,” said Kristen. “If you do, you’ll just end up unhappy and that’s no fun for anybody.” Amber Cole


14 soundtrack: “Faith” George Michael

05•06•10 senior salute Photo by Alex Rowe

Forged by faith Ashton Fairchild’s high school career and his entire life has been continuously shaped and influenced by the Mormon Church. Almost every school day for the past four years, Ashton has has been at school for seminary with fellow Mormon students long berfore most other people are even out of their houses. “The Church is what makes me.... me. Everything I do is influenced by the Church,” said Ashton. “It has helped me in every aspect of my life, [strengthening] my work ethic, [motivating] me to do well in school and receive a good education and just made me a happier person all around because of the values that I have [as a result of being a member of the Mormon Church].” Membership in the Mormon Church has led Ashton to contribute an estimated hundred-plus community service hours. He once helped to install a new playground at a battered women’s shelter, where he was “able to see first hand how I was helping out these women and their children,” said Ashton. “They had been through such hard times I was grateful to be able to help in some way”. For Ashton, adulthood draws near.

After graduating in May, Ashton plans to attend BYU Idaho, where he will room with Brad Farnsworth ‘10, longtime friend and fellow Mormon. “There’s going to be a lot of pranks going on,” said Farnsworth. In the Mormon church, missions can vary from going door to door spreading the gospel to going to Haiti and helping to rebuild the nation. When Ashton turns 19 he will be sent on his mission by his church for two years and then return to BYU as a sophomore, where he plans to major in a business or medical field. “You don’t pick where you serve [your mission]” said Fairchild. “ I’m not afraid [to do my mission]; I’m actually really excited”. For Ashton, his mission will be a way to give back to the world and increase his own faith many times over. “Although you may go through some very difficult trials in your life,’ said Ashton. “They will pass and you will always be able to overcome these trials as long as you stay motivated and always keep on fighting.” Gabriel Martinez

Work in the Learning by leading the blind recession

The summer before her senior year Sara Klienkopf joined a program called Global Explorers who takes kids on different trips around the world. The catch? The sighted kids like Sara help guide the blind kids around the various destinations they explore. Sara took two trips with this program, one to Mexico and one to Peru. She led her now close friend, Caitlin Lynch from New York, on both trips. “My first impression of Sara was that she was very responsible. She was always quick to lend a helping hand, or a guiding elbow to anyone who needed it,” said Lynch. “She has traveled to places she had never been and invested herself completley in allowing others to experience the wonders she does fully.” “In Peru there were these bridges from the top of the rainforest canopy almost a mile high, and they would sway when you walked on them and they didn’t look very sturdy,” said Sara. “I’m afraid of heights, but it was totally worth it. Definitely the coolest thing I have ever done. Caitlin even helped me write and edit my college essay on it.” Her once-in-a-lifetime experience with the Global Explorers program only better helped her decide that she would study environmental science at Whittman College next fall. “Sara is a terrific person and she will be successful in anything she does,” said Lynch. “ But from first hand experience, I know that pursuing a degree in environmental science will be a really great fit for her.” Meghan Long

CLOSING

In today’s economy there is a widely accepted perception that the summer job market for teens is tougher than ever, and consequently there is no point in applying at all. For this very reason you may be opposed to the idea of working a part time job during the school year or even just over the summer. After all, unemployment nationwide has gone up tremendously in the last two years and many well qualified adults cannot find work. However, I would encourage you not to use this viewpoint as a pretext for never having tried at all. Though it is true that today getting a summer job is more challenging than it has been in the past, it is by no means impossible and simply requires a few key tricks. Despite the fact that currently numerous adults are applying to teenage level jobs in an attempt to take any kind of work they can, companies do not necessarily hire the most qualified candidates. Who companies will almost always hire, however, regardless of age, are the candidates who want the job the most. At my job, after one of our employees quit and my manager began looking for a candidate to fill the position, an older man probably in his mid thirties came in and turned in an application. Out of curiosity, we looked over his application and found that he had a master’s degree. The fact that he was even applying at Starbucks somewhat frightens me, but ultimately he was not hired. No matter how impressive your credentials are, this will not be the deciding factor. So here’s what you do. When you turn in your application and are told that you will be contacted within two weeks, you’re a nobody to the manager. You are just another name among dozens of others whom they will likely forget within a day, and never does the manager actually contact you in two weeks. So what’s the trick? Persistence! When you turn in the application, go in and talk to the manager in person, tell them who you are, that you strongly desire the position, and ask for a specific day that you can expect to hear back. When they don’t call you on that day, call them and ask about the status of your application. Ask if there is anything you can do, and continue this process over and over until you prove to the manager how badly you want the job. Everyone says that high school is meant to prepare you for college, and ultimately, for the work force, so what better way is there to get experience that you will need for life than by getting a part time job? Whether it be a career related job such as working in a hospital, or even just making burgers, a summer job will greatly help you learn essential skills such as responsibility and selfconfidence. You will be entering the real world; there are real rewards and real consequences to your decisions.

THOUGHTS Matt Rabon

Overcoming the pain The words out of your mouth can make or break a person. For Kelsey Finkelstein ‘10, the cruel words said by students in eighth grade caused Kelsey to be frustrated with the lack of acceptance in school. Kelsey was tormented and destroyed by students, calling her out because she was Jewish. “I grew up being Jewish, and my whole life I was made fun of for being different,” said Kelsey. Kelsey tried her hardest to fit in but a group of vicious eighth grade girls where on a trail to destroy. Cruel words were almost all that was heard. After Kelsey had been pushed too far, she separated herself. Kelsey began hanging with a lot of older people who held music culture and style. To these kids drama wasn’t a factor; rather the only thing that mattered was music, shows and friends. These were people who accepted her, and who didn’t hold so much baggage. Kelsey loved there enthusiasm and how they liked her for who she is as a person. “It made me defiantly grow up a lot faster then I should have. I didn’t want to talk to anyone from school, no one would understand me, they didn’t even

understand themselves,” said Kelsey. Kelsey feels that the negative of growing up to fast is the loss of your since of humor. “The little jokes in life are no longer as funny as they use to be. I lost my true teenager mentality, the want to party and the want to experience high school in its true form.” In the beginning of high school Kelsey didn’t have any friends. She spent the majority of her time going to a lot of music shows and concerts, feeling like she had people who cared about her there. When Kelsey finally tried to get in touch with people from her school, they weren’t around. They had already found a new group of friends and were satisfied with them, Kelsey didn’t feel she wanted to pry herself into a group and be the “outcast” or the “newbie”. Kelsey has opened up to people again and gained friends as well as kept friends from the third grade. Kelsey says she spent too many years feeling sad about the fact that she didn’t fit in. Now Kelsey could care less about what others think or say. “I’m not going to change who I am anymore to make someone else happy,” said Kelsey. “It’s time to make me happy,

and after many years of two faced, backstabbing, and heart breaks, I’ve finally realized that I live my life with no regrets, and I’ve never been happier.” The older group of friends Kelsey has lost touch with. Kelsey has also lost her interest in the concert scene, now she uses most of her free time either working at Children’s Choice a day care for kids or focusing on her studies. Austin Frankel

Kelsey relaxes at her favorite park, where she spends most of her free time. Photo by Austin Frankel.


05•06•10 senior salute

soundtrack: “Take me out to the ball game” Tin Pan Alley

15

Memories on a baseball field I walked past the Retreat park the other day by myself. I couldn’t help but move blindly down the cool road at dusk; the area filled me with past memories and nostalgia of my childhood. I snapped awake quickly, though, as I passed the heart of the park, where a T-ball sized baseball field lay. There, it had a team of a dozen kids learning and practicing drills with as many dads coaching. Past memories shot through me. There were Mr. Krietemeier, Mr. Sandlin, and Mr. Wetzel throwing fly balls to us. Standing behind us with bats in our hands, helping us through the mechanics of a swing. Hitting us ground balls, us throwing the ball wildly at a base to get

out a sprinting runner, chasing, laughing, and growing all in the American past time’s atmosphere. I couldn’t help but grin. The field was birthing another sandlot Castle Pines team. Maybe this team would as well go to Rock Canyon in another ten years together and play ball. I kept walking through and left the practice behind while it hit me. The cycle would always continue. The few members of the class of 2010 varsity baseball team that have been together since the beginning, in our last year together, are just being reborn in the lives of another generation of kids.

CLOSING

THOUGHTS

Top row left to right: Austin Enterline ‘10, Levi Russell (Douglas County Senior), Matt Porter ‘10, Matt Hopper ‘11, Jeremy Belk (Douglas County Senior), Reid Carter ‘10, Chad McGraw (Douglas County Senior), Bryce Campbell ‘10, Tanner Krietemeier ‘10, Tyler Engel (Regis Junior), Erik Wetzel ‘10, Drew Sandlin ‘10. The DC Rockers when the boys were around 12 years old.

Austin Enterline

Unexpected inspiration The timer starts and in less than ten seconds, it’s all over; a new record is set. Current records are anywhere from sixteen seconds to two seconds depending on the different stacking sequences. Sport stacking, or cup stacking, is a fitness based sport that anyone can participate in. It is the way in which an athlete up stacks and down stacks a set of twelve cups into various configurations. Joel Goers started stacking when he was only five years old and was introduced to the sport by family friend and founder of Speed Stacks Inc., Bob Fox. Joel got involved with the Speed Stacks demo team through his school during the time that Fox was a teacher there. The demo team was a group of kids hired to travel around the world and present the sport live and up close. “Starting on the demo team as a seven year old was intimidating at first,” said Joel, “but since everything started pretty small and in state I was never overwhelmed.” The first demonstrations were held in school gyms and was a show that lasted only about a half hour before they would go out and help the students learn how to stack in hour long workshops. There could be many workshops for one show depending on how many kids were there. However, convention demonstrations were run differently. “At conventions we flew out of state, set up our booth, and worked usually two eight hour days of demos for P.E. teachers,” said Joel. “I have been working since I was very young and had a chance to get use to the routine before I really started doing important demos that involved television, live shows and educational workshops.” The demo team took him all over the world including England, Germany, Denmark, Turkey, Australia, Argentina, and all throughout the United States. “It’s hard to say which place is my favorite since they are all so culturally different,” said Joel. “I don’t think there is a better or worse, just a different style.”

He has made many friends throughout his travels, some living in London, Germany, and Argentina. But despite the separation, Joel still makes an effort to stay in contact with them. “The most important thing I have learned is that no matter where you go, there are good people,” said Joel. “Everybody expresses themselves differently according to their own experiences.” Joel was a part of the demo team for over eight years, but as time went on it became unrealistic to be traveling throughout the world and manage school at the same time. Today he doesn’t participate in the demonstrations, but stays involved by tagging along and learning how to run a business from behind the scenes. “This summer I plan on doing an internship with my dad,” said Joel, “hopefully I’ll be able to travel with him on all of his trips including China, Europe tour, Israel, and hopefully Chile. I will be learning important skills that I believe will really help me in the long run.” Speed Stacks still plays an important role in his life, not only as great experiences, but also as inspiration. “This is a side of me that very few people know about, and yet it has contributed immensely to the person I am today,” said Joel. “It wasn’t always the “cool” thing to do by any means, but I guess that by following my inspirations I was rewarded in the end.” Sam Pusar

Diving into change Looking at Wajeeh Ahmed, you would never expect that this calm, content student would ever attempt sky diving. “I am deadly afraid of heights so it will be a big thrill for me to go,” said Wajeeh. He has been planning this extreme adventure since the beginning of the school year. He decided that it was his senior resolution to rid himself of his fear. Wajeeh plans to attempt his first jump along with his two good friends Stephen Engineer ’10, and Kameron Reinke ’10. Wajeeh plans on attending the

Photo by Alex Rowe

University of Colorado Denver next year, and he feels like his fear of heights is something that needs to go before he checks into his dorm for the 2010-2011 school year. Wajeeh plans on doing his jump outside of Boulder, somewhere that he feels will be scenic as well as frightful. “This will be a life changing experience that I will never forget,” said Wajeeh. “I am definitely excited, and hopefully I won’t be afraid of heights afterwards.” Drew Dodds

Simply ‘good enough’

Photo by Alex Rowe

Nate Schnebeck will never tell you outright he’s good at anything. His normal response to any question of his talent is “good enough.” But if you dig a little deeper, you’ll find the man who played four straight quarters of the Pueblo West game, has above a 4.0 GPA, and, in his first year on the team and in the sport, starts on the Chapparal-Rock Canyon rugby team. It was a long road to get there, though. “I wasn’t that great at football my freshman and sophomore years, so I decided to work hard and ‘get huge’ over the summer of 08,” said Nate. His junior year, he started “about half” of the Varsity football games and threw for the track team in the spring, taking time out during the winter to work lights for the Drama Department’s production

of “Flowers for Algernon.” His senior year was a different story. It was all contact sports for him, from starting every single Varsity game in the fall, to pursuing a brand new sport, rugby, in the spring. “It’s the only sport I’ve played that I can score in,” Nate said. “So that’s nice!” All the while, he kept his ‘super A’ GPA and was accepted into the Colorado School of Mines for the Fall. He plans to study engineering and possibly walk on to the Mines football team for his freshman season. “I’m not sure if I’ll get on the team, but since I’ve come this far, it’s hard not to be optimistic,” Nate said. “The sky’s really the limit for my college experiences.” Drew Goodman

Slaves to the Jumbotron

CLOSING

Troy Tulowitzki stepped up to the plate in the bottom half of the second inning facing Adam Wainwright, the starting pitcher for the Skyler Draper St. Louis Cardinals. All was silent in Coors Field after a three run first inning for the Cards; as Tulowitki took strike one the only voice to be heard was that of the vendor six rows down. “Peanuts! Cotton Candy! Get your cotton candy here! Only four dollars!” I looked toward first base where Albert Pujols, the reigning National League MVP, was spitting sunflower seeds and kicking dirt off his cleats when, all of the sudden, the crowd erupted in applause. I focused back in on the game, fully expecting to see Tulowitzki rounding first base after a solid hit. However, much to my surprise, he was still standing outside the chalk line adjusting his batting gloves. Nothing happened, the second pitch still had yet to be thrown, but the crowed grew louder and louder by the second. Confused, I turned to the Jumbotron in left field to see what was going on. A flashing sign that said “Make Some Noise!” danced across the screen as a phony decibel meter slowly rose to its maximum level. On the next pitch Tulowitzki grounded out, but the crowd was still yelling and stomping their feet as if nothing had happened on the field. Moments later, the screen went blank. Once again, Coors Field was silent until a few innings later when this happened again. The crowd became a slave to this magical Jumbotron, virtually anything that it told the fans to do, they did. After about seven innings of witnessing this trend continue, I was tempted to hack into the system and flash a sign across the screen saying “Buy Skyler Nachos.” I would’ve surely inherited more nachos than any single man could eat in a lifetime. While walking back to the parking lot after the game, I got to thinking. What began as a modest idea morphed into a brilliant, foolproof plan that will fix the budget cuts crisis that currently plagues our school. First, we must contact the Rockies’ advertising director. With a little persuasion and about $300, we could buy our very own advertising slot during any part of the game. Next, we make the sign. I’m thinking something along the lines of “Give Money to the Needy of Rock Canyon High School” would be just fine. Finally, student volunteers run around the stadium in rags, collecting the money that the crowd will undoubtedly fork over, simply because the Jumbotron told them to. In 2009, an average of 32,209 people attended every Rockies game. By my estimations, approximately 15,000 people will obey the commands of the Jumbotron, donating about $3 per person. By the end of the night, Rock Canyon will have an extra $45,000 in cash to do with as they please. (Of course, I will receive 10% of the profit since I came up with the idea, it’s only fair. But still, $40,500 isn’t bad for one night.) Students, faculty, and administration, rejoice, for the days of no more toner in the printers are far behind us now. Hot tubs will soon reside in every classroom, private jets will fly us to and from school, and lobster will be served every day at lunch. You’re welcome Rock Canyon.

THOUGHTS


16 soundtrack: “We are family” Sister Sledge

An unbreakable bond When her parents first told her a new person would be welcomed into the family, butterflies swarmed inside her stomach. At the time, 11-year-old Becki Dillon couldn’t imagine adding another addition to her close-knit fourperson family, much less an infant. “When you’ve had the same family for 11 years and suddenly a new member is added, the environment and relationships are bound to change,” Becki said. “I was curious – I had absolutely no idea how this would affect us, but at the same time I was yearning to learn.” The Dillon family welcomed two-year-old Jacob from Guatemala just three weeks before September 11, 2001. And if they’d waited three simple weeks, the adoption likely would have fell through. “There were no flights going out and the immense scrutiny over people from other countries would have made it nearly impossible,” Becki said. “Our adoption has truly been a miracle. I love knowing that we saved my brother from a potential life of living in the streets as a thief or in an orphanage.” “I believe that every child deserves the blessing of a loving family,” Christine Dillon, Becki’s mom, said. “In return, adopting Jacob has been a true blessing to us.” Since the adoption, Becki’s family has become even more connected. Family nights consisting of dinner and a movie or lunch and a board game are not out of the ordinary. “I love the time that I spend with my family. I know that I’m always guaranteed a great time when we do something fun together like going out to eat and then to a movie,” Jessica Dillon ‘12, Becki’s sister, said. “Family is definitely one of the most important priorities in my life and even though Becki won’t be too far away, I’m going to miss having her here every night when she leaves for college. I’m hoping she won’t have enough money to stay on campus 2nd semester so she’ll be forced to live at home with me.” Quality family time in the Dillon household has made Becki’s decision for college that much harder. Ultimately she decided on Denver University because it was close to home yet far enough away to still experience independence, but the thought of not seeing her family every day still tears at her. She remembers breaking her wrist while sparring in Tae Kwon Do and her sister’s sympathetic presence immediately after. She remembers flying an airplane with her dad – nose-diving over the mountains and slicing through her fears. She remembers the night when her family nearly became separated on the metro in Washington, DC and the overwhelming anxiety that accompanied it.

On to the next lap For Wes Bakke being on the varsity swim team has been one of his greatest passions in high school. Wes has been swimming competitively since he was ten years old. “My best event is the 50 meter freestyle,” said Wes. “I swim it between 24 and 25 seconds.” The varsity team consists of players from Rock Canyon, Mountain Vista, Highlands Ranch and Thunder Ridge. Wes has been swimming for varsity since his sophomore year. “I like meeting new people from other schools and growing to such a bond that they are like family,” he said. Wes has devoted much time and effort to becoming a better swimmer in the past few years, including joining a club team to get faster before the high school season. Swimming at such a competitive level is also physically taxing. “The hardest part about swimming is that it works your entire body,” said Wes, “but after swimming your body just feels awesome.” Wes recently got accepted to CU-Denver, which does not have a swim team. This will be his last year as a competitive swimmer. “Swimming was a passion of mine, but it’s gotten a little old,” he said. “I’m ready to move on.” With state only three weeks away, Wes looks to finish his high school swim career strong. “We have a good chance at winning state as a team this year.” While he is moving on to other things, Wes looks back at his swimming careeer with positivity. “Swimming taught me how to work hard and be dedicated.” Max Wellman

Photo by Lauren Scheirman

05•06•10 senior salute Becki and her brother Jacob in Washington, D.C. during a family vacation over the summer of 2009.

Got a minute?

• After going to DU, Becki would love to move on to medical school in order to become a doctor of some kind. • Becki has been doing Tae Kwon Do for over seven years and has gotten her second degree black belt. She is also an instructor at her Tae Kwon Do School. • Becki’s favorite classes throughout high school have been Anatomy and AP Biology. • Becki loves to bake - she’ll often make truffles or cookies and bring them to school for her friends. • She feels the number one misconception people have about her is that she seems reserved and minimally talkative. • God, family, and friends are the three most important things to Becki. • Becki has been playing the piano for over 11 years. • The two traits she admires most are honesty and kindness. • Her biggest pet peeve is when someone takes a stance on an issue and has no reason to back up their point. • She has ridden an elephant with a friend at the circus. • Becki’s favorite movie is Pirates of the Caribbean because she loves the originality of the plotline. Compiled by Rebecca Ruh “I hate thinking about moving away from my family,” Becki said. “But at the same time, I know that I’m going to remain extremely close to them while attending Denver University so that helps with the separation factor.” “Even though I’m leaping forward on the path of life, I’ll be able to take a small step down memory lane whenever need be.” Rebecca Ruh

Cherishing life

Photo by Paige Newman

Photo by Jenn Burton

From team to family I regret complaining after practice Holding hands backstage at nationals and stressing over someone wearing the I realized that I have tried it all. wrong uniform. Because when it comes Softball, swimming, soccer, tennis. I was never really good at any of it. It wasn’t down to it, the girl wearing the wrong uniform was the one standing until I started dancing next to me on the floor, helpthat I felt at home. It was ing me to do one of the most the only thing I was good important things in my life. at and the only thing that When we stepped actually felt like me. out for our last dance, I This would be the last Paige Hesen almost cried at the thought time I would dance with of having to leave my team behind. this team. The last time I would dance Dance had become my identity and I was for this team. I actually no idea when or afraid of being lost without it. When you if I would have the opportunity to ever spend four years of your life dedicated to dance again. something, it’s hard not to get your whole I hadn’t thought about what this moheart involved. My coach was right when ment would feel like until it was actually happening. I had spent the past four years she told us that we won’t have something growing as a dancer, a person and a team- like this ever again. As I wearily waited for the music to mate and although I knew the days were turn on for the last time, I felt a teammate growing shorter, reality had not set in. squeeze my hand and tell me everything Dance was my life. This team was the would be okay. bain of my high school existence. These I may never have the option to dance girls are my best friends and in the four again, but I know I have the friends to years we spent together, they showed me what an important part dance plays in my keep it alive in me forever. My last dance was for the team that has stood by me life. through just about everything and al Now that it’s over, I look back and lowed me to always feel at home. cherish the three hour practices, the fake eyelashes, the team bonding and the long After all, it’s not about how much time weekends spent away at competitions. All you get to play in the game, it’s about the obstacles you fought to get there and the of this is what made it possible for me to love that grew out of it. do what I love.

CLOSING

THOUGHTS

“I guess I’ve learned to cherish everything, and really take my life seriously,” Stephany Castleberry said. Stephany’s mom’s boyfriend was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer this year. He and her mom have been together since Stephany was a freshman. “We’re all very close (mom, sister, and mom’s boyfriend). He spends a lot of time with my family and has been a huge part of our life,” Stephany said. “It’s been such a blessing

having him around.” Most people don’t expect to find out something so life changing when they go to the doctor. Pancreatic cancer can be cured by surgical methods but typically it spreads so quickly that its hard to catch it in time. “I was mostly shocked, I never thought someone close to me would get cancer, until it happened,” she said. “People just don’t realize how common it is.” Since then, Stephany has re-evaluated her life and what she wants to do. She’s going to Colorado State University and she hopes to major in graphic design. “I really like photography, so I’d like to spend my life doing what I enjoy,” she said. Going to college will be especially hard for Stephany, considering she’s leaving someone so close to her that is sick. Leaving everything you know behind is already scary, but having the extra worry of a sick family member makes it even tougher. But, part of the reason Stephany chose CSU is because that is also where her sister goes. It’ll be easier leaving the familiarity of her home with her sister close by. The most important thing Stephany learned from this is to live everyday like it’s your last. One day your entire world could be turned upside down. But by appreciating life and cherishing every moment, like Stephany did, it is possible to overcome anything. Jenn Burton


05•06•10 senior salute

soundtrack: “Feels like home” Chantal Kreviazuk

From being alone to being at home The last 14 years of Leah Johnson’s life have been spent like most American girls would spend them: shopping sprees with her mom and friends, family trips to the beach, watching movies and reality TV, and devouring all food in sight. However, the first four years of Leah’s life were spent a little different; being spanked and screamed at by welfare house owners. Before she was even one month old, Johnson’s parents left her at a train station in Zhejiang Province, China only to be found by the police and taken to the Tonglu County Social Welfare Institute. “I can still remember the fear of being left totally alone,” said Leah. Things only got worse from there. The conditions at the home were filthy, and the owners cruel. The beds were made of wood with no mattresses, holes in the ground functioned as bathrooms, and there was never enough food to go around. “I was left alone, hours on end, to play by myself,” said Leah. “There were daily spanks, and endless teasing from the director’s children.” Her life had become a painful routine which she endured on a daily basis, until

Fast facts • Leah’s parents were part of the 30th group to travel to China and complete their adoption. The adoption group numbers are now in the thousands. • Adoption takes several months to finalize, due to Chinese government complications. • The Chinese Children Adoption International has annual conferences for adoptees across the country. Compiled by Karly Hanson

one day a government official came to, yet again, take her away and change her life forever. Without being given any sort of explanation, Leah was introduced to two new people that did not speak her language. Even the translator had trouble talking to Leah, she spoke a different Chinese dialect that they couldn’t fully understand. “It was a repeat of my train station experience, only more terrifying because

17

I couldn’t communicate with them,” said Leah. “They scared me because they had blonde hair, something I had never seen before.” Adapting to the idea of new parents took some time, but over the years she has developed a strong and healthy relationship with her new American parents. “I can’t imagine life without Leah, she is a treasure to her mom and I and the adoption process was worth every minute of it,” said Jeff Johnson, Leah’s dad. “They’re great,” said Leah. “My parents and I are really close and I like being able to tell them stuff about my life.” Leah puts the past behind her with each day as she looks forward to her new future at college. She is following in her adoptive parents’ footsteps by attending Iowa State and is excited to move away from the comfortablility of the high school halls, and hopes to one day visit her birth home. “I believe everyone has a choice in life regarding difficult situations or wrongs,” said Leah. “You can hold on to them and be bitter or let them go and be free.” Karly Hanson

Returning the favor CLOSING

Nobody at Falcon Cove Middle School knew why Carolina was never in class anymore. They might have wondered for a minute or two, but they didn’t care enough to ask. Nobody knew that while the rest of us were laughing in the lunchroom, she was in her bed at home. That while we were on the playground at recess, she was in the hospital. Nobody thought to pick up her homework and bring it to her. Or to call her and check in to see what was wrong. Nobody asked a teacher, or the principal, why her attendance was getting worse and worse. Why she would be in first period, but already gone at the start of second. I asked one day. And then I knew. She was a quiet, shy girl, and her family only had each other. She had hardly any friends at school, which is maybe why nobody knew that she was dying of brain cancer. We became friends, perhaps a little too late. I went over to her house after

school now and then just to keep her company. We watched movies, played board games, anything to take her mind off of her sickness. At the end of each visit, her mom would thank me for coming over. I should have been thanking her. Carolina passed away when she was only 13 years old. There were hundreds of kids from school at her funeral, many of who probably had never spoken to her before. I get it, though; they thought it was the right thing to do, to go to their classmate’s funeral, though they never considered the right thing was getting to know her. Her mom hugged me as I said goodbye before leaving. Her teary eyes stared into mine, and she thanked me for giving Carolina the friend she never had before. She handed me Carolina’s “passport” with her picture on it, a project we both had to make in our English class that year. She told me to keep it. Over five years later, I still think of

THOUGHTS Paige Newman

Carolina. Her mom kept thanking me for being good to her, for being her friend, but I don’t think her family ever realized what Carolina did for me, what her life gave to mine. The passport made it with me through my move from Florida to Colorado, through every time I cleaned my room, through every time I threw away what was no longer important to me. It sits on my desk, the reminder of a life that wasn’t done being lived. The passport will stay with me forever. It will remain in its spot on my desk, and Carolina’s memory will remain in its spot in my heart.

Facing your gargoyles When I was three I was sent to a Montessori pre-school. I hated it. I would cry, and kick, and whine every day until I left. I wanted to go to school with Sara. My parents put me in First Step Pre-School with Sara, and soon I looked forward to my days spent learning. For much longer than I can remember Sara Kleinkopf ‘10, has been my neighbor, my partner in crime, and my best friend. This last Saturday the seniors that grew up on my street got together to celebrate the successful completion of twelve years of school. While I was looking through pictures of Sara and I from before pre-school up through prom, I was reminded of the importance of a best friend. I remembered long family hikes when all we wanted to do was play in rivers, burying ourselves in our costume boxes to put on the silliest outfits we could, and pouring lemonade powder in the snow to eat it. But our relationship is defined by so much more than the fun we had. I also remember her forgiving me

after I broke her favorite Barbie (it was Jasmine; we both loved the Aladdin movies), comforting her when we had to fast forward through the scary parts of Bambi, and when neither of us would go into my basement because we were afraid of gargoyles. As we grew older I changed schools, and there became more to life than splashing in rivers, the costume box, and your neighbor. In elementary school when we were on different school schedules it seemed like we never saw each other. In middle school when we were together again I made minimal effort to reconnect. In high school when I got my first girlfriend, I blew Sara off for her. But it never mattered. We never fought, it was never awkward, and it was always just fun. Whether we hadn’t seen each other in two months, or two hours, Sara and I were always the same. Sara is going to college in Washington state, and I’m going to school in New Hampshire, so we won’t be spending any time together in the fall. This time

Meghan and Chelsea on Easter when Meghan was four years old and Chelsea was six.

My driving force CLOSING

Before there was me, there was an only child. Before I was there, there was Chelsea. Ever since we were little I can remember competing at everything with her. It was an unspoken battle, a fight till you drop, fight till the death type of competition with everything we did. I even felt a small sense of triumph when I was awake first on the weekend because she was the sister that rose with the sun after a night of motionless sleep beneath her covers and I was the little sister that rose much later than the sun with tuffed hair and drowsy eyes after a night of kicking and rolling half way under the sheets. Even on religious family holidays like Easter I wasn’t about to let her win the egg count in the hunt through grandma’s back yard. As I trailed my sister in my frilly flowered dress, she would grab the high hidden eggs and in a rushed attempt to beat her, I would slam every egg I picked up from the grass into my basket so hard the shells would crack. Since we were little Chelsea has always been bright in school, and in my attempt to follow her doings I have usually come up short. But as we grew older, the academic gap grew larger, the athletic gap shrunk. Eventually she was a National Merit Scholar, acing all her classes from high school, even into college, while I was traveling to play teams across the nation and beginning to talk to college coaches. She paved a path of excellence that I followed until I found my own passions. If Chelsea hadn’t played bunch ball soccer first, I may have never stepped on the pitch that paid for my college. If Chelsea hadn’t been there, I may have never developed the competitive drive to make it to the collegiate level. For me, the bratty little sister who wants nothing more than to be independent, it is hard to admit that I didn’t get here alone. She made me better. Our competition helped me find my strengths and weaknesses, which in time did make me independent. It just took a while. Backing out of a competition because it’s intimidating would have left me nowhere. It’s that fight till you drop drive that we need in our everyday passions. Without competition we would be nothing. Without her I would be nothing.

THOUGHTS Meghan Long

CLOSING

THOUGHTS Alex Rowe

Alex and Sara at Christmas time during preschool. though, I won’t have to cry until I get to go to school with her. Come Thanksgiving, no matter what happened at school, we will still be the same friends who were terrified of the gargoyles in my basement. That’s what a best friend is.


18-19

05•06•10 senior salute Katie Adams-University of Colorado, Undecided Wajeeh Ahmed-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Mackenzie Akerfelds-University of Arizona, Undecided Alia Alabassi-Could not be reached Raquel Alexandre- Pontifico Universidade Catolica Rio de Janiero, Brazil, Pre-law Evan Almon-Southern Methodist University, Business Thomas Andersen-Marines Elizabeth Anderson-Colorado State University, Undecided Julie Anderson-St. Olaf College, History and English Aaron Appleman-University of Northern Colorado, Biology Gina Armijo-University of Colorado, Marketing or Environmental science Guillermo Arribas-New York University, Performing arts Spencer Bailey-Community College of Aurora, Writing and Directing Elizabeth Baker-Oregon State University, Chemical engineering Wesley Bakke-University of Colorado, Business Tyler Barbachano-Working at Ibeta Chris Battin-University of Colorado, Undecided Tina Beaman-Colorado State University, Nursing Jami Becker-Tulane University, Biology Daniel Beckstead-University of Utah, Dentistry Alessandro Bello-New York University, Undecided Brandon Bender-Metropolitan State College, Criminal justice Daniel BensonRachel Berensen-Brigham Young University Idaho, Microbiology Kimberly Betthauser-Community College of Denver, Undecided Allison Boatright-University of Colorado, MCD biology Kelli Bohren-University of Minnesota, Biology Ethan Booth-Front Range Community College, Computer Science Erik Bosemberg-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Christian Boyer-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Rachael Brandt-University of Northern Colorado, Education James Brannock-Colorado State University, Undecided Victoria Burdon- Lindenwood University, Biology Daniel Burke-Colorado State University, Computer engineering Kayla Bush-Metropolitan State College, Theater teaching Bryce Campbell-Colorado State University Pueblo, Undecided Cameron Carolus-Colorado State University, Undecided Jeffrey Carter-Metropolitan State College, Business Reid Carter-University of Nebraska at Omaha, Geography and planning Wesley Cashion-University of Colorado, Undecided Stephany Castleberry-Colorado State University, Undecided Martin Castro-Red Rocks Community College, Undecided Sean Chan-Colorado State University, Undecided Shayer Chowdhury-John Hopkins or University of Chicago, Biology Cole Christensen-Carnegie Mellon, Undecided Samuel Classen-Iowa State University, Engineering Patrick Cline-University of Arizona, Undecided Nicholas Cochlan-University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Music production Kristen Cole-Arizona State University, Biology Chantal Cook- Jason Cook-University of Colorado, Environmental engineering Kaitlan Coppola-Georgia Institute of Technology, Biomedicine Kristan Corl-Arapahoe Community College, Art or Counselling or Vet Robert Cosgrove-Arizona State University, Aeronautical science Joseph Costello-Colorado State University, Undecided Kaitlyn Cottrell-Georgia Institute of Technology, Biomedical engineering Randi Couch-Metropolitan State College, Psychology Geoffrey Craver-Fort Lewis, Business Clay Creighton-Colorado State University, Business

soundtrack: “Where are you going?” Dave Matthews Band

Wherewillthey benextyear?

Each paw print outside of Colorado represents a college that is being attended by one or more Rock Canyon students. Art by Alex Rowe

The graduates of the class of 2010 will be everywhere from going to school at the University of Denver, to Brazil, to traveling around China and Europe. This list includes every graduate’s plans for the future, and this map shows where in the country you can find a Jaguar next year. Kelly Culton-Arapahoe Community College, Business Kristina Cummings-University of Colorado, Integrated Physiology Rachel Curtright-University of Missouri, Undecided Stacey Daggett-University of Colorado, Psychology Alex Dagner-Fort Lewis, Engineering Marijane Dau-College at Western State, Creative Writing Amanda Davanzo-George Washington University, International affairs Dustin David-Colorado State University, Pre-med Trenton Davin-Colorado State University, History Alex Davis-Colorado State University, Sociology Alexander Davis-Brigham Young University, Pre-med Gary Davis-Briar Cliff University, Biology Nicklas Decherd-University of Colorado, Integrated physiology Michael Dempsey-University of Colorado, Business and Film Vanessa Devey-Could not be reached Rebecca Dillon-University of Denver, Biochemistry Vance DiPasquale-University of Northern Colorado, Business and Pilot Daniel DiPetro-University of Nevada Las Vegas, Hotel management Chelsea Dome-University of Northern Colorado, Elementary education Morgan Dorcheus-Arizona State University Connor Dozois-University of Colorado, Undecided Amanda Drake-University of Colorado-Denver, Hotel and resort management Skyler Draper-Brigham Young University, Undecided Austin Duardo-Art Institute, Animation Justin Dykes-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Victoria Eberlein-Could not be reached Devin Elletson-Arapahoe Community College, Psychology Michael Elmore-University of Colorado-Denver, Mechanical engineering Stephen Engineer-University of Colorado-Denver, Pre-engineering

Austin Enterline-University of Colorado-Denver, English Kelly Everds-Saint Ambrose University, Nursing Ashton Fairchild-Brighan Young University-Idaho, Business Bradley Farnsworth-Brigham Young University Idaho, Undecided Justin Fast- Seattle Pacific University, Business Law Sarah Ferguson-University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Biology and Nursing Kelsey Finkelstein-University of Colorado-Denver, Liberal arts and science Evan Fisch-Carnegie Mellon, Civil engineering Alison Forrester-Colorado State University, Applied kinesiology Emily Freeman-University of Kansas, Political science Erica French-Colorado School of Mines, Engineering Cody Galbraith-Colorado State University Joel Goers-Taking a year off to travel in: China, South America, and Europe Alexandra Goldberg-Denver University, Business Andrew Goodman-University of Missouri, Journalism Ethan Gottula-University of Northern Colorado, Psychology Kipling Gray-University of Northern Colorado, Education Nicholas Graybeal-Adams State College Alexandra Green-Pacific Lutheran University, English education Scott Griffee-University of Colorado, Business Mariah Griggs-Metropolitan State College, Fine arts Amanda Grimes-University of Colorado-Denver, Pre-med Dylan Grimmett-Colorado State University, Undecided Laura Gritz-Colorado State University David Hahn-Colorado State University, Undecided Jacob Harmeyer-Colorado State University, Business Krysten Hart-University of British Columbia Okanagan, Undecided Ashley Harvie-Bridge Program Kirsten Hastert-United States Navy,

Nuclear engineering Taylor Hayek-Metropolitan State College, Art Austin Heller-University of Texas, Engineering Ty Henry-Fort Lewis, Undecided Lauren Hensen-Mesa State College, Criminal justice Thomas Hernandez-University of Colorado, Undecided Tyler Herrera-Univeristy of Colorado, Aerospace engineering Kelsey Herzfeld-Could not be reached Paige Hesen-University of Colorado , Psychology Alexa Heslin-University of Colorado, Undecided Gustavo Hidalgo Castillo-Metropolitan State College, Business Ashley Higgins-Metropolitan State College, Biology Ayla Higgins-Arapahoe Community College, General studies Brittany Hill-University of Colorado, Pre-Medicine Benjamin Hilzer-Colorado State University, Business Shaina Hoday-Los Angeles Community College, Undecided Renee Horsting-University of South Carolina, Hospitality Jody Hunt-University of Colorado, Education Courtney Ireland-Community College of Denver, Undecided Brianna Johnson-University of South Carolina, Psychology Jessica Johnson-Colorado State University, Human development Lauren Johnson-Arizona State University, History Leah Johnson-Iowa State University, Undecided Taylor Jones-University of Colorado, Communications Tyler Kahn-University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Planning and growth management Victoria Karst-University of Colorado, Integrative physiology Niki Katsaros-University of Colorado, Undecided Ian Kaufman-University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Game Development Shanna Keller-University of Northern Colorado, Nursing Ian Kelsall-University of Colorado, Undecided

Sana Khan-Unversity of Colorado, Biology Sarah Khan-University of Colorado-Denver, Psychology Max Kiehn-University of Colorado-Denver, Theater, Film, and Television Kyler KilgoreSarah Kim-University of Texas, Pharmacy Sara Kleinkopf-Whitman College, Environmental studies Melanie Koceski-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Kathleen Kopchik-University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Nursing Sean Kovacs-Marymount Manhattan College, Musical theater and Biology Tanner Krietemeier-University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Construction management Kelsey Krueger-Colorado State University, Undecided Katrina Lam-Could not be reached Dylan Lama-Could not be reached Samantha Lee-University of San Diego, Undecided Zachary Lee Metropolitan State College, Music artist management. Emily Leines-Nebraska Wesleyan University, Physical training Jah Juan Lewis-Undecided Taylor Lewis-Brigham Young University, Mechanical engineering Brandon Lichty-Metropolitan State University, Business Danielle Light-Biola University, Film Sara Lillard-Cal Poly State University, Aerospace engineering Christian Linder-Working at Dominoes Keith Link-Air Force Academy, Undecided Jacob Lissek-Fairleigh Dickinson College, Business Jiawei Liu-Not attending college next year David Loe-St. Olaf College, Norwegian history Meghan Long-Duquesne University, Undecided Drake Ludwig-Colorado State University, Undecided Stephen Mabary-Could not be reached Jake Macek-Arizona State University, Political science

Mackenzie Markey-Grand Valley State University, Hospital Management Faith Marshall-Xenon International, Cosmetology Graham Marshall-University of Toronto, Astronomy Catherine Martin-University of Colorado, Undecided Leah Mason-Colorado State University, Biochemistry Cody Matal-Colorado State University, Computer engineering Anne McCarthy-University of Notre Dame, Undecided Patrick McCloskey-University of Colorado-Denver, Business Lindsey McCormick-Georgia Southern University, Journalism Conor McCue-University of Colorado, Undecided Kathleen McLaughlin-University of Colorado, Undecided Kortney McPherson-Boston University, Pre-med and French Steffani Meusburger-University of Wisconsin, Undecided Danielle Michaeli-University of Colorado, Business marketing Alex Mierau-University of Puget Sound, Undecided Kyle Milberg-Denver University, Chemistry Emily Miller-Colorado State University, Undecided Mackenzie Mitzner-Grand Valley State University, Hospitality management Nicole Modesitt-Florida Southern College, Athletic Training William Morris-Undecided Matthew Morrison-Biola University, Film Kellicia Morse-Adams State College, Graphic design and Business Tyler Murphy-University of Colorado- Denver Paige Newman-University of Michigan, Undecided Charles Newton-University of Redlands, Undecided Alexandra Nilsson-Brigham Young University, Foreign affairs Kirstin Nordentoft-University of Colorado-

Denver, Math and Education Jenny Kristine Nordsletten-Colorado Mountain College, Undecided Ashley Norton-Fairleigh Dickinson University, Political science Alexander Nuss-University of Colorado, Biomedical engineering Erin Oehm-Kansas State University, Interior architecture Jonathan Orantes-Construction Jessica Owsley-University of Colorado, Undecided Michael Palestino-Marines Kaitlyn Pattarozzi-Metropolitan State College, Athletic training Bria Pellandini-University of Northern Colorado, Performing arts Courtney Personett- Arapahoe Community College Kelsey Peters-Colorado State University, Chemistry and Criminology Chelsea Peterson-University of Colorado, Pre-communications Tara Pianko-Colorado State University, Biological science Court Pietra-School of Mines, Engineering Caitlen Pogue-Colorado State University, Finance Matthew Porter-Colorado State University Pueblo, Communications Samantha Powell-Colorado School of Mines, Biochemistry Talia Pratte-Utah State University, Special education Whitney Prior-University of Texas, Communications Mason Proffit-Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design, Illustration Matthew Rabon-Vanderbilt University, Biomedical engineering William Ready-Metropolitan State College, Psychology Conor Reagan-University of Colorado, Business Justin Reed-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Kameron Reinke-Colorado State University, Business management Austin Reisman-Colorado State University, Business Logan Riley-University of Northern Colorado,

Undecided Taylor Ritter-Could not be reached Steven Rodriguez-Faulkner State, Undecided Meredith Rollins-Southwestern University, Undecided Elizabeth Rooney-Carthage College, Pre-law Thomas Rosenkrans-University of North Dakota, Aviation management Amanda Ross-School of Mines, Engineering Ryan Rossi-Could not be reached Melinda Rotunda-Community College of Denver, Undecided Alex Rowe-Dartmouth College, Environmental and mechanical engineering Meghan Ruenger-Could not be reached Jessica Salus-Colorado State University, Biology Andrew Sandlin-Fort Lewis, Business Marisa Sandoval-University of Colorado, Biochemistry Michael Sangaline-University of Colorado, Business Jordan Sartor-University of Oregon, Undecided Amanda Sawicki-University of Colorado, Integrated physiology Nicholas Scalercio-Metropolitan State College, Business Brandon Schein-University of Colorado-Denver, Psychology Jakeob Scherer-United States Marine Corps Brandon Schmidt- Nathan Schnebeck-Colorado School of Mines, Engineering Andrew Schneider-Denver University, Business Evan Schneider-Biola University, Cinema and media arts Casey Schwartz-Undecided Natalie Seely-Brigham Young University-Idaho, Music education Caitlin Sherry-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Dietrich Shockcor-United States Marine Corps Andrea Sieker-York College, Education Caroline Sievers-Southern Methodist University, Undecided Brooke Skinner-Duke University, Biomedical engineering Leann Slavin-Cosmetology program

Abigail Smith-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Christopher Smith-University of Colorado Denver, Mechanical engineering Connor Smith-Colorado Mountain College, Undecided Ronnie Smits-University of Northern Colorado, Elementary education Nicholas Sophinos-San Francisco State University, Business Forrest Spradling-University of Colorado-Denver, Architecture Megan Spradling-Washington State University, Biochemistry Lily Stanfield-Metropolitan State College, Forensic science and Psychology Katherine Stapleton-Colorado State University, Communications Chase Stasney-Monoa University, Travel industry management Ashley Stephens-University of Northern Colorado, Audiology and Speech therapy Tyler Strampel-McPherson College Curtis Stuck-University of Colorado-Denver, Creative Writing Marna Swakid-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Ian Szlachta-Metropolitan State College, Fine arts Camille Tan-University of Colorado-Denver, Pre-pharmacy Jonathan Tate-United States Military Tarrah Tate-University of North Carolina Asheville, Psychology Devin Tauber-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Cory Thelen-University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Engineering Ashlee Thompson-Colorado State University, Equine science Logan Thompson-University of Puget Sound, English Daniel Tobey-University of Colorado, Fine arts Korina Tran-Cal Poly Pomona, Architecture Alexandra Tuccy-Metropolitan State College, Special education Sean Typher-Regis University, Pre-med Elizabeth Van Dyke-University of Tennessee Tyler Varland-Colorado State University, Business Allix Viau-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Ryan Vinchetti-University of Colorado,Undecided Jodie Wagner-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Emily Walker-Brigham Young University, Undecided Julien Walker-University of Colorado-Fort Lewis, Computer sciences Myles Wallingford-University of Colorado, English Hailey Walsh-Colorado State University, Undecided Meliss Watt-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Brittney Webber-University of Colorado, Business Allison Wesson-Arapahoe Community College, Undecided Andrew West-Could not be reached Brandon West-Could not be reached Hillary West-University of Colorado-Denver, Broadcast Journalism Pierce Westfall-Could not be reached Erik Wetzel-University of West Florida, Sports management Daniel Wheeler-Undecided, Liberal arts Nikolaus Wiersma-University of Idaho, Materials engineering Bradley Williams-Eckerd College, Business or International studies Bailey Wilson-University of Denver, Environmental science Andrew Wilt-Miami University, Microbiology Larry Woods-University of Colorado Business, Finance Diana Yang-Purdue University, Pre-pharmacy Trevor Yip-University of Colorado, Engineering Richard Young-Marines, Scout sniper Carissa Zabor-Undecided Arianna Zabriskie-Colorado State University, Biological science Erin Zelazny-University of Northern Colorado, Elementary education Matthew Zhu-Could not be reached Austin Ziel-Could not be reached Nicholas Zimberoff-University of Colorado- Colorado Springs,Undecided Kaitlin Zindel-University of Colorado, Biochemistry 

Compiled by the staff of The Rock


18-19

05•06•10 senior salute Katie Adams-University of Colorado, Undecided Wajeeh Ahmed-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Mackenzie Akerfelds-University of Arizona, Undecided Alia Alabassi-Could not be reached Raquel Alexandre- Pontifico Universidade Catolica Rio de Janiero, Brazil, Pre-law Evan Almon-Southern Methodist University, Business Thomas Andersen-Marines Elizabeth Anderson-Colorado State University, Undecided Julie Anderson-St. Olaf College, History and English Aaron Appleman-University of Northern Colorado, Biology Gina Armijo-University of Colorado, Marketing or Environmental science Guillermo Arribas-New York University, Performing arts Spencer Bailey-Community College of Aurora, Writing and Directing Elizabeth Baker-Oregon State University, Chemical engineering Wesley Bakke-University of Colorado, Business Tyler Barbachano-Working at Ibeta Chris Battin-University of Colorado, Undecided Tina Beaman-Colorado State University, Nursing Jami Becker-Tulane University, Biology Daniel Beckstead-University of Utah, Dentistry Alessandro Bello-New York University, Undecided Brandon Bender-Metropolitan State College, Criminal justice Daniel BensonRachel Berensen-Brigham Young University Idaho, Microbiology Kimberly Betthauser-Community College of Denver, Undecided Allison Boatright-University of Colorado, MCD biology Kelli Bohren-University of Minnesota, Biology Ethan Booth-Front Range Community College, Computer Science Erik Bosemberg-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Christian Boyer-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Rachael Brandt-University of Northern Colorado, Education James Brannock-Colorado State University, Undecided Victoria Burdon- Lindenwood University, Biology Daniel Burke-Colorado State University, Computer engineering Kayla Bush-Metropolitan State College, Theater teaching Bryce Campbell-Colorado State University Pueblo, Undecided Cameron Carolus-Colorado State University, Undecided Jeffrey Carter-Metropolitan State College, Business Reid Carter-University of Nebraska at Omaha, Geography and planning Wesley Cashion-University of Colorado, Undecided Stephany Castleberry-Colorado State University, Undecided Martin Castro-Red Rocks Community College, Undecided Sean Chan-Colorado State University, Undecided Shayer Chowdhury-John Hopkins or University of Chicago, Biology Cole Christensen-Carnegie Mellon, Undecided Samuel Classen-Iowa State University, Engineering Patrick Cline-University of Arizona, Undecided Nicholas Cochlan-University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Music production Kristen Cole-Arizona State University, Biology Chantal Cook- Jason Cook-University of Colorado, Environmental engineering Kaitlan Coppola-Georgia Institute of Technology, Biomedicine Kristan Corl-Arapahoe Community College, Art or Counselling or Vet Robert Cosgrove-Arizona State University, Aeronautical science Joseph Costello-Colorado State University, Undecided Kaitlyn Cottrell-Georgia Institute of Technology, Biomedical engineering Randi Couch-Metropolitan State College, Psychology Geoffrey Craver-Fort Lewis, Business Clay Creighton-Colorado State University, Business

soundtrack: “Where are you going?” Dave Matthews Band

Wherewillthey benextyear?

Each paw print outside of Colorado represents a college that is being attended by one or more Rock Canyon students. Art by Alex Rowe

The graduates of the class of 2010 will be everywhere from going to school at the University of Denver, to Brazil, to traveling around China and Europe. This list includes every graduate’s plans for the future, and this map shows where in the country you can find a Jaguar next year. Kelly Culton-Arapahoe Community College, Business Kristina Cummings-University of Colorado, Integrated Physiology Rachel Curtright-University of Missouri, Undecided Stacey Daggett-University of Colorado, Psychology Alex Dagner-Fort Lewis, Engineering Marijane Dau-College at Western State, Creative Writing Amanda Davanzo-George Washington University, International affairs Dustin David-Colorado State University, Pre-med Trenton Davin-Colorado State University, History Alex Davis-Colorado State University, Sociology Alexander Davis-Brigham Young University, Pre-med Gary Davis-Briar Cliff University, Biology Nicklas Decherd-University of Colorado, Integrated physiology Michael Dempsey-University of Colorado, Business and Film Vanessa Devey-Could not be reached Rebecca Dillon-University of Denver, Biochemistry Vance DiPasquale-University of Northern Colorado, Business and Pilot Daniel DiPetro-University of Nevada Las Vegas, Hotel management Chelsea Dome-University of Northern Colorado, Elementary education Morgan Dorcheus-Arizona State University Connor Dozois-University of Colorado, Undecided Amanda Drake-University of Colorado-Denver, Hotel and resort management Skyler Draper-Brigham Young University, Undecided Austin Duardo-Art Institute, Animation Justin Dykes-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Victoria Eberlein-Could not be reached Devin Elletson-Arapahoe Community College, Psychology Michael Elmore-University of Colorado-Denver, Mechanical engineering Stephen Engineer-University of Colorado-Denver, Pre-engineering

Austin Enterline-University of Colorado-Denver, English Kelly Everds-Saint Ambrose University, Nursing Ashton Fairchild-Brighan Young University-Idaho, Business Bradley Farnsworth-Brigham Young University Idaho, Undecided Justin Fast- Seattle Pacific University, Business Law Sarah Ferguson-University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Biology and Nursing Kelsey Finkelstein-University of Colorado-Denver, Liberal arts and science Evan Fisch-Carnegie Mellon, Civil engineering Alison Forrester-Colorado State University, Applied kinesiology Emily Freeman-University of Kansas, Political science Erica French-Colorado School of Mines, Engineering Cody Galbraith-Colorado State University Joel Goers-Taking a year off to travel in: China, South America, and Europe Alexandra Goldberg-Denver University, Business Andrew Goodman-University of Missouri, Journalism Ethan Gottula-University of Northern Colorado, Psychology Kipling Gray-University of Northern Colorado, Education Nicholas Graybeal-Adams State College Alexandra Green-Pacific Lutheran University, English education Scott Griffee-University of Colorado, Business Mariah Griggs-Metropolitan State College, Fine arts Amanda Grimes-University of Colorado-Denver, Pre-med Dylan Grimmett-Colorado State University, Undecided Laura Gritz-Colorado State University David Hahn-Colorado State University, Undecided Jacob Harmeyer-Colorado State University, Business Krysten Hart-University of British Columbia Okanagan, Undecided Ashley Harvie-Bridge Program Kirsten Hastert-United States Navy,

Nuclear engineering Taylor Hayek-Metropolitan State College, Art Austin Heller-University of Texas, Engineering Ty Henry-Fort Lewis, Undecided Lauren Hensen-Mesa State College, Criminal justice Thomas Hernandez-University of Colorado, Undecided Tyler Herrera-Univeristy of Colorado, Aerospace engineering Kelsey Herzfeld-Could not be reached Paige Hesen-University of Colorado , Psychology Alexa Heslin-University of Colorado, Undecided Gustavo Hidalgo Castillo-Metropolitan State College, Business Ashley Higgins-Metropolitan State College, Biology Ayla Higgins-Arapahoe Community College, General studies Brittany Hill-University of Colorado, Pre-Medicine Benjamin Hilzer-Colorado State University, Business Shaina Hoday-Los Angeles Community College, Undecided Renee Horsting-University of South Carolina, Hospitality Jody Hunt-University of Colorado, Education Courtney Ireland-Community College of Denver, Undecided Brianna Johnson-University of South Carolina, Psychology Jessica Johnson-Colorado State University, Human development Lauren Johnson-Arizona State University, History Leah Johnson-Iowa State University, Undecided Taylor Jones-University of Colorado, Communications Tyler Kahn-University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Planning and growth management Victoria Karst-University of Colorado, Integrative physiology Niki Katsaros-University of Colorado, Undecided Ian Kaufman-University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Game Development Shanna Keller-University of Northern Colorado, Nursing Ian Kelsall-University of Colorado, Undecided

Sana Khan-Unversity of Colorado, Biology Sarah Khan-University of Colorado-Denver, Psychology Max Kiehn-University of Colorado-Denver, Theater, Film, and Television Kyler KilgoreSarah Kim-University of Texas, Pharmacy Sara Kleinkopf-Whitman College, Environmental studies Melanie Koceski-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Kathleen Kopchik-University of Colorado Colorado Springs, Nursing Sean Kovacs-Marymount Manhattan College, Musical theater and Biology Tanner Krietemeier-University of Nebraska at Lincoln, Construction management Kelsey Krueger-Colorado State University, Undecided Katrina Lam-Could not be reached Dylan Lama-Could not be reached Samantha Lee-University of San Diego, Undecided Zachary Lee Metropolitan State College, Music artist management. Emily Leines-Nebraska Wesleyan University, Physical training Jah Juan Lewis-Undecided Taylor Lewis-Brigham Young University, Mechanical engineering Brandon Lichty-Metropolitan State University, Business Danielle Light-Biola University, Film Sara Lillard-Cal Poly State University, Aerospace engineering Christian Linder-Working at Dominoes Keith Link-Air Force Academy, Undecided Jacob Lissek-Fairleigh Dickinson College, Business Jiawei Liu-Not attending college next year David Loe-St. Olaf College, Norwegian history Meghan Long-Duquesne University, Undecided Drake Ludwig-Colorado State University, Undecided Stephen Mabary-Could not be reached Jake Macek-Arizona State University, Political science

Mackenzie Markey-Grand Valley State University, Hospital Management Faith Marshall-Xenon International, Cosmetology Graham Marshall-University of Toronto, Astronomy Catherine Martin-University of Colorado, Undecided Leah Mason-Colorado State University, Biochemistry Cody Matal-Colorado State University, Computer engineering Anne McCarthy-University of Notre Dame, Undecided Patrick McCloskey-University of Colorado-Denver, Business Lindsey McCormick-Georgia Southern University, Journalism Conor McCue-University of Colorado, Undecided Kathleen McLaughlin-University of Colorado, Undecided Kortney McPherson-Boston University, Pre-med and French Steffani Meusburger-University of Wisconsin, Undecided Danielle Michaeli-University of Colorado, Business marketing Alex Mierau-University of Puget Sound, Undecided Kyle Milberg-Denver University, Chemistry Emily Miller-Colorado State University, Undecided Mackenzie Mitzner-Grand Valley State University, Hospitality management Nicole Modesitt-Florida Southern College, Athletic Training William Morris-Undecided Matthew Morrison-Biola University, Film Kellicia Morse-Adams State College, Graphic design and Business Tyler Murphy-University of Colorado- Denver Paige Newman-University of Michigan, Undecided Charles Newton-University of Redlands, Undecided Alexandra Nilsson-Brigham Young University, Foreign affairs Kirstin Nordentoft-University of Colorado-

Denver, Math and Education Jenny Kristine Nordsletten-Colorado Mountain College, Undecided Ashley Norton-Fairleigh Dickinson University, Political science Alexander Nuss-University of Colorado, Biomedical engineering Erin Oehm-Kansas State University, Interior architecture Jonathan Orantes-Construction Jessica Owsley-University of Colorado, Undecided Michael Palestino-Marines Kaitlyn Pattarozzi-Metropolitan State College, Athletic training Bria Pellandini-University of Northern Colorado, Performing arts Courtney Personett- Arapahoe Community College Kelsey Peters-Colorado State University, Chemistry and Criminology Chelsea Peterson-University of Colorado, Pre-communications Tara Pianko-Colorado State University, Biological science Court Pietra-School of Mines, Engineering Caitlen Pogue-Colorado State University, Finance Matthew Porter-Colorado State University Pueblo, Communications Samantha Powell-Colorado School of Mines, Biochemistry Talia Pratte-Utah State University, Special education Whitney Prior-University of Texas, Communications Mason Proffit-Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design, Illustration Matthew Rabon-Vanderbilt University, Biomedical engineering William Ready-Metropolitan State College, Psychology Conor Reagan-University of Colorado, Business Justin Reed-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Kameron Reinke-Colorado State University, Business management Austin Reisman-Colorado State University, Business Logan Riley-University of Northern Colorado,

Undecided Taylor Ritter-Could not be reached Steven Rodriguez-Faulkner State, Undecided Meredith Rollins-Southwestern University, Undecided Elizabeth Rooney-Carthage College, Pre-law Thomas Rosenkrans-University of North Dakota, Aviation management Amanda Ross-School of Mines, Engineering Ryan Rossi-Could not be reached Melinda Rotunda-Community College of Denver, Undecided Alex Rowe-Dartmouth College, Environmental and mechanical engineering Meghan Ruenger-Could not be reached Jessica Salus-Colorado State University, Biology Andrew Sandlin-Fort Lewis, Business Marisa Sandoval-University of Colorado, Biochemistry Michael Sangaline-University of Colorado, Business Jordan Sartor-University of Oregon, Undecided Amanda Sawicki-University of Colorado, Integrated physiology Nicholas Scalercio-Metropolitan State College, Business Brandon Schein-University of Colorado-Denver, Psychology Jakeob Scherer-United States Marine Corps Brandon Schmidt- Nathan Schnebeck-Colorado School of Mines, Engineering Andrew Schneider-Denver University, Business Evan Schneider-Biola University, Cinema and media arts Casey Schwartz-Undecided Natalie Seely-Brigham Young University-Idaho, Music education Caitlin Sherry-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Dietrich Shockcor-United States Marine Corps Andrea Sieker-York College, Education Caroline Sievers-Southern Methodist University, Undecided Brooke Skinner-Duke University, Biomedical engineering Leann Slavin-Cosmetology program

Abigail Smith-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Christopher Smith-University of Colorado Denver, Mechanical engineering Connor Smith-Colorado Mountain College, Undecided Ronnie Smits-University of Northern Colorado, Elementary education Nicholas Sophinos-San Francisco State University, Business Forrest Spradling-University of Colorado-Denver, Architecture Megan Spradling-Washington State University, Biochemistry Lily Stanfield-Metropolitan State College, Forensic science and Psychology Katherine Stapleton-Colorado State University, Communications Chase Stasney-Monoa University, Travel industry management Ashley Stephens-University of Northern Colorado, Audiology and Speech therapy Tyler Strampel-McPherson College Curtis Stuck-University of Colorado-Denver, Creative Writing Marna Swakid-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Ian Szlachta-Metropolitan State College, Fine arts Camille Tan-University of Colorado-Denver, Pre-pharmacy Jonathan Tate-United States Military Tarrah Tate-University of North Carolina Asheville, Psychology Devin Tauber-University of Colorado-Denver, Undecided Cory Thelen-University of Colorado-Colorado Springs, Engineering Ashlee Thompson-Colorado State University, Equine science Logan Thompson-University of Puget Sound, English Daniel Tobey-University of Colorado, Fine arts Korina Tran-Cal Poly Pomona, Architecture Alexandra Tuccy-Metropolitan State College, Special education Sean Typher-Regis University, Pre-med Elizabeth Van Dyke-University of Tennessee Tyler Varland-Colorado State University, Business Allix Viau-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Ryan Vinchetti-University of Colorado,Undecided Jodie Wagner-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Emily Walker-Brigham Young University, Undecided Julien Walker-University of Colorado-Fort Lewis, Computer sciences Myles Wallingford-University of Colorado, English Hailey Walsh-Colorado State University, Undecided Meliss Watt-Metropolitan State College, Undecided Brittney Webber-University of Colorado, Business Allison Wesson-Arapahoe Community College, Undecided Andrew West-Could not be reached Brandon West-Could not be reached Hillary West-University of Colorado-Denver, Broadcast Journalism Pierce Westfall-Could not be reached Erik Wetzel-University of West Florida, Sports management Daniel Wheeler-Undecided, Liberal arts Nikolaus Wiersma-University of Idaho, Materials engineering Bradley Williams-Eckerd College, Business or International studies Bailey Wilson-University of Denver, Environmental science Andrew Wilt-Miami University, Microbiology Larry Woods-University of Colorado Business, Finance Diana Yang-Purdue University, Pre-pharmacy Trevor Yip-University of Colorado, Engineering Richard Young-Marines, Scout sniper Carissa Zabor-Undecided Arianna Zabriskie-Colorado State University, Biological science Erin Zelazny-University of Northern Colorado, Elementary education Matthew Zhu-Could not be reached Austin Ziel-Could not be reached Nicholas Zimberoff-University of Colorado- Colorado Springs,Undecided Kaitlin Zindel-University of Colorado, Biochemistry 

Compiled by the staff of The Rock


20 soundtrack: “Keep holding on” Avril Lavigne

05•06•10 senior salute

The pursuit of happiness My senior year at Rock Canyon has been filled with more friends, fun, and memories than my previous 3 years of high school combined. I lived my last year at Rock Canyon like it was my first year, because unfortunately it was. I transferred to Rock Canyon for my senior year after never feeling a sense of belonging at Regis. I missed the friends I grew up with, and the routine schedules, strict uniforms, lack of individuality, competitiveness, of this all guy school were certainly not making anything any better. I gave up everything I loved: lacrosse, music, family life, writing, skiing, and faltered in my academics. I gave up my individuality in hopes that I could someday conform and become part of the “Brotherhood;” after this I was left not only as an outcast, but having severed ties with my passions as well. I simply would just go to and from home and school on 45 minute drives everyday completely numb, without anything to participate in other than feeling unaccepted and sorry for myself. I distanced myself from everyone I loved because they were all at Rock Canyon, and as my loneliness grew it began to eat away at me, causing me to shove everyone I love away, even my family. I just didn’t fit in, and I was trying to be somebody I wasn’t. I once heard the phrase, “You spend more time in school than you do at your own house, so love your school as if it were your home.” Well, I vividly remember the day when I decided to go back home. I say that because at Rock Canyon I truly do feel at home. I was visiting my best friend in Arizona who had gone to Rocky Heights and Buffalo Ridge with the senior class. We were laughing about all the good times we used to have with our friends that are now currently at Rock Canyon. It then finally dawned on me that I had not been this happy in a long time, and just memories of my pre- High School friends and life could rekindle a spark of enthusiasm within me. I realized that I needed to set things straight, and graduate with the friends I loved and started with. Immediately after I got home I enrolled in this privilege of a public school. Some people would tell me, “Sometimes the grass isn’t always greener on the other side.” I can assure you all that is undoubtedly false. If I could make a cheesy moral quote, I would have to state “you don’t know what you’ve lost until it’s gone.” Thankfully I was finally recovering what I had lost, and nothing has ever been better! In the halls of Rock Canyon I would hope you can normally find me with a smile on, because I aim to give everyone back as they have given to me just by being a group of students that challenge me to always do my best, laugh hard everyday, pick me up when I am down, and cheer “We Love Evan” at the Regis vs. Rock Canyon basketball game. I could never be more thankful for anything than a life-changing moment like that. It was like the entire world stopped, and I realized that happiness is out there for the taking, and it is indeed attainable. I participated in everything I possibly could manage, like newspaper, lacrosse, mock trial, and Mr. Jag. I have never felt so accomplished and proud of myself, as I bonded with three amazing and talented teams through the good times and the bad. The best example of this extracurricular experience is Lacrosse; and as the season is coming to an end, I am so grateful that I get to express my gratitude towards the program and the players that were a family on the field. I am not very good at Lacrosse, I was last on the depth charts and did not see the field very often, but I love the sport. Thankfully to my coaches, the rest of my team, and myself, that is all that mattered. I hadn’t played since Freshman year which was when I quit the Regis team halfway through because I once again felt unwanted. The Rock Canyon Lacrosse bros however, never let me feel anything short being a player and a friend on the team. They congratulated me when I accomplished more and more as a player and athlete, helped me understand any mistakes I made, and inspired me to practice until I was worthy of competing on a Varsity level team. Through wind, snow, rain, blood, and tears they had my back and I could never thank the program enough for what they have done for me as a person. So the next time you say something because you are upset with Rock Canyon, even if you mean it full heartedly, try and consider that you could be stuck elsewhere without being able to be yourself. Stop thinking about what you don’t have and start being thankful for what you do.

CLOSING

THOUGHTS Evan Almon

Persevering through hard times She spent her life in the pool and in the dance studio. Dance was everything to her, and swimming was even more. For Lexie Goldberg, being active was all she knew. Until, in second grade, she was bit by a deer tick that carried Lyme disease. Though Lexie contracted the disease in second grade, it was not actually diagnosed until she was 12 years old. By the time the doctors caught the disease it was already neurological, so there was no cure. “On an everyday basis it makes me really tired and my joints constantly hurt,” said Lexie. “I have just learned to live with it.” Before she knew she had the disease, Lexie swam twice a day every day. “It was pretty much my entire life,” she said. “But when I found out I told myself I couldn’t do it anymore and gave up.” However, Lexie started swimming again her freshman year of high school, but not as much as before. She could not find a coach or a team outside of school that understood her situation. “Originally I felt like I was sick so I had to give up,” Lexie said. “When I got back into it, I wasn’t asking my coaches to put in less effort. I wanted to do what everyone else did, but no coach understood.” Lyme disease did not only affect swimming for Lexie, but also school. Starting mainly in 7th grade, every month or six weeks she would have to miss a week or two of school because the disease would flare up, and it would feel like she had mono. This caused Lexie to have to put in hours of make up work and catching up with teachers. “I have never really been one to complain,” said Lexie. “It’s just the way my life is [now]. My family and I still have the same expectations for me in school.”

Though she tried to keep positive through missing so much school, the make up work got out of hand at times and was overwhelming for Lexie. “Last semester I had two weeks to make up six weeks of missed school,” said Lexie. “And it was all during finals week, too.” Throughout the course of high school, some teachers were more understanding than others about Lexie’s disease and her frequent absences because of it. “Most teachers were helpful, but a few were definitely not,” she said. “I would have to teach myself what I missed and get by on my own. I don’t expect my teachers to do anything special for me except to give me the work to make up and just help me with questions I have.” Still, most of her teachers were understanding of the situation and did what they could to help Lexie get through the periods of school she missed and keep up with the work. “The good ones just helped me and made me feel like I wasn’t some bad kid ditching school,” Lexie said. “They understood that I had no control over what was going on.” Though Lyme disease has kept her out of school and limited her activities to some degree, it has also given her a new outlook on life, and a new attitude overall. “It kind of helped me because I was able to grow and push beyond what I thought my limits were,” said Lexie. “It sounds dumb and cliché, but having something like I have teaches you to push through and never give up.” Paige Newman

They understood that I had no control over what was going on.

So much more than just a pretty face What many fail to see about Megan Spradling as she passes them in the hall every day is that she isn’t just a pretty face, but a tenacious worker who wants to join the Air Force. For Megan, high school has been about experiences: with friends, with activities, and aspirations that she longs to achieve. Spradling’s favorite parts of high school were the friends she made, and the excitement that came from them. “I will never meet anyone like the people I met in high school,” said Spradling. “I know I will always remember the times we spent together.” She also entertained her more intellectual appetite by participating in her favorite high school activity, mock trial. “I am really in love with the mock trial program and the people in it,” said Spradling. Like the rest of her high school career, Spradling learned more by actually participating in the activity and experiencing it first hand, than she learned in any other class. “This is my inner nerd speaking, but I have learned so much more from participating in mock trial than I have from any other class,” said Spradling. Spradling plans on attending Washington State University this fall, hoping to study abroad in Spain so she can improve her Spanish speaking, which she plans on minoring in. She also yearns to help her fellow man, wants to major in either law or medicine, and use her skills and degrees from college to join the Air Force. Once in the air force, she hopes to achieve the rank of officer.

“I really want to help people one day,” said Spradling. “And I think the Air Force is a great way to do it.” At the moment Spradling hopes to go to medical school and enlist in the military after she graduates. “After med school I would enlist and hopefully end up with some kind of position at a military or VA hospital. At some point, I want to work internationally at air force bases where people need medical help the most.” Spradling’s father was in the Air Force and told her his adventuresome stories about his time there to Megan as she grew up. “My dad told me all about his career in the air force, which was 20 years,” said Spradling. “And he has told me about the different places he has been able to live and work in. I have always been interested in helping other people I have just never really known how I wanted to do it until I looked more into the Air Force and the endless amount of options I have within the military to help people.” Bill Spradling, Megan’s father, fully supports her decision to follow in his footsteps and join the Air Force. “I think Megan has the potential to be a very good doctor and I can even see her being more in the research end of medicine as well,” said Mr. Spradling. “I know she is really interested in joining the Air Force and I know it will be a wake up call for her because it’s tough... but she will make a great leader and will be able to handle anything the air force throws at her.” I don’t want to end up on the bandwagon,” said Spradling. “I want to do something completely different that will force me to look beyond my comfort zone and towards new experiences.” Connor Dozois


05•06•10 senior salute Photo by Alex Rowe

soundtrack: “Sing” A Chorus Line

21

Singing through the suspense David Loe was in the United Kingdom at the time of the now-infamous subway and bus bombings of July 7, 2005, in London. Only 13 years old, he was traveling the British Isles with a prestigious children’s choir, the Young Voices of Colorado. “We were having a great time,” said David, “and then we turned on the radio and heard the news.” On July 7, David’s choir was scheduled to perform one last time at a cathedral in London, then immediately fly home. Luckily, he and another member of the group were staying with a host family while the choir toured Wales. “They lived in a tiny little flat,” said David. “They didn’t have a TV at all. When they turned on the radio that day, we heard that bombs were going off all over London and they didn’t know where any more were.” It was not clear at the time that the only buses being targeted were public transportation, so David was terrified. He immediately thought of his own impending bus trip from Wales to London. “My friend and I were completely speechless,” said David. “We were travel-

ing all over the place on these great big buses and we couldn’t help but think maybe we were in danger too.” He had been enjoying the trip immensely, singing at some of the oldest and most famous cathedrals in the world. The adult chaperones of Young Voices quickly conferred and decided it was unwise to linger in the UK with a large group of children. They would depart from London as planned, but a day late. “When we got there, things were very different from the way they had been when we had first flown in,” said David. “The security was crazy, cops everywhere. People usually will stop on the sidewalks to chat with each other, but not then. Everyone was hurrying and looking terrified.” The normally congested London streets were moving swiftly. All public transportation had been shut down

We were having a great time. And then we turned on the radio and heard the news

and checked thoroughly for any hidden bombs. At David’s young age, however, he and his peers simply couldn’t comprehend the magnitude of the chaos and destruction. “Now that I look back on it, I think ‘Wow, we could have been in serious danger,’” said David. “But at the time we didn’t realize how significant it was, that more than 50 people had died and hundreds upon hundreds had been hurt. It could have been us. “The Moscow bombings made me remember it all again. I feel so terrible for those people. I saw firsthand what it’s like after something like that, and it’s not pretty. I just hope everything will be all right for them.” David’s choir experience will stay with him in his adult life. He will attend St. Olaf College in Minnesota next fall. The college has one of the best college choirs in the country, and David hopes to make singing something permanent. “I’ve been in several choirs since I was really young,” he said. “I want to be in them when I’m old, too.” Laura Romer

Satisfied with the norm Move over, Travis Imagine yourself a freshman, strutting down the work out, I’ll probably play Ultimate Frisbee, just to runway with a girl on each arm. Add on to that scekeep in shape.” nario that you are the only AJ also worked at freshman boy who is even Target from the end of his participating in the Fashsophomore year through his ion Show. For Alexander senior year, and as he is head“AJ” Nuss, it was all in the ing out for college he actually spirit of high school. attributes his time at Target to “I was in the After why he is going to University Prom Fundraiser all four of Colorado’s engineering years while I was at Rock school. Canyon,” said AJ. “It was “It was kind of like being just a way to be outgoing. stuck in the movie Office You always have a better Space, but I had to work a time if you get involved.” cash register too.” AJ stayed dedicated to “Working at Target defivolunteer service throughnitely made me want to have a out his time at Rock Canbetter major and work harder yon; aside from the After in college, that way I don’t Prom Fundraiser he also stay at Target forever,” said volunteered at the Wildcat AJ. “That is why I took AP Mountain Book Fair Physics. I figured if I was good since he was a freshman enough at it and enjoyed it I and worked at the Rocky might as well try engineering, Mountain food drive. and if that doesn’t work out Along with AJ’s I would like to be a math or volunteer service, he has English teacher.” been playing hockey since Once AJ goes off to college, he was five and started he still wants to push himself playing lacrosse in seventh to be as proactive as possible. grade, both of which AJ “You just have a betplayed varsity for at Rock ter time if you get involved Canyon. instead of just sitting around AJ and his mom, Chris Nuss, at the end of the runway of the sulking all the time,” said AJ. “I’m thinking about 2010 AfterProm fashion show. Photo by Meghan Long trying out for CU’s club “ I had a normal high school hockey team,” said AJ. experience; I went to all of the “Hockey was my favoirte sport in high school, because school events, I played sports, I didn’t get in trouble for I was so involved and have so many great memories drinking or anything like that, and I actually enjoyed with my teammates. But if college hockey doesn’t myself.” Curtis Stuck

Take a look around the musical world and you’ll be hard pressed to find a female drummer in a popular band. Take a look around Rock Canyon and you’ll quickly find Randi Couch hitting her snare. “In the fourth grade my mom told me I had to be in the band,” said Randi. “She told me that I could play any instrument I wanted, so I picked the drums. They looked fun.” Eight years later, Randi is still banging on the drums. Throughout high school she’s been perfecting her skills by participating in drumline. “I’d definitely say one thing that has shaped my life is drumline,” said Randi. “I love it because music has always been a huge part of my life. Drumline was a good way to express that.” Among Couch’s musical influences, Travis Barker of Blink-182 is at the top of the list. “I love Blink, their music was different from any other stuff I had heard like Brittney Spears or Backstreet Boys,” said Randi. “Travis [Barker] is so unique, I’ve never heard anyone else play the drums the way he does.” Joel Naegele, her band teacher and conductor, has taught Randi for her entire high school career. “I have to say something nice about Randi?” said Naegele sarcastically. “Well, let’s see. She’s got a great sense of humor and is a good little musician.” As Naegele alluded to, in typical rock star fashion, Randi is always eager to have fun and create havoc during drumline. “We screwed around a lot and always had a ton of fun,” said Randi. “One time

Forever making music in life Christopher Battin picked up a violin when he was in first grade. This was just the start of a childhood centered around music. Throughout the course of elementary and middle school, he became more and more of a musician as he became interested in various genres of music and began playing several instruments. “I didn’t enjoy music all that much when I was a kid,” said Chris, “but I always loved to play around on the violin and the piano.” As of now, he plays the guitar, the viola, the piano, and in his free time, he enjoys playing the electric bass. Chris also composes full orchestra pieces. He has been in a band since his junior year and got involved with music throughout high school. He has played the guitar in every school musical as well as been a guitarist in the jazz band since his freshman year. Chris did not play in Jazz band the second semester of his senior year because he needed room in his schedule. He has been in the orchestra all four years as well. Music is the biggest influence on Chris’ life right now. He uses his

compositions and the “softer” things that he writes to express how he feels, even without lyrics. He has not only been influenced by music but also by several musicians. “My biggest influences in guitar are Steve Vai and Joe Satriani for their technical and creative genius,” said Chris, “but in music overall the composers Debussy, Brahms, and Benjamin Britten have inspired me to dive seriously into music. Ben Folds inspired my writing a lot as well, how he can write a depressing song but still be so lighthearted.” Chris’ best musical accomplishments include writing a full orchestral composition. He is planning on attending University of Colorado and is undecided on what he wants to major in. Though he may or may not major in music, he hopes to continue onward with his musical talents in his life. “If there is one word that describes me, it is Champion.” Sean McGavin

Photo by Alex Rowe we had a water fight and totally demolished the band. We gave some kid a bloody nose. It was awesome.” While many may be quick to criticize female drummers, Randi has a message for all of the skeptics. “I might be a female drummer,” said Randi, “but I’ve proven myself and I know what I’m talking about.” Skyler Draper

Photo by Alex Rowe


22 soundtrack: “Shadow” Ashlee Simpson

05•06•10 senior salute

Photo by Zach Tornabene

Overcoming life in the shadows For Kyle Milberg, swimming is simply a way of life. It’s something that he has always known, and the only thing he has ever done. Although Kyle believes that many people don’t know much about the boys swim team, he finally feels like he is making progress, especially since his older sister, is state champion swimmer Kirsten Milberg, was off to college and off the high school radar last year. “It is a pretty big reputation to live up to. I have put a lot into swimming and finally I am starting to make a name for myself,” said Kyle. But making a name for himself hasn’t come as easily as it could have. Having an older sibling is hard enough for most students, but for an athlete with an older sibling in the same exact sport, things can get a little more complicated. “My sister Kirsten is only a year older and is an amazing swimmer. She was a eight time high school state champ, swimmer of the year, and student athlete of the year in the Denver post. It is a pretty big reputation to live up to,” said Kyle. Now that he finally has all the attention on his name with Kirsten gone, he doesn’t enjoy it as much as he

thought he would. The pressure to do well has switched from his older sister to his own shoulders, and the weight of it can sometimes be hard to handle. He has the State Championship, the Denver Post, and the whole of Rock Canyon Swim Team peaking over his shoulder, watching his every move. “The pressure is so much more now that [Kristen] is gone,” said Kyle. It is tough to live up to.” As the stress to impress increases, the support decreases. With his sister moved out of the house and on to her own college career at the University of Denver, its hard to believe that the looming shadow is gone too. Kyle is truly on his own, doing his own sport, at his own school. “For so long I really wanted that attention, but now that my sister is gone I miss having her there for me.” Kyle said. Kyle has come realize that no matter how many times he may have fought with his sister at home, its not worth losing her support at the swim meet. “I am going to the University of Denver with her next year because i realized how much harder swimming was without her support,” Kyle said.

And if it wasn’t hard enough with his sistergone, with the long hours he must put in daily, himself drifting away from some of his friends. Year round he swims almost every day. He admits it’s hard to balance school friends and swimming. “Because of how much training I do, especially over the summer. I have grown a little distant from my school friends,” Kyle said. “But have gotten even closer with my swimming friends.” Swimming is a brutally honest sport, one that requires more work and dedication than many people would be willing to take. But Kyle is not intimidated. So although he used to live in the shadow of his sister’s impressive reputation, the swimming spotlight is finally on him. He has to practice harder, and find a balance in his life in order to find the success that he truly deserves. Sara Heyn

Fast facts • Kyle swims about four miles every day at practice. • His favorite race is the 200 yard backstroke. • Kyle is ranked third in the nation in the 200 yard backstroke. • Next year at DU, he will have four hours of practice a day, which means about seven or eight miles of swimming a day next year. • Each DU swimmer swims three races at their conference meet, so Kyle will swim the 100 back, 200 back, and 100 fly. Compiled by Paige Newman

Leaving footprints Trying to fit into the mold on her heart Niki Katsaros has opened up. Stepped out. And is ready to move on. As a freshman, she was shy. Even insecure, but she learned in time how to be vivacious. “I found out that I’m happiest around people, and that people are really more similar then you would think,” Niki said. Niki’s personal journal started when she made the choice to get involved. She experimented with Culinary Club, but feeling a lack of personal development she opted for Spanish Honor Society and Link Crew instead. Activities that would enrich her as a person. But at times, the process had its drawbacks. She admits she made mistakes, but thinks the outcome is positive. Always. Even when going down a long pathway, the outcome will always be a good one. “You take a dive and open up. Try something new. But in the process…you learn from the experience and learn from your mistakes.” Niki’s biggest obstacle is defining herself. “I’m still not sure who I am, but at least now I’m leaving high school with more education,” said Niki. “Not only about the world, but myself too.” Senior year became a virtual nightmare as she struggled to balance a waitressing job, coaching a cheerleading time with her best friend, and her other activities. She had already had to give up soccer- one of her greatest passions, to the disappointment of her mother. But by

“Are you excited for high school?” “Got everything you need for high school?” “What activities are thinking about in high school?” ….Um, well, I guess I hadn’t really thought about it that much. That was always my response when people would ask me these sort of things. How was I supposed to know what I wanted from high school? The only time I had ever even seen the inside of a high school was in American Pie or when my mom and I would work lunch at Regis because my brothers went to school there. I knew only a few key things before entering high school. If you wanted to get the girl you had to be either the quarterback or the starting pitcher. If you wanted to get beaten up and thrown in lockers you joined the speech team or the chess club. If you wanted friends you spent weekends in malls looking for cool clothes to wear. Who knows where you get your premonitions about high school. Movies, probably. Television, maybe. Wild assumptions based on absolutely nothing, most definitely. My first few months I spent a lot of time not trying to be cool, but just figuring out what it even meant to be cool. But try as I might I found myself spending three days a week at speech and debate, where I was very good, and five days a week at soccer, where I was barely mediocre. Days turned into weeks and months and I was raising first place trophies with men in suits on them and trying to find enough places to pin my medals. And in athletics and social savvy, I was still barely mediocre. Now that months have turned into years, I have competed and succeeded on the speech and debate, mock trial, and FLBA teams. So all I’m missing are my coke bottle glasses and pocket protector, I suppose. But looking back, soccer was fun, good exercise, and provided some camaraderie, but never meant to me what the other things did. When I got to high school I would have given anything to figure out what the mold was, how some people managed to fit into it so well, and what I needed to do to fit equally as well. I never did figure that

one out, but by being ok with what I was good at and what I wasn’t, the friends, some success, and contentment to a point I never had before high school just sort of fell into my lap. My freshman year I spent nights sitting up trying to figure out what exactly I was missing. Why my mold didn’t fit. Why I felt so claustrophobic walking down the hallway. But it wasn’t because I didn’t fit the mold, it was because there was no mold. Turns out, no one really cares what clubs you’re in or how long ago you got diamond studs in your ears. Some people will like you no matter what, and some people won’t, no matter what. The only mold that has ever existed in high school is the one that kids build around themselves. Every opportunity turned down for fear of teasing shapes it a little more, every avenue not explored, every chance for success turned down because it just doesn’t sound like very much fun wraps the mold tighter around you. I think I was just about to put the finishing touches on a mold that would have left me miserable in high school, until a speech and debate coach told me joining the speech club would make the debate class I was in easier. That was the first crack in the mold I was working on. And from then on, every nudge towards something I would have never seen myself doing has cracked it a little more. Standing outside my shattered mold, it’s surprisingly clear to me, the only mold that ever existed for me is the one I built for myself.

CLOSING

THOUGHTS Logan Thompson

second semester, Niki was done. Ready to move on to the next part of her life. In retrospect though, she wouldn’t change a thing. High school had been an interesting trek, but it was worth it, and if she had the time, she would thank everyone she had encountered. “Whether you like it or not,” Niki said, “people are going to leave footprints on your heart.” Daniel Wheeler


05•06•10 senior salute

soundtrack: “Spirit in the night” Bruce Springsteen

23

Keep the spirit up CLOSING

high school, I spent about There’s something $300 and 70 hours feeding about football season that the random people who turns me into a crazed fan. showed up in the side lot. I have to admit that I went I’m encouraged, however, to one basketball game by of the and one wrestling meet Drew Goodman classtheofparticipation 2014. Every single the entire year. But I went home game I attended, I saw at least a few to every single home football game last freshmen in attendance. I was discourseason. aged by the showing of the Sophomore I didn’t just go, either. Tom Rosenand Junior classes, and I was at more krans ’10, and I arrived at the Shea Stadium parking lot before every game at games than the new Golden Boyz in those classes. least two and a half hours before kickoff, For those of you out there who are “too broke out the grill, and cooked for cool” to have school spirit, look around, everyone who showed up. I don’t know take some time out of your day, and supwhat it was about my senior year, but in port your sports teams. Remember that previous seasons, I’d only gone to one or you only have four years here, so make two a year, usually the Castle View and the most of it. Homecoming games. The last season of

THOUGHTS

The final wave of high school

Ahead of the game Arianna Zabriskie received the chance to see people in a unique way, a way where a split second could mean life or death for a person, a way where a single mistake could end somebody’s life. At the beginning of her senior year, Arianna started a program at Littleton Hospital called the CNA program, or the Certified Nurse Assistant. It is a program through ACC which Zabriskie can use towards her degree when she attends Colorado State in the fall. “I hope to major in biological sciences,” said Arianna. “I originally wanted to be psychiatrist, but I decided that while working here that I would rather be a dermatologist.” Arianna explained that she would rather work with people who have a physical illness rather than a mental illness. “I realize that both would be draining but I think working with mentally unstable people would be harder,” said Arianna. “It baffles me how much people

change when they are sick. They are completely different. When they get better, though, they are actually human again. That’s why I like doing what I do because I get to see that transformation while I help them any way I can.” Throughout her stint with the hospital, Arianna has made a different kind of connection from the patient; a connection with the staff. “The show Scrubs is a very accurate example of hospital staff,” said Arianna. “We all have a very dry sense of humor. It’s something you really have to have if you work at a hospital because of the serious nature of your work. We all understand it and appreciate it.” Arianna’s connection with her colleagues is based on more than just a sense of humor, but also on an extremely personal level. “We once had an AIDS patient come in and the head nurse wouldn’t even let me follow her into the room,” said Arianna. “She told me that she thought of me as her daughter and that she wouldn’t

Arianna and Mandy Grimes ‘10, talk to a patient at the hospital about winter. The patient brought up the topic of winter to them as she inquired about the weather outside. Photo by Zach Tornabene let her kids in that room. It’s one of the things that I appreciated most.” It’s these personal connections that help keep Arianna on track. “Those connections help take my mind off all of the unpleasent stuff that you see on a day to day basis,” said Arianna. “It’s what keeps me going.” Zach Tornabene

Competing with the clock I keep tying the perpetual staring contest with my alarm clock. The blue LED stares back at me, and the night slowly develops into morning. I am an insomniac. For over 35 million Americans, including myself, sleep has become a luxury that is seldom afforded. Over 30 percent of the adult population is considered to be suffering sleep deprivation, which costs the government up to $100 billion in medical expenses and productivity losses every year. You encounter insomniacs everyday. It has become an illness so common that it is almost unspoken. I share this unknown connection with the people around me. We may seem your average student by day, but our second life begins when the clock tolls midnight. We are only halfway through our long and arduous day. Insomniacs spend their time differently. Many will stay up doing work for school or a job, others will stay up watching movies and playing video games. I am a reader. For most of my night I read booksanything from Dostoevsky to Frank Miller comics. Though this activity is straining on my already tired eyes, it is nice to be able to just sit down and relax, and read a book. It may seem as though I enjoy my insomnia, which sometimes I dobut it’s actually the reading I enjoy, and for the most part insomnia is really stressful. If I have something I need to get done, then it seems like a gift. But those nights are rare. Most of the time, when I actually want sleep, I end up laying in bed

CLOSING

staring down my alarm clock, hoping that I am asleep before it starts ringing to remind me I have school. Day time activities become increasingly monotonous when you are an insomniac. Since you are usually too tired to think through what you are doing, you have to rely on your muscle memory. Walking to and from class, petty hallway conversation, writing your name on papers, and eating, all become products of mindless repetition. There’s a point in all the obscurity which accompanies sleep deprivation when you begin to feel like you are dreaming while you are awake, when everything feels like an abstraction. This is the point when I fall asleep, and claim as many hours of rest as possible. When you awake from a good night’s sleep, after countless nights of insomnia, you feel as if you have been distilled from from an unpleasant chaos, like you have been purified and rejuvenated. This incredible sensation occasionally justifies the strenuous nights of gawking at my alarm, but the end can’t always justify the means. After these great nights I reset, regress to an ever familiar over excitement- the prelude to the long, burdensome nights without sleep ahead of me.

THOUGHTS Connor Dozois

Let’s go Jaguars, let’s go Kaitie Coppola’s high school experience can be boiled down to black faces, gold shoes, and Mardi gras beads. Kaitie Coppola will always remember here first homecoming game as a high school student. Kaitie and her friend Jessica Bicknell (Castle View) decided to go all out to the homecoming game their freshmen year. “We painted huge paw prints on our faces, spray painted our shoes gold, and bought gold and black Mardi gras beads,” said Kaitie, “and we got stuffed animal jaguars and velcroed them to ourselves.” The girls couldn’t find black face paint so they had to use eyeliner. “It took 20 minutes just to put the

paws on our faces,” said Kaitie. Kaitie liked her freshman year homecoming game the most because it was the game with the most spirit. “That year unlike the rest the seniors had a lot of school spirit and they got everyone involved,” said Kaitie. “I have never seen people dress up that much for any other game I was actually on the low side for dressing up,” said Kaitie. What Kaitie will always remember about that night was how the school came together as one. “ It’s fun everyone is cheering and it’s the only game that everyone goes to and the whole school cheers and marches together,” said Kaitie. “No one was cliqued

into groups it was just one school.” When the football team won the homecoming game the entire stands rushed the stage and celebrated with the football team. “ Everyone was going crazy screaming and celebrating, I lost my voice,” said Kaitie. It was a great start and memory to Kaitie Coppola’s high school years. Lauren Scheirman

CLOSING

Like many people, I vividly remember my first day of freshman year. Seniors appeared so wise, so experienced. Being a senior, I feel anything but. Myles Wallingford Each year I realize how knowledgeable I thought I was before, which seems to be nothing compared to what is known now. Think of each individual student that goes here. Think of their personality, their habits, their behavior. Imagine that they, some day, could raise a child. Imagine what that child will grow up to be like under their influence. Imagine what your classmate’s parent was like in high school, how their character effected the way their child developed. Think about that kid in your class, you know-that one kid. Imagine who he will end up marrying. Think of where he will live, the problems he will face, the people he will befriend, the people he will piss off, the daily routine he will acquire. Think of the role he will play in this game called society. What role will you play? It is almost sure to turn out different than you currently picture it. Where will our teachers be in 30 years? Will they still remember having you in class? Some will still be in their profession; some will have retired and can be found playing shuffle board off the Florida coast, requiring a cane for assistance with standing. Some will have left this earth. All will have lost color in their hair. They will have altered the way you understand the world, but will the favor have been returned? There will be things you regret from your high school career. What will you desire to have done differently? What would you have liked to have said to that one person before you parted ways forever? What will be their final thought on your existence, what do you wish it to be? 30 years from now, high school will be a 30 second clip of flashing images/sounds/smells/feelings/emotions/memories that all blur together to give you a dominant impression of your time spent in and outside this building. Every subject’s recollection will turn out a different color than yours. Will you have played a part in creating that hue, adding a shade of light or darkness to it? Is it not sad that four long and difficult years of tests and studying and homework and hours spent in a desk are summed up with a simple digit known as a ‘GPA?’ I believe one’s knowledge and understanding of the world is worth more than a numerical value. There will be many of these generalizations in life. It’s not the score you are given, but the experience you had and impact you left while creating such a value that matters. Case in point is salary. Because this is RCHS, most of us will go to college and get some fancy degree. Some will choose an (in my opinion) immoral carrerar such as Business or Marketing, thinking solely of the number of digits on their next paycheck. Some will buy a $60,000 car for their child, but wont donate a cent to charity at checkout. Bred in an enviornment symbolic of the capitalistic system, RC has been a safe haven. After all, it is hard to spell ‘riches’ without rchs.Tucked away in the quite suburbs, many are unaware of the realities of life, that millions of people go to bed hungry at night. It’s easy to ignor facts like these and flip on MTV once the school day is over, furthur fueling ignorane. We talk of “The Bubble” jokingly, doing nothing to dispell the stereotype. Hopefully one day there will be some sort of reform.

THOUGHTS


24 soundtrack: “Here I am” Camp Rock

05•06•10 senior salute

Exceeding expectations Ashley Harvie always considered herself to be unique. Not because she was born with a learning disability. Not because she sometimes had to try twice as hard as her classmates to get her work done. And not because she would run into the occasionally mean peer. Ashley is a hard worker, a great friend and can make just about anyone laugh. “I love who I am,” said Ashley. “And I love all my friends.” Although her high school experience was not the typical routine, she enjoyed every second. Just like everyone else Ashley loved to go to football games and getting dressed up for dances. “I played on the unified soccer and basketball team,” said Ashley. “It was very fun!” Not only involved in sports, Ashley was also a member of the key club and did some work with the culinary club. She explained how some people doubted she could do all her activities and keep up with school, but she proved them all wrong. “I have been working with Ashley since she came here four years ago,” said Jenn Ottinger, one of Ashley’s favorite teachers. “She is very quirky and has a dry sense of humor; she can always make me laugh.” Through out her four years at Rock Canyon Ashley did a lot of work with the Special Education Department, whom she credits a lot of her success to, as well as taking regular classes with her peers. “My favorite part of high school was hanging out with all my friends, my best friend Emily Fenton ’11, and my teachers,” said Ashley. “I am very excited for graduation because I get a graduation party!” So what is up next for Ashley? She will be joining the Bridge Program which is a transition program for 18 to 21 year olds to help them find jobs, experience real-life situations, and make the transition out of high school easier. Her parents are also looking into a transition college in Chicago where she could live in dorms, experience the’college life’, and learn to live independently. “The program will really be fun and

Quoted

Ashley is a really good friend. I will miss her waving at me in the hallway when she leaves. -Damon Levigne ‘13

She is my best friend. I will miss having her in class next year because she is fun and really helpful. -Emily Fenton ‘11

I worked with Ashley for unified basketball and soccer. She is a great person and so enthusiastic and encouraging. -Renee Horsting ‘10 helpful,” said Ashley. “I am ready to start it soon.” Although the past four years have not always been easy, Ashley and her family, friends and teachers have enjoyed every second of it. “Ashley is definitely one of those students I will keep in touch with,” said Ottinger. “I think I learned just as much from her as she did from me.” Exceeding expectations, proving everyone wrong, and moving on to life’s next adventure, Ashley is thankful for her four wonderful years at RC. “It will be sad to leave, but I am still excited,” said Ashley. “I had fun here, learning everyday and meeting friends. Sometimes they were mean, but they just don’t know me.” Paige Hesen

Startling revelations I vividly remember a certain incident that happened my freshman year. A very minor incident, mind you, but one that has stuck with me a long time. It was in Journalism class. Mr. Kennedy told us that we were going to be seeing an original production by Ponderosa High School’s Theatre Department called “Revelations.” Watching the play I was stunned by how good it actually was for a student-written play. But I was even more excited about what I thought was some fiery and exciting symbolism they had chosen to add. “Revelations” was set in a coffee shop, where the students/actors would come and go and talk about their problems. Periodically I would hear a sort of chime in the background. I of course interpreted this initially as recognition of when a character on stage had had a revelation. But then I soon realized that the chimes were coming awfully fast and at seemingly random moments. Which is when I had a revelation. The chime wasn’t a symbol. It was merely some minor sound effect to signify when the door of the coffee shop was opening and closing. I was a little let down. Certainly I felt somewhat foolish making a huge deal out of something rather minor. In fact, I hadn’t really thought much about that day until I realized my life was sort of becoming like a character in the students’ play. Full of revelations. When I was a little younger...say my sophomore year, I was dead set on making an experimental film. Inspired by my favorite filmmaker John Waters’ life story on how he got started out making gory unusual films on the sly, I was determined to create my own piece of lovable celluloid fun. I began writing a script, visualizing locations to film at, and asking people whether they might be interested in being in my film. But soon I found it more difficult then I thought, trying to balance the prospects of making a film (even a short one), and keeping up with school and life. I shelved the project, kept my love of film, and kept that desire to make a film on the back burner. Just recently I was watching the film “Scorpio Rising,”

by Kenneth Anger. I was amazed by its color, its occultish themes, its screaming visuals, and shocking gritty nature. And I had a revelation. Yes, a movie with no dialogue about flashy drugtaking satanic bikers caused me to have a revelation. I still want to make that movie. Even if I never make multiple films in my life, I still don’t want to let that dream go away. Even now as I write this commentary, I’m still thinking about the prospects of making my movie. Using my creative talents in a new medium. Even if I am not as good as some of the greats, I’ll never learn if I don’t try. I want to be that person who blends strange imagery and poetic beauty. The possibilities seem endless. So why not? And ultimately, I guess, the rest of my life at the moment has been full of revelations. Mostly revelations are about things I still want to do with my life. Things I still want to achieve. A simple, rather tedious project about poetry in English reminded me that poetry actually is a worthwhile subject and not a pretension. Certain relationships with people reminded me that “the course of true love never did run smooth.” All the roles I played this year reminded me of why I love theatre, and despise it at the same time. But they also made me come to the revelation that theatre is a part of me, so I should never abandon it. A chance encounter with my dad’s half-sister made me come a rather unexpected revelation. That “family isn’t a word, but a sentence.” My grandmother’s death this year also reminded me of the same thing. Sometimes revelations can have dual meanings. I hope this doesn’t seem entirely tedious. Because the truth is, all these little revelations have allowed me to piece together who I am at the moment. And right now, I seem like a pretty strange, mixedmedium sculpture. And perhaps one day I’ll be made out into a fine marble bust of sorts, but for now I like my confused status. So bring on more revelations. I’ve gotten quite used to that little chime sounding off in the background...

CLOSING

THOUGHTS Daniel Wheeler

Tooting his own horn Within four years of high school, one can often see in that time the rewards of their work and discover passions they will keep for the rest of their lives. This is certainly true for Alex Dagner, who has fostered a passion for music through playing the trumpet and the baritone for the RC symphonic and concert bands. Alex joined band his freshman year and quickly became an active member, willing and able to play two different instruments, the trumpet and the baritone. “We started out a little sketchy and I was a bit skeptical at first, but band has definitely developed over the years,” said Alex. “Today we’re the best we have ever been before.” This can certainly be proved true when looking at how the RC band scored this year in the CHSAA (Colorado High School Activities Association) competition. For this event, the band performs one or two songs to four judges that come to the school, and are graded on a one through three scale in several different categories, ranging from rhythm to tone, quality to interpretation. “In past years, we have achieved an overall ‘1’ rating, but never across the board,” said Alex. This year, for the first time in school history, the symphonic band made perfect scores in every category for their two pieces “Yorkshire Ballad” and “Exhilaration.” While Alex certainly helped make this a reality, it was a team effort on the part of both the students and their teacher, Joel Naegele. “Mr. Naegele is one of my favorite teachers ever,” said Alex. “He is always there to support us, and his jokes and sarcasm make band so much more fun.” While this feat in and of itself is truly impressive, Alex has also played band

while actively involved with Track and Field. “These definitely take up a lot of my time, and you really have to go full out to succeed,” said Alex. He has, however, seemed to have found a healthy balance between the two. While the band was awarded a plaque for their flawless performance, this was not the real reward for Alex. He discovered and enhanced his passion for music and plans to continue cultivating his talent next year at CU Boulder, where he will attend college. “I really love music because it’s more than just an activity,” said Alex. “It is an art form and a way to express who you are.” Matt Rabon


05•06•10 senior salute

soundtrack: “Getcha head in the game” High School Musical

25

Giant leaps forward For the most part, JahJuan Lewis is a normal 19 year-old guy. He is working on parabolas in math class; he refuses to eat his carrots; he hangs out with his friends. But Jah-Juan started out in a very different environment than Highlands Ranch, Colorado: Brooklyn, New York City. Beyond the lights, the fashion, and busy streets, Jah-Juan describes life on the East Coast as “close.” “Everyone is closer in New York,” he said. “Well everything is closer in New York so relationships are a lot closer.” But in 2008 Jah-Juan decided to move from New York to Denver in order to take advantage of the educational opportunities in Colorado. He was going to leave his family, his friends, and his high school basketball team. When he came to Highlands Ranch for the first time, it was a whole new world. “Have you ever seen that show ‘Seventh Heaven?’ Yeah, it looked a lot like that when I first got here,” he said. “But the people, like the parents and kids were nice and welcoming. It wasn’t too much of a problem. I knew it was going to be different, so I was somewhat prepared.” To keep himself occupied, he began to play pick up basketball at the local rec centers. That’s where he met one of the biggest

influences of his life: Eric Burrage. Eric remembers the first time he saw Jah-Juan playing. “Someone set up a game between us, to see who was better. I was thinking, ‘I’m about to bust this kid’s ass in ball,’” he said with a laugh. “I won but I thought I needed to keep in touch so we could play another time.” From there, their friendship flourished. Almost every day that summer, Eric and Jah-Juan could be found together, whether they were at the rec center or just lounging around in Eric’s basement playing video games. Before the Burrage’s knew it, they began to notice items of Jah-Juan’s showing up in their house. “I remember one time I found a box of cereal and a carton of soy milk in the basement. It was Jah-Juan’s!” Laura, his aunt said, laughing. “He was at our house so often that he started bringing stuff like food over, so he didn’t feel like he was eating all of ours.” It didn’t take long for Jah-Juan to become part of the family. That next year, JahJuan had his mind set on going to RCHS to finish his graduation requirements. The Burrages opened their doors and allowed him to move in with only three rules: try in school, keep your bedroom clean, and fol-

low curfew. Along with Jah-Juan’s arrival came Eric’s graduation. He went nearly one thousand miles across the country to University of Pittsburgh. “I wasn’t sad because I knew we would keep in touch some how… I mean I was sad but I knew we would see each other again,” Jah-Juan said. Eric’s influence helped him continue striving for his goals throughout his senior year and to stay focused on the important things. Along with hopes of graduating, he came to RCHS in order to fulfill another goal; play on the varsity basketball team. At first the basketball program was hesitant to let Jah-Juan join, being that it is rare for a transferred student to play varsity level their first year at the school. But the charisma and energy that Jah-Juan brought to the team made him a crowd favorite. “I will miss high school basketball the most,” he said. “It’s a lot of fun traveling with the boys on the team and I will miss all the coaches. Overall, it’s just a lot of fun.” He is already setting goals for himself in the future. “I hope to graduate,” he laughed. “Graduate from college and maybe take part in a coaching job. Not in Colorado though! No, I can’t live in Colorado. Arizona, New York, somewhere, but definitely not Colorado.”

All the way in Pittsburgh, Eric heard the news about Jah-Juan’s graduation. “I’m proud of him. I’m proud because he has taken big steps to adjust to things he is not used to, like being challenged in school and being forced to earn everything he gets. I want to be there to see him graduate. Too bad I’ll be in summer school,” Eric said. “But I don’t know. Maybe I can come over for that weekend.” As of now the basketball program in Louisburg, North Carolina is looking at Jah-Juan for a potential spot on their team. “I am excited for the opportunity, but I’m not sure if it’s certain. I’ll keep my fingers crossed. But even if I don’t make it, look out for me! I will be playing basketball somewhere, even if it’s just at the rec.” But Laura sees JahJuan achieving more than just success on the basketball court. When asked what she sees for Jah-Juan in the future she pauses for a second, smiles and says, “The kid can make me extremely mad at times but every time he talks to me, he makes my heart melt.” She laughs before continuing. “He has a way of winning people’s hearts. That’s what makes him so special.” Dani Burrage

Lights, camera, action, film school Evan Schneider is the RCTV phenomenon who has made his way through broadcast after broadcast of RCTV films. As a junior, he was the youngest of the legendary Team Laisyzer and has become the role model to many new-comers on RCTV. “My favorite high school experience would probably have to do with everything on RCTV,” said Evan. “I have gotten to do a lot of really cool projects, go to some sweet places, and I learned way more than I ever thought I would.” Evan says that his favorite broadcasts over his high school career were Team Laisyzer’s “Male Model” or “Bye, Bye, Bye.” “Male Models was our very first broadcast as Team Laisyzer and we never thought it would turn out so funny,” he said. “Also, ‘Bye, Bye, Bye’ was so fun to make. We

pretty much just took a camera and acted like NSYNC for a week filming the music video and announcements.” When you see the final broadcast it can be a week sometimes more of hard work and the final project isn’t as easy as it looks. “The hardest things about making films is trying to make the story flow and go together,” said Evan. “It is not always that easy. We once forgot to plug in the mic, so then all the audio didn’t work for the whole film.” Even though there were some hard times, Evan not only impacted the people around him on RCTV, but stuck out to the teachers as well. “Evan was one of the most talented, if not the most talented that has come through our program in the school’s existence,” said Jim McClurg, RCTV founder and teacher. “His passion for learning through filming

and producing video with professional equipment made him stand out from the others. It probably doesn’t hurt that he is quite a perfectionist.” Evan said that film is his true passion over anything else. As he moves on next year he will be attending the University of Biola in Southern California where he will major in film. You never know, maybe in the future you will see Evan as a famous film editor or producer out in Hollywood. “RCTV was the best. It gave me an opportunity to be creative and work with other people. I will not only remember it forever, but I have made friends in there that I will always keep in touch with.” Courtney Schellenger

Photo by Alex Rowe

Aloha Colorado, goodbye Hawaii

Nicole during her summer trip to Hawaii in 2007.

Nicole Modesitt was able to experience beaches, nice sunny weather, and fun every day while she lived in Hawaii. Although Nicole was only 7 when she lived there with her family, it was a great experience. She only lived in Hawaii for a year, but her family goes back every summer to the island of Kauai. Each summer, they rent out their old house for about two weeks. “Even though I only lived there for a little,” said Nicole, “I love Hawaii, and I look forward to going there every year. It’s awesome.” Now, Nicole has a tattoo of a turtle on the top of her foot to symbolize her love for Hawaii and her time spent there. Nicole’s best memory of Hawaii is when she would go to the beach with her

family and friends and then go to the ice cream shop. “That ice cream shop was the best!” said Nicole. “Their coconut ice cream was amazing!” After living in Hawaii, Nicole moved to Colorado where for her first two years of high school she attended Chaparral. “I hated Chaparral,” said Nicole. “It wasn’t fun and I wanted to go somewhere else so I could have a really good high school experience.” Next year, Nicole plans to attend Florida Southern College in Florida and she is majoring in Athletic Training and minoring in Marine Biology. She also is trying to see if she can play volleyball for the school as well. “I picked this school because it’s

somewhere warm and it’s small but really nice,” said Nicole. “Also, the one thing I really liked is that you get to start your major as a freshman with a guaranteed internship, which is super nice.” Nicole says that Hawaii had a part in influencing her to go into Marine Biology. “Whenever I am in Hawaii I go scuba-diving,” said Nicole. “I got to see so much and it made me interested in Marine Biology.” Although her time at Rock Canyon was enjoyable, as she participated in Choir, varsity volleyball, and other clubs, and she is excited for the next upcoming years in her life. “The one thing I am going to miss in Florida is the snow and the mountains!”

Nicole’s tattoo of a turtle

said Nicole. “I love snowboarding, so you will definitely see me back in Colorado over winter break snowboarding!” Erika Guilbault


26 soundtrack: “Behind blue eyes” The Who

05•06•10 senior salute

The rule of threes Three is Chelsea Peterson’s favorite number. She moved to Colorado from Georgia in third grade, she has been in three talent shows, she has been in three school musicals, she played Girl #3 in “How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying,” she placed third in Colorado’s state Irish dancing competition, she wants to make it to the top third in the National Irish dancing competition someday, and she is completing her third year at Rock Canyon High School. Along with participating in both Chamber and Women’s select choirs, musicals, and two AP classes, Peterson finds the time to spend two hours each day, five days a week, and anywhere from two to ten hours on weekends at her Irish dance studio, Celtic Steps Studio. “I used to do ballet and competitive dance, but I quit [last spring] so I could focus on Irish dance.” said Peterson, “School comes pretty naturally to me. I’ve found a good balance.” Peterson competes in about ten competitions in Colorado each year, in regional every year, and even in Nationals, which was in Ireland this year. Only 40 of the about 200 dancers at her studio were given the opportunity to go, and although she didn’t make it to the top

third this year, Peterson is not willing to give up yet. “My ultimate goal is to compete at nationals for my solos.” said Peterson, “I want to be really good. It’s like, you want to keep winning and beating other people.” Not even college will stop her. Although looking to major in either pre-communication or pre-health at University of Colorado-Boulder, Celtic Steps is conveniently looking to expand to Boulder, allowing Peterson to keep dancing with them. These lofty goals have seeped into her entire family, causing them to become an “Irish dance family”. With each costume costing around $2,000, plus about $50 per competition, and at least $7 per class, her parents have their hands full; All of their vacations end up being about dance. Fortunately, Peterson’s mom used to Irish dance, and her sister, Hannah Peterson ‘13, dances as well. Her Dad is more than happy to cheer the girls on, as he always has. The most exciting thing for Peterson right now is graduating, which she will celebrate with exactly three graduation parties. Emma Kate Fittes

Mason Proffit, on the far left, with some friends

Too much fun to grow up

Kristen Corl’s self portrait Kristen Corl has been behind the lenses of cameras since 7th grade. A simple gift she got for Christmas eventually grew into her biggest passion. Currently in Photo IV, Corl does work outside the classroom, sometimes even for a profit. Corl takes senior portraits, as well as portraits for various local bands including Carcinoma and Iconocaust. She advertises her services on flicker and other social networking sights, occasionally landing gigs. “It’s difficult, even when bands do decide they want me to take their picture,”said Corl. “Bands are flakey, you can’t really rely on them.” Some of her most elaborate work is created when she is the one in front of the camera. Corl is a also makeup artist, often taking two to three hours to apply a design for a shoot. One of her self-portraits is on display in the library, right behind the main desk. “Sometimes I will go downstairs when I have all my stuff on and my mom will say, ‘Oh my god, you look like your ready for Halloween!’”

Learning about yourself Through her last year of high school, Kate Pattarozzi has overcome a lot of adversity, but she has refused to let it bring her down. “[All of the bad things that have happened] has made me a stronger person and made me realize things about myself that I didn’t know before,” said Kate. During her junior year, Kate was forced to transfer from Highlands Ranch High School to Rock Canyon because of problems with the administration. “I didn’t like the administration at Highlands Ranch because [I felt that] they let you do whatever you wanted. If there was trouble, it was your problem to fix it. [It felt like] they didn’t really want to help you succeed,” said Kate. Though she didn’t move very far, Kate was still forced to leave her friends behind and make new ones. “At first it was weird, the schools are really different,” said Kate. “Looking back now I see that the change was good, it was interesting to change high schools and meet a bunch of new people. The kids at Rock Canyon are a lot more outgoing and motivated than at Highlands Ranch.” Kate’s senior year proved to be her toughest year. On September 18, her best friend, David King, committed suicide. It crushed Kate. The two were like brother and

sister, they had grown up with each other, and they were always there for each other. “When I first found out, it made me feel lost, confused, and alone. I wasn’t until after I started to grieve that I realized he was in a better place and that he was watching over me,” said Kate. Just a few months after losing David, Kate’s family life was also starting to fall apart. In January, Kate’s father left her family and shortly after her parents officially seperated. The split agitated Kate at first, but she soon realized that it was best for her family. “My parents fought a lot and I believe that the split was for the best because it made them both grow up a lot.” Though she was put through a lot in her final two years of high school, she has made the best of things, and her outlook on life couldn’t be more positive. Kate is most proud of herself for staying strong through her struggles. “Throughout everything, I have kept myself up,” she said. “I have learned that I am never alone, and that [life] is a long road, but even if you take a wrong turn or two, you can always get back on the right path.” Taylor Pettaway

When most people see Mason Proffit they don’t think ‘teddy bear.’ His spiked up mohawk, multiple piercings, tattoo on his calf of a Celtic knot, and interesting style of dress make the majority of the population look the other way. However, for Mason, the label of ‘punk’ is what he chose to be, despite not being accepted by most of his peers. “For me, my hair, my dress, it’s a way for everyone to see what I am,” Mason said. “If people are going to judge me by the way I cut my hair or the way I dress, than it’s not worth my time to be [their] friend, because I don’t want to be friends with judgmental people.” Mason cares more about how he lives his own life. “I live my life very free; I try my best to do what I want. I use my discretion and follow my own rules and generally keep out of trouble,” he said. While Mason follows some of the usual stereotypes of his label, such as rebellion, and listening to heavy metal, he also has a side of him that most people never take the time to know.

Mason doesn’t smoke pot, he loves reading, and he and his mom have always gotten along. Not only that, but Mason is an optimist. “I know for a fact that human nature is good on its own,” he said. “I’m a hopeful person; I have a lot of hope that people will get better. I see a lot of things that people do are bad, but I hope for them.” Mason hasn’t always been so hopeful for the future, and he had to go through his own crossroads before he decided to be the person he is now. “When I decided to become ‘free’ I was in a bad place, and I didn’t want anything to do with people,” he said. “I was so sad and angry all the time; I needed a change, so I changed.” Glad to leave Rock Canyon behind after graduation, Mason will be attending Rocky Mountain College of Art and Design in the spring to become a tattoo artist, unsure of what his future will bring. “Honestly, I want to stay a kid forever,” said Mason. “I’m having too much fun right now.” Maddie Jones

In a crowd you might not notice that Joey Costello is particularly tall, or built all that solidly, or even that he seems a touch short, but chances are good that you would notice him. Growing all his life, but finding newfound freedom in these last few months is what Joey would call “the worlds most awesome chia pet.” His afro has been given free range of late, and has taken the opportunity to be Joey’s most proud and noticeable characteristic. That isn’t all that Joey gives free range to though. He lives his life free of inhibitions, worries, and fear. Which are convenient things to not be burdened by when you’re whipping yourself through the air at speeds upward of fifty miles and hour on your 200CC dirt bike. Dirt biking since he was eleven it was Joey’s way to unleash his love of thrill. “I wasn’t trying to be rebellious or do something outrageous, I was trying to have a good time,” said Costello. He has carved grooves into the solid

mud, and into his life as well. “I have won some awards and competitions”, said Costello, “but what really matters to me is the organization biking has brought to my life. He applies that organization on and off the track, and uses it to keep him honest. Whenever it seems like a good time to watch a movie instead of doing homework, or see a friend instead of menial chores he focuses on the concentration and preparation it takes to perfect his moves on the bike, and then applies that focus to his life, and that has helped him keep everything in perspective. The only thing that seems able to contain Joey’s hair is a motocross helmet, and the only thing that seems able to contain Joey himself, is motocross. “I think in the end everyone needs something that they can both fall back on, and that keeps their life exciting enough to be worth living.” Logan Thompson

Cutting his own groove


05•06•10 jaguar stories

jaguar stories

slices of life from our community

soundtrack: “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” Mendelssohn

Join student dancers from the area as they take on the challenge of a classical ballet

Dancers begin long journey toward a dream performance calm before storm March 6, 2010. 6 p.m. In a back corner of the Mellow Mushroom, a loud group of teenagers are taking up the biggest table. There is a lot of hugging and texting, and every few minutes another person walks in and joins the group. The waiters run off to get more drinks, sighing wearily. These are the dancers from the International Ballet School, their friends, boyfriends, and siblings – no one is excluded here. It is the last weekend before they start rehearsing for their spring show, “A Midsummer Night’s Dream,” and they are celebrating with dinner and a movie, a rarity for these constantly busy dancers. It’s been over an hour, and there is still no sign of Anisa Scott, who planned everything tonight, and her friend Kelsey Heiman. “Ha! I got here before them! And I came from Ballet Guild!” says Sylvie Cubbage, who rushed to the restaurant from a ballet competition. “Is Kelsey driving? I could see Kelsey getting lost,” says Allie Hutt. After much speculation and a few phone calls, it is determined that they are indeed lost. Directions are given and Anisa and Kelsey arrive 20 minutes later. With everybody finally at the restaurant, pizzas are ordered and the conversation turns to their favorite topic: ballet drama. They talk about their director, their classes, and of course their auditions for Midsummer, which are on Wednesday. Surprisingly, there is no cattiness, no snarky gossip. They are each other’s best friends, and while they have had their share of fights, they have figured out that it’s easier to just be nice when you spend every single day together. The breezy, lighthearted mood of tonight won’t last forever. A week from tonight, they will be at home after rehearsal, nursing sore muscles, and trying to remember their choreography. But right now there is only excitement and hope about the coming week. auditions March 10, 2010. 7 p.m. At the International Ballet School studios in Littleton, tall skinny “bunheads” in leotards and tights fill out audition forms in the dressing room. They laugh and joke with each other. They discuss their favorite music. Laura Achziger throws a jellybean into Anisa Scott’s open mouth from across the room. Nobody would ever guess that they are about to audition for anything, especially not their spring show. It is extremely important to all of them. All the girls are given numbers to pin on. This is just a formality – directors Mark and Sandra Carlson already know all of the dancers. They have likely already thought about who will dance what roles. At the back of the studio, Sophia Andrianakos walks in quietly and starts chatting with a few friends. She is in street clothes and is walking with a slight limp. Her knee gave out at a competition on Friday, and although she will be better in time for the show, she cannot dance today. However, she still had to come to the audition. “They still gave me a number. I’m number 63,” Sophia tells her friends. She has been stuck at home all week, letting her knee heal. She hopes to get a good role tonight, even without dancing. It might make the knee seem like less of a disappointment. “It’s so boring just sitting at home after school,” she says. Mark Carlson walks into the room and the chatter subsides. He is a tall man who reminds many of the girls of Santa Claus. He explains that they will do a quick barre to warm up. He gives the first combination at lightning speed and turns on the music, and all of a sudden everyone is moving in unison, plie, plie, grande plie. After barre, Mark sits down and his wife Sandra takes over. “Okay, let’s do some stuff from the ballet,” she says. She teaches several excerpts. Cobweb and Puck. Peaseblossom and Puck. Helena and Hermia. She and Mark want to see the girls act – they already know what they can do technically. Sandra explains what she wants to see in Helena’s dance. “You’re not the girl who’s like, ‘And then I was lost.’ You’re the girl who’s like, ‘AND THEN I WAS LOST IN THE WOODS, AND IT WAS SCARY, AND I COULDN’T FIND DEMITRIUS!!”

With this in mind, the girls go all out with both their dancing and their acting. With only one combination left, Sandra has the dancers partner up. They prepare for the scene where Helena and Hermia get in a catfight. This involves fake-slapping and punching, and the dancers eat it up. When the audition is over, they go out to the dressing room to wait for their results. At first everyone is happy, the mood light. Everyone enjoyed the audition, especially the acting. But after a few minutes, the chatter subsides as the nerves sink in and the dancers seem to realize that they are competing with each other. They realize how badly they want these roles. “The post-audition cloud of silence has descended,” says Emily Snow. After 20 long minutes, the dancers are called back into the studio to get their roles. Sandra makes a quick speech about coming to class and rehearsal before handing out the forms with the roles written on them. As the girls get their papers back, they either run off to the dressing room to compare notes or to their cars to hide their disappointment. In the dressing room, Charis Spencer is ecstatic. She has been cast as Peaseblossom, a major solo role. This is by far the biggest part she has ever been given. At 14, she is one of the youngest soloists in the group. “I’m so happy!! I’ve never gotten anything like this!” Charis says. She is so elated, she is close to tears. Sitting on a bench, Sophia Andrianakos is quietly packing up her things. She seems content. Another dancer asks, “What did you get, Sophia?” “I got Cobweb and corps parts,” she says, a smile on her face. Her hard work over the past semester has paid off. Despite not being able to dance tonight, she has been given a solo role. excited for the show March 11, 2010. 3:30 p.m. Pre-professional class is about to begin at International Ballet School. Dancers are sitting on the floor or stretching on the barre, chatting quietly. There is rarely any mention of Midsummer. None of the girls want to seem as if they are bragging or complaining about their parts. Slava Mesropov is teaching class today. If Mark Carlson is Santa Claus, then Slava is one of his elves. He teaches his classes with a ton of energy and enthusiasm. He starts the music and the class is off and running. After an intense technique class comes variations. In this class the girls learn solos from famous classical ballets and perform them in small groups or by themselves. The pre-professionals are joined by the intermediate group. The girls who aren’t dancing at the moment sidle up to each other, whispering, “So… what did you get?” They quickly tell each other their parts, reply “oh, good job,” and walk away, curiosity satisfied. After the audition on Wednesday, Sandra had announced she would not be posting a cast list for the show until it was absolutely necessary, which only intensified the intrigue. The idea was to prevent drama surrounding casting. With four shows and many parts triple-cast, some girls will get to dance their solo roles more than others. Announcing who these girls are is like throwing a match onto a pile of kindling. However, by the end of class on Thursday, everyone knows what everyone else is dancing. Mystery out of the way, they can now begin to get excited about rehearsal on Saturday. This is reflected in many of the girls’ Facebook statuses: “Stoked for Midsummers! I wanna rehearse right now!!” “A Midsummer Night’s Dream… I am pumped for tomorrow!” “OMG so stoked for tomorrow!!” a very long day March 13, 2010. 9 a.m. Before they can start learning the choreography, the dancers have a two-hour technique class with Sandra Carlson. They dust off the early morning cobwebs and slowly start to warm up. They give it their all in class, but they all know that they have to save some energy for later. Most of the dancers won’t be finished until 3 or 4 this afternoon. Others won’t leave until 6. After class, they have a half hour for lunch. Many

of the girls make a quick run to Wendy’s or to the gas station to get soda, candy, coffee, or fries. The healthy ones might have a salad. Most of them seem to think that if you’re going to dance for four hours, you can eat what you want. They grab their wallets and their jackets without a second thought. “It feels like it was Nutcracker rehearsal yesterday,” says Ryan Lee. “Yeah, these three months have gone by way too fast,” replies Sophia Andrianakos. Everyone quickly buys and scarfs down their food, then they put on their pointe shoes and head into the studio. Mark Carlson enters the room with his laptop and a DVD of the show from three years ago. They will learn the choreography from watching the video. After watching the first wedding scene dance, Mark asks eight random girls to pick spots and dance it. Immediately, the room is whispering, trying to figure out the logistics of who will actually have to dance which parts. Sandra already told some of the girls that they had to learn two spots in all the corps de ballet dances, but they won’t know which ones to learn until they have definite casts in place. Mark just wants to focus on learning the choreography for now. After struggling through this first wedding dance, the girls have a short break. Everyone is starting to get tired and a little frustrated. After the break they start working on a dance for the Titania’s Court section. It’s complicated choreography, with people running in different directions and lots of formation changes. Mark is trying to use analogies to explain the dance, but the dancers are still focused on figuring out the formations and are very confused. “This right side is normal. The left side is opposite, so you’re in bizarre world. No, actually, this left side is supposed to be in normal world. Can I see?” Mark asks. Half of the girls go in one direction, half in the other. They stop and regroup. “Guys, we changed it,” says Allie Hutt. This is news to several of the dancers. Just as everyone is reaching the peak of confusion, Sandra walks in and glances at the haphazard formation. “Has Mark given you guys spots yet?” she asks. She is answered by a chorus of no’s. “Okay, I’ll do the formations on Monday,” she says. Everyone breathes a sigh of relief. It is almost 2:30 anyway, and corps rehearsal is over. Only the soloists have to stay now. Three and a half hours later, the last of the soloists are straggling out. Their rehearsal for the Lovers (Helena and Hermia) ran over by an hour. They take off their pointe shoes as fast as they can – it is obvious that their feet are throbbing. They have learned so much choreography, it isn’t all straight in their heads. Yet they seem happy, the agitation from corps rehearsal seems to have faded. “It’s so much fun!” says Sylvie Cubbage. The girls exchange good-byes and head home to nurse their aching muscles. reviewing their work March 15, 2010. 5 p.m. A quick one-hour rehearsal is about to start at International Ballet School. Everyone has just finished putting on their pointe shoes. Many of the girls still seem exhausted from the weekend. Sandra Carlson walks in. In a quick, no-nonsense manner, everyone is given places for the Titania’s Court dance and the choreography is reviewed. Everything is much calmer than it was on Saturday. No one is arguing and the dance starts to come together. The rehearsal passes quickly and everyone goes to the dressing room to pack up their things. They won’t have rehearsal again for another two weeks due to spring break. “Guys, we have to remember this,” says Allie Hutt. They all know that forgetting some choreography is inevitable, but having people come back with no recollection of the dance causes problems for everyone. Everyone agrees and goes home peacefully. Even thought there are sure to be waves later in the rehearsal process, right now the waters are calm. The show is June 4-5 at the DU Newman Center. For tickets talk to Sarah Foley. Guest writer Sarah Foley

27


28 soundtrack: “Teenagers” My Chemical Romance

jaguar stories

slices of life from our community

05•06•10 jaguar stories

Join a chemistry class for a few days as they explore the mysteries of heat, and a talented instructor

Sophomores mix fun, hard work in chemistry new seating March 18, 2010 As Dave Ferguson’s 3rd period Honors Chemistry class had finally gotten settled into their seats, Ferguson stood and caught them all by surprise: “Grab your stuff, stand up, we’re getting new seats today.” The response was a series of moans and groans. Not only was there the confusion of walking in the next day and forgetting the new seating arrangement, but the students also had to try to decipher another confusing sheet of paper. No one ever knew which way to turn the sheet of paper to figure out which side showed the front of the room. Usually the students would just guess, and wait to be told by Ferguson whether or not they were in the right place. But today was different. Today, Ferguson dared to do something most teachers would never even attempt. “Instead of a seating chart, everyone pick two other people to sit at a table with you. No more than three per table.” This time, the class responded with excited chatter and appreciative comments. Still, the question remained as to why Ferguson would allow such madness. Ferguson’s third period had a history of being a rather talkative bunch. A few of the more bold students had managed to sneak on over to a friend’s table from time to time. Now sneaking was no longer necessary. Towards the back of the class sat sophomores Christian Storch, Steven Theodore, and Taylor Woods. Storch was a tall boy who often liked to wear what he referred to as “tall tees,” even if it didn’t seem to fit him. One shirt in particular always seemed to grab other students’ attention. It was a large orange plaid shirt that was covered in brown and white lines. His friends could give him a hard time about it all they wanted, but none of it was enough to keep Storch from simply grinning in return. He had a loud and expressive personality, and was never too shy to holler out humorous comments in class. Theodore wasn’t much different from Storch in this way. He too found immense joy in calling out clever responses to some of Ferguson’s lessons. Much of Theodore’s time in class was spent carefully pulling an iPod out onto his desk while trying to play a few techno songs as softly as possible. He didn’t always succeed, considering Ferguson would often hear the music and say, “Put it away or it’s mine, Steven.” At another table, seated in the middle of the classroom, were sophomores Nick Merrill, Ben Finnerty, and Devon Block. Merrill could almost always be found in something that sported the USC Trojans. He loved to join in on the banter in the classroom; Ferguson described him as “one of the brightest kids in the class.” Even though Merrill frustrated him from time to time, Ferguson knew that he was always interested in the matter at hand when it came to chemistry. He never ceased to ask questions, which came in handy for him when he was able to complete his assignments with time left over to talk with his friends. Just then, another boy walked through the door of the classroom: Sam Harlan ‘12. “I’m sick,” he said after entering. Harlan, a normally vibrant and upbeat spirit in the class, looked completely and totally worn out. Storch had even told him that he had looked like a “diseased hatchling.” Harlan had trudged into class that morning in his brightly colored shoes and Rock Canyon Lacrosse hoodie that he wore often, even though he wasn’t actually on the team. After everyone was situated and Ferguson recorded the new seating arrangement, he stood in front of the class and opened with the question: “What is heat?” Most responded with, “Heat is energy.” However, Anthony Mcknight ‘12, dared to respond with a vocabulary enhanced answer that made the students who managed to hear his explanation frown in confusion. Katie Lillard, another student who Ferguson regarded as a “star” in the bunch, wondered aloud, “Is he supposed to be in this class?” It appeared she thought Anthony belonged in a far more advanced class. After listening to a few more failed attempts from the class, Ferguson finally smiled and handed out a stack of papers. At the top of the packet were the words “Thermochemistry and Calorimetry.” Some students read the questions while most first tried to pronounce the word “calorimetry.” Ferguson looked around the classroom and said to all of them, “You’ve got some work to do.” back from break March 29, 2010 The Monday after Spring Break was not one that

anyone looked forward to. However, Lauren Fleecs ‘12, came to class with a bright smile on her face. She was wearing a medical boot on her leg which explained the need for the wheelchair. Some asked “What happened?” Block replied jokingly, “Oh, she stepped on a staple.” Fleecs replied with a joyful chuckle and corrected him, “I had surgery.” After the bell rang and everyone had sleepily settled into their seats, Ferguson called out to Woods, who managed to situate herself next to her friend Nancy Hunt ‘12, “This isn’t social hour, Taylor.” Nancy tried to think of a quick excuse and replied, “She’s explaining the lab from Friday to me.” “No, she’s not,” Ferguson replied with a smile. Woods went back to her desk and promised to finish her story later. Ferguson wasted no time in starting the lesson for the day. As he scribbled a few things on the board, a large bang was heard from the day-care classroom next door. Any other class probably would have paused and acknowledged the incident, but third period was used to this sort of thing by now. It wasn’t rare for them to hear a scream come from the class every now and then, so a loud bang from a chair didn’t seem to be much of an exception. As Ferguson continued to teach, the class began to jump into the conversation. They were discussing entropy, a term that came from thermochemistry. After Ferguson explained the term a bit, Nick interrupted, “So the more heat you have, the more entropy you have?” This sparked further conversation throughout the class as the concept was becoming more and more confusing. This wasn’t a necessarily bad thing, in fact it was rather expected. As Ferguson often said, chemistry is “difficult stuff.” After the class had decided that they couldn’t pick apart the subject any further, Ferguson headed back toward his desk and reminded the class, “Don’t forget: there’s a homework quiz tomorrow.” The majority of the students responded in bewilderment: “What?!” quiz day March 30, 2010 Devon walked into the classroom and sat down at his seat while muttering, “There’s no way we’re taking this quiz today.” The majority of the students from third period had spent the previous night scrambling through the oversized chemistry book to finish the homework that had been assigned over the week in the hopes of surviving their quiz. Despite Devon’s hopes, after the bell rang, Ferguson stood and said what he did before every test or quiz: “Two per table facing me.” The class groaned as they situated themselves in the two-per-table-facing-me arrangement. They all put away everything but a calculator as Ferguson began to pass out the quiz. When he finished, he returned to his desk and waited for the students to finish. The quiz didn’t actually contain much of what was on the homework. In fact, in order to pass this quiz, they would only have had to pay attention in class. Hardly a problem for this class. After a while, Ferguson called out and asked, “Who needs more time?” The majority of the class raised their hands. Ferguson shook his head. “Come on guys, you know this stuff.” Christian turned around from the table at the very front of the classroom where he and Sam Harlan had situated themselves for the quiz and said, “Staring at a problem will not help you figure it out.” Ferguson said, “Yeah, believe him. He’d know.” The class laughed again as Ferguson made it clear that he was just joking. Two minutes later, Ferguson declared, “Time’s up.” A few students groaned. “Don’t cry, Steven,” Christian called from the back of the class. Ferguson had the students switch papers with the person next to them. As he went through the questions, they responded with groans and cheers as some were fortunate enough to answer a question right and others weren’t so lucky. As it turned out, the outcome of the quizzes wasn’t as bad the class had anticipated. “I’m happy with my score,” Nancy said. She had been one of the ones dreading the quiz most of all. The class brought the quizzes up to the front of the class and then returned to their seats. As they did so, Ferguson cut open an ice pack and explained that it was full of ammonium nitrate.

“If you eat that stuff, you die,” Nancy pointed out proudly. She seemed to know much about the subject; she is a soccer player who used ice packs often. Ferguson poured the contents of the ice pack into a beaker. As he shook it around, he managed to capture the interest of the group by telling them about how ammonium nitrate could be used to make bombs. “How could you make a bomb out of that stuff, Ferg?” Nick called out. Ferguson’s response was a mischievous smile. The class erupted with laughter at this scenario. He poured water into the beaker and the class watched as some sort of smoke rose from the mixture. Ferguson explained how the process that was going on was called an endothermic process. This meant that the mixture was taking in energy from its surroundings. The class passed around the concoction while Ferguson wrote the formula up on the board. As he did so, he heard some chattering from the back of the room. Sam and Christian were talking and Christian had his phone out. “Christian, it’s mine,” Ferguson said, referring to the phone. He was serious now. He told the two boys to go out in the hall. Sam tried to fight a smile as they left the class. “How old are you?” Ferguson asked before he reached the door. “Sixteen,” Sam replied. “Yeah, going on six,” Ferguson replied. lab day April 1, 2010 Ferguson started off the day by passing out another lab and asking the class to read it silently. “What’s a King Soopers calorimeter?” one of the students asked. Ferguson held up two styrofoam cups stacked on top of each other with half a styrofoam cup placed upside down on the two. “Why’s it called a King Soopers calorimeter?” Nancy asked. “I made it up,” he replied with a proud smile. After a while, he asked Taylor to summarize what they had just read. She explained the procedure that they were about to carry out and the short paragraph at the top of the lab that explained the concept they would be learning. This launched a discussion about how thinking and calorie burning are related. “So the more you think, the more calories you burn,” Devon thought out loud. This seemed to humor the students who now were buzzing about the relationship between the two. “What if you don’t think that much?” someone asked. “I guess you’d have to make up for it in fidgeting,” Ferguson replied while fidgeting to himself. Sam joined Ferguson in his joking. “I’ve got a six pack from fidgeting,” he said. Of course, this resulted in a few laughs from some friends nearby. As everyone settled down, Ferguson explained the procedure a bit further, and then sent them on their way. Everyone grabbed goggles and aprons. Ferguson told everyone to make sure that they wore their glasses correctly as he looked at Nick and Devon who were wearing their goggles around their necks. “Oh come one, Ferg,” Nick protested. “We gotta protect the jugular.” He patted his neck with a grin. When Ferguson didn’t look convinced, he slid his goggles back over his eyes. The class experimented with “King Soopers calorimeters” and substances to record the heat change. Devon came through the front door with a bag labeled “Subway.” It seemed as if no one had noticed he’d left. Unfortunately for him, Ferguson had noticed him re-enter. He asked him what he was doing. “A friend got it for me, Ferg, I swear! I can even show you the text he sent me,” Devon defended himself. “You’re not supposed to be texting either,” Ferguson responded. Devon wasn’t sure what to say to this. Ferguson just laughed. Although Ferguson finds his third period class irritating at times, he also knows that it isn’t a group of lost causes. In fact, third period is one of his higher scoring classes. As frustrating as all of the disruptions can be, Ferguson actually prefers it this way. He can’t stand having a boring class. “Some of these kids may not be able to dress themselves,” he says, “but when it comes to chemistry they know what they’re doing.”

Ginny Stouse


05•06•10 community

soundtrack: “Acoustic #3” Goo Goo Dolls

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29


30 soundtrack: “The Grocery Store” Jim Gaffigan

05•06•10 jaguar stories

jaguar stories

slices of life from our community It’s Grand Re-Opening Week at the Castle Pines North King Soopers. Check out the fun.

Hectic week at Kings means overtime for some ready for a long night Sunday Susan Patrick wanders around the produce department frazzled by the Sunday rush. A list is formulated as she scans for empty displays that need filling. The notebook is quickly crammed with scribbles of the standard four digit PLU code for each needed fruit or vegetable. She then hustles back to the crowded back room to retrieve the inventory needed. It is three days before the grand re-opening of King Soopers Store #91 in Castle Pines and the remodel is two days behind schedule. Tonight not only will Susan have to keep the displays presentable for the customers, but clear them by the end of her shift so the remodel crew can replace two aging cooled tables. But meanwhile the dinner rush on a Sunday night is enough to worry about on its own. Broccoli must be conditioned, celery must be washed, the tomatoes rotated, and the lettuce trimmed. The final product is wheeled out and stacked, only to reveal more empty space that must be filled with product. “This is insane,” said Susan. “They expect us to fill all this,” she jokes. After a few hours, and a skipped break, she is finally able to catch up. The wet rack (a long display that is sprayed with water to keep vegetables fresh) is piled full. The remaining tables are stacked neatly in pyramids of fresh fruit. Now all she must do is wait. After finally getting caught up, Susan must merely keep the department tidy and let items sell down until business dies off and she can clear the shelves for the remodel crew. She finally gets a chance to take a break and grabs a markdown sandwich from the deli as she prepares for a long night. “Who knows how long I’ll be here tonight? There’s a lot of stuff to do,” says Susan. The department is down a man today as fellow new hire Doug Davis is out sick with the flu that has been going around the department. “I’m one person doing two people’s job,” says Susan, “but I don’t mind it. The money is always nice.” “There’s no limit on overtime this week; the big guys want everything perfect,” explains Susan, “so I’ll take advantage of it.” Susan picked up the job when the store was hiring last month to help send her two sons through college. Her husband is a pilot for United Airlines, and is flying to Hawaii this weekend. “Might as well pick up some extra money to send to my sons. I’m the only one home this weekend, it keeps me busy,” she explains. It’s not long before she is back out on the floor, and it is time to clear the tables. She loads up a cart with boxes and begins to take down the displays. Before she gets a chance to rest, it’s ten o’clock and group of contracted workers begin to gather at the front of the store. The nocturnal group pounds the caffeine as Susan removes the last apple from the display. As Susan clocks out the remodel crew clocks in. The crew plugs in the radio and to the sound of sweet mariachi tunes they begin the miracle seven-hour overhaul the crew has until the store opens at 5 a.m. the next day. no tables Monday “They’re still not done?” asks the antsy produce manager Harry Baker. It is now seven o’clock on a Monday morning and the store has been open two hours without any tables to display the fresh fruit. While replacing the display tables last night, the crew inadvertently damaged the refrigeration unit that is used to cool the tables. A repairman is diligently working to get it back to functioning but meanwhile the rest of the morning produce clerks are at a standstill. In the back room the clerks are working to unload the daily shipment received that morning. The room is already cluttered with bins and boxes of produce waiting to get on shelves, but the tower of boxes can only stack so high. Until the new tables are ready to go, the sinks used to clean the veggies cannot even be accessed due to the mountain of boxes surrounding them. “We got about a 700-piece load,” says Harry, referring to the number of boxes the shipment contained, which is about 400 more than the average due to the grand

reopening. “We’ve got to move this stuff or we’re going to fall even further behind,” says Harry. Not only is the mishap making the schedule even tighter, but the department is losing valuable sales that are used to determine how many hours the department can give its employees the following week. “They better fix this. I’ve got a family to feed,” says clerk John Foster. Finally the repairman enters the back room and notifies Harry the tables are complete. The clerks load up the carts and head out to the floor to fill up the new tables and create some space in the back room. After a few hours the mountain of boxes has transformed to a steep hill and the new tables are stacked full and functioning. Susan arrives again to work the evening shift and manager Harry Baker commends her for the good work she did the previous evening. Tonight she will do the same with the wet rack that contains all the vegetables. “Hopefully the rack goes a little smoother than the tables,” says Harry. morale is up Tuesday Assistant manager Sean Hoffman arrives to a much more pleasant surprise than manager Harry did the previous day. The new wet rack is functioning properly and is refrigerated at the correct temperature. However, the back room has regained its mountain status as another shipment of inventory for the upcoming grand reopening sale has arrived. The room is a maze of pallets and boxes, and the floor is littered with shards of tile from the newly replaced flooring. Employee moral is up despite the extra work for the same pay. “This is a hell of a lot better than yesterday,” says John. It is now two days away from grand reopening and final preparations are being made. New lights are installed above the display table, and a new case is installed for prepared fruit trays. But most importantly the order for inventory to be delivered for the grand reopening must be made. As newly promoted assistant manager, Sean is in charge. With little faith in his own ability, he begins what will be a two-hour marathon phone call with the district manager Mike Vallejo. Multiple trips are made from the computer to the sales floor and back to the phone to receive instructions from Mike throughout the lengthy ordeal. Right as the 11 o’clock order deadline arrives, the order is submitted. The remainder of the day is spent tidying up the department and preparing it for the big day tomorrow. With a large expected number of customers and corporate inspectors in town, the department must begin spotless and well stocked. Doug Davis has recovered from the flu and is back to work today. Susan has the day off so Doug will be the closer this evening. “Geez, I barely even recognize this place,” said Doug, commenting the newly remodeled department. As Doug gets to work, the morning employees file out when their shift comes to an end, looking forward to the reopening tomorrow that will spice up such a repetitive job. Assistant manager Sean’s time comes to leave and he says goodbye to Doug and clocks out nervously, hoping he ordered enough for the big day tomorrow. the big day arrives Wednesday It is early, really early, and today is the big day. Signs have been hung around the store, sale advertisements are printed and ready, and the store is fully stocked. Manager Harry Baker and assistant Sean Hoffman arrive at 4 a.m. to ensure everything is in place. They double check the price tags, rearrange the fruit, and clear out the back room into tidy stacks of boxes. Assistant manager Sean’s nerves are loosened as he sees the order came in as expected, and seems to be enough to get them through the day. Corporate officers arrive on the scene right on time for the ceremonial cake cutting and survey the store for any imperfections before it is opened to the public. District Produce Manager Mike Vallejo comes over to talk to Harry Baker.

“I don’t care how much overtime it takes, I want this place looking perfect, or it’s both of our jobs,” says Mike. Harry passes this on to the clerks as they arrive, stressing that they don’t leave until the department is looking flawless. John Foster is the first to receive this lecture, followed by Jerry Novotny, Mike McManus, Danny Wily, Susan Patrick, and Doug Davis as they arrive for their respective shifts. The crowd begins to build as sunlight starts to rise upon the store. Customers enter some just as a daily routine, while others are searching for bargains that they saw in the ads. The customer flow begins steady but soon rises to a frantic pace as dollar pineapples fly off the tables and customers buy enough salad to feed a small town. The clerks go to work filling holes that the customers make, ensuring the department is always looking top notch. Manager Harry Baker even pitches in, working on the potato table. “Stack them high and watch em fly,” he hollers as he stacks the russets. During lunch break, produce clerk Mike sits down to the smell of pizza the company has bought the employees for all their hard work during the remodel process. The rush continues on into the evening. By the time the department is meeting its perfect expectations, the clerks are allowed to leave. “I don’t think it’s ever been that busy in here,” says clerk Susan. “I’m wiped.” The clerks head home, sore and tired from the long day, to rest for another similarly busy day. one bustling day Thursday After a very successful first day of the Grand Re-Opening sale, the produce clerks return for a day of craziness. Despite leaving the department in near perfect condition the previous evening, it is now been picked over from the late night and early morning shoppers, and there is work to do. And the delivery this morning is much smaller than anticipated, which leaves manager Harry concerned. Later he finds that the pineapples and bananas were back-ordered at the warehouse and that he must survive on the leftover supply from the previous day. The crew is notified and they continue with normal operations, trying to keep things in good shape despite another busy day. Around noon the supply of pineapples has been depleted and the last bunch of bananas is purchased. With nowhere else to turn, writing rain checks is the only option for disgruntled customers. The better half of the afternoon is spent apologizing and explaining why two of the big sale items are out of stock. Despite this mishap, when the sales numbers for the first half of the week are distributed to the department managers Harry was pleasantly surprised to learn the produce department had already exceeded its weekly budget. He knows this will cheer up the tired and worn down team so he individually thanks them for their hard work and tells them they met the budget. This is especially good news for the clerk Mike. “Thank god we made it, I really need those hours,” says John. “I’ve got to have those 40 hours so I can pay the bills and afford food for my family.” The day bustles on and as the time comes the clerks file out of the store when their shifts ends, knowing they will get the hours they need the next week. The last to leave is clerk Susan Patrick, the same who began the remodel in the department. “The store is a lot different, there is more to do, and the work is a little bit tougher,” Susan says, “but it’s a job and it gets all of us by.” The store has five more days of the grand reopening sale left and the produce department looks to continue the large number of sales they began the week with. The department has met all the standards of the cooperate inspection and manager Harry Baker has set himself up for a possible promotion. Assistant manager Sean has gained valuable experience for his career at the store, and the clerks have managed to meet the budgeted sales, ensuring they will get enough hours the next week. The department is different, mishaps happened, but the eight workers of the produce department have made it, and thrived while doing it. Tom Rosenkrans


05•06•10 jaguar stories

jaguar stories

slices of life from our community

soundtrack: “Strange Magic” Electric Light Orchestra

Join the Chamber Orchestra as they work toward their biggest competition of the year

Musicians find success through effort, focus There were just seven class periods left until the Rock Canyon Chamber Orchestra set out for the annual Colorado High School Activity Association’s (CHSAA) competition. Two exceptionally difficult pieces. Three movements. Each member of Rock Canyon’s Chamber Orchestra had the full intention of getting a I (perfect score) on CHSAA’s grading scale when the Orchestra journeyed to the competition on April 8. But, as they learned in the last few days of preparation, doing so would be harder than expected. what’s wrong with your hand? March 29 It’s the first day back from Spring Break and everyone knows there’s a lot of ground to cover. Ryan McGavin ’12, the prestigious first chair bass player, walked into that second period classroom, his wrist wrapped in a bandage, and silence fell upon the room. McGavin told the class he had broken his thumb but assured them that he’d be back playing soon, that it was nothing to worry about, and that he’d be good to play in the CHSAA competition. After that was sorted out, the orchestra finally sat down to play, and showed their substitute teacher, Mrs. Watkins, what they could do. Suzanne Tellefson, the orchestra director, was out of town with ThunderRidge’s orchestra until Friday (she directs both groups). Watkins knew quite a bit about music, but transitioning to a new conductor is always a bit bumpy. Watkins told the class to pull out Academic Festival Overture by Johannes Brahms. This was a piece the orchestra had worked on earlier in the semester, but hadn’t touched since their winter concert in February. Old dynamics, rhythms, and bowings flew back into the minds of these young musicians. Still, it was a bit shaky. “It’s good,” said Watkins, “but it could be great.” six minutes drag on March 30 McGavin was back on the job. But still no directon. Watkins told the class they’d be working on Sentimental Seriband, the third movement of Benjamin Britton’s “Simple Symphony.” Groans emerged from the second violin section. They had the easiest part in this peice, and they found it difficult to keep a steady beat. The six minute piece droned on and on, seemingly forever, considering the way the orchestra was playing it. “Come on. You’ve got to put some emotion into it!” Watkins yelled. They played the movement again, stopping to practice various parts more than others. Five class periods left. of course I’ll go to prom with you March 31 There is less than a month until prom. In a romantic yet amusing way, viola player Christopher Battin ’10, welcomed fellow section member Erica French ’10, to class with a Starbucks coffee and a cheesey smile. He asked her to prom in front of the entire orchestra. Being the tight knit bunch they are, the class awwed and giggled when French said yes. Tellefson would return from her trip on Friday, and Watkins wanted the orchestra to impress her with each piece they had been so dilligently working on. The orchestra started on “Frolicsome Finale,” the fourth and last movement of Simple Symphony by Benjamin Britton. The beginning starts with 12 consecutive short notes – which, as written, should be played simultaneously through each section – and then a long pause. That wasn’t exactly the way it worked out that day. The orchestra played that part over three times before Watkins called it good enough to move on. Though they moved on, everyone was still missing cues or playing too loudly when they were supposed to be playing softly and vice versa. Watkins took the bulk of the song apart into pieces and worked on them separately for almost the entire duration of the 90-minute block period. Even so, by the end of the period, the orchestra was still a couple steps away from “great” on Frolicsome Finale. Four class periods left. Complications arise April 2 Tellefson sat once again in her conductor’s chair as the members of the orchestra filed in, unpacked their instruments, and searched for their music. “I’d like to run through ‘Sentimental Seriband’ and ‘Frolicsome Finale’ to see what you’ve done. Did you get a lot done?” she asked. “Yeah, we worked really hard,” said Violinist

Courtney Linch ’11. Now it was time to prove it. At the end of Sentimental Seriband, Tellefson showed a pleased look. “That was great! You guys must have worked really hard on that! Now let’s try Frolicsome Finale.” They played their first song phenomenally given the time they had to work on it; however, the fourth movement of Britton’s Symphony was a completely different story. The first short twelve notes were still nowhere close to where they needed to be and in other parts of the song, people weren’t coming in at the correct points and others werent playing as loud as they needed to. Tellefson continued to have the class play certain parts repeatedly until they were acceptable. It was Friday, and Tellefson made it known that she expected everybody to go home and work on it. “You guys NEED to go home and practice. CHSAA is only three days away!” she said. twelve notes cause trouble April 5 Students walked into the classroom, everyone understanding how key this practice session was. They started on Sentimental Seriband, beginning with the climax of the piece, the loudest, fastest part. Playing with absolute precision, they nailed the part after just two run-throughs. After that, they moved on to the harder fourth movement, Frolicsome Finale. The first twelve notes still needed much work. The first attempt failed horribly, but the second time was better. The rest of the movement was finally starting to come together. Tellefson only had minor comments on a few things, instead of major ones on everything like she had the days before. Things were starting to look up for the Rock Canyon Orchestra. playing in the commons April 6 The usual orchestra room was being used as a sight reading room for the band’s CHSAA competition, so the orchestra had to give up their practice spot for a day. Practicing in the lunchroom definately wasn’t the greatest place to have practice, considering the lack of acoustics, but even in these conditions, the show must go on. The only problem was, since the band and choir rooms were being used by the band’s CHSAA competition, only a few students had brought stands like they were supposed to. The violins, violas, and cellos opted to use other chairs as stands while the bass players had to stack three chairs on top of each other to meet an adequate height. The group cruised through all four pieces, not flawlessly, but definitely more confident than they had been a week before. Just one class period left. one last day of rehearsal April 7 The chamber orchestra was lucky in the sense that they got a block period to prepare for the competition. Tellefson called for an entire run-through of what they would be performing the following day. The musicians had gone home and practiced their music, as the pieces were even better than they had been before, and the parts that they had had trouble with earlier were nearly flawless. The orchestra was peaking at its crucial moment. Still, there were always minor tweaks that could be made that added just a little more to their performance. Tellefson warned those who tend to have problems with rushing about the final piece in their lineup, “Frolicsome Finale.” They duly noted this as the rest of the orchestra went back to working on a difficult part in the “Academic Festival Overature” by Johannes Brahms. The part they were trying to get down had been one that had agonized both the young musicians and their director since the time they had started work on the piece, featuring a series of eighth notes which went back and fourth between different instruments. Each group had trouble remembering when to come in and when to cut out, but it had become progressively better since they first started working on it. Still, Tellefson had to make sure it was perfect by making the students play it several times. After all, the next day was the CHSAA competition. time to shine April 8 It was 7:45 on the morning of the competition. As the musicians in the String Orchestra became prepared

for their performance, the musicians in Chamber filed into the auditorium. There were a couple of other groups who had to go on stage first, and students in Chamber eagerly watched their competition. A few orchestras from other schools performed, followed by the Rock Canyon String Orchestra. Chamber watched as their schoolmates went through their pieces. As soon as they were finished, it was time for Chamber to start preparing for what lay ahead. They each filed out of the auditorium and then into a practice room room where they got out their instruments. Because there were still several groups to go before them, Chamber had some down time. Some musicians practiced their parts, while others, such as Battin, Andrew Wilson ‘11, and McGavin found themselves in a wheelchair competition with the injured Lauren Fleecs ’12. But eventually, as the minutes ticked away, they had to perform in just moments. The Chamber students piled into the warm-up room and got ready to go. Talia Pratte ’10, Chamber’s concert mistress, played an A note for the basses and cellos to tune to, followed by one for the violas and violins. Tellefson entered the room and the orchestra focused on warming up. After just a few minutes, a student from the hosting school came in and told them that it was time for them to take the stage. The students filed onto the wing of the stage, preparing to manifest everything they had been working towards for the past few weeks. Each student showed poise and maturity as they walked onto the stage, just as they had been carefully molded to do so by Andrea Meyers, the school’s former orchestra director, who retired last school year. Everybody sat down as they waited for Pratte to come on stage and give them their tuning notes again. After that, Tellefson walked on stage as the announcer told the judges and audience that Rock Canyon’s Chamber Orchestra would be playing “Academic Festival Overature” by Johannes Brahms, plus “Sentimental Seriband” and “Frolicsome Finale” from Benjamin Britton’s “Simple Symphony.” A deep inhalation was heard from one of the violins. And they played it all phenomenally. They nailed cue after cue, the notes in tune, and hardly rushed the seconds. As they concluded the last piece, Tellefson lowered her baton and looked up with a smile on her face. Relief, as well as pride, overcame her face. With absolutely no down time, the Chamber Orchestra was next in the sight reading room, so they exited the stage and filed into a classroom. The judge recited the rules they had to abide by for the six minutes they were given to practice the piece. This may be difficult for non-musicians to grasp, but they weren’t actually allowed to make noises with their instruments as they prepared to play a piece they had never seen before. They clapped the rhythm out and talked about the notes which they imagined would be difficult to play. As their six minutes concluded, Tellefson pointed out a few last details. The orchestra was then allowed to warm-up again with a new scale, and then it was again time to play. They played their piece successfully, not perfectly, but still good. The judge handed out praise, and then critiques. He told the orchestra that they were definitely one of the better groups that he had seen that day. The orchestra then left the sight-reading room, and headed into the picture room. After the professional looking photos, they took some well-deserved goofy pictures. They then packed up their instruments, changed out of their nice clothes, and headed towards the bus. On the way back to school, a few of them stopped in front of the score board. First, they looked at String Orchestra’s score. They got a II all around – Excellent. Next, the moment that they had been working for for the past month – Chamber Orchestra received a I – Superior. Even though there was a slight sense of disappointment when they saw that one of the judges had given them a II, their spirits were still high. They had finally completed what they had set out to do. Nina Dadabhoy

31


32

05•06•10 eyewitness to education

soundtrack: “Theme from star wars” John Williams

The Bench Press

Q&A

With Keith Link ‘10

Rock: What do you like most about P.E? Link: I like how you can release energy during the school day and have a chance to workout

“[Benching] works my upper body” said Shinn, “and wears me out, but it’s worth it because I want to get bigger.”

Rock: What is your favorite part of Individual Sports? Link: Bowling is a lot of fun; it’s like having a mini field trip every week! Rock: Do you think P.E should still be a graduation requirement? Link: Absolutely. I think it’s very important to encourage healthy habits and exercise. compiled by Paige Hesen

Left and Bottom left; Blake Shinn ‘11, spots Brandon .Lichty‘10 in their 7th period conditioning class; after returns the favor and spots Shinn while he gets his reps in.

Physical Education The Rack

Brandon Schein ‘10, poses with one of the weight racks in the weight room during his 7th period class. The racks hold weights for the bars used for squats and bench press, as well as the machines. “I love this class. Lifting weights is a stress reliever for me and the fact that I get to do it in school is great,”said classmate Brandon Lichty ‘10. Photos by Karly Hanson

The Machine Adrian Riviera ‘12, lifts on the bench press machine during his 7th period strength and conditioning class. “ [PE] is really fun, you get to get a nice workout in and can talk with your friends at the same time,”said Riviera’s classmate Michael Kohler ‘13. “It can be hard at times, but it helps you accomplish your goals.”

The Chair

Payton Warren ‘11, uses the bottomless chair to work out his abs during his 7th period strength and conditioning class. “This class helps you get stronger and I wanted to sign up to help me strengthen for football,”said Warren’s classmate and workout buddy Curan Jaspeck ‘12.

Social Studies

Q&A With Brent Handy

The social studies department’s teachers display their personalities through their belongings.

“It’s for keeping control of the beast… and waking kids up.”–Mr. Page on his “Boom boom” stick.

Withey’s Wall

Left: “I’ve had him since I was 7 years old. Now he’s a functioning part of my classroom. We use him as a buzzer for a review game in my history classes.”-US and AP US teacherMatt Sassali on his Yoda puppet

“I call myself a homer, which means I always have to root for the home team. It’s taken me 6 years to grow this as much as it is-I plan on filing up all my walls.”-Withey on his posters Left: “They are Beijing Opera masks that I bought in china town in San Francisco.”–Mrs. McKay on her masks on the wall. Right: “It’s easy access. It’s that simple.”Mr. Handy on his shoulder bag.

Rock : How long have you been friends with Mr. Koy and Mr. Munro? Handy: I have been friends with both of them for four years now. We all came to Rock Canyon at the same time and worked in the same office the first year at Rock Canyon. Rock : What do you guys like to do in your free time outside of school together? Handy: Mr. Munro and I went to Costa Rica on a surfing trip. We also love to go to some good rock n’ roll shows. Rock : Do you have any other really good friends in other departments besides social studies and math ? Handy: Mr. Dunkle and I are good friends from coaching golf together.

Compiled by

Courtney Schellenger


05•06•10 eyewitness to education

Where there’s a will there’s a way ... in Science

Photo by Matt Rabon

Photo complimentary of Emily Reeder ‘12 Danna Wineland, a Vet Tech, and Emily Reeder doing an exam on a Cairn Terrier

A man’s best friend

Emily Reeder ‘12, has spent the past seven months cleaning and securing animals simply for the experience. Emily is an intern at VCA Mountain View Animal Hospital and Pet Lodge. “Everyone at the clinic is nice and helps you learn so much about animals,” Emily said. When Shawndra Fordham discovered that Emily desired to be a veterinarian, she introduced her to her husband, Dr. Matt Fordham, the director at the animal hospital. Emily had to go through three months of training before she could be considered an intern. “Being an intern is serious because you have lives in your hand,” said Emily. “It’s dangerous if animals feel unsafe or intimidated. They’ll lunge at you and possibly hurt you.” In April Emily became an employee of VCA. “We love having Emily. She has great instincts and is good with animals,” said Dr. Monica Hazelwood. “My favorite part about it is when doctors ask me what I would do with a specific case like take a radiograph, ultra sound, or x-ray,” said Emily. “It’s a good way to test myself.” While eveyone lays out by the pool or hangs out with friends this summer, Emily will be spending 40 hours working at the veterinarian hospital. “It’s gonna make my summer even better because I like what I’m doing,” Reeder said. Lauren Schierman

Above: Students in Ferguson’s AP Chemistry class perform a titration lab using ammonia and hydrochloric acid. Phenolphthalein is added to the solution, such that when the equivalence point is reached, the solution changes color from pink to clear.

soundtrack: “The Scientist” Coldplay

33

Photo by Lauren Scheirman

Got a minute? Students active in the science and medical fields • Jasmine Bains – Sky Ridge Medical Center Volunteer • Kayla Bush - Community College Aurora’s Science Department Internship • Lauren Fleecs – Sky Ridge Medical Center Volunteer • Hannah Gunther – Littleton Hospital Volunteer • Ryan Higgins – Sky Ridge Medical Center Volunteer • Lauren Jones - Sky Ridge Medical Center Volunteer and Intern • Eric Jung - Swedish Medical Center Volunteer • Sarah Khan - Finalist for the Nanotechnology summer internship • Jackie Marthouse - National Youth Leadership Forum on Medicine • Alexis McKenzie - Littleton Hospital Volunteer • Nick Morris – Sky Ridge Medical Center Volunteer • Emily Reeder - VCA Mountain View Animal Hospital Intern • Charity Sammons – Sky Ridge Medical Center Volunteer • Camille Stillman – Sky Ridge Medical Center Volunteer • Melanie White - National Youth Leadership Forum on Medicine • Andrew Wilt - Finalist for the Nanotechnology summer internship compiled by Rebecca Ruh

On April 28, Biology students traveled to the zoo during their study of biomes to investigate different regions of the world and their climates. “The field trip was awesome because we learned a lot about biomes yet we were hanging out with friends,”Blake Greiner ‘13, said. “What could be better?”

Above: Mackenzie Bacon ‘13, and Mckenna Clark ‘13, work on a project for Jeremy Newman’s astronomy class. “We are doing a time line of the creation of the Earth on toilet paper with a felt pen, said Mackenzie Bacon. “It’s kind of hard though, because it keeps bleeding.”

Photo by Matt Rabon Physics students experiment with mirrors during a reflection lab. In this lab, students place an object at a certain location and then determine the location of its image by placing mirrors at various areas, often creating multiple images.

Carli Webber ‘13, Morgan Storch ‘13, and Corry Rossi ‘13, goof off in Physical science as they converse with a table across the room.

Rachel Branson ‘12, writes an essay in English II Honors. Photo by Lauren Scheirman

What can you expect from the different English classes?

Trading typical text for brand new technology

Match the teachers to their favorite books 1. Kristi Rathbun 2. Jack Kennedy 3. Kelly Lloyd Cain 4. Lissa Cullen 5. Wendy Lerolland 6. Melissa Rosati

A. To Kill A Mockingbird B. She’s Come Undone C. 100 Years of Solitude D. Catch 22 E. ‘Tis F. Cloud Atlas

English II Honors: “Be ready to work hard and not procrastinate. We write a lot of papers.” –Alex Winkler ‘12 1-A. 2-D. 3-E. 4-F. 5-C. 6- B.

Projectors, Power Points, computers, clickers, televisions, telephones, and smart boards have all become part of an average day at school. For the English department, it has become a staple of teaching and a part of lesson plans. English teacher Wendy Lerolland spends her free periods and extra time learning about new presentation programs, such as Power Point and Prezi so that she can present the information to her class in a way that will optimize learning for visual, auditory, and kinesthetic learners. Although the English department has the opportunity to use a lot of different forms of technology, they have yet to receive a smart board, which have been mainly going to the science and social studies departments “I would love a smart board,” said Lerrolland, “It would be perfect to annotate texts with! Kids would pay more attention if it was on one. The reason why we haven’t gotten one is just because we haven’t really defined that we have a need for them.” Lerolland believes that students are better prepared for the rest of their educational careers and the rest of their life if they are introduced to technology and learn how to corporate it into their lives. Hopefully the English departments will be able to receive a smart board, and even if they don’t they will continue to incorporate technology for their student’s benefit. Emma Kate Fittes

English II: “A lot of the stories we read are about death, they’re not very happy.” –Maddie Ham ‘12

English III: “If you like writing 17 page papers, then English III is the class for you.” –Cam Lindemann ‘11 AP Lang: “If you go in thinking you are going to succeed, you have the wrong mindset. Expect to be challenged. Be willing to do all the work as well, it’s a class of analysis.” –Matt Jones ‘11 English IV: “It’s a lot of fun, it’s not that much busy work. You have a different relationship with your teacher and you’re on your own leash.” –Jessica Johnson ‘10 AP Lit: “It’s a lot of reading. If you don’t actually read the books you’re not going to understand the discussions we have.” –Bailey Wilson ‘10 Creative Writing: “Through Creative Writing you can learn more about your classmates by reading what they have to say. You look at literature through a whole new lens.” –Scott Griffee ‘10

Arielle Harrison ‘11, writes an on demand essay while she listens to music in AP Lang.

Compiled by Ade Eiche


34 soundtrack: “Blister in the Sun” Violent Femmes

05•06•10 reviews

It’s hard to find enough fun activities to keep you occupied for the entire summer. The Rock went on several trips to different summer hotspots to try them out. Here’s an exclusive, price-based guide on great (and not-so-great) places to go under the Colorado sun.

Free fallin’for fifty

$10-40

$40+

I stepped into the Skyventure facility eager and enthused. After all, everyone says skydiving is a must do before you die, so I figured this was the closest I’d ever get, at least before I turned 18. After signing a few waivers and getting registered, I stepped into a small side room where myself and a few other first timers received a run through about proper technique and a long list of what not to do. Shortly afterward, I was all suited up in my bright yellow and blue suit and stepping into the ring. The initial rush took my breathe away and caused the immediate sensation of weightlessness.

$0-10

After a few seconds I stabilized myself and despite my inexperience or the artificial atmosphere, I truly felt like i was flying. However, as Robert Frost would say, “nothing gold can stay.” After what seemed like barely a minute I was rushed out to make way for the next customer, and charged an outrageous $50 for a total of two minutes in the ring. While indoor skydiving is certainly a euphoric experience and feels surprisingly authentic, it is not a hobby I would recommend developing an addiction to. Matt Rabon

Spend a day at Spavia Upon entering Spavia, a quaint spa located in the Park Meadows area, a friendly face greets the spa patrons and escorts them to de-robe, slip on some fuzzy slippers, and collapse into a colossal armchair. With the soft sound of water flowing through a creek and the aroma of pine and honey, I expected the ambiance of the rooms to be up to par with the waiting area - soothing, dark, and relaxing. As I was led into the rooms to receive the Signature Facial and Deep Hydrating Wrap, I couldn’t help but anticipate relishing in the treatments. When the door eased open my eyes

fell upon what looked like a classroom - white walls and Styrofoam ceiling tiles with a tiny shower tucked in the corner and a massage bed in the center. While the massage and rejuvenating body wrap felt amazing and relieved my body of tension, I couldn’t stop thinking about the environment of the actual room. I’m not that hard to please and the procedures were heavenly, but there was such a contrast between what a spa environment should be - serene and peaceful - and what it actually was - monotonous and commonplace. Rebecca Ruh

Just keep jumping

Fun, frights, and funnel cake

Jumpstreet is basically a warehouse with floors and walls made of trampolines. Naturally, I was skeptical when my friends first asked me to go. So when I decided to take the time to drive all the way up to Denver to see if it was as much fun as it sounds, I was pleasantly surprised at how much I enjoyed myself. Once I handed in my precautionary waiver, I was all set up to enjoy the indoor trampoline park. I slipped off my socks and shoes then headed into the main jumping area. The entire place smells of sweaty feet, but you get over the

If you like being jerked around in metal cars, and a good chance of throwing up, then Elitches is the place for you. However, some rides are not for everyone. Starting with The Tower of Doom, if you’re scared of heights don’t bother waiting in line. If you’re not a fan of spinning, you won’t be a fan of The Half Pipe, and if you’re paranoid of old things falling apart, then the Twister is not for you. People who easily get migraines should not ride the Mind Eraser, and if you’re a germaphobe, don’t bother trying to get past the front gate. The food at Elitches is crazy expen-

stench pretty quickly. The indoor park is fun for everybody, there is a dodge ball arena on trampolines, batting cages, and small arcade. I also quickly realized how much of a work out jumping on trampolines is, the allotted hour is plenty of time to jump until your legs are completely worn out. I honestly didn’t expect that Jumpstreet would be as nearly much fun as it is, but my cynicism was quickly quited. Since that first time going there, I have been back several times and ,luckily, it still hasn’t gotten old. Curtis Stuck

sive, and the eating areas practically scream disease. Walking around all day can get hot, so a nice soaking from Ship Wreck Falls might sound nice, but trust me, you don’t want to spend the rest of the day covered in sewage water; avoid that ride at all costs. On the other hand, The Boomerang and Side Winder are thrilling classics that anyone would enjoy, as long as you don’t mind walking up thousands of stairs to get to the Side Winder. Nevertheless, if you haven’t already, go and make a day of it. It’s worth a shot. Karly Hanson

Get down country style Simply watch the sunset The Grizzly Rose is totally country: come in jeans, cowboy boots, and a cowboy hat and get ready to line dance. It is a saloon and dance emporium located in Denver off of I-25. On Sunday nights starting at six they have family night where all ages are admitted. The line dances range from easy to impossible so the first night you go you’re going to look like an idiot. The dance floor is very small, and overly crowded, so be prepared to get your feet stepped on. The line dancing gets repetitive

after a while so you might get bored. They also have a mechanical bull, riding it is kind of fun, but sitting and watching people make fools out of themselves is even better. At eleven anyone under 17 must leave and they start playing hip-hop and R&B. This is a nice change in environment when all the younger children leave and it starts to clear out a little more. The Grizzly Rose is an entertaining way to spend some of your summer Sunday nights when really there is nothing else to do. Lauren Scheirman

Though many enjoy going out and doing crazy things during summer, going on adventures and being active, every once in a while nothing tops a relaxing evening at Daniel’s Park. After a long day, going to Daniel’s Park to watch the sun set over a stretch of beautiful land is a rewarding outing. It’s an amazing sight, and it’s entirely free. All you need is some mode of transportation to get you there, whether it’s your motorcycle, car, or your ‘hipster’ scooter, it doesn’t really matter. Located off of Daniel’s Park road, it Daniel’s Park is a nice junction between Highlands Ranch and Castle Pines. Its easy accessibility and prime location only add to its convenience as a fun activity. You can scale rocks, cook barbeque, or just relax, but whatever you choose to do at Daniel’s Park, it’s always an incredible experience. Connor Dozois


05•06•10 editorial

soundtrack: “One sweet world” Dave Matthews

Goodbye to our teacher, friend, and mentor This year marks the end of Jack Kennedy’s long teaching career. He has been advising newspapers since any of the students - and most of the teachers - were born. He is the best at what he does and his experience and passion are unparalleled. Some of the former editors of The Rock had a few words to say about Mr. Kennedy. Kate Jones ‘09 - Editor in Chief

Being a journalist has showed me that people truly are the ones who shape your life; it’s the people who make the story. No person has shaped my life more than Jack Kennedy. Mr. Kennedy has been my teacher since my freshman year, first as my Intro to Journalism instructor and thereafter as the adviser of our high school newspaper. I never even considered journalism as a possible extracurricular activity, but thanks to Mr. Kennedy, I now want to make it a career. He consistently reminds us that everything we do is real, despite what most adults would have you think. He tells us, “There is no ‘real world’ once you leave high school. This is it. You’re living it right now.” He demands that, as journalists, we be the “spokesperson for our generation.” “You’re anything but a problem, you’re anything but useless, you’re anything but a delinquent,” he told us once, giving us our “pep talk” for the next issue of the newspaper. “You have something to contribute. And it’s up to you to prove it.” Dedication is the first word that comes to mind when I think of Mr. Kennedy. He has stayed with us as late as 1:30 a.m. to send the paper to press. He never censors us, only giving his opinion when it is asked for. “This is your paper,” he reminds us, “not mine.” He knows how to give criticism, and therefore his students know how to take it. The first time Mr. Kennedy criticized an article I wrote, I didn’t know what to do— I so desperately wanted his approval. But he teaches his students a lesson that usually takes years after high school to understand: it is not personal. It’s just business. My friends and I used to walk the halls and we literally asked each other, “Do you think Mr. Kennedy has any idea how many lives he’s changed?” It is because of teachers like Mr. Kennedy that students find themselves in high school, come into their own, and grow.

Lousia Tur ‘07 - Editor in Chief

I don’t even know where to begin. Mr. Kenendy was probably the best teacher I have ever had, even as a junior now in college. He was so intelligent and was able to convey that intelligence and knowledge to all of his students, which a lot of teachers have difficulty doing or they don’t have that abundance of knowledge. [Three years later] as a history major, pre-med track, I still have the NY times as my homepage. I remember him emphasizing [a quote from Annie Dillard’s “An American Childhood”] that said, something along the lines of, “listen to those moments where the music is playing loud enough.” I’m trying to live my life by those standards, where music is loud enough to keep it interesting and fun.

Chelsea Long ‘08 - News Editor

I’m a Journalism and English major at CU so I guess I was influenced by him somewhat. He was more than just a teacher, I remember he actually suggested that I date Kyle - who I ended up dating for two years - because he thought we would work well together. I would always go to him if I had problems. He always brought lemon cookies to the [newspaper] conferences because they were my favorite.

Jenna Scheirman ‘08 - Sports Editor

One of the things I remember him telling us is that as a journalist you have to care about other people; you have to take an interest in other people. That has stuck with me because no matter what profession you end up in that is something that applies; that is something that is important. He lives that statement too because he takes an interest in students’ lives. He goes to as many activities as he can and tries to show his support for the students.

Nate Cook ‘07 - Perspectives Editor

[My favorite memory of Mr. Kennedy is] when we were in Nashville, and he told us, “You can do anything you want as long as I don’t know what it is.” We went on the newspaper conference to Nashville and we saw how influential he is within the newspaper community nation wide. He is so respected out there, and to see him outside of the classroom, to see how much fun he had, and that he likes to be a big old kid was probably the best memory I have. I’m a very math and science guy and Jack showed me that when I put my mind to something I can do it. [He showed me this] in a way that nobody else has.

Mandy Shapiro - World News Editor ‘09

“The dream begins with a teacher who believes in you, who tugs and pushes and leads you to the next plateau, sometimes poking you with a sharp stick called ‘truth.’” -Dan Rather. The knowledge that I gained while working on The Rock is immeasurable, and the many lessons that Mr. Kennedy taught me are invaluable. As I reflect on my time in the news room, I feel so fortunate to have learned from Mr. Kennedy, and I’m very grateful for all of his tugs and pushes that have led me – and will continue to lead me – to live out my dreams to their fullest potential.

The goals of The Rock, the student newspaper of Rock Canyon High School, are to inform, educate, and entertain readers as well as to provide an educational opportunity for the students who produce it.

Susie Typher ‘08 - Editor in Chief

At the end of my sophomore year of college, I can honestly say that there are very few people who have impacted my life as profoundly as Jack Kennedy. Even in a college classroom, there is not a day that goes by that I don’t implement or build upon a skill he has taught me. More than that, though, Jack’s guidance, wisdom, and incredible devotion to journalism have enabled me to passionately pursue my own goals. In his humility, he will never truly understand the amazing ‘ripple effect’ he has on his students: no one will ever know where his influence stops. Jack: Thank you for showing me what it means to pursue the truth no matter the consequences. Thank you for showing me how to be brave in the face of adversity. Thank you for your patience (even the nights it was in short supply). Thank you for your compliments, but even more so for your criticism. Thank you for never accepting anything less than the best; the best in me I owe to you. Thank you for your selflessness, your unceasing devotion to your students, and for reminding me that high school is not merely preparation for something better; but a place full of stories that deserve telling. Most of all, thank you for teaching me how to tell stories that might someday change the world, just as you changed mine. Thank you, thank you, thank you.

Dusty Ellis ‘08 - Opinion Editor

For whatever reason, Jack influenced my life more than any other person in my academic career. He became more than a teacher; he was a friend. Quick to anger, quicker to forgive, he always demanded the most from his students, and we were damned if we weren’t going to make him proud. We didn’t fear him, we knew when he yelled he was laughing at himself on the inside. We respected him. He went to choir concerts, basketball games, school plays. He was always there. An RC without Jack Kennedy isn’t a complete RC. Never will be. I now compare every professor I have to Jack, because the knowledge he passed on is the only thing I can honestly say has been useful from high school. How to work under pressure, how to deal with people, how to always keep your cool, and how to work as hard as you can for as long as it takes- that’s something that takes a very special person to pass on. I hope he finds his way back to the classroom, because there is never a shortage of young minds that would benefit from what good ol’ Jack has to say.

Kyle McDaniel - Education Editor ‘09

Jack Kennedy was, for his students, a refreshing slap across the face. In his class, you didn’t learn about things: you did them. Jack stepped beyond being only a teacher and became a mentor, a friend, and a role model. His passion for teaching and straightforward honesty changed my perspective of what being an educator is truly about.

Paige Newman ‘10 - Culture Editor

The first time I was in Mr. Kennedy’s class for Journalism I was beyond nervous. I sat in the back row so I wouldn’t get called on to share a lead, and I tried not to make eye contact with Kennedy as he spoke. Newspaper later became my favorite class, Mr. Kennedy my favorite teacher by a landslide. I can’t explain how much he has taught me over the past three years, and not just in newspaper. He changed not only the way I write but also the way I think. I never cared as much about anyone’s opinion as I did about Kennedy’s. He was often my biggest critic, but also my biggest supporter. To say the least, Kennedy has been one of the biggest influences on my life so far, and I can’t imagine what the school will be without him.

Hannah Wellman ‘09 - Campus News Editor

I walked in to my first Introduction to Journalism class to find one large, lonely word on the board: F***. Classic Jack, right? The topic that day was censorship, and Jack decided, in his characteristically brash way, to throw us wide-eyed freshman into the deep end. As I grew older and less innocent (but just as clueless) Jack never lost that verve. High school in Highlands Ranch is as cushy and accommodating as it gets, but Jack had the patience to treat us like adults. His respect pushed me to produce the best work of my life. As an incredible mentor, Jack never failed to stand up for his students, exemplifying again and again the meaning of loyalty and conviction. We’re really going to f***ing miss you, Jack.

Kayla Kallery ‘09 - Sports Editor

Jack Kennedy: One of the few educators I have encountered that made me feel as if I was destined for true greatness. Rock Canyon is losing a truly incredible teacher that has the ability to make a connection with his students that many teachers don’t have. JPK-You hold a very special place in my heart and I couldn’t appreciate you more for calling me on all my s***, because we all know I’m full of it. I wish RC the best of luck in finding a teacher that comes remotely close to impacting students the way that Jack Kennedy does, as an educator, and as one of the best men I’ve ever met. Meghan Long ‘10 - Sports Editor Getting to work with Kennedy on the newspaper staff and in the classroom has been a great experience for me. He brings such an amazing energy to teaching, he can truly hold anyone’s attention. I have learned so much from him, not just about English but about life. My high school experience was definitely better because Kennedy was a part of it.

35

Max Rowe ‘08 - Editor: Black & Gold

A good teacher educates a student on success. A great teacher inspires a student to succeed. Jack Kennedy is a great teacher. Mr. Kennedy has taught me English, journalism, and all there is to know about running a publication. A performer at heart, he can’t help but hide his lessons in the curtain folds of his show. It can take a while to get past the theatrics. His booming voice, cutting criticisms, and shroud of worldly wisdom, can make him impossible to deal with at times. But at two in the morning after a night of hell brought on by students crying, cursing, kissing, eating, bluffing, and some doing nothing, well face it, there’s simply not enough energy for a show. At two in the morning, that’s when you’ll find out who someone really is. I have seen Mr. Kennedy inspire the most unlikely, to true greatness. He gave me the guidance and help I needed to realize great potential in myself.

Kristen Scheirman ‘09 - Editor in Chief

There were days in high school when I would enter Mr. Kennedy’s classroom feeling frustrated, stressed, or melancholy, but I would always leave his room happy. I was happier in Mr. Kennedy’s classroom than I was anywhere else in the school because he is the best teacher I have ever known. He is hilarious, wise, and intelligent. He really understands his students and how to reach them and teach them. He cares about his students and has dedicated hours of his life to push them to become the best writers, photographers, journalists, and people they can be. His passion for journalism is contagious. Teaching is more than a job to him; it is a lifestyle. He has changed the lives of countless students for the better. He taught me that being average isn’t good enough. He encouraged me to step outside my comfort zone and take risks. He knew the answer to any question I asked because he is so knowledgeable about journalism. The lessons I learned from him have transferred in college and my life in general and will continue to. I never said this enough in high school. Thank you, Mr. Kennedy. Good luck and keep on singing.

Daniel Wheeler ‘10 - News Editor

From the first day I walked into Journalism class I knew I was going to like Jack Kennedy, but I never anticipated the impact he would have on my life. He possesses a mysterious power, an all-knowing intelligence, a blunt, almost brutal honesty, and a cynical humor. Jack has helped me through some of the most difficult times in my life. He’s supportive, and dedicated to whatever he chooses to embark on. One of the reasons he is such an outstanding individual is the fact that he treats his students like human beings. He will tell you when you’ve done well, and he will tell you when you haven’t. Jack tells it like it is. Good. I wouldn’t want it any other way.

Alex Rowe ‘10 - Editor in Chief

After my second issue with The Rock, I had my first true Jack Kennedy moment. He created a Power Point that is most accurately described as, “Why Alex Rowe sucks at writing.” Initially, it was upsetting, but from that moment I have put all of my heart into newspaper. Mr. Kennedy taught me how to truly throw myself into a project, and he didn’t stop there. He taught me how to lead, how to think, and how to yell. This year I have made more mistakes and put him through more trouble than I ever thought possible. However, Mr. Kennedy never stopped supporting and encouraging me. He is a rare specimen who truly cares about and believes in his students. My only regret is that we can’t do it all again. If only we had... A HOT TUB TIME MACHINE!

Editorial Board

Alex Rowe - Editor in Chief Daniel Wheeler - News Editor Ade Eichie - News Assistant Emma Kate Fittes - News Assistant Meghan Long - Sports Editor Zach Tornabene - Sports Assistant Sara Heyn - Sports Assistant Kate Ready - Sports Assistant Paige Newman - Culture Editor Max Wellman - Culture Assistant Caley Pavillard - Culture Assistant Maddie Jones - Culture Assistant Laura Romer - Community Editor/News Assistant The Couch-Copy Editor Jack Kennedy - Non-voting Adviser

Reporting and Photography Staff Evan Almon Zach Anderson Amanda Becker Evan Ann Boose Danielle Burrage Jennifer Burton Amber Cole Rachel Curtright Michael Dempsey Drew Dodds Connor Dozois Skyler Draper Austin Enterline Austin Frankel Drew Goodman

Erika Guilbault Karly Hanson Paige Hesen Gabriel Martinez Sean McGavin Alexandra Pedrinan Taylor Pettaway Sam Pusar Matt Rabon Rebecca Ruh Lauren Scheirman Courtney Schellenger Curtis Stuck Logan Thompson Myles Wallingford

Submission and Editorial Policies

The Rock invites your comments. Letters to the editor and commentary submissions are encouraged. You are also encouraged to submit coverage ideas, cartoons, photos, or anything else you want to see in The Rock Opinions of the staff of The Rock are presented as editorials. All editorials are at least the majority view of the editorial board. We also feature a number of columnists and commentary writers. Their opinions are their own.

Recent Honors and Awards 2008-09 NSPA All-American Quill & Scroll Gallup Award 2009

The First Amendment

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise therof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Rock Canyon High School 5810 McArthur Ranch Road Highlands Ranch, CO 80124 Phone 303.387.3060 / Fax 303.387.3001 The first three copies of The Rock are free, additional copies are available for 50 cents each.


36 soundtrack: “Imagine” John Lennon

05•06•10 eyewitness to education

Be part of the art

Above: A crab apple blossom in the backyard of sophomore Orlando Martinez’s home. The assignment was to find a beautiful spring picture. “[I took the photo because] flowers express spring, new life,”said Martinez. “Dr. Shuler was using it to enter into an art show at Park Meadows Mall,”said Martinez. “I did not earn any awards for it.” Compiled by Gabriel Martinez Photos by Alex Pedrinan

Art teacher Daniel Gonzalez’s ceramics classes use many techniques to make pots, including the Japanese Raku technique. The pots are heated to 1800 degrees using paper, leaves, or similar materials for fuel. The resulting wares are prized in Japan for tea ceremonies. Gabriel Martinez

Dillion Ricks ‘12, works on his pastel landscape for Mr. Gonzalez’s Drawing and Painting class. “I chose to do this [landscape] because it looked easy to do with pastels,”said Ricks. Taylor Pettaway

The final draft of Kirsten Lumsden’s Drawing and Painting III pastel drawing project. “[I chose to do this] because I saw another artist [from the Internet] do styles like this, where his subject was created from the shape of his hand,”said Lumsden. “I thought it would make my drawing more creative.” Lumsden recently won the Congressional Art Show Award for her pastel drawing, “The Great Sand Dunes.” She will receive $1500 a year if she

attends the Savannah College of Art and Design, and also gets $200 up front. “I am not sure if I am going to take the scholarship money [to the school] because I am not sure if I want to make a career out of art,”said Lumsden. In addition to the money, Lumsden’s painting is going to be hung in the Capital Building for the next year. She gets two plane tickets to Washington D.C. to see her painting. Taylor Pettaway

Unique instruments of the Symphonic Band Left: “Most flutes don’t have holes in the keys like mine does,”explained Lauren Burke ‘12 who enjoys the band’s inside jokes. “It makes class a lot more fun when we’re laughing about something Naegle doesn’t understand.” And who would consider a flute a dangerous weapon? “One night when I played at pep band, my friend tripped and impaled me with her flute. Now I recognize the danger inherint in instumentals,”explained Mady Zierke ‘12. Rachel Curtright

Right: The clarinet is an easily recognizable woodwind instrument. However, the bass clarinet isn’t so easy to identify, as it resembles a black and silver saxophone. One of the main differences is the presence of a fifth key. Mady Zierke, whose bass clarinet is featured on the right, has played clarinet for five years, two of which have been the bass clarinet. Rachel Curtright Photos by Dani Burrage

Left: The mouthpiece of Tiffany Clark ‘13, is different than the other brass ones you see on the other trumpets of the Rock Canyon band. Clark’s is made of glittery plastic. “When I got my braces on, I was unable to play my trumpet,”said Clark. “Now I have multiple plastic mouthpieces which I am able to play with.”Clark chose the trumpet in 4th grade because she had several family members who also played the trumpet. “I hope music will be a part of my life for a long time,”said Clark. “I look forward to the rest of high school, and maybe even college marching band.” Dani Burrage

The Rock - May 6, 2010 - #9  

Volume 6, Number 9

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